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Sixth Form Curriculum Subjects 2015-16


Contents Art & Design Biology Business and Management Chemistry Classics Design Technology Economics English Food, Nutrition and Health French Geography German Government and Politics History Mathematics Music Philosophy, Theology and RE Physics Psychology Sixth Form Enrichment Spanish Sport Science Theatre Studies Careers Information Extension Classes in the Upper 6th

Page No. 5 7 12 15 18 22 26 29 33 36 39 43 47 51 54 58 61 64 68 70 72 76 80 82 85 - 114

Please Note: Due to forthcoming changes at A Level, current course information is subject to change for 2015 entry onwards. This will be published as soon as more information is available.


Art & Design Head of Department:

Mr K Yearsley

Contact No:

0161 488 3330 ext. 3212

Students work in three main specialist areas in the Art and Design Department. These are Painting, Textiles and Ceramics. At all levels, as a Department, we are aiming for all students to be expected to demonstrate a response to all of the following: 

Record observations, experiences, ideas, information and insights in visual and other forms appropriate to intentions.

Analyse and evaluate critically sources such as images, objects, artefacts and texts, showing understanding of purposes, meaning and contexts.

Develop ideas through sustained investigations and exploration.

Present a personal, coherent and informed response, realising intentions, and articulating / explaining connections with the work of others.

At the core of all work within the Department, drawing from primary source plays a key role as a starting point for all projects. We encourage work in mixed media, experimental ideas and students who show personal initiative and translation of media and ideas.

Co-Curricular Activities Students studying Art and Design have the opportunity to become in a variety of C0-curricular activities, these include students helping with set designs, posters etc. for School Drama Productions. The Department also invite practising Artists/past students to visit to deliver workshops and demonstrate techniques. There is also Life Drawing Class for Sixth Form Students. There are a number of trips outside School also organised by the Department - each year group has the opportunity to go on one visit per academic year. Visits are made to Galleries, Museums, Collections, Design Studios, Workshops etc. where and when appropriate to the studies. A variety of specialist Art Clubs are run for each year group. The Department has close links with local Junior Schools and Sixth Formers have the chance to work with these groups of younger children. In the Summer Term the Department holds an Annual Art Exhibition of all GCSE, AS and A2 work which is open to parents, staff and students.

Course Entry requirements Candidates are required to obtain a minimum Grade B and preferably A or A* at GCSE level.

Exam Board: AQA


Course details This course is designed to encourage students to: • • • • • •

develop the interest of, and enjoyment in, the study of art and design, fostering its value in lifelong learning develop personal responses to ideas, observations, experiences environments and cultures work from their own strengths and interests within the remit of the specification. to develop personal responses to ideas, observations, experiences, environments and cultures to allow students and teachers to work from their strengths embark upon further study of Art and Design or related subjects in Higher Education

The department aims to enhance: a) b)

Intellectual, imaginative, creative and intuitive powers. Investigative, analytical, experimental, practical, technical and expressive skills, aesthetic understanding and critical judgement.

c)

An understanding of the interrelationships between art, craft and design and awareness of the contexts in which they operate.

d) Knowledge and understanding of art, craft and design in contemporary society and in other times and cultures.

Career/HE opportunities

Students may apply via direct entry for the following degree courses: Architecture; Art History; Product Design; Film/Animation OR Foundation Course: 1 year course covering a range of skills – eventually applying for a degree course in a wide variety of specialist areas e.g. Fine Art, Graphics, 3D design, Textiles, Interior Design etc.

Art and Design AS Level Content of course: Coursework: Students are required to work in at least two areas of art, craft and design. They may explore overlapping areas and combination of areas. Fine Art - drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture Textiles - printed fabrics, domestic textiles, constructed textiles, fashion Three Dimensional Design - ceramics, sculpture Photography Unit 1: ARTA1 Coursework Portfolio 50% of AS, 25% of A Level No time limit 80 marks Portfolio of work set and marked by the centre and moderated by AQA Available in June only Unit 2: ARTA2 AS Externally Set Assignment 50% of AS, 25% of A Level Supervised time 5 hours 80 marks Work produced will be marked by the centre and moderated by AQA Available in June only.


Art and Design A2 Level A2 Examinations Content of Course Unit 3: ARTA3 Personal Investigation 25% of A Level No time limit 80 marks Personal investigation supported by written element of 1000-3000 words, set and marked at the centre and moderated by AQA Available in June only Unit 4 - ARTA4 A2 Externally Set Assignment 25% of A Level Supervised time 15 hours 80 marks Work produced will be marked by the centre and moderated by AQA Available in June only Coursework: - Candidates are required to submit a coursework unit in the specified area of study. (see AS level)

Art and Design Extension Classes The aim of the Art and Design Extension Class is: to foster and interest in and enthusiasm for the subject beyond the set weekly lessons; to help further develop the talents of students showing high potential; to help students considering applying to study Art and Design at University with the practical skills and wider reading experience needed for success in gaining offers in a highly competitive field. More information is available from the Head of Department


Biology Head of Department:

Mr Jonathan Hedwat

Contact No:

0161 488 3330 ext. 3250

Twitter:

@Biology_CHS

The Biology Department is staffed by six teachers and two technicians. We have a wide range of experience including examining, training and moderating for examination boards. Our philosophy includes the aim to use a variety of teaching and learning styles to involve and cater for all students. We try to use practical work and other kinesthetic exercises as much as possible in order to reinforce the idea that scientific knowledge can only progress with experimentation to test hypotheses. We are well resourced and offer students relevant and modern practical work such as DNA extraction, restriction enzyme analysis, PCR and gel electrophoresis.

Co-Curricular Activities The Department runs its own Society (more details of which can be found on the co-curricular pages). Outside speakers are invited into School to talk to Sixth Form students on specialist topics. We also organise evening lectures and workshops for our Sixth form students throughout the year. In order to address the requirements of A2 Unit 4 Populations and environment, students will complete a four day residential field course at one of the Field Studies Council Centres across the country. These are staffed and run by experienced ecologists with excellent local knowledge. This field course is normally in October of the Upper Sixth year. In previous years the trip has been to North Wales where students have studied coastal ecology.

Entry requirements:

A minimum GCSE Grade A for Single Science Biology or AA in Co-ordinated Science.

Exam Board: AQA

Course Details The AQA specification is designed to fulfil the QCA criteria and provide logical progression from the International GCSE specification. The emphasis is on the application of knowledge; for example the first unit looks at disease of digestive and circulatory systems which are major health issues in the United Kingdom. In order to understand the subject better, and to enable you to make valid judgments, you need information on disease causing organisms, the physiology of these systems, and the principles of immunity by which the body naturally defends itself. Therefore topics are not taught in isolation, but with a purpose to but with a purpose to complete a larger jigsaw of ideas.

Careers/HE Opportunities Biology enables you to develop an informed interest in new areas that have important medical, commercial and ethical consequences. Many students leave school to study a subject allied to Biology (Medicine, Vet. Medicine, Dentistry, Biology, Genetics, Natural Science).


Biology AS level The AS qualification consists of two theory units and one practical unit involving an externally marked practical assignment (EMPA). A summary of the two theory units follows: Unit 1: Biology and disease (110 UMS Marks 1 ¼ hour exam) The emphasis of this unit is upon fitting together the pieces of the jigsaw to enable students to understand disease and how the human body responds to fight off infection. 

How bacteria, viruses and fungi enter the body and cause diseases affecting the lungs and digestive systems. How lifestyle affects health.

The structure and basic function of the digestive system. The biochemistry of proteins and amino acids, the biochemistry of carbohydrates.

The structure of cells as seen with the electron microscope. The role of lipids in membranes and membrane function.

Lung structure and function. Related disease and the effects of smoking and pollution.

Heart structure, stimulation and contraction. Heart disease and risk factors.

Principles of immunology; vaccination and the use of monoclonal antibodies.

Unit 2: The variety of living organisms (140 UMS Marks – 1 ¾ hour exam) This unit looks at the causes of variation in living things, classification and an introduction to biodiversity. •

Measuring and evaluating the importance of variation.

The structure of DNA, genes and the importance of translated polypeptides. Chromosome structure and meiosis.

The effects of selection on genetic diversity.

Haemoglobin occurrence and function. Carbohydrate biochemistry. Animal and plant cell differences.

Replication of DNA, mitosis and the cell cycle.

Cell differentiation and the organisation of cells into organisms.

Size and surface area effects, especially related to gas exchange surfaces, the blood system and transport in plants.

The principles of taxonomy.

Genetic comparisons between species using DNA sequences and protein structures.

Antibiotic resistance in bacteria.

Practical methods for measuring biodiversity.

Unit 3: Investigative and practical skills in AS Biology (60 UMS marks) Externally marked practical assignment (EMPA)

Biology A2 level The A Level qualification consists of a further two theory units and one practical unit (in addition to the AS units) involving one externally marked practical assignment (EMPA). Total UMS marks available for the 3 AS units and the 3 A2 units = 600). A summary of the two theory units follows:


Unit 4: Populations and environment (100 UMS Marks 1 ½ hour exam) This unit looks at ecology of ecosystems, and the flow of energy by focusing upon photosynthesis and respiration. It is expected that candidates will carry out fieldwork involving the collection of quantitative data from at least one habitat and will apply elementary statistical analysis to the results. •

The study and measurement of populations.

The synthesis of ATP from ADP and phosphate and its role as the immediate source of energy f or biological processes.

Photosynthesis. The light-independent and light-dependent reactions in a typical C3 plant.

The biochemistry of aerobic respiration

The transfer of energy through ecosystems and the efficiency of transfer, including farming systems.

The recycling of chemicals in ecosystems, including the role of micro-organisms.

Succession from pioneer species to climax community.

• of

Genetic variation within a species and geographic isolation leading to new species. The genetics inheritance.

Unit 5: Control in cells and in organisms (140 UMS Marks 2 ¼ hour exam) •

Responding to stimuli.

Coordination may be chemical or electrical in nature. Content includes the conduction of the nerve impulse.

Muscle contraction, and the role of ATP and phosphocreatine in providing the energy supply during muscle contraction. The structure, location and general properties of slow and fast skeletal muscle fibres

Homeostasis is the maintenance of a constant internal environment. The control of body temperature, blood glucose, and types of diabetes.

