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#FINEDININGINDIAN

WOMEN IN INDIAN CUISINE

What was the motivation behind starting your blog DivineTaste?

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She understood what I was doing, right from the beginning . And my father who was a bit clueless about this whole blog thing (to give him the benefit, we are talking about a time which was nearly a decade ago and blogs were

My father is an entrepreneur and has a chemical industry manufacturing life saving drugs. Being influenced by him, I

unheard of), now understands, supports and encourages me and I derive a whole lot of inspiration from him.

loved chemistry as a student and at that time, had no clue whatsoever, that I would be doing what I’m doing right now.

That said, food has always fascinated me and even as a young girl growing up in South India, I have memories of stirring vegetables in a kadhai and mixing pickles in my grandmother’s Bangalore kitchen. But my tryst with food in the way it has shaped my career and my life, began only when I shifted to Mumbai in 2003. Suddenly, I had a kitchen

How did you overcome set backs? I wanted to start divinetaste in the year 2006. But, it took me two years to find the right person to design and develop my site. I had to go through a lot of difficulties in these two years and after a series of events, I found the right person to execute my idea into reality and divinetaste went live in the year 2008. 

all to myself with a plethora of ingredients that a cosmopolitan city like Mumbai has to offer.

This was when I began experimenting and delving deeper into different cuisines and also researching into Ayurvedic nutrition and cooking. I started to look at food not just as a means to feed the body, but also fuel growth, calm the mind, heal the body and bring great contentment and joy.

What are the nnovations you are taking on in Indian cuisine?   Indian cuisine is one of the oldest cuisines in the world and many of the traditional recipes are based on the ancient science of Ayurveda dating back to more than 5,000 years. There is a notion and a perception that Indian food is quite elaborate and time consuming, which is true for

The knowledge acquired was translated into writing articles and recipes in Bombay Times (a part of the Times of India

some recipes, but there are also a gazillion recipes that can be rustled up quickly to suit our present day lifestyle.

Group), BBC Good Food and other publications. Then there was this deep desire to share my stories (my food amost always revolves around a memory or story), recipes and pictures on a platform accessible to many and that’s how divinetaste.com was born.

What was your initial Investment?

My effort has always been to showcase a mix of these recipes. There are certain traditional recipes like my grandmother’s mustard infused mango rice or the kheer that has been cooked in the old temples of Vrindavan, which I will not tamper with. And then there are recipes like my baked cauliflower pakoda or the baked chakli which are not deep fried like the traditional version but are

Right from the beginning my website has been hosted on a professional platform and my investments included paying a hefty price for the domain name of my choice which was

made in an oven using the same techniques and ingredients with less amount of fats, making it easier to digest.

previously owned by someone else, web hosting charges, website development costs, purchasing professional camera equipment and buying props for food shoots.

What was your support system in the beginning?

I like to showcase India’s rich vedic heritage through my work. The focus in divinetaste.com has always been on pure vegetarian and sattvic food.

The vedas (ancient scriptures) classify food as sattvic My husband has always inspired and encouraged me to keep going, right from the time I started divinetaste. And since I started divinetaste when I was seven months pregnant, my mother who was with me at the time of the birth of my son and at other crucial points in my life, has been a huge supporting factor.

(mode of goodness), rajasic (mode of passion) and tamasic (mode of ignorance). Sattvic food is known to create positive vibrations and subtly nourish the mind, intelligence and consciousness. As far as innovation goes, I would love to give the right perspective about sattvic food and showcase it in the best possible manner.

Profile for Fine Dining Indian Magazine

Fine dining Indian food magazine may 2017 issue  

Welcome dear all to our May 2017 Issue of Fine Dining Indian Magazine We have been very fortunate to collaborate with few great Indian che...

Fine dining Indian food magazine may 2017 issue  

Welcome dear all to our May 2017 Issue of Fine Dining Indian Magazine We have been very fortunate to collaborate with few great Indian che...

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