Issuu on Google+

may / june 2012

Vol. 34 No. 3

2012 Scholarship Winners h g s

Local 1059 Awards nine $1,500 Scholarships s

Tonya Jackson

Aaron Artis

Katerina Chilikov

Tonya is a UFCW Local 1059 member working at Kroger 931 in Lancaster. She graduated from Fairfield Union High School with a GPA of 3.83. Ms. Jackson will pursue her interest in nursing as she continues her education.

Aaron is a UFCW Local 1059 member working at the Kroger Marketplace in Pickerington. He graduated Watkins Memorial High School in Pataskala with a GPA of 3.32. Aaron intends to matriculate at The Ohio State University, Newark campus this fall.

Katerina is the daughter of Miglena Chilikov, a UFCW Local 1059 member at Kroger 942 on Chambers Road in Columbus. She will enter her junior year at Miami University in the fall of 2012. Among her many achievements is participation in her university’s study abroad program in Spain.

Samuel Spivey

Hannah Evans

Wesley Lewis

Samuel Spivey is a UFCW Local 1059 member who works at Kroger 857 in Delaware. He graduated Rutherford B. Hayes High School with a grade point average of 3.85. That puts him well within the top 10 percent of his graduating class.

Christina Cox, a Local 1059 member at Kroger 805 in Lewis Center, is Hannah’s mother. Hannah graduated from Worthington Christian High School. She has been accepted to Lake Erie College and will attend as a part of the incoming class in fall 2012.

Wesley is the son of Barry Lewis, a Local 1059 member employed at Kroger 557 in Mansfield. He graduated from Madison High School in Mansfield in the top quarter of his class that numbered over 200 students. His extra curricular activities include National Honor Society, Key Club and Spanish Club.

Morgan Fields

Ryan Teynor

Kelsey Smith

Morgan Fields is a Local 1059 member who works parttime at Kroger 880 in Marion. She went to Marion Harding High School, active in sports and community service. She graduated with a GPA of 3.25 in the top quarter of her class.

Ryan has been a Local 1059 member for nearly 2 years as an employee of Kroger 518 in Mansfield. He graduated Lexington High School this year and will attend The Ohio State University, Mansfield campus starting in the fall of 2012.

Kelsey is employed at Kroger 851 in Canal Winchester. Her father, Keith Smith, is also a Local 1059 member, working in the meat department at Kroger 299 on Refugee Road in Columbus. She graduated from Groveport Madison High School with a GPA of 3.06.


officers

table of contents

officers’ reports Randy Quickel, President............................................3 “Contract Negotiations: The Time is Now”

Randy Quickel President/Editor

Mark Fluharty, Secretary-Treasurer..............................5 “This Election, By the Numbers”

Mark Fluharty Secretary-Treasurer

Mark Hertenstein, Service Director.............................6 “Don’t Get in Trouble for Grazing”

Barbara Fletcher Recorder

Tina Morgan, Organizing Director..............................7 “American Red Cross Organizing Campaign” Jason Kaseman, Political Director..............................10 “Looking Toward the Fight Ahead” Rick Gregory, Education Director.............................11 “We’re Going to Need Enough Food to Feed Coxey’s Army” Paul Smithberger, Communications Director............13 “Education Leads the Way at Stewards Conference”

features 2012 Scholarship Winners...........................................1 The Other Memorial Day.............................................4 2012 Local 1059 Ticket Prices.....................................8 2012 Active Ballot Club Contest................................10 Employer & Negotiation Updates..............................12 CHOICES Thank-You...............................................13 Ray Collier Memorial Scholarship.............................14 UFCW Local 1059 UnionWize (USPS 567- 310) is published bi-monthly by UFCW Local 1059 at 4150 E. Main Street, Columbus OH 43213-2962. Periodicals Postage Paid at Columbus, OH. Postmaster: Send address change to UFCW Local 1059, 4150 E. Main Street, Columbus 43213-2962.

Paul Smithberger Tina Morgan Communications Director Organizing Director Mark Hertenstein Service Director

Jason Kaseman Political Director

Rick Gregory Education Director Vice Presidents Steve Allen Allison Appel Louis Cruse Josh Greenlee Mark Hertenstein Cheryl Hoffman Brian Perkins Dave Renneckar Gene Smith Juanita Smith Kim Smith

John Angeloff J. R. Berroyer Frank German Rhonda Helcher Lonnie Newman Mike Nichols Carol Prater Jim Ryder John Smith Keith Smith Carlos Stiffler

Union Representatives Allison Appel Anthony Bridges Mark Dersom Tom Gartner Neil Hertenstein Diana Marlette Brian Perkins John Smith

J. R. Berroyer Sylvester Carothers Barbara Fletcher Rhonda Helcher John King Mike Nichols Mack Quesenberry Carlos Stiffler

Letters to the Editor intended for publication are welcome and should be addressed to UFCW Local 1059, 4150 E. Main Street, Columbus, Ohio 43213. They should include the writer’s full name, address, union affiliation, company, store number, and its location. Letters may be edited for clarity or space.

Contact UFCW Local 1059 by calling 614.237.7671 or 800.282.6488 and entering your party’s extension: Allison Appel........................................216 J.R. Berroyer........................................206 Anthony Bridges..................................242 Sylvester Carothers...............................236 Mark Derson........................................238 Bobbie Fletcher....................................215 Tom Gartner........................................237 Rhonda Helcher...................................211

Mark Hertenstein.................................205 Neil Hertenstein...................................217 Jason Kaseman.....................................240 John King.............................................204 Diana Marlette.....................................239 Tina Morgan........................................235 Mike Nichols.......................................214 Brian Perkins........................................244

Mack Quesenberry...............................209 John Smith...........................................203 Paul Smithberger..................................250 Carlos Stiffler.......................................218 Administrative Office...........................223 Dues Office..........................................229 Organizing Director.............................235 Service Director....................................205