The role of positive and negative feedback in reproductive systems.

• DNA structure, its transcription into RNA and subsequent translation into protein. Mutations and oncogenes in cancer. •

The control of gene expression. The use of oestrogen, siRNA, and tumour suppressor genes.

Gene cloning technologies. Content includes industrial and medical processes, genetic engineering, gene markers, PCR, and the ethical issues surrounding the subject.

Unit 6: Investigative and practical skills in A2 level Biology (60 UMS Marks) Externally Marked Practical Assignment (EMPA)

Field course

In order to address the requirements of Unit 4 Populations and environment, students will complete a five day residential field course at one of the Field Studies Council Centres across the country. These are staffed and run by experienced ecologists with excellent local knowledge. This field course is normally in the last two weeks of the Upper Sixth year.

Biology Extension Classes

Students at A2 can choose to take a Biology extension class. This is a unique opportunity for students to explore areas of Biology beyond the syllabus with a view to continuing their study at University. The aim of the Biology Extension Class is: to examine contemporary issues and frontier technology in the Biological Sciences. to develop critical thinking skills to use during debate. to promote independent practical and investigate skills. to bridge A Level and undergraduate concepts.


Business and Management Head of Department: Contact No:

Mr Gareth Matthews 0161 488 3330 ext. 3268

The Business and Management Department aims to interest students, develop their confidence and self-reliance and, of course, to achieve academic success. The students are encouraged to develop a variety of skills relevant to their future careers and lives which include the presentation and interpretation of data and the analysis of it to generate well founded opinions and recommendations.

Co-curricular Activities

The Department runs a number of Co-curricular activities, including:  Young Enterprise for Lower Sixth students  Student Investor for students in years 9-13  Manchester Airport Dragon’s Den Competition for students in years 9-11  Manchester Airport Year 7 and 8 Enterprise Competition for students in years 7-8  Make it in Manufacturing Enterprise Competition for year 9 students  Enterprise opportunities during Activities Week including Dragon’s Den and Smoothie challenge  BASE Enterprise Competition for year 13 students  The provision of external speakers throughout the year

Entry requirements The Department sets no formal entry requirements, other than those for entry into the Sixth Form. No prior knowledge of the subject is required. This is not an indication as to the difficulty of the course; rather the educational philosophy of the department.

Content of course Business and Management provides an appreciation of the value of business activity, plus a practical understanding of how businesses operate and why business decision-making is so important. The course aims to blend academic rigour with the development of practical skills. Knowledge relevant to businesses in the twenty-first century is embodied in the curriculum content. For example, there are topics such as corporate social responsibility, Porter’s Five Forces model, waste management and off-shoring, as well as the more traditional principles which will continue to be relevant in business. Syllabus content is divided into five areas: • • • • •

The Business Environment Marketing Accounts and Finance Operations and Project Management People in Organisations


Career/HE opportunities The study of Business & Management need not lead to the study of Management at university, although a large number of students on the course do proceed to this type of course. As a Social Science, it could be a useful preparation for study in many areas and as a third subject it will meet the A Level entry requirements for any degree where the subjects to be studied at ‘A’ Level are not specified. Universities offer a wide range of courses that combine Business Studies with other subjects such as Modern Languages, Economics, ICT and even Engineering. Theses combinations of technical skills and understanding of the business world are positive selling points in a competitive employment market. Business and Management Cambridge Pre-U Course

Course details Candidates will complete the coursework project at the start of the Upper Sixth and take the two examination components at the end of the course. Paper 1 - Business Concepts - multiple-choice, case study and essay questions Paper 2 - Strategic Decisions – short answer and essay questions Paper 3 - Personal Investigation – coursework project There will be no external examinations in the Lower Sixth.

Business and Management Extension Classes The purpose of this course is to deepen students’ knowledge of Business Studies, develop an awareness of historical and current trends in the subject and introduce students to some of the concepts which will be studied on undergraduate courses. This course is recommended for students who have an active interest in the subject and wish to engage in wider reading and discussion. More details of the course are available from the Head of Department.


Chemistry Head of Department: Contact No:

Mr I Chippendale 0161 488 3330 ext. 3270

The Chemistry Department is staffed by a team of 7 teachers (3 men and 4 women) and 2 technicians. We have five laboratories all with multi-media capabilities. The laboratories offer a modern, comfortable wand well equipped working environment. Our aim is to challenge our students, to open their eyes to the wonders of Chemistry and to have fun at the same time. Our results and Sixth Form uptake are excellent and we take pride in the professional job that we do.

Co- Curricular Activities At A Level we have a Chemistry Club offering 3 or 4 talks by external speakers each year. Periodically, interesting external lectures are advertised which we aim to attend, such as those offered by Manchester Literary and Philosophical Society. Sixth Form Chemistry Students are encouraged to be involved in mentoring younger students in the School in Chemistry Clinics. In the Upper Sixth Mr Taylor organises a visit to Sheffield University for a 1 day laboratory class.

Entry requirements Ideally, minimum GCSE Grade A for Single Science Chemistry or AA in Co-ordinated Science. Students with Grade B would be assessed by the Department on an individual basis. Exam Board: AQA

Course details The aim of the course is to allow students to develop essential knowledge and understanding of the concepts of Chemistry, and the skills needed for the use of these in new and challenging situations. Students gain an understanding of the link between theory and experiment and become aware of how advances in ICT and instrumentation are used in Chemistry. Students appreciate the contribution of the subject to society and the responsible use of scientific knowledge and evidence. The course aims to develop and sustain students’ enjoyment of and interest in Chemistry. A2 takes a much more in depth approach to Organic, Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, and allows students to make connections between these three branches of the subject.

Career Opportunities Medicine, Veterinary Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy, Teaching, Research – e.g. in pharmaceuticals, Chemical Engineering As well as this obvious list, it must be noted that a Chemistry degree has a high currency in the general job market, and Chemistry graduates are highly sought after by firms such as management consultants and accountants.


Chemistry AS Level Content of the course Lower Sixth (AS) covers units 1, 2 and 3. Unit 3 is based on an externally assessed practical activity. The students take both modules in the summer of their Lower Sixth year. Unit 1 – Foundations in Chemistry (100 UMS marks, 1 ¼ hour exam) Topics covered Atomic Structure, Bonding and Structure, Amount of substance, Periodicity and an introduction to Organic Chemistry. Unit 2 – Chemistry in Action (140 UMS marks, 1 ¾ hour exam) Topics Energetics, Kinetics, Equilibria, Redox reactions, Halogens, Organic Chemistry, Group 2 and Extraction on metals. Unit 3 is worth 60 UMS marks.

Chemistry A2 level Content of Course Upper Sixth (A2) covers units 4, 5 and 6. Unit 6, like unit 3, is externally assessed coursework. Unit 4 – Kinetics, Equilibria and further Organic Chemistry (120 UMS marks, 1 ¾ hr exam) Topics: Kinetics, Equilibria, Acid/Base reactions, Carbonyl Chemistry, Aromatic, Amine and Amino acid Chemistry, Polymers, Synthesis and Analysis and Structure determination. Unit 5 – Energetics, Redox and Inorganic Chemistry. (120 UMS marks, 1 ¾ hr exam) Topics: Thermodynamics, Periodicity, Redox Equilibria, Transition metals and Aqueous Chemistry. Unit 6 – 60 UMS marks based on internal assessment. In general A2 is more mathematical, and goes into topics in a much greater depth, particularly in Organic Chemistry.

Chemistry Extension Classes The aims of the Chemistry Extension Classes are to extend the students' thinking beyond the confines of the Chemistry GCE specification, and to encourage students to be able to think across the various Chemistry disciplines. Each session will have the structure of an Oxbridge tutorial which also mirrors the structure of the academic interview at these institutions. Topics covered include molecular orbital theory and advanced organic chemistry. Students are also encourage to have a go at the Chemistry Olympiad which is organised by the Royal Society of Chemistry.

More information is available from the Head of the Department.


Classics Head of Department: Contact No:

Mrs A Johnson 0161 488 3330 ext. 3213

The Classics Department offers Latin AS and A2 courses to Sixth Form students as well as Latin Extension Classes to the Upper Sixth. The Department also offers A Level Classical Civilisation.

Co-Curricular Activities

Students often have the opportunity to attend the Sixth Form Classics Conference at Manchester University and visit to the British Museum. The Department runs a trip abroad every two years.

Latin Entry requirements: Latin GCSE Grade A*, A or B

Exam Board: OCR

Course details Latin A Level builds on the foundation of GCSE Latin and develops further many skills which are already familiar. The aims of the course are to enable students to read Latin literature with understanding and enjoyment, and to develop their linguistic skills. There is no translation from English into Latin.

Career/HE opportunities The linguistic skills acquired in A Level Latin can clearly be of great use to those studying Modern Languages, whilst the mythological, social and historical content of the course enables the study of Latin to complement well the study of subjects such as History and English. AS level Latin should also appeal to those who are studying 3 sciences as their main A Level subjects. A Latin A Level qualification is highly regarded both by universities and prospective employers, and law, accountancy, computing, teaching, personnel management, merchant banking, advertising and archaeology are just some of the diverse careers pursued by those who have done Latin A Level.

Classical Civilisation Entry Requirements

Minimum GCSE Grade B in English. GCSE Latin, Greek or Classical Civilization is not a pre-requisite.

Exam Board: OCR

Course Details Many of the topics in the Classical Civilisation A Level course will already be familiar to students from their Year 7 Classical Studies Foundation Course and from the background sections of the Cambridge Latin Course. The course is entirely non-linguistic, and offers the opportunity to study the Classical World from various different perspectives: archaeological, historical, cultural and literary.


The course aims to develop an interest in, and enthusiasm for, the Classical World, and to give students a knowledge and understanding of selected aspects of Classical Civilisation. The continuing influence of the Classical World on later times will be studied, as will the similarities and differences between the Classical World and our own. Students will be expected to analyse and evaluate material, and make an informed, personal response to it. The course consists of 4 Units, two at AS and two at A2. There is no coursework.

Career/HE opportunities

Classical Civilisation A Level is highly regarded by Universities and is an excellent preparation for students wishing to progress to further study. The literacy, cultural and historical content of the course complements well the study of subjects such as English, Philosophy, Art, Drama, Modern Languages, History and Latin, but such a wide-ranging course should appeal to students of all academic disciplines. Career opportunities are similar to those of any graduates in Arts and Humanities subjects, and might include law, journalism, the media, personnel management, advertising, archaeology, teaching, banking and the Civil Service.