UNIONWIZE

vol. 34 / no. 3

from the president’s desk­­…

Contract Negotiations: The Time is Now President Randy Quickel

T

he collective bargaining agreement between The Kroger Company and UFCW Local 1059 expires August 11, 2012. I felt that it was important to talk about what to expect from Kroger negotiations. Kroger represents nearly 60% of Local 1059’s membership, and their contract sets the tone for our collective bargaining cycle. Between 2012 and the end of 2013, we will have negotiated contracts for over 80% of the Local 1059 membership. We expect difficult and contentious bargaining with Kroger. If you look at our Employer & Negotiation Updates on page 12 of this issue, you will find a detailed list of contract settlements and contracts on extension with Kroger. The problem in negotiations across the country continues to be the cost of health care and the uncertainty surrounding the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). As I reviewed the tabulated results from the Kroger bargaining surveys and read the comments members wrote at the end of the survey, one message came through very clearly: We need to protect our health care. Our members want Local 1059 to maintain the quality of our health care insurance and keep it affordable. Secretary-Treasurer Fluharty and I are committed to this task. We will work with the rest of the bargaining team keeping that goal in focus. The Kroger contract is a very mature contract. While other employers have come and gone throughout our history as a union, Kroger has been there since the beginning. A mature contract means good wages, health

care, defined benefit pensions, retiree health care and contract language that protects the rights of workers. These are union-negotiated benefits that you and others before you have fought and sacrificed to achieve. So what do we need from our Kroger members to help make these upcoming negotiations successful? Primarily, we need strategic and tactical alignment. If we are to succeed in these contract negotiations, we must stick together. In 2008, we had a timely and, ultimately, quite positive round of negotiations. But that is not always the case. Many of our members have never faced a situation of contentious negotiations with their employer. In those instances where bargaining is drawn out and difficult, it is essential that our members keep these things in mind: 1. Always behave professionally. Even if things are not going well in negotiations, do not risk your job or risk alienating the public by letting the situation affect your work. It’s important that you keep that job we’re all fighting so hard to improve. It’s also important that we maintain a good relationship with our customers and the public because they can be our best advocates to the company if we need them. 2. Don’t be intimidated by management. I think of the situation where a manager tells you how much he or she has to pay for their health care, and you should be grateful for what the “company” has provided. Look that manager

straight in the eye and tell them it is a negotiated benefit that your union has provided. 3. Get your information from your union. As bargaining begins, you will surely hear rumors of what is being discussed. Anytime you listen to rumors, you never know if you are getting the correct answer. Make sure that you know the union message—get that information from your union representative, the designated communicators within your store or the messages sent from the Union directly to you via our hotline, our website, text messages or e-mails. If you have questions during the bargaining process, you can always call into the Local 1059 office to get an answer. As I stated in my June 1st letter to Kroger members, we have put in place a communications network of your coworkers who will be kept abreast of what is happening in negotiations. These are the people that will be getting information to you. Along with your union representative, these are some direct lines of communication with your union. Following our first bargaining session, we will hold regional informational meetings for Kroger members on July 10-12 in Cardington, Columbus and Jackson, respectively. The members that Local 1059 has designated as communication liaisons will be attending this meeting. If you are also interested in attending one of these meetings, please call the Local 1059 office for continued on page 4…

UFCW Local 1059 | 4150 East Main Street, Columbus, OH 43213 | www.ufcw1059.com

3


UNIONWIZE

MAY / JUNE 2012

from the president’s desk­… ­

…continued from page 3

specific information on the location nearest you. In the near future, Local 1059— through our network of communicators in our Kroger stores—will be asking for the best way to get in contact with you. That may be through e-mail, texting or by phone, whether cell or landline. Please provide that information so we can reach you in a conve-

nient and expedient way. It is my sincere hope that we can bring these negotiations to a successful conclusion without labor unrest. However, Local 1059 will be prepared. You should also be prepared. As we have learned through decades of successful bargaining, being prepared for the worst often helps us avoid that from happening. With our strong member-

ship, our capable negotiating committee and a fast, reliable communications network, we will be ready for the job ahead.

UFCW LOCAL 1059♥ NY September 24-27, 2012

Enjoy 3 days and 2 nights in New York City by joining Local 1059 for a chartered bus trip to the Big Apple! For $399 per person, you will enjoy: Chartered Bus Travel Leaving Monday, September 24 at 9:00 pm Water Taxi and Tour of Manhattan 2 Night Hotel Stay in North Bergen, NJ Tour of 9/11 Memorial Tour of Ellis Island with a View of The Statue of Liberty Optional Broadway performance of Phantom of the Opera, orchestra seating (additional $80)

Name: _________________________________________________ Home phone: ____________________ Guest (optional): _________________________________________ Cell phone: _____________________ Address: ________________________________________________ Employer: ______________________ City: _______________________________________________ State: _______ Zip: _________________ E-mail: _______________________________________________________________________________ Enclosed: $__________________ Send payment to:

Cash, money order, Visa, MasterCard, Discover accepted.

UFCW Local 1059 4150 East Main Street Columbus, OH 43213

Pay online in the Members Area of www.ufcw1059.com or contact Paul Smithberger at 614.237.7671 or 800.282.6488, ext. 250 4

UFCW Local 1059 | 4150 East Main Street, Columbus, OH 43213 | www.ufcw1059.com


UNIONWIZE

vol. 34 / no. 3

This Election, By the Numbers by Mark Fluharty, Secretary-Treasurer

E

very day, we hear different statistics about our country. You hear about the 1% in the United States that has most of our nation’s wealth. You hear about the 99% that are working to make ends meet. I would like to reflect on the 33% of Wisconsin’s voters who came from union households in that state’s recall election on June 5th. Better yet, let’s talk about all the families of union workers who didn’t show up to the polls that day. A third of that election’s voters may have come from union households—and that is a respectable portion of the electorate—but it is nowhere near the number of all eligible voters from Wisconsin’s union families. And now, because so many of those voters sat out the June 5th election, anti-union governor Scott Walker can continue his agenda against workers. The 2010 election swept into office many anti-worker politicians intent on stripping collective bargaining rights from teachers, state and local government workers, police and firefighters.

That’s exactly what we’ve seen in states like Wisconsin, Indiana and Ohio. Who’s next? We are. These laws are intended to break the strength of the middle class but are offered in the guise of budget-cutting measures. Don’t be fooled. The real goal has always been to take away workers’ collective bargaining rights. In Wisconsin’s 2010 election, only 26% of the electorate was from union households. No wonder a pro-business, anti-worker candidate like Scott Walker ended up winning that governor’s race. In Indiana, so-called “right to work” legislation was recently passed, which cripples a union’s strength at the bargaining table. Workers in Indiana fought for a year to keep this bill from becoming law, but, in the end, they could not overcome the powerful pro-business lobby and its cronies in Indiana’s state government. Yet again, the 99% just weren’t powerful enough to stop the moneyed interests of the top 1%. And there are parallels in our own state. In 2010, only 24% of Ohio’s voters came from union households, resulting in John Kasich being elected governor over Ted Strickland. John Kasich, whose motto to workers was “Get

on the bus or get run over by it.” John Kasich, who rammed Senate Bill 5 through the state legislature and nearly took away the rights of Ohio’s public sector workers. Fortunately, workers in Ohio rallied together and defeated this attack on our rights at work, voting down Issue 2 by nearly a 2-1 margin. Still, in the near future, we may also be dealing with a “right to work” ballot initiative here in the Buckeye State. The war on workers continues. So what can we do? June is UFCW voter protection month, and our Local’s union representatives will be at worksites registering our members to vote. They will also be asking members to contribute to the UFCW Active Ballot Club (ABC), our political fund to push issues that support workers. Check out page 10 of this issue for more information about our ABC Contest and the prizes you’re eligible to win. Now is the time to get off the sidelines and into the game. Put these corporate-backed politicians on notice. When union members vote, workers win. Make your voice heard at the ballot box. Be more than a number; be part of a movement.

volunteer opportunity Monday, July 2, 2012 5:00 pm to 8:00 pm The YWCA Family Center provides emergency shelter and critical services to stabilize homeless families. Join UFCW Local 1059 in serving an evening meal to those in need.

Director of the U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Richard Cordray, speaking at the UFCW Legislative and Political Conference, with Secretary-Treasurer Mark Fluharty and President Randy Quickel

YWCA Family Center 900 Harvey Court Columbus, OH 43219 If you would like to volunteer, contact Diana Marlette at 614.237.7671, ext. 239

UFCW Local 1059 | 4150 East Main Street, Columbus, OH 43213 | www.ufcw1059.com

5


UNIONWIZE

MAY / JUNE 2012

Don’t Get in Trouble for Grazing by Mark Hertenstein, Service Director

I

think the summer is my favorite time of the year. Whenever the fresh produce products start hitting the stores, my mouth almost waters at the thought of biting into a ripe plum or peach. During the long winter months, I try to imagine how a watermelon is supposed to taste. Sure, you can get some produce year round, but, for some reason, the summer brings out the true flavor. This article isn’t about my fruit fantasies, but I am trying to appeal to your senses. While walking through your workplace, whether it is a production plant, a bakery, a meat shop or any other establishment that emits an aroma, know that common sense is appreciated as much as those common scents. Using your head can help you retain your livelihood for you and your family.

After cutting fruit in the produce department, cooking or cutting meat— whether deli or meat department—DO NOT taste the product. These are probably samples for the customers. The whole idea is that the product is for the customers. Also, if you are walking by these departments on your break, you might think a bite is no big deal. One sample might not be that big of a deal, but if one leads to two and two leads to three, that could be considered “grazing.” Grazing is the term most companies use for eating a product not paid for at the time of consumption. While that might not seem to be a big deal to you, multiply that by everyone in your store. The one to two piece sample of lunchmeat or cheese could end up being a whole ham or 4-5 lbs. of cheese when you do the math. That could lead to more shrink in your store and shrinkage to your paycheck if caught grazing.

Grievance report April-May 2012 Grievance Success Rate.......... 81% Grievances Settled.................. 167 Monetary Awards....... $21,314.17 My articles are not intended to scare you from trying new products or possible new recipes sampled at the workplace, but remember what the term means. If you are wondering about whether a particular situation falls under what is considered “grazing,” talk to your management personnel to get clarification. It is better to ask and be sure than not ask and be unemployed.

The Other Memorial Day

W

orkers Memorial Day is observed around the world on April 28, recognizing those workers who have died or sustained work-related illness or injury. In 2010, a total of 4,547 U.S. workers died from occupational injuries. Each year, approximately 49,000 deaths are attributed to work-related illnesses. On average, twelve workers are killed on the job each day. At the corner of Front Street and Long Street in Columbus, we remember those in our area who died while at work. There, you will find the Harry E. Richter Workers Memorial Park. The park is maintained and supported by organized labor, including UFCW Local 1059. 6

The park includes a memorial to those who lost their lives in the September 11 attacks. There is also a plaque remembering the brave miners who died in West Virginia’s Big Branch Coal Mines. Then, of course, there are all the names of those Franklin County workers who lost their lives while doing their jobs. Unfortunately, this year, we had to add seven new names to the memorial for our brothers and sisters who didn not return home from work to be with their loved ones. Every year, the hope is that the next year will be the first when no new Secretary-Treasurer Mark Fluharty and names are added to the memorial. Organizer Diana Marlette at Workers Memorial Park in Columbus