Latin AS Level Content of course

Unit 1 Language (written paper 1 ½ hours – 100 UMS marks) · Unseen Latin prose, tested by translation· Unit 2 – Latin Verse and Prose Literature (written paper 1 ½ hours - 100 UMS marks) · Prescribed verse and prose text Latin A2 Level Content of Course Unit 3 – Latin Verse · Prescribed verse text · Unseen Latin verse, tested via comprehension and translation (written paper 2 hours – 100 UMS marks) Unit 4 – Latin Prose (written paper 2 hours - 100 UMS marks) · Prescribed prose text · Unseen Latin prose, tested via comprehension and translation

Latin A2 Level Content of Course Unit 3 – Latin Verse · Prescribed verse text · Unseen Latin verse, tested via comprehension and translation (written paper 2 hours – 100 UMS marks) Unit 4 – Latin Prose (written paper 2 hours - 100 UMS marks) · Prescribed prose text · Unseen Latin prose, tested via comprehension and translation

Latin Extension Classes

The aims of the Latin Extension Classes are to develop further translation skills and an appreciation of Latin literature through practising the techniques of literary criticism; to read a wider selection of Latin authors; to place the literature read in some kind of historical and social context.


Classical Civilisation AS Level Two of the following Units: Archaeology – Mycenae and the Classical World Homer’s Odyssey and Society Roman Society and Thought Greek Tragedy in its context Greek Historians City Life in Roman Italy Each Unit is assessed by a 1 ½ hour written paper (100 UMS marks each).

Classical Civilisation A2 Level Two of the following Units: Roman Britain : Life in the Outpost of Empire Art and Architecture in the Greek World Comic Drama in the Ancient World Virgil and the world of the hero Each Unit is assessed by a 2 hour written paper (100 UMS marks each).


Design Technology Head of Dept: Contact No:

Mrs F J Buxton 0161 488 3330 ext. 3246

The Design Technology Department is housed in a well-equipped self-contained unit, comprising three multi-media work studios, each accommodating 14 students seated, with facilities for design and written working, practical modelling and 3D making production as well as a Plastics Room, two ICT rooms and Resources Library. The Department offers courses at AS and A2 level as well as Design Technology Extension Classes for the Upper Sixth.

Co Curricular Activities

Through the Student Leadership Scheme Sixth Formers can help students in Years 7 to 9 with lunchtime activities such as Design Challenge and Electronics Club. The Department holds an Annual Design Technology Exhibition which showcases the work of GCSE, AS and A2 students to parents, students and staff.

Entry requirements

It is expected that students will have been predicted an A grade GCSE in Design Technology. Students with Grade B would be assessed by the Department on an individual basis.

Exam Board: AQA

Course Title: Design Technology: 3D Product Design

Course details

The course aims to provide an opportunity for students to exercise initiative, imagination, resourcefulness and creativity in the solution of design problems. They will develop awareness in all aspects of design activity and an understanding of the role of design technology in meeting human needs. Students will acquire a body of knowledge and skills which will be of considerable benefit to them, whether or not they continue further studies in this or related areas. Students are encouraged to make use of available ICT facilities at all times.

Career/HE opportunities

There are a large number of DESIGN based Higher Education courses available, throughout the country, including;- the various branches of Engineering, Electronics, Motor Vehicle Design, Product, Furniture and Industrial Design, Advertising, Manufacturing, Systems Design, Architecture to highlight but a few.

Design and Technology AS Level Content of course Product Design (3D Design) There are TWO units of assessment; one unit is assessed by internal marking and external moderation and one unit is externally assessed by examination. Unit 1: MATERIALS, COMPONENTS AND APPLICATION AS Examination paper (80 marks) 2 Hours 50% AS: 25% A2 The 2 hour Examination Paper, in the form of a question and answer booklet, is set and marked by AQA.


The examination paper is designed to test the candidates knowledge and understanding of:• Materials and Components — Metals, Plastics and Polymers, Timbers and Manufactured Materials, Composites and Laminates, Compliant Materials, Smart materials, Modern Materials, Product components and Adhesives. • Design and Market Influences — the broader issues for a designer such as: environmental sustainability of products and their manufacture, ergonomic and anthropometrics, inclusive design, and consumer safety. • Processes and Manufacture — Methods of preparing, processing, manipulating and combining materials and components to enhance their properties. This will include associated tools, machinery and equipment including CAD CAM, and the use of basic quality control measures. Through study and first-hand experience students will also develop knowledge of health and safety issues relevant to working with materials. Unit 2: LEARNING THROUGH DESIGNING and MAKING AS Coursework project (80 marks) Approx. 50 Hours 50% AS: 25% A2 Internally Marked and Externally Moderated Students will be set three projects to be included in a portfolio of work. These will be set in different context and will cover design, manufacture/modelling and evaluation. The product outcomes must be of sufficient complexity to demonstrate high level skills and outcomes in all areas of design and manufacture, using appropriate Materials, processes and components. The Design and practical activity must be supported by an A3 design portfolio of between 26-30 pages in length. The folio must include appropriate ICT generated images. Five criteria for assessment are as follows: - Investigation and Clarification of Problems - Development of Design Proposal - Making/Modelling - Evaluation and Testing - Communication and Presentation

Design Technology Extension Classes

The Design Technology Extension Classes introduce students to CAD software and applications and systems as well as tailoring sessions to individuals to meet the needs and interests of further studies such as Architecture, Engineering, Civil Engineering, Automotive Engineering.

Design and Technology A2 level Content of Course

On completion of the TWO AS Units a further TWO Units are studied to complete the Advanced GCE. Marks are carried over from AS to A2 to give the final overall grade for the subject. Unit 3: DESIGN and MANUFACTURE A2 Examination paper (84 marks) 2 Hours 25% A2 The 2 hour Examination Paper, in the form of a question and answer booklet, is set and marked by AQA. This unit will build upon the knowledge and understanding gleaned in the AS Unit 2 studies and examination, but will include new and possibly unfamiliar areas of study which will include:Materials and Components —At A2 this knowledge and understanding will be developed through Unit 4 coursework and a further study of how materials and components play a major part in the sections which follow.


• Design and Market Influences — Major developments in technology, a study of manufactured products and systems, product life cycle, the influence of design and technology in society, role of the designer, the marketing function, design methods, design processes, safety, safety legislation, communication methods, illustration, selection and use of appropriate 2D/3D techniques, enhancement, information drawing, modelling, use of ICT in Design, development, human needs, human factors, quality assurance and quality control, the work of past and present designers, copyright protection, Design Methods, product development and improvement, communication methods- detail and form of products, environments and system so that they may be manufacture, Design in the Human Context, Sustainability and Environmental Concerns. • Processes and Manufacture-ICT applications, manufacturing systems, product development/ improvement, manufacturing systems, safety, systems and control. Unit 4: DESIGN and MAKING PRACTICE AS Coursework project (85 marks) Approx. 60 hour 25% A2 Single substantial ‘Designing and Making’ activity. Internally Marked and Externally Moderated Students identify a client / user group, with whom they liaise, throughout the duration of their project. The A2 ‘design and make’ activity is a ‘synoptic’ element building upon experiences gained throughout the whole of a students Design Technology educational experience, with a greater emphasis upon ‘real -life’, ‘industrial / commercial’ procedures and technologies. • • • 30 • • •

Students are expected to identify a suitable product topic and external ‘client / contact’ to work with throughout the project. As practical project outcome should be a functioning prototype that matches its original specification. The practical outcome must be supported by an A3 design folio, which is likely to be between 26pages long, including appropriate ICT produced work and images. The product must be manufactured to full size, using any of the appropriate materials specified in Unit 1, Materials, Components and Application and Unit 3 Design and Manufacture. Students must ensure that at least two-thirds of their work focuses on the appropriate materials both in practical outcome and in the design folio. Photographic evidence throughout the design folio, of each stage in product development, manufacture and testing is crucial - this is the only evidence External Moderators have of the practical processes used and the standard of outcome and finish of the final product.

The six criteria for the areas of assessment are as follows; - Context and Objectives - Plan of Action and Classification of Problem - Design Specification - Development of Design Proposal - Manufacture/ Modelling - Conclusions, Evaluations and Recommendations


Economics Head of Department: Contact No:

Mr G Matthews 0161 488 3330 ext. 3268

The Economics Department aims to interest students, develop their confidence and self-reliance and, of course, to achieve academic success. The students are encouraged to develop a variety of skills relevant to their future careers and lives, which include the presentation and interpretation of data and the analysis of it to generate well founded opinions and recommendations.

Co-Curricular Activities The Department runs a number of local and national co-curricular activities such as Student Investor and the Bank of England Challenge, as well as often inviting speakers into School to talk on a range of topics from urban regeneration to sanitation in the 3 rd world.

Entry requirements The Department sets no formal entry requirements, other than those for entry into the Sixth Form. This is not an indication as to the difficulty of the course; rather the educational philosophy of the department. No prior knowledge of the subject is required but a minimum of GCSE Grade B in Mathematics is essential.

Content of course The course aims to encourage an understanding of current economic issues, through the application of economic theories and models, that will be useful to students as citizens, consumers or producers. Economics enables students to:   

gain a thorough and rigorous understanding of the theory that underpins the workings of a modern day economy develop quantitative skills through the appreciation and use of various statistical methods have a sound understanding of events, both internal and external, that have influenced the UK and the world economy over the past 10 years.

Syllabus content is divided into four areas:  Microeconomics  The National Economy  International Economics  Investigation Topics

Career/HE opportunities Economics is highly regarded by Admissions Tutors for a wide range of courses in HE. It is an excellent complement to Mathematics, Modern Foreign Languages, Geography and Politics. It is also particularly suited to the skill–set of many scientists who may be looking for an extra subject to provide variety in their Post-16 choices. A degree in Economics might lead to careers in the City, and other financial areas, as well as public policy making, but will also develop the analytical skills necessary in a large number of careers, such as journalism or Law. Economics Cambridge Pre-U Course


Course details Candidates will take all three examination components at the end of the Upper Sixth. Paper 1 - Multiple Choice, Short Answers and Data Response – questions testing the entire syllabus content Paper 2 – Essay Paper – Three essays; one micro, one macro and one free choice Paper 3 - Investigation – one essay from four titles, which reflect current issues in economics: • Transport and the Environment • China and the Global Economy • The Millennium Development Goals and the Post-2015 Development Agenda • Behavioural economics and government policy. There are no external examinations in the Lower Sixth.