UFCW Local 1059 | 4150 East Main Street, Columbus, OH 43213 | www.ufcw1059.com


UNIONWIZE

vol. 34 / no. 3

American Red Cross Organizing Campaign by Tina Morgan, Organizing Director

T

he workers of Red Cross blood collection services have opened my eyes. Before I met these brave folks, I had a pretty picture of the American Red Cross (ARC) painted in my mind. I imagined that ARC was a wonderful, humanitarian organization that comforts families with blankets, food and shelter when a disaster has destroyed their homes. Of course, ARC does do that. But there is another side to the Red Cross: the profit side. The blood collection side of their organization is their real moneymaker. Central Ohio’s Red Cross Blood Service covers 27 counties with workers assigned to 6 teams: North, South, East, West, Franklin County West and Franklin County East. Workers are scattered among those counties, and they report to work at irregular hours to various locations, sometimes far outside their assigned area if coverage is required for a blood drive. What happens after the blood is

collected surprised me. After a donor volunteers their blood, ARC then tests that blood and sells it in whole or in part to hospitals and trauma centers. Make no mistake, our donated blood is sold—not donated—sold so those in need have access to it. And blood appears to be good business. Charity Navigator and Forbes Magazine report that compensation to American Red Cross President and CEO Gail J. McGovern topped $1 million! But back to the true heroes of Red Cross, the workers. Blood collection workers travel about 2 million miles every year collecting or delivering blood. Workers move more than a ton of equipment in and out of blood drive sites as often as 20 times in a single day. The haphazard scheduling of these workers denies them any real personal life. Though they are given schedules 2 weeks in advance, they must call in after every drive to find out what changes have been made to the next day’s agenda. These workers want a union! They need a union! The Columbus area ARC is fight-

ing against its workers for exercising their right to a free and fair union election. The company is demanding a manual ballot. With coverage from Athens County in the southeast to Logan County in the northwest and up to 20 blood drives each day, the company knows their workers will have a difficult time fulfilling their duties and still finding a way to cast their ballot for a union. In fact, ARC wants the election held at their Columbus office even though no one in their 160-person unit actually works there. Local 1059 has suggested a mail-in ballot to give workers an honest opportunity to vote on their future. The union and the company will present their case on this point to the National Labor Relations Board soon. I am angry. The workers of Red Cross blood collection services are doing difficult work that saves lives. They deserve respect in the workplace. UFCW Local 1059 is committed to fighting for them, to making their voices heard.

Cake Decorating Class

Barbie Doll Cakes Tuesday, July 17, 2012 at 7:00 pm

Chef Victor Blauser (Kroger 273) offers a cake decorating class, teaching you how to make Barbie Doll cakes. The cost is just $20, including the supplies you will need and your own cake to take home! The class will be held at: UFCW Local 1059 Union Hall 4150 East Main Street Columbus, OH 43213 Send your payment to the address above with your name & store number or pay online in the Members Area at www.ufcw1059.com UFCW Local 1059 | 4150 East Main Street, Columbus, OH 43213 | www.ufcw1059.com

7


theme parks & water parks

2012 local 1059 movie theaters

AMC Theatres Cedar Point

1 Cedar Point Drive, Sandusky, OH 419.627.2350 www.cedarpoint.com Local 1059 prices: up to five tickets adult..................................... $36 (reg. $51.99) junior (under 48”)................. $18 (reg. $26.99) senior (age 62+).................. $18 (reg. $26.99) children age 2 and under..... free more than five tickets adult..................................... $39 junior (under 48”)................. $20 senior (age 62+).................. $20 children age 2 and under..... free

Kings Island

6300 Kings Island Drive, Mason, OH 513.754.5700 www.visitkingsisland.com Local 1059 prices: adult..................................... $31 (reg. $53.99) junior (under 48”)................. $28 (reg. $32.99) senior (age 62+).................. $28 (reg. $32.99) children age 2 and under..... free

­ ll tickets allow free admission after 5:00 A pm the night before you wish to spend a full day at the park. Tickets are sold until October 20.

Locations include: - Columbus - Pickerington www.marcustheatres.com

­Tickets are sold until October 20.

Great Wolf Lodge Cincinnati

2501 Great Wolf Drive, Mason, OH

Great Wolf Lodge Sandusky

4600 Milan Road, Sandusky, OH

Perimeter Road, Sandusky, Ohio www.soakcitycp.com Local 1059 prices: up to five tickets................... $22 (reg. $32.99) more than five tickets.......... $27 children age 2 and under..... free

Visit www.greatwolf.com or call 800.913.9653 through December 30, 2012 to make reservations. Use corporate code UFCW432A to receive 15% off of the best available room rate, including waterpark admission for the duration of your stay. Members should have their union card to prove affiliation at check-in.

­Tickets are sold until August 31.

Zoombezi Bay

4853 West Powell Road, Powell, OH 614.645.3550 www.zoombezibay.com Local 1059 prices: adult..................................... $26 (reg. $32.99) child (ages 2–9)................... $22 (reg. $24.99) senior (age 60+).................. $22 (reg. $24.99) children under age 2............ free

Tickets may be used towards admission to any movie without restriction. All tickets through Local 1059 are $6.50 (reg. $6.50–$9.50). 3D movies may require additional charges at theater.

Marcus Theatres

2-day adult Cedar Point & Soak City pass up to five tickets................... $70 (reg. $82.99) more than five tickets.......... $78

Soak City Cedar Point

Locations include: - Dublin Village 18 - Lennox Town Center 24 - Easton Town Center 30 www.amctheatres.com

Kalahari Resorts

Tickets may be used towards admission to any movie without restriction. All tickets through Local 1059 are $6.50 (reg. $7.50–$10.50). 3D movies may require additional charges at theater.

Rave Motion Pictures

Locations include: - Polaris 18, Columbus - Grove City 14, Grove City - Fallen Timbers 14, Maumee - Levis Commons 12, Perrysburg - Franklin Park 16, Toledo www.ravemotionpictures.com Tickets may be used towards admission to any movie without restriction. All tickets through Local 1059 are $6.50 (reg. $6.50–$9.75). 3D movies may require additional charges at theater.