Economics Extension Classes The purpose of this course is to deepen knowledge of Economics, develop an awareness of historical and current trends in the subject and introduce students to some of the concepts which will be studied on undergraduate courses. This course is recommended for students who have an active interest in the subject and wish to engage in wider reading and discussion. For further information please contact the Head of Department.


English Head of Department: Contact No:

Mr N Westbrook

0161 488 3330 ext. 3238

The English Department at Cheadle Hulme School currently comprises twelve fully qualified graduate members of staff, all dedicated to achieving the best for all students by enabling everyone to read widely with understanding and pleasure; to write accurately, neatly and imaginatively in both hand-written and computerized formats; and to speak and listen to one another with assurance, tolerance and effectiveness in a wide range of situations. We encourage and reward excellence while giving clear and practical guidance on how to learn from errors and improve performance. We aim to make the work we do enjoyable, stimulating and stretching; we insist on the highest standards of effort at all times. Our teaching rooms in the Holden Hall are fully equipped with the latest multi-media technology. The English Department offers courses at AS and A2 level in both English Language and English Literature

English Language Entry requirements

Ideally, minimum GCSE Grade A in English. Students with Grade B would be assessed by the Department on an individual basis.

Exam Board: AQA Specification B

Course details:

The aim of the course is to develop your interest in and enjoyment of English, through learning about its structures, functions, development and variations, and your ability to express yourself with increasing confidence and sophistication. A2 consolidates and develops further your knowledge of and ability to apply linguistic frameworks to a wide variety of texts, and to investigate and research language use.

Career/HE opportunities

Degrees in English, Linguistics, Media Studies. Careers in: journalism; advertising; writing; teaching; editing; child-centred learning etc.

English Literature Entry requirements:

Ideally, minimum GCSE Grade A in English. Students with Grade B would be assessed by the Department on an individual basis.

Exam Board: AQA (Specification ‘A’)

Course details

To develop your interest in and enjoyment of English Literature, through reading widely, critically and independently and to gain a wider sense of the scope of literary study.

Career/HE opportunities

Degrees in English, Law, combined courses. Careers in writing, editing, teaching, journalism, TV, film and theatre etc.


English Language AS Level Content of Course Unit 1: Categorising Texts (Written Exam 2 hours) Weighting: 60% of total AS marks / 30% of total A Level marks You will study the introductory aspects of language, including the fundamental structures and functions of writing, speech and conversation, and also focus on three specific social contexts: Language and Power, Language and Gender and Language and Technology Unit 2: Creating Text Coursework Weighting: 40% of total AS marks /20% of total A Level marks You will develop your writing skills by studying style models and producing your own writing in different genres for different audiences and for different purposes.

English Language A2 level Content of Course Unit 3: Developing Language (Written exam: 2 hours 30 mins.) Weighting: 60% of total A2 marks. 30% of total A Level marks You will focus in detail on two specific areas of language study: Child Language Acquisition (how children from 0 to 11 years develop language and social skills) and Language Change (historical and contemporary changes from 1770 to the present day). Unit 4: Investigating Language Coursework (Weighting: 40% of total A2 marks /20% of total A Level marks) You will apply your knowledge of linguistic methods and concepts to an investigation of your choice. Your investigation is followed by the production of a media text (e.g. newspaper or magazine article) focussing on the language ideas and issues surrounding the investigation topic.

English Language Extension Classes The aims of the English Language Extension Classes are to encourage students to develop further their interest in the use and study of English; to help develop the linguistic talents of students; to equip students considering applying to study English Language at University with the analytical skills and wider reading experience needed for success. More information is available from the Head of Department.


English Literature AS Level Content of course Unit 1: Texts in context (Written Exam 2 hours (Open book) Weighting: 60% of total AS marks / 30% of total A Level marks One set poetry text plus wider reading in the chosen area of study, either Victorian Literature or World War 1 Literature or ‘The Struggle for Identity in Modern Literature.’ You answer two questions: Question 1 invites you to link your wider reading to the focus of a given passage; Question 2 assesses the set poetry text. Unit 2: Creative Study Coursework, consisting of two tasks using 2000 to 2500 words in total. Weighting: 40% of total AS marks /20% of total A Level marks You study one prose text and two drama texts. Your first piece of writing will be a personal informed response to the prose text and may be a re-creative piece. The second piece will compare the two drama texts.

English Literature A2 level Content of Course Unit 3: Reading for Meaning (Written exam: 2 hours 30 mins (closed book) Weighting: 60% of total A2 marks /30% of total A Level marks You answer two compulsory questions involving unprepared extracts and wider reading on the theme of Love Through the Ages. You will have to comment critically on the extracts which will be linked by theme; compare and connect these texts to your wider reading; offer informed and creative interpretations and evaluate the significance of contextual factors. Unit 4: Extended Essay and Shakespeare Study Coursework Weighting: 40% of total A2 marks / 20% of total A Level marks Three texts with a shared theme: any two texts of any genre of your choice, plus any one Shakespeare play. Your one task will be an extended essay of about 3000 words comparing the three texts and exploring your appreciation of the writers’ choices of form, structure and language, your interpretations of the text and your understanding of the significance of the context in which the texts were produced.

English Literature Extension Classes The aims of the English Literature Extension Classes are to foster interest in and enthusiasm for the subject; to help further develop the talents of students showing high potential; to help equip students considering applying to study English at University with the practical skills and wider reading experience needed for success in gaining offers in a highly competitive field. More information is available from the Head of the Department.


Food, Nutrition and Health Head of Department.: Contact No:

Mrs R Dalton-Woods

0161 488 3330 ext. 3254

The Food, Nutrition and Health Department was completely refurbished a few years ago, creating two well-resourced and well equipped teaching rooms. The teaching staff is well supported by two part time technicians. The rooms are equipped with computers and the equipment is replaced on a regular basis. A Level teaching began in September 2013.

Co-Curricular Activities The Department runs a ‘Good Food’ Club. Students also have the opportunity to enter national competitions, for example, The Guild Of British Food Writers, Future Chef. The Department also runs an external speakers programme, which includes skills workshops, visiting chef demonstrations and lectures from food industry specialists. There is a residential trip to River Cottage.

Entry Requirements Minimum GCSE Grade B in Food and Nutrition, or Food Technology, minimum GCSE Grade B in English.

Exam board: OCR Course Title: Home Economics: Food, Nutrition and Health

Course details The study of Food, Nutrition and Health plays an important role in our School curriculum by delivering the needs identified in national polices which recognise the importance of adopting a holistic approach to the promotion of healthy lifestyle and understanding the inter-relationships between diet and health throughout life. It provides the opportunity for students to learn practical life skills in food preparation and at the same time providing important theoretical background to issues such as nutrition and food safety.

Career/HE opportunities The course gives an excellent foundation for courses in Food Science, Food Technology, Food Journalism, Sports Science, Management, Marketing and Retailing, Hospitality and Catering, Dietetics, Nutritional Analysis, Consumer Science, Nursing, Midwifery and Teaching. The range of employment in the food industry is very wide and challenging.


Food, Nutrition and Health AS Level The course is divided into two mandatory units at AS: 1. Society and Health This covers: • Demography and the study of population changes • Family and Society • Key issues for society, unemployment and poverty • Environmental issues • Social issues and the welfare state • Health and nutrition 2. Resource Management This covers: • The management of resources and budgeting • Food provision and food choice • The selection and purchase of food and household goods • Food preparation and cooking equipment • Food safety and hygiene Both are externally assessed through 1 ½ hour written examination.

Food, Nutrition and Health A2 Level 3. The Coursework Study This contributes to 25% of the overall grade and will be completed in and out of school. It will be an investigation using a suitable agreed title. This is internally assessed. Examples of investigations are: • Dietary needs in pregnancy • Reducing the risk of coronary heart disease • The rise in demand for party food products This also involves a range of practical work. 4. Nutrition and Food Production This covers: • Nutrition • Nutrients and energy • Groups with nutritional and dietary needs • Properties of food • Design development and production of food This is externally assessed by 1 ½ hour written examination.


French Head of Department:

Mrs F Lucas

Contact No:

0161 488 3330

The French Department, located in the Christopher Simon Building, has the benefit of specialist language laboratories for students studying A Level French. There are five graduate teachers in the Department teaching at Sixth Form level, together with a French Assistant to help students with verbal skills.

Co-Curricular Activities The Department believes very strongly in the value of educational visits and exchanges as a method of complementing the learning in the classroom and providing the students with a greater awareness of the life and culture of the French. Annually the Upper Sixth students have the opportunity to visit Paris. The Department also takes part in the annual Northwest Schools' Debating Competition for Modern Languages, which is hosted by the School's Modern Foreign Languages Departments.

Entry requirements: Minimum GCSE or IGCSE Grade A in French.

Exam Board: AQA

Course details

The aim of the course is to develop the ability to use French effectively for purposes of practical communication, and to provide the confidence and linguistic skills to understand, discuss and write about contemporary events and issues in France. The course also aims to provide enjoyment and intellectual stimulation and offer insights into the culture and civilisation of France and Frenchspeaking countries. It also aims to foster independent learning and provide a very good basis for further study of the language at degree level or equivalent.

Career/HE opportunities   

transferable linguistic and communication skills opportunities in expanding European Union and global markets importance of language skills for employers when recruiting in the world of business, industry, commerce, media, education.

French AS Level Content of Course • • • •

Media: TV, advertising and communication technology Popular culture: cinema, music and fashion/ trends Healthy living/lifestyle: /exercise, health and well-being and holidays Family/relationships: relationships within the family, friendships and marriage/partnerships.