7000 Kalahari Drive, Sandusky, OH 877.525.2427 www.kalahariresorts.com Discount availability varies. Log in to the Members Area of www.ufcw1059.com, or call 614.237.7671 or 800.282.6488 ext. 233 and speak with Julie for information on the latest discounts.

­Tickets are sold until August 31.

UFCW Local 1059 | 4150 East Main Street, Columbus, OH 43213 | www.ufcw1059.com

Tri City Theatre

972 East Main Street, Jackson, OH www.tricitytheatre.com All tickets through Local 1059 are $4.00 (reg. $6.50). 3D tickets will cost an additional $2.00 at the ticket booth when accompanied by the UFCW $4.00 ticket.


9 ticket prices recreation

Toledo Zoo 2 Hippo Way, Toledo, OH 419.385.5721 www.toledozoo.org Local 1059 prices: up to five tickets adult..................................... $10 (reg. $14) child (ages 2–11)................... $6 (reg. $11) senior (ages 60+).................. $6 (reg. $11) children under age 2............ free more than five tickets adult......................................$11 child (ages 2–11)................... $8 senior (ages 60+).................. $8 children under age 2............ free

Tickets are sold until November 2.

Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden 3400 Vine Street, Cincinnati, OH 513.281.4700 www.cincinnatizoo.org Local 1059 prices: up to five tickets adult..................................... $10 (reg. $15) child (ages 2–12)................... $6 (reg. $10) senior (age 62+).................... $6 (reg. $10) children under age 2............ free more than five tickets adult..................................... $13 child (ages 2–12)................... $8 senior (age 62+).................... $8 children under age 2............ free

Tickets are sold until December 15.

Newport Aquarium

One Aquarium Way, Newport, KY 859.261.7444 www.newportaquarium.org Local 1059 prices: Columbus Zoo and Aquarium 4850 West Powell Road, Powell, OH 800.666.5397 www.colszoo.org Local 1059 prices: up to five tickets adult..................................... $10 (reg. $14.99) child (ages 2–9)..................... $5 (reg. $9.99) senior (ages 60+).................. $5 (reg. $10.99) children under age 2............ free more than five tickets adult..................................... $12 child (ages 2–9)..................... $7 senior (ages 60+).................. $7 children under age 2............ free

Tickets are sold until December 15.

UFCW

up to five tickets adult..................................... $20 (reg. $23) child (ages 2–12)................. $13 (reg. $15) children under age 2............ free more than five tickets adult..................................... $21 child (ages 2–12)................. $13 children under age 2............ free

Tickets are sold until December 15.

special events

Kings Island Local 1059 Picnic Tuesday, June 26 and Saturday, July 28 Local 1059 prices: up to five tickets adult..................................... $30 junior (under 48”)................. $20 senior (age 62+).................. $20 children age 2 and under..... free more than five tickets adult..................................... $37 junior (under 48”)................. $30 senior (age 62+).................. $30 children age 2 and under..... free

Tickets must be purchased in advance. Pre-paid parking available: $6.00 the night before and $6.00 the day of the picnic. Ticket price includes: • admission the day of the picnic • free admission the night before (after 5:00 pm)—we offer pre-paid parking for $6 (reg. $12) • lunch served from 11:30 am to 1:30 pm, which includes Southern fried chicken, hot dogs, Montgomery pulled pork, baked beans, potato salad, ice cream treats and soft drinks

Cedar Point Member Appreciation Day Wednesday, July 11 and Sunday, October 14 Local 1059 prices:

The Jet Express Put-in-Bay boat line 800.245.1538 www.jet-express.com Show your union card a. nd get $2 off each ticket! Valid on up .to six tickets.

up to five tickets adult..................................... $24 junior (under 48”)................. $13 senior (age 62+).................. $13 children age 2 and under..... free more than five tickets adult..................................... $28 junior (under 48”)................. $18 senior (age 62+).................. $18 children age 2 and under..... free

Buy tickets in advance or at the main gate from 9:00 am to 3:00 pm the day of the event—look for the Local 1059 booth.

Theme park and water park tickets are valid during the park’s normal operating schedule. Tickets are non-refundable and nonreplaceable if lost or stolen. UFCW Local 1059 reserves the right to limit the number of tickets purchased at one time. MasterCard, Visa and Discover are accepted for online purchases in the Members Area of www.ufcw1059.com and for phone orders called in to 614.237.7671 or 800.282.6488. Cash or credit card purchases can also be made at the UFCW Local 1059 office between 8:30 am and 4:00 pm, Monday through Friday. UFCW Local 1059 | 4150 East Main Street, Columbus, OH 43213 | www.ufcw1059.com


UNIONWIZE

MAY / JUNE 2012

Looking Toward the Fight Ahead by Jason Kaseman, Political Director

I

n the 2012 election, workers have a tough job ahead of them. Thankfully, Local 1059 has been put in a great position to mobilize our membership and protect workers’ rights due to the hard work of former Political Director, Allie Petonic. Last month, Allie moved on to the AFL-CIO where she will continue her passionate advocacy for Ohio’s working men and women. Her tireless contributions to this union merit my sincere gratitude. Many reading this may already know me, but, for those I have not met yet, allow me to introduce myself. My name is Jason Kaseman, and I am Local 1059’s new Political Director. I have previously served in this same role, helping with our union’s electoral work from 2004 through 2007. After I left the Union to pursue a graduate degree, Allie became Political Director and expanded the position to something beyond my wildest expectations. She increased our political capacity by

training a legion of eager and knowledgeable Member Political Organizers ready to do the unglamorous work of gathering signatures, knocking on doors and phoning voters, which makes our efforts successful. And we are going to need all hands on deck this election cycle. All across our country, pro-business politicians are launching an assault on the middle class. Though we Ohioans were able to beat back Senate Bill 5’s attack on workers in last year’s election, our brothers and sisters in Wisconsin weren’t as lucky in their efforts to punish the public officials who forced similar legislation in their state. The Wisconsin election on June 5th should be a warning to us all. The state’s corporate-backed governor, Scott Walker, managed to survive his recall election through the excessive funding of out-of-state businesses. Tom Barrett, Walker’s Democratic challenger, was outraised almost 10 to 1 ($30 million vs. $3.1 million). Needless to say, money remains a factor in our elections. Expect the same dynamic to play out in Ohio come November’s vote.

Expect the wealthiest businessmen in our nation to pour millions into our state in an effort to silence the voices of workers. That money will buy attack ads, fund political mail and pay for robocalls. But for all the things money can buy in an election, dollars don’t vote. We do. Our families do. Our coworkers do. From now until Election Day, UFCW Local 1059 will have numerous opportunities to help inform workers about the stakes of this election and encourage them to vote. We’ll be registering the unregistered, updating registration information for those who have moved or changed their name, raising funds for the Active Ballot Club (see below) to support our issues and contacting voters about the importance of casting their ballot for candidates who will fight for us. As I said, our job is not easy. But Local 1059 members know how to get the job done. I look forward to working with everyone—whether you’re a new activist or an old ally—throughout this important election cycle.

2012 Active Ballot Club Contest The Active Ballot Club (ABC), the UFCW’s political action committee, leads the charge to elect pro-worker candidates so we don’t end up with anti-worker politicians making decisions that affect our future. ABC supports pro-worker candidates and incumbents—Democrats, Republicans and Independents. This year, we have great prizes for Local 1059 members who start a weekly contribution to the ABC fund, maintain their current level of giving or decide to increase their weekly contribution. $1,000 Grand Prize—Members who pledge to start, continue or up their weekly contributions to ABC for the next year will get one entry for every 25¢/week they contribute to the fund. Drawing will be at the Columbus Quarterly Area Meeting on November 6, 2012. Free T-Shirt—Every member pledging at least $1.00/week to ABC will get a free UFCW Local 1059 Solidarity t-shirt. 10

UFCW Local 1059 | 4150 East Main Street, Columbus, OH 43213 | www.ufcw1059.com


UNIONWIZE

vol. 34 / no. 3

We’re Going to Need Enough Food to Feed Coxey’s Army by Rick Gregory, Education Director

I

n the last two issues of UnionWize, I wrote about “B” movie monsters, the “Big Picture,” eagles and turkeys. There were two general themes in both articles. One: The urgent need for union members and other workers to join together to oppose politicians and companies that are attempting to weaken the labor movement and the middle class.

Two: Your union, UFCW Local 1059, plays a major role in leading you in this fight. Anyone reading UnionWize or who follows local, state and national news reports over the past year knows that pro-worker groups have banded together to fight anti-union legislation, corporate greed and protect the middle class. The successful campaign in Ohio to prevent Senate Bill 5 from being enacted, the attempt in Wisconsin to recall the state’s governor as well as several state legislators and the Occupy Wall Street movement are examples. In my next four articles, I will go back in history to discuss earlier mass movements on behalf of the poor, workers and unions. When I was a child growing up on a farm in Members of Coxey’s Army march through an Ohio town

rural Tennessee, a phrase I often heard was something like this: “We’re going to need enough food to feed Coxey’s Army.” At the time, I didn’t know what the term meant, but I knew it referred to a lot of hungry people eating a lot of food. The story of Coxey’s Army actually began in Ohio in 1894. The Panic of 1893 resulted in large-scale unemployment in the industrial areas of the United States. In 1894, an Ohio businessman, Jacob Coxey, led a protest march that left Massillon, Ohio on March 25, 1894 and ended at the United States Capitol on April 30, 1894. Coxey left Massillon with 100 men, but his ranks had swollen to over 500 people before they got to Washington, D.C. Even though Coxey and some of the other march leaders were arrested when they stepped onto the grass at the Capitol, the protest march focused the attention of the President and Congress on the plight of unemployed workers. It also sparked similar protests and marches across the country and served as a model for future marches on Washington to get the attention of the federal government. My next article will cover another protest march: The World War I Veterans’ Bonus Marches of the 1930s.

Name (print): ___________________________ Phone: __________________ Guest’s Name (print): __________________________ Enclosed: $__________ Address: ________________________________________

Number of tickets ________________________________________ Purchased: _______

City: _____________________________________ State: _________________ Employer: _______________________________________________________ Send payment to:

UFCW Local 1059 4150 East Main Street Columbus, OH 43213

Send your payment with the form above or pay online in the Members Area at www.ufcw1059.com

Tuesday, September 18, 2012 UFCW Local 1059 offers a daylong trip to Greektown Casino in Detroit. The cost is just $30, including transportation and $20 of bonus play on the casino’s slots.

UFCW Local 1059 | 4150 East Main Street, Columbus, OH 43213 | www.ufcw1059.com

11


UNIONWIZE

Employer & Negotiation Updates • Dayton. UFCW Local 75 has reached a tentative agreement, and a ratification vote has been scheduled for June 27. The agreement calls for a bonus the first year of the contract, a 25¢/hour raise the second year and a 30¢/ hour raise in the third year. • Las Vegas. UFCW Local 711 members at Kroger-owned grocery chain Smith’s have ratified a contract. Health care premiums for employees rose to $7.00 for single coverage, $10.50 for employee plus children and $15.00 for family coverage. To keep health insurance affordable, members accepted lump sum bonuses of 25¢/hour based on straight-time hours worked in the preceding 12 months for the first two years and 20¢/hour based on the same formula in the third year. Contract Extensions

• Indianapolis. The UFCW Local 700 contract was set to expire on May 12 but the contract has been extended indefinitely while bargaining continues. • Nashville. The UFCW Local 1995 contract expired in May 2012. They are working under an extension as health care bargaining continues.

• Central Valley & Bay Area. Negotiations with the California grocery chain began in October. Both sides have agreed to multiple contract extensions as bargaining continues. Save Mart is pushing the UFCW unions for health care concessions, citing market share loss to Walmart, which has lower labor costs due to its limited health insurance options.