The AS specification has 2 units: Unit 1: Listening, Reading and Writing Assessment Externally Examined. Written Paper: 2 hours Weighting: 70% of total AS / 35% of total A Level marks


Candidates will answer a range of questions based on approximately 5 minutes of heard material and on a selection of written stimulus texts. They will also respond in writing to a question based on one of the AS topics. The stimulus material for the Listening sections of specimen Unit 1 is available as a written transcript and as an electronic sound file. The material is not available on cassette tape or on CD. These arrangements apply to the specimen material only. Centres will be informed in due course of the arrangements for the examinations for the new specifications in January 2009 and beyond. Unit 2: Speaking Test Written Paper: 35 minutes (including 20 minutes preparation time) Weighting: 30% of total AS / 15% of total A Level marks Speaking. Candidates will discuss a target-language stimulus card based on one of the AS topics and take part in a conversation covering three further AS topics.

French A2 level Content of Course The • • • •

A2 course will cover: Environment: pollution, energy and protecting the planet The multi-cultural society: immigration, integration and racism Contemporary social issues: wealth and poverty, law and order and the impact of scientific and technological progress Cultural topic: the study of a target language speaking region/community or the study of a period of 20th century history from a target language-speaking country/community or the study of a novelist/dramatist/poet from a target language-speaking country/community or the study of a director/architect/musician/painter from a target language-speaking country/ community.

The A2 specification has 2 units: Unit 3: Listening, Reading and Writing Assessment Externally Examined. Written Paper: 2 hours 30 minutes Weighting: 35% of total A Level marks Listening, Reading and Writing Candidates will answer a range of questions based on approximately 6 minutes of heard material and on a selection of written texts. They will also respond in writing to a question based on one of the four A2 cultural topic areas. Unit in 4: Speaking Test Assessment Externally Examined. Written Paper: 35 minutes (including 20 minutes preparation time) Weighting: 15% of total A Level marks Speaking Candidates will present a point of view based on a target-language stimulus card from one of the A2 topic areas and take part in a conversation covering three further A2 topics.

French Extension Classes

The aims of the French Extension Classes are a better understanding of French history, culture, literature and arts and to give a better overall view of the evolution of thought in that era and to nowadays; to develop critical thinking from the ideas of French philosophers and to discuss themes found in literature, thus laying the foundations for University; to promote interest and enthusiasm to pursue further study at University level. More information is available from the Head of Department.


Geography Head of Department: Contact No:

Mrs C Shallcross 0161 488 3330 ext. 3278

Why Choose Geography at A Level? Geography has never been more relevant or interesting: Climate Change; Hurricane Katrina; Poverty in Africa; Resource Use; Trade, Aid and Debt; Sustainability; the HIV-AIDS pandemic to give but a few examples. Geography is one of the most exciting subjects you can study. It is concerned with the multicultural society and interdependent world in which we live, where events in one place are part of a chain of events spanning the globe. Our complex interaction with the increasingly fragile physical environment and the way in which it shapes us and we in turn shape it, requires sophisticated analysis and sensitive management. It is these issues that are the central problems of modern Geography. Our aim is to help you develop an informed knowledge and understanding of the world. Geography straddles the Arts and the Sciences, and you will find yourself dipping into a variety of disciplines. There is strength in this breadth, which allows a wide combination of subjects to be taken alongside Geography. Above all, you should choose Geography because you are interested in it and have the appetite and enthusiasm to study it for another two years. The Geography Department is a lively and thriving Department staffed by 5 full time subject specialists. As a Department we have a wide range of effective teaching styles and subject interests. We meet weekly to discuss issues, share good practice and monitor student progress. The department achieves excellent results and each year a number of students go on to study Geography at university. In recent years the department has had a number of successes at many of the more selective universities.

Fieldwork and Other Opportunities There is no longer any coursework required for A Level Geography, but fieldwork remains an integral part of the course. At AS we run a three day residential trip to North Wales and Manchester. We also run a fieldtrip to the Gambia every other year. In addition to fieldtrips we encourage students to attend Geographical Association lectures at The Universities of Chester and Manchester.

Specification Summary Exam Board: WJEC This Geography syllabus is designed specifically to be engaging and relevant to you, whose adult life will span most of the 21st Century. The emphasis is firmly placed on change, reflecting the dynamic nature of the world. Included are newer issues and areas of study such Climate Change, Extreme Environments, Sustainability and the emerging Asian superpowers of China and India. This syllabus will require you to adopt a more critical approach as there will be a shift away from the acceptance of material as uncontested fact to a debate surrounding the truth of the material you are being presented with and an examination of the reliability of sources and evidence.

Entry requirements

Ideally, minimum GCSE Grade A in Geography. Students with Grade B would be assessed by the Department on an individual basis.

Career/HE opportunities Many of those who have taken A Level Geography in recent years have gone on to study it at university. Geography is a very broadly-based subject and, as such, leads to a wide number of job possibilities. Geographers are both literate and numerate and develop a wide range of transferable skills which are very much sought after by employers. Indeed evidence shows that those who study Geography throughout their school lives are amongst the most employable people in our society.


Geography AS Level Content of AS course Module One: Changing Physical Environments (25%) • Investigating climate change • Investigating tectonic and hydrological change Module Two: Changing Human Environments (25%) • Investigating population change • Investigating settlement change

Content of A2 Course Module Three: Contemporary Themes and Research in Geography (30%) One theme selected from four physical options:    

Climatic hazards Extreme environments Glacial landforms and their management Coastal landforms and their management

One theme selected from four human options:  Development  Emerging Asia – China  Emerging Asia – India  Globalisation Research enquiry based on candidate’s own choice of one topic from the list below, assessed by a twopart exam question.          

Crime Deprivation Disease Ecosystems Environmental Psychology Leisure and Recreation Microclimates Pollution Retailing Rivers

Module Four: Sustainability (20%) All four topic areas are studied and the exam is based on a pre-release resource booklet.    

Sustainable Sustainable Sustainable Sustainable

Cities Energy Food Supply Water Supply

Geography Extension Classes The aim of the Geography Extension Course is to help further develop the breadth and depth of geographical knowledge for students intending to study Geography (or related courses) at University; to help equip students with the relevant practical, research, wider reading and referencing skills needed for success in gaining offers and adapting to the different requirements of university Geography. More information is available from the Head of Department.


German Head of Department: Contact No:

Mrs N Meredith

0161 488 3330 ext. 3232

The German Department offers courses at AS and A2 level as well as Extension Classes. There is extra provision for outstanding linguists who wish to prepare for Oxford and Cambridge and extension lessons are offered for talented linguists. The German Department contains four full-time members of staff. In addition, we benefit from the service of a German Language Assistant. Results in public examinations are consistently very good.

Co- Curricular Activities The Department believes very strongly in the value of educational visits and exchanges as a method of complementing the learning in the classroom and providing the students with a greater awareness of the life and culture of the people whose language they are studying. The perfect opportunity to practise dealing with real life situations comes with the trips the Department offers. The German Department regularly organises a Sixth Form trip for Lower and Upper Sixth students. Apart from the range of trips and exchanges offered by the MFL Department, we take students to a variety of activities available in the area. These may include study days at universities or visits to the Corner House and the Goethe Institute in Manchester for talks and lectures. The MFL Department has hosted the North West Debating Competition for the last two years in which a number of other schools have taken part and in which our candidates have excelled and made the Department very proud. The Department also organises for guest speakers to come in for all year groups. The Department also runs a weekly film /music club according to interest which is open to anyone to attend.

Entry requirements Minimum GCSE Grade A in German.

Exam Board: A Level: AQA

Course details The aim of the course is to develop the ability to use German effectively for purposes of practical communication, and to provide the confidence and linguistic skills to understand, discuss and write about contemporary events and issues in Germany. The course also aims to provide enjoyment and intellectual stimulation and offer insights into the culture and civilisation of Germany and Germanspeaking countries. It also aims to foster independent learning and provide a very good basis for further study of the language at degree level or equivalent. All Sixth Form students have the opportunity to go on a study trip and have access to the many resources including a variety of literature, magazines, DVDs/CDs, the internet, Contact time with the German Language Assistant.

Career/HE opportunities •

transferable linguistic and communication skills

•

opportunities in expanding European Union and global markets

•

importance of language skills for employers when recruiting in the world of business, industry, commerce, media, education


German AS Level Content of Course The AS course will cover: • Media: TV, advertising and communication technology • Popular culture: cinema, music and fashion/ trends • Healthy living/lifestyle: /exercise, health and well-being and holidays • Family/relationships: relationships within the family, friendships and marriage/partnerships. The AS specification has 2 units: Unit 1: Listening, Reading and Writing Assessment Externally Examined. Written Paper: 2 hours Weighting: 70% of total AS / 35% of total A Level marks Candidates will answer a range of questions based on approximately 5 minutes of heard material and on a selection of written stimulus texts. They will also respond in writing to a question based on one of the AS topics. The stimulus material for the Listening sections of specimen Unit 1 is available as a written transcript and as an electronic sound file. The material is not available on cassette tape or on CD. These arrangements apply to the specimen material only. Unit 2: Speaking Test Written Paper: 35 minutes (including 20 minutes preparation time) Weighting: 30% of total AS / 15% of total A Level marks Candidates will discuss a target-language stimulus card based on one of the AS topics and take part in a conversation covering three further AS topics.

German A2 level Content of Course

The A2 course will cover: • Environment: pollution, energy and protecting the planet • The multi-cultural society: immigration, integration and racism • Contemporary social issues: wealth and poverty, law and order and the impact of scientific and technological progress • Cultural topic: the study of a target language speaking region/community or the study of a period of 20th century history from a target language-speaking country/community or the study of a novelist/dramatist/poet from a target language-speaking country/community or the study of a director/ architect/musician/painter from a target language-speaking country/ community.


The A2 specification has 2 units: Unit 3: Listening, Reading and Writing Assessment Externally Examined. Written Paper: 2 hours 30 minutes Weighting: 35% of total A Level marks Listening, Reading and Writing. Candidates will answer a range of questions based on approximately 6 minutes of heard material and on a selection of written texts. They will also respond in writing to a question based on one of the four A2 cultural topic areas. The stimulus material for the Listening sections of specimen Unit 3 is available as a written transcript and as an electronic sound file. The material is not available on cassette tape or on CD. These arrangements apply to the specimen material only.

Unit 4: Speaking Test Assessment Externally Examined. Written Paper: 35 minutes (including 20 minutes preparation time) Weighting: 15% of total A Level marks Speaking. Candidates will present a point of view based on a target-language stimulus card from one of the A2 topic areas and take part in a conversation covering three further A2 topics.