• United States. After reporting

MAY / JUNE 2012

net revenue up 19.9% for the first quarter, the pharmacy chain increased its full-year forecast. The jump was due largely customer loss from its competitor, Walgreen. In late 2011, Walgreen stopped filling prescriptions for Express Scripts patients. The data show that many of these customers have now moved to CVS as their primary pharmacy.

• Bribery Scandal. Walmart officers face federal investigation under allegations that the big box retailer bribed Mexican officials millions of dollars in order to speed the construction and opening of stores in the country, then engaged in a cover-up of that activity. Internal, companyled investigators recently suggested Walmart expand their review to include China, Brazil, India and South Africa as well.

• Illinois. Bargaining continues for two UFCW locals in Illinois. The contract with Local 881 expired in May 2010. The Local 536 contract expired in September 2009. • Memphis. Negotiations continue between the Kroger Company and UFCW Local 1529 while Tennessee’s members enter their sixth month working under a contract extension. Health insurance-related issues continue to be a major factor for the long bargaining period. • Louisville. UFCW Local 227, based in Kentucky, has entered a contract extension as negotiations continue. Health care bargaining remains the primary cause of the delay. The contract expired on March 31, 2012. 12

Anti-Walmart activists passed out over 450 flyers at 7 Walmart stores for June’s day of action. Pictured are UAW Local 2269 President Bill Lucas, Organizer John King, UAW member Steve Ealy,UAW Local 2269 Vice President James Starrett, Organizer Anthony Bridges, Organizer Brian Perkins

UFCW Local 1059 | 4150 East Main Street, Columbus, OH 43213 | www.ufcw1059.com


vol. 34 / no. 3

UNIONWIZE

Education Leads the Way at Stewards Conference by Paul Smithberger, Communications Director

U

FCW Local 1059 stewards gathered at Deer Creek State Park in late April to get further education on how to better represent Local 1059’s membership. This union provides a training session for stewards when they are newly appointed, but the annual stewards conference gives us opportunities to further our stewards’ education. Service Director Mark Hertenstein led a class called the “Power of Perception.” He used different scenarios of disciplinary and grievance meetings to outline how a steward can behave in ways that keep the trust of other members. The session was interactive, giving stewards the opportunity to weigh in with recommendations about best practices for maintaining a positive and professional relationship with members and management.

Organizing Director Tina Morgan taught a class on workplace safety. Her course began with a discussion of OSHA’s role and some eyeopening statistics about the frequency of workplace injuries. Then President Randy Quickel speaks at the Stewards Conference came a segment focused on precautionary measures tention to Local 1059’s membership. such as lockout-tagout, which refers This union is here for our members. to the procedure for “locking-out” Our union stewards have accepted anyone—including yourself—from a great responsibility as this union’s being able to accidently supply power day-to-day representatives in our to a machine. worksites, and we are reminded of The last of our three classes was how exceptional they are each year conducted by Education Director at our annual Stewards Conference. Rick Gregory. The class explored From leadership to union representhe idea of treating a steward’s fellow tatives to union stewards, we hold members like customers. President ourselves to the highest standards for Quickel saw this class as a way to em- servicing and representation. phasize the need for giving special at-

During one evening of the Stewards Conference, dozens of members came together to make baby blankets for CHOICES, a domestic violence shelter in Columbus. Here is a portion of the letter UFCW Local 1059 received from the organization. June 7, 2012 On behalf of CHOICES, I thank you for your donation of hand-made blankets. In-kind donations like yours allow us to effeciently use our resources to directly help survivors, resources that would have otherwise gone toward the kind of items you have donated.… Frankly, we could not provide such life-saving services without supporters like you. Once again, thank you for your donation, I am Inspired by your generosity, Sharon McCloy-Reichard Executive Director

UFCW Local 1059 | 4150 East Main Street, Columbus, OH 43213 | www.ufcw1059.com

13


UNIONWIZE

MAY / JUNE 2012

Ray Collier Memorial Scholarship

In Celebration of His Service to the Coalition of Black Trade Unionists

R

ay Collier was a good friend, a valuable member of the UFCW Local 1059 staff and a staunch supporter of workers’ rights. When Ray Collier he passed away in 2003, we wanted to honor his memory, continuing his commitment to our membership by offering a $1,000 scholarship in his name. Ray was a tireless advocate for the Columbus chapter of the Coalition of Black Trade Unionists (CBTU), and it is in celebration of that conviction we offer the Ray Collier Memorial Scholarship to a UFCW Local 1059 member who shares Ray’s passion for union activism and helping others. Scholarship Rules & Procedures

In order to be eligible for the Ray Collier Memorial Scholarship, you must be a UFCW Local 1059 member in continuous good standing for

at least 12 months immediately preceding July 6, 2012. All applications and the materials enumerated below must be received at the UFCW Local 1059 office by Friday, July 6, 2012. Eligible applicants must meet the following additional provisions: 1. Applicants must be high school students graduating in 2012 or currently enrolled as a full-time college or post-graduate student. 2. Applicants must have a cumulative 2.50 or better grade point average and must submit their most recent official transcripts of either high school or college work. 3. Applicants must submit official documentation of their acceptance by an accredited college or university as a full-time student for the 2012 fall semester/quarter. 4. Applicants must be able to attend the CBTU Martin Luther King, Jr. Day brunch in Columbus on Saturday, January 12, 2013. 5. Applicants must submit an essay of not less than one and no more than three pages, typed and

double-spaced, on the topic of How the Union Has Been a Part of My Family Life. 6. Applicants must submit a current photograph of themselves and a biography of approximately 500 words to be published in a future issue of UnionWize as well as the program for the CBTU Martin Luther King, Jr. Day brunch should they win. The scholarship winner will be determined by the Scholarship Committee following the July 6 deadline. The $1,000 scholarship payment will be presented at the Coalition of Black Trade Unionists’ Martin Luther King, Jr. Day brunch, conditioned upon the winner’s attendance at the event. All documentation must be submitted with your application in order to qualify. The scholarship is awarded by the Scholarship Committee with consideration for the totality of each applicant’s submitted materials.

Ray Collier Memorial Scholarship

This application must be received no later than Friday, July 6, 2012. Applicant’s full name: __________________________________________ Phone: _________________________ Home address: ______________________________________________________________________________ City: ___________________________________________ State: ____________ Zip: ______________________ Last 4 digits of member’s Social Security number: _____________________ Employer: ______________________ Signature: __________________________________________________________________________________ Mail completed application together with transcripts, documentation of college enrollment, essay, photo and biography to: 14

UFCW Local 1059 | 4150 East Main Street, Columbus, OH 43213 | www.ufcw1059.com

UFCW Local 1059 4150 East Main Street Columbus, Ohio 43213


UNIONWIZE

vol. 34 / no. 3

Quarterly union meetings

Membership Orientations

All Quarterly Union Meetings start at 7:00 pm unless otherwise noted.

All Membership Orientations start at 5:30 pm unless otherwise noted.

Central Area-—Tuesday, May 1, 2012 UFCW Local 1059, Columbus 4150 E. Main Street

Columbus—Monday, July 9, 2012 Meeting times: 10:00 am & 5:30 pm UFCW Local 1059, Columbus 4150 E. Main Street

Eastern Area—Wednesday, May 2, 2012 Holiday Inn Express, Zanesville 1101 Spring Street

Lima—Tuesday, July 10, 2012 Holiday Inn & Suites 803 S. Leonard Avenue

Southern Area—Thursday, May 3, 2012 Meeting times: 10:00 am & 7:00 pm Comfort Inn, Piketon 7525 U.S. Route 23

Hebron—Tuesday, July 10, 2012 Creative Catering 925 W. Main Street

Toledo Area—Monday, May 7, 2012 Holiday Inn Express, Perrysburg 10621 Fremont Pike

Sandusky—Wednesday, July 11, 2012 Fairfield Inn and Suites 6220 Milan Road

Southeastern Area—Tuesday, May 8, 2012 The Olde Dutch Restaurant, Logan 12791 State Route 664 S.

Athens—Wednesday, July 11, 2012 Holiday Inn Express 11 E. Park Drive

Central Area—Wednesday, May 9, 2012 Meeting time: 10:00 am UFCW Local 1059, Columbus 4150 E. Main Street

Marion—Thursday, July 12, 2012 Tri Rivers Career Center 2222 Marion-Mt. Gilead Road

Northern Area—Wednesday, May 9, 2012 Quality Inn & Suites, Mansfield 500 N. Trimble Road

Piketon—Thursday, July 12, 2012 Comfort Inn 7525 U.S. Route 23

Northwestern Area—Thursday, May 10, 2012 Comfort Suites, Findlay 3700 Speedway Drive

Perrysburg—Monday, July 16, 2012 Holiday Inn Express 10621 Fremont Pike

Upcoming events YWCA Family Center—Monday, July 2, 2012 Ray Collier Scholarship Deadline—Friday, July 6, 2012 Cedar Point Member Appreciation—Wednesday, July 11, 2012 Barbie Doll Cake Class—Tuesday, July 17, 2012 Kings Island Picnic—Saturday, July 28, 2012 Greektown Casino—Tuesday, September 18, 2012 New York City Trip—September 24-27, 2012 Cedar Point Member Appreciation—Sunday, October 14, 2012

Contact information Local 1059 Office 614.237.7671 or toll-free 800.282.6488 Health & Welfare Office 614.237.7618 or toll-free 800.282.6483 Pension Office 614.237.7423 or toll-free 800.282.6483

Defiance—Tuesday, July 17, 2012 UAW Local 211 2120 Baltimore Street Zanesville—Tuesday, July 17, 2012 Holiday Inn Express 1101 Spring Street Lancaster—Wednesday, July 18, 2012 Hampton Inn 2041 Schorrway Drive Mansfield—Wednesday, July 18, 2012 Quality Inn & Suites 500 N. Trimble Road Findlay—Thursday, July 19, 2012 Comfort Suites 3700 Speedway Drive Circleville—Thursday, July 19, 2012 Holiday Inn Express 23911 U.S. Route 23 S.

UFCW Local 1059 | 4150 East Main Street, Columbus, OH 43213 | www.ufcw1059.com

15


periodical postage paid at Columbus, OH

United Food & Commercial Workers International Union, CLC 4150 East Main Street, Columbus, OH 43213

UFCW Local 1059 Picnic Saturday, July 28 Local 1059 prices: up to five tickets adult............................................................... $30 junior (under 48”)........................................... $20 senior (age 62+)............................................. $20 children age 2 and under............................... free more than five tickets adult............................................................... $37 junior (under 48”)........................................... $30 senior (age 62+)............................................. $30 children age 2 and under............................... free Tickets must be purchased in advance. Pre-paid parking available: $6.00 the night before and $6.00 the day of the picnic. Ticket price includes: • admission the day of the picnic • free admission the night before (after 5:00 pm)—we offer prepaid parking for $6.00 (reg. $12) • lunch served from 11:30 am to 1:30 pm, which includes Southern fried chicken, hot dogs, Montgomery pulled pork, baked beans, potato salad, ice cream treats and soft drinks

UFCW Local 1059 Member Appreciation Day Wednesday, July 11 and Sunday, October 14 Local 1059 prices: up to five tickets adult............................................................... $24 junior (under 48”)........................................... $13 senior (age 62+)............................................. $13 children age 2 and under............................... free more than five tickets adult............................................................... $28 junior (under 48”)........................................... $18 senior (age 62+)............................................. $18 children age 2 and under............................... free

Buy tickets in advance or at the main gate from 9:00 am to 3:00 pm on the day of the event—look for the UFCW Local 1059 booth.


UnionWize May/June 2012