German Extension Classes The syllabus of the German Extension Classes aims to broaden pupils’ knowledge about German history, culture, literature and film, to develop pupils’ language skills as well as their critical thinking skills from the aims of the authors and producers, to discuss themes found in literature and film and thus laying the foundations for university and to promote interest and enthusiasm to pursue further study at university level. The course is divided into three periods: 1933-45, 1945-88, 1989-90 More information is available from the Head of Department.


Government and Politics Head of Department:

Mr N Axon

Contact No:

0161 488 3330 ext. 3312

Read the Politics Blog and follow the Government and Politics Department on Twitter @PoliticsCHS The Government & Politics Department is based in a suite of rooms on the top floor of the Main Building. It offers AS and A2 courses to Sixth Form students.

Co-Curricular Activities The Department runs an extensive programme of co-curricular activities. These include: - Think Tank: a current affairs society that meets fortnightly during the Friday lunch break. Guest speakers over the past couple of years have included MPs from all the major parties, as well as journalists, academics, and activists from a variety of pressure groups. The society is also responsible for running mock elections, most recently a 2012 US presidential election. - Question Times: occasional evening meetings prior to local and national elections, allowing students the opportunity to quiz the candidates - Dubs Lecture: inaugurated in 2005, this annual lecture series provides an eminent public figure with a platform to speak on an issue of the day; Clare Short MP addressed a school audience in April 2008 on Britain’s changing role in international relations, and Peter Tatchell gave a talk on human rights law in 2012. - Trips: A Level students have the opportunity to take part in a trip to Washington, DC as part of their two-year A Level course, as well as joining the History trip to Moscow & St. Petersburg. 

Amnesty International: Students design school-wide campaigns raising awareness for the work done by Amnesty in protecting human rights worldwide.

- Political Studies Association: Students can enter a national short video competition ran by the PSA. The competition was won by students from CHS in 2011, and in 2012 and 2013 students from CHS were finalists.

Course Entry requirements The Department sets no formal entry requirements, other than those for entry into the Sixth Form. No prior knowledge of the subject is required but a GCSE in History would be an advantage.

Exam Board: OCR


The aims of this course are to encourage candidates to: • develop a critical awareness of the nature of politics and the relationship between political ideas, institutions and processes; • acquire knowledge and understanding of the structures of authority and power within the political system of the UK and the USA, and how these may differ from those of other political systems; • acquire knowledge and informed understanding of the rights and responsibilities of the individual; • encourage an interest in, and engagement with, contemporary politics Government & Politics makes extensive use of the school’s online learning facility. As well as a valuable teaching and learning tool, it provides candidates with an experience of the kind of resource they can expect to use at university. The focus of the AS Level course is a wide-ranging survey of the political and governmental systems of the United Kingdom and European Union. The A2 course covers the political and governmental systems of the United States of America, as well a comparative study of other systems.

Career/HE opportunities Politics and associated degree courses at university have proved popular with Cheadle Hulme School students in recent years, notably at Oxford, Nottingham, Leeds, Bristol and Lancaster. The Department also offers help to students seeking practical work experience, such as placements in parliament and the media. Government & Politics is a well-established and respected degree subject in the social sciences. It serves as a valuable preparation for candidates interested in a career in law, journalism, the civil service, public consultancies, teaching and academia, business and advertising.

Government & Politics AS Level Content of Course Contemporary Government and Politics of the UK The focus of the new AS Level course is a wide-ranging survey of the political and governmental systems of the United Kingdom and European Union. Unit 1: Political parties; pressure groups; electoral systems and referenda; parliamentary elections in the UK; voting behaviour Unit 2: British constitution; the executive; the legislature; the judiciary; the European Union All units are examined externally. There is no coursework.


Politics A2 level Content of Course Contemporary US Government and Politics / Synoptic The A2 course covers the political and governmental systems in the United States of America, as well as considering comparative systems elsewhere within the European Union and beyond. Unit 3 (US): Presidential elections; political parties; pressure groups; the constitution; Congress; the presidency; the Supreme Court; civil rights and liberties Unit 4 (Synoptic): Elections; political parties; pressure groups; civil rights and liberties; constitutions; legislatures; executives; judiciaries All units are examined externally. There is no coursework with this A Level.

Politics Extension Classes The aims of this extension programme are: to stimulate the students' interest, curiosity and enjoyment in Government and Politics with a lively, well-resourced and fresh approach to the discipline that goes beyond the confines of the A Level specifications – specifically, students are introduced to political thought, political history and international relations to foster the development of the students' ability to arrive at carefully reasoned, well researched and plausible interpretations of challenging questions to provide the students with opportunities to enhance their abilities to undertake independent research and enquiry to enable the students to improve their skills in communicating their understanding of the subjects both on paper and in class discussion, with emphasis on conveying their views in a clear, accurate and literate manner to advertise the exciting intellectual challenges provided by the study of the subject at University For more information, please contact the Head of Department.


History Head of Department: Contact No:

Mr N Axon

0161 488 3330 ext. 3312

The Department is based in a suite of rooms on the top floor of the Main School building. There are five classrooms for teaching. There is a Department office and an additional resources and study area. The History Department offers courses at AS and A2 level as well as Extension Classes.

Co-Curricular Activities The History & Politics Departments run an extensive programme of co-curricular activities. These include: -

Diggers, a society that meets on Thursdays after school; it serves to broaden students’ experience of the past, tackling subjects not covered on the current A Level specifications; recent talks have included crime in Victorian Manchester, a genealogical mystery, the Titanic and colonialism. Students have also set up a related History book club.

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Think Tank, a current affairs society that meets fortnightly during the Friday lunch break; guest speakers over the past couple of years have included MPs from all the major parties, as well as activists from environmental and human rights groups. The society is also responsible for running mock elections, including a 2012 US Presidential election. Dubs Lecture: inaugurated in 2005, this annual lecture series provides an eminent public figure with a platform to speak on an issue of the day; at the first meeting Lord Dubs spoke movingly of his childhood escape from Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia and subsequent life and career in Britain. Subsequent guests have included former Labour MP and government minister, Clare Short, and campaigner Peter Tatchell. Trips: A Level students will have the opportunity to take part in trips to Washington DC and Moscow & St. Petersburg as part of their two-year A Level course.

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Entry requirements Ideally, minimum GCSE/IGCSE Grade A in History. Students with Grade B would be assessed by the Department on an individual basis. As an A Level subject, History makes extensive use of the school’s online learning facility. As well as a valuable teaching and learning tool, it provides candidates with an experience of the kind of resource they can expect to use at university.

Career/HE opportunities History is a popular degree with CHS students, with recent candidates going on to read the subject at a variety of universities, including Oxford, Leeds, Nottingham, UCL, Bristol and Edinburgh. The Department also offers help to students seeking practical work experience, such as placements in museums and the Institute of Historical Research in London. History is a highly respected humanities degree subject. It serves as a valuable preparation for candidates interested in a career in law, journalism, the civil service, public consultancies, teaching and academia, business and advertising.


History AS Level Content of Course Unit 1: Historical Themes in Breadth D3: Russia in Revolution, 1881-1924: From Autocracy to Dictatorship D4: Stalin’s Russia, 1924-53 Unit 2: British History Depth Studies B1: Britain 1830-85: Representation and Reform

History A2 Level Content of Course Unit 3: Depth Studies and Associated Controversies B1: France 1786-1830: Revolution, Empire and Restoration Unit 4: Historical Enquiry (Coursework) CW39: The USA: From Reconstruction to Civil Rights, c.1877-1981

History Extension Classes 

The aims of this extension programme are:

to stimulate the students' interest, curiosity and enjoyment in History with a lively, well-resourced and fresh approach to the disciplines that goes beyond the confines of the A Level specifications.

to foster the development of the students' ability to arrive at carefully reasoned, well researched and plausible interpretations of challenging questions

to provide the students with opportunities to enhance their abilities to undertake independent research and enquiry

to enable the students to improve their skills in communicating their understanding of the subjects both on paper and in class discussion, with emphasis on conveying their views in a clear, accurate and literate manner

to prepare students for examination, at A Level, at Advanced Extension Award level and for other pre-university tests

to advertise the exciting intellectual challenges provided by the study of both subjects at University

For more information, please contact the Head of Department.


Mathematics Head of Department: Contact No:

Mr Steven Norton

0161 488 3330 ext. 3416

The Mathematics Department at Cheadle Hulme School is staffed by 14 graduates, all experienced teachers. We aim to develop an appreciation for and interest in Mathematics, both for itself and for the part it plays in everyday life. The Department offers AS and A2 Level Courses in both Mathematics and Further Mathematics as well as Mathematics and Further Mathematics Extension Classes. Students who choose to study Mathematics or Further Mathematics at AS or A2 Level are entered for the MEI examinations (OCR). In both cases, the full A Level consists of six modules each.

Co-Curricular Activities Students have the opportunity to enter the Senior United Kingdom Mathematics Challenge. The UKMT Challenge is a National competition consisting of questions designed to stimulate students’ mathematical thinking and to test their mental agility. We also enter a team for the Senior UKMT Team Challenge. Several of our students take part in the UKMT Mentoring Scheme. Our AS and A2 Mathematicians regularly attend Mathematical lectures held in the region, as well as attending talks after school given by former students and local experts. The Department also offers two weekly support sessions: Thursday lunchtime and Tuesday after school, available for students studying Mathematics or Further Mathematics at AS or A2 level.

Mathematics Entry requirements Minimum IGCSE or GCSE Grade A in Mathematics.

Exam Board: OCR (MEI)

Course details The AS course builds on the student’s GCSE experience and encourages students to: develop their understanding of Mathematics in a way that promotes confidence and fosters enjoyment extend their range of mathematical skills and techniques and use them in more difficult unstructured problems The A2 course develops and extends ideas encountered on the AS course. Students should learn an approach to Mathematics that will equip them to use it in the adult world and to be able to communicate what they are doing to those around them.


Further Mathematics Entry requirements

Grade A* at IGCSE or GCSE Mathematics.

Exam Board: OCR

Course details

This course is ideally suited for those students who have a particular aptitude and ability in Mathematics. Students who elect to study Further Mathematics receive double the teaching time of single mathematicians and work towards the completion of two full A Levels (Mathematics and Further Mathematics). In some circumstances it is possible to gain an AS level in Further Mathematics instead of the full A Level. The general aims of this course are the same as the single option Mathematics. However, the content and depth to which the students will study is greater within Further Mathematics. As such, students who have studied Further Mathematics are heavily sought after by universities and employers alike.

Career/HE opportunities

Mathematics A Level is recognised as a valuable qualification, useful not only in financial and numerical fields, but also in a broad spectrum of careers where the skills of problem solving and analysis are needed. In Higher Education Mathematics can be studied as a degree course or to complement other courses such as business studies, computing, engineering and science. Some Universities are now requiring Further Mathematics for Engineering or Economics related degree courses.

Mathematics AS Level Content of course: A total of six modules are covered over the two years. A student chooses to follow either the Mechanics or Statistics route dependent on their future career choices. AS level (3 modules) Introduction to Advanced Mathematics (C1) aims to build on and develop the techniques students have learnt at GCSE. Concepts for Advanced Mathematics (C2) is to introduce students to a number of topics which are fundamental to the advanced study of Mathematics e.g. Calculus. Either: Statistics (S1) aims to build on and extend handling data techniques from GCSE and give insights into ideas of hypothesis testing. Or: Mechanics (M1) aims to introduce the student to mathematical modelling and to the basic concepts in kinematics, static’s and dynamics which underlie the study of mechanics.

Mathematics A2 level Content of Course A2 Level (3 modules) Methods for Advanced Mathematics (C3) aims to build on and develop the techniques form AS level especially in the area of calculus. Applications of Advanced Mathematics (C4) applies all techniques to real world problems. For those who studied S1 at AS: Statistics (S2) includes the representation of data in bivariate situations with linear and rank-order modelling; hypothesis testing. For those who studied M1 at AS: Either Statistics (S1) or Mechanics (M2). The second mechanics module extends the range of mechanical concepts covered and modelled.


Further Mathematics in the Lower Sixth Content of Course During the first year of the course the students will cover 6 modules leading to an A Level in Mathematics. These are: · Introduction to Advanced Mathematics (C1) · Concepts for Advanced Mathematics (C2) Methods for Advanced Mathematics (C3) Applications of Advanced Mathematics (C4) Statistics 1 (S1) Statistics 2 (S2) The content of these units are outlined in the A Level Mathematics specification.

Further Mathematics in the Upper Sixth Content of Course In the second year of the course we cover 6 modules leading to the award of the Further Mathematics A-level. Although there is some flexibility here, these 6 modules are typically: · · · · · ·

Further Pure 1 Further Pure 2 Further Pure 3 Mechanics 1 (M1) Mechanics 2 (M2) Differential Equations (DE)

Outlined below are the additional modules covered in Further Mathematics: Further Pure 1, 2 and 3 develop and extend the student’s knowledge and techniques within pure mathematics, introducing fundamental ideas in complex numbers, matrices and proof. We also look at some new areas of the subject such as multivariable calculus and group theory. Differential Equations extends the work carried out in C4 on differential equations to cover the second order and higher equations which occur in practical situations within mechanics and are useful in work carried out at a higher level. Mathematics and Further Mathematics Extension Classes The aims of the Mathematics and Further Mathematics Extension Classes are to develop the ability of students to think through problems and apply their knowledge in novel and unusual ways; to give opportunities for students to express themselves within the mathematical context both verbally and in written form. More information is available from the Head of Department.


Modern Foreign Languages Heads of Department:

Contact No:

Mrs Francoise Lucas

(Head of French)

Mrs Nicole Meredith

(Head of German)

Mr John Wilson

(Head of Spanish)

0161 488 3330: Mrs Lucas (French) ext. 3271 Mrs Meredith (German) ext. 3232 Mr Wilson (Spanish) ext. 3301

We firmly believe that successfully learning other languages enriches your life forever. Knowledge of languages opens doors to another world. Nothing can replace reading a novel or seeing a play in the original, and visits to foreign countries are so much more interesting if you can eavesdrop on conversations in buses and restaurants, read what is written all around you and speak to anyone you meet. It can also be a lifesaver in moments of crisis! We teach our students how to become skilled linguists, to be independent in how to learn a language, and to understand how to become better at an art that can be challenging to perfect. The Modern Languages Department is divided into three separate language departments: French, German and Spanish. There are ten teaching staff and each of three languages taught on the core curriculum benefits from a native-speaker Language Assistant. Having achieved at least an A at GCSE/iGCSE as a minimum requirement, our students combine their languages with a variety of other subject areas, varying from sciences to humanities. Many study Modern Languages at university, either as a specialism or in combination with another subject such as Economics, Medicine Law or Geography. We cover the AQA course which gives students the opportunity to access a range of topics associated with the enriching cultures related to the languages they are learning. At AS these include: “Family and Relationships”, “Popular Culture”, “The Media” and “Healthy Living”. At A2 these are: “The Environment”, “Contemporary Issues”, “Multicultural Society” and a range of cultural topics from art, literature and film.

AS is assessed as follows: Unit 1: Listening, Reading and Writing (Written Paper: 2 hours) Weighting: 70% of total AS / 35% of total A-level marks Unit 2: Speaking Test (35 minutes including 20 minutes preparation time) Weighting: 30% of total AS / 15% of total A-level marks A2 is assessed as follows: Unit 3: Listening, Reading and Writing (Written Paper: 2 hours 30 minutes) Weighting: 35% of total A-level marks Unit 4: Speaking Test (35 minutes including 20 minutes preparation time) Weighting: 15% of total A-level marks There is also the opportunity to investigate the languages and their cultures further during the extension classes in each of the languages during Upper Sixth. Furthermore, in the Sixth Form Enrichment Programme students have the opportunity to opt for Russian and Italian from beginners’ level. For more detailed information on each subject, please see French, German, or Spanish


Music Head of Department:

Mr P Dewhurst

Contact No:

0161 488 3330 ext. 3267

There is a strong tradition of music making at Cheadle Hulme School as witnessed by the number and quality of co-curricular groups, the frequent concerts and the large number of students receiving private music lessons in School. The Department is lively and well-resourced and has a reputation for excellence. Senior school facilities include: • Twelve practice rooms & three main teaching classrooms • A large rehearsal/concert room • Two music technology rooms are equipped with 20 Macs/PCs in one and 12 PCs in the other, both running 'Garage Band', ‘Cubase’, & ‘Sibelius 7’ software • Dedicated Sixth Form teaching room • A keyboard room • A professionally equipped recording studio The principal aim of the department is to develop every student’s enjoyment and appreciation of music and to ensure that the musical potential of every student is fulfilled. Courses in AS and A2 Music are offered to students as well as Music Extension Classes. Students can also take private music lessons.

Co-Curricular Activities

The School’s concert calendar is very busy and is designed to give as many students as possible the opportunity to perform. There are also several opportunities each year for students to hear live music groups both in and out of School. There are a variety of Music Groups which students can join including Concert Band, CHS Big Band, Wind Band, Boys' Choir, Swing Band, Orchestra, Rockshop, Sinfonia, Chamber Choir and Samba Band. Several other Chamber Groups also rehearse on a weekly basis.

Entry requirements

GCSE music is desirable but not a pre-requisite. However, it is expected that all students will have a secure working knowledge of music theory as well as a minimum of Grade V distinction on their principal instrument or voice at the start of the course.

Exam Board: OCR

Course details

The course provides further development of the skills gained at GCSE in composing, performing and listening. If you require further details or have any queries, the music staff would be very happy to talk to you and answer any questions.

Career/HE opportunities Some of our students go on to read music each year at university or Music College. Music is regarded by universities as having academic rigor combined with creativity. Students leaving higher education with a degree in music have the same career opportunities as those with any other arts degree. Previous students of the school who have studied music at A-level have gone on to careers in music, medicine and law.


Music AS Level Content of course: Unit 1 (G351): Performing For this unit you will give a short solo recital and also perform either on a second instrument, in an ensemble, perform your own composition or a short improvisation. There will also be a short viva voce related to the programme you perform. Both will be assessed by a visiting examiner. Unit 2 (G352): Composing 1 For this unit you will compose a piece of music (maximum of 3 mins.) for between four and ten instruments which will be performed and recorded by professional musicians. You will also learn about western tonal harmony through short exercises to develop your understanding of basic harmony. Your work will be assessed by your own teacher/tutor and moderated by OCR. Unit 3 (G353): Introduction to Historical Study For this unit you will study music directly linked to your work for Unit 2. There is a 2 hour examination for this unit, divided into three sections. In the first, you will listen to an extract related to your harmonic exercises in Unit 2 and answer questions on it. In the second, there will be questions on two sets of prescribed works – 18th/19th century orchestral music, and 20th century jazz – and in the third, there will be a choice of questions about the background to the music you have been studying.

Music A2 level Content of Course These 3 units complete the Advanced GCE qualification. Unit 4 (G354): Performing: Interpretation For this unit you will be able to choose for yourself what music to study and perform. You will give a recital as a soloist or accompanist, or in an ensemble. There will also be a short viva voce related to the programme you perform. Both will be assessed by a visiting examiner. Unit 5 (G355): Composing 2 The are two components to this unit - 1. You will complete a folio of eight two-part Baroque counterpoint exercises 2. you will write one composition from the following: a vocal composition, a piece of programme music, a soundtrack to accompany a TV or Film clip. Unit 6 (G356): Historical and Analytical Studies This will consist of a timed examination paper (2 hours) with two main sections: aural extracts, prescribed historical topic – Programme Music from 1700 to the present day. In preparation for the first section you will study a wide range of early 20th-century vocal music, learning about techniques of word-setting and about more advanced techniques of handling harmony and tonality. The full specification is available by following the links on this OCR website • MUSIC Advanced Subsidiary GCE H142 

MUSIC Advanced GCE H542

Music Extension Classes The aims of the Music Extension Classes are to foster an interest and enthusiasm for the subject; to help further develop the talents of students showing high potential; to help equip students considering applying to study Music at University with the practical skills and wider reading experience needed for success in gaining offers in a highly competitive field. More information is available from the Head of Department.


Philosophy, Theology and Religious Studies Head of Department:

Mrs H Firth

Contact No:

0161 488 3330 ext. 3227

The Philosophy, Theology and Religious Studies Department at Cheadle Hulme School currently offers the Cambridge Pre-U Philosophy and Theology. The course is non-sectarian, nondenominational open to and suitable for students of all religions or none. We do not assume any particular beliefs on the part of students. We aim to inform, deepen understanding and develop tolerance of different traditions and cultures. The Department has two classrooms for teaching and two seminar rooms with a departmental resources base and library for Sixth Form classes in Broomefield. We use TV, video and IT in a variety of ways to enhance students` work and learning. Many students complete work on their own computers or on the IT equipment in school. The Department also offers Extension Classes.

Co-Curricular Activities

The Department runs The Philosophical Society which is open to Sixth Form students and encourages them to discuss all aspects of philosophical thinking from the nature of knowledge to current issues of concern. Occasionally guest speakers, from both inside and outside School present their views.

Entry requirements:

The Department sets no formal entry requirements, other than those for entry into the Sixth Form. No prior knowledge of the subject is required.

Philosophy and Theology Cambridge Pre-U Course What we are trying to achieve: This course is intended to allow students to think rigorously about fundamental questions of truth and human understanding. The Philosophy and Theology option available to Sixth Form students at Cheadle Hulme School aims to equip students with the skills required to make a success of their subsequent studies at university. It provides not only a solid grounding in each specialist subject at an appropriate level, but also the ability to undertake independent and self-directed learning and to think laterally, critically and creatively. Throughout this programme of study, we seek to develop an understanding of the shared heritage of Philosophy and Theology. It will allow students to gain a real insight into both subject areas, rather than simply the topics of ethics and philosophy of religion. A major aim of this course is to prepare students thoroughly for the study of either Philosophy or Theology in Higher Education; or any other subject which requires rigorous thinking and the analysis of complex ideas. It will enhance skills in the critical examination and evaluation of evidence and arguments, and develop the ability to construct, develop and maintain a clear and coherent argument. Students will be introduced to some of the key ideas and texts which have played a large role in shaping our intellectual heritage.

Career/HE opportunities

At heart this is a programme of study which supports the development of well-informed, open and independently-minded individuals. It is a curriculum which retains the integrity of subject specialisms and which can be efficiently, effectively and reliably assessed, graded and reported to meet the needs of universities. Ultimately it is designed to recognise a wide range of individual talents, interests and abilities and which provides the depth and rigour required for a university degree course. This is particularly important as an increasing number of university courses incorporate elements of Philosophy and Critical Thinking.


Philosophy and Theology Cambridge Pre-U Course Course details As the course unfolds students will be required to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the issues arising from the relevant philosophical and theological themes and texts; and the ability to identify, select and apply ideas and concepts, through the use of examples and evidence from recognised sources of authority. They will be required to provide a systematic critical analysis of the texts and theories they have studied, sustain a line of argument and justify a point of view. Different views, including those of different scholars and schools of thought, will be referred to and evaluated where appropriate. The course is assessed in three written papers, externally set and marked, at the end of Year 13. The three topics are: • Introduction to Philosophy and Theology • Philosophy of Religion • Ethics

Philosophy and Theology Extension Course The aim of the Philosophy and Theology Extension Classes is to introduce candidates to the major ideas of western philosophy and to enhance their skills in philosophical discussion.


Physics Head of Department:

Dr J Johnstone

Contact No:

0161 488 3330 ext. 3211

The Physics Department consists of 4 full-time and 2 part-time teaching staff. Teaching is supported by 1 full-time and 1 part-time technician. The Department has the sole use of 4 laboratories. It has modern accommodation and is very well equipped. The Department offers courses at AS and A2 Levels as well as Physics Extension Classes. We have had considerable success at A Level and Oxbridge and Sixth Form students have the opportunity to enter the British Physics Olympiad competition. All members of the Department are committed to working as a team and we aim to develop an appreciation for and interest in Physics so that you gain a better understanding of the world around you. We always share good practice and continually try to improve what we do.

Entry requirements

Ideally, minimum GCSE Grade A for Single Science Physics or AA in Co-ordinated Science. Students with Grade B would be assessed by the Department on an individual basis. A minimum of GCSE Grade B in Mathematics is essential.

Exam Board: AQA

Course details

Are you interested in the natural laws which govern the Universe? If so, read on. The aim of the course is to provide students with interest, enjoyment and a sense of achievement from their study of Physics. The course will not only suit those who may go on to further study in Physics, but also those who may pursue other studies such as Engineering, Mathematics, Chemistry, or Medicine/medically related careers. It also gives students who will not need Physics for studies beyond A-level a sound scientific grounding, nicely complementing non-scientific AS levels. The approach is to revise and extend work met at GCSE and to introduce new topics, including some very up-to-date ideas. Students should be able to understand ideas and methods and be able to apply their understanding to problems. The level of demand is equal to that expected of students half way through a full A-level course. The A2 course extends the AS work to include some more mathematical topics and brings out some of the main themes in physics and emphasises the coherence and unity of the subject. Students should be able to understand ideas and methods and be able to apply their understanding to problems. Taking A-level Mathematics is not essential as long as you are competent in Mathematics.

Mathematics for Physics

For those students who are not taking AS level Mathematics, there is a Mathematics for Physics course run by the Physics Department. At one period per week this course covers the mathematical skills required for AS and A2 Physics

Career/HE opportunities

A-level Physics is a good choice for entry into many science-based degree courses, especially those related to physics such as engineering, materials science or geophysics. It is also useful for those who may pursue other studies such as mathematics, architecture, medicine, medically related careers, dentistry and veterinary science courses. In the past some students have gone on to take degrees in subjects like history, geography and law.


Physics AS Level Content of course UNIT 1 (Written paper 6/7 short, structured questions. 1 hour 15 minutes. 40% of AS marks. 20% of A Level marks) Particles, Quantum Phenomena and Electricity. · Atom, nucleus, particles, antiparticles, quarks, photon. · Photoelectric effect, wave particle duality. · Electric circuits, components, current, voltage, resistance, power, resistivity, alternating current. UNIT 2 (Written paper 6/7 short, structured questions. 1 hour 15 minutes (40% of AS marks /20% of A Level marks)) Mechanics, Materials and Waves. · Forces, motion, energy, power. · Density, Hooke’s Law, stress, strain, Young’s modulus. · Longitudinal and transverse waves, progressive and stationary waves, refraction, diffraction, interference. UNIT 3 Investigative and Practical Skills (20% of AS marks / 10% of A Level marks) · · · ·

Selection and use of various equipment Processing of data Making observations and measurements Analysing and evaluation of results

Physics A2 level Content of Course The A2 course extends the AS work to include some more mathematical topics and brings out some of the main themes in physics and emphasises the coherence and unity of the subject. Students should be able to understand ideas and methods and be able to apply their understanding to problems. UNIT 4 (Written paper 25 multiple choice, 4/5 structured questions (1 hour 45 minutes / 20% of A Level marks)) Further Mechanics and Fields. · Momentum, circular motion, simple harmonic motion. · Gravitational fields, electric fields, capacitors, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction.


UNIT 5 is in two parts (Written Paper Section A 4/5 structured questions / Section B 4/5 structured questions 1 hour 45 minutes. (20% of A Level marks / (11% for A, 9% for B)) Section A: Nuclear and Thermal Physics · Radioactivity, probing the nucleus, nuclear instability, nuclear energy. · Thermal properties of materials, ideal gases molecular kinetic theory of gases. Section B: One of these Options: · Astrophysics: lenses, telescopes, non-optical telescopes, classification of stars, cosmology · Medical Physics: physics of the eye, physics of the ear, biological measurements, non-ionising imaging, X-ray imaging · Turning Points in Physics: discovery of the electron, wave-particle duality, special relativity If there are 3 teaching groups all 3 options will be put on, if there are 2 teaching groups the most popular 2 will be put on. UNIT 6 Investigative and Practical Skills (10% of A Level marks) · · · ·

Selection and use of various equipment Processing of data Making observations and measurements Analysing and evaluation of results

Physics Extension Classes The aims of the Physics Extension Classes are to explore the wider thinking and use of techniques that can be applied in the topics already covered at AS Level and that will be covered at A2 in the Autumn term; to practise expressing good, clear Physics both in writing and verbally, in classroom discussion. More information is available from the Head of Department.


Psychology Head of Department: Contact No:

Ms K Gilbertson

0161 488 3330 ext. 3255

Psychology is the study of mind and behaviour and students on the ‘A’ level course will study some of the major topics and approaches in Psychology. In addition students will undertake psychological research using a number of methods. Psychologists are interested in topics such as: - how children learn language - treatments for depression - the relationship between stress and illness - improving performance in sport - the behaviour of animals - how memory works

Co-Curricular Activities The Department runs a lunch time Psychology club for students in Years 9, 10 and 11. Members have the opportunity to learn about the subject and participate in fun quizzes. Topics covered so far include personality, perception, memory, visual illusions, face recognition and non-verbal communication.

Course Entry requirements The Department sets no formal entry requirements, other than those for entry into the Sixth Form. No prior knowledge of the subject is required.

Exam Board: AQA (Specification B)

Course details Psychology is often defined as ‘the scientific study of mind and behaviour’. In AS Psychology you will discover some of the major influences on behaviour and also develop investigative skills. The aim of the A2 course is to further develop the knowledge and skills achieved at AS Psychology via additional psychological topics and synoptic assessment.

Career/HE opportunities Psychology as a subject blends well with both the sciences and arts. It is useful for students studying medicine as universities are developing the psychology element for prospective doctors, and over the past few years students studying Psychology A Level have all received offers from medical schools. It is relevant to the world of work (e.g. in Business and the Caring Professions), and is offered at many universities. Psychology graduates go into diverse fields, including careers in Clinical, Forensic and Educational Psychology.


Psychology AS Level Content of Course Unit 1: Introducing Psychology  Approaches – the key perspectives e.g. Behaviourism, Biological theory and Psychoanalytic perspective  Research Methods, Statistics and Ethics  Psychology of Gender - Do we behave as males and females due to nature or nurture? Unit 2: Social & Cognitive Psychology and Individual Differences  Social Psychology  Social Influence – Why do we obey those in authority? What have psychologists discovered about why we conform to others?  Cognitive Psychology  Memory and forgetting i.e. How does your memory work? Why do we forget?  Individual Differences  The symptoms, explanations and treatments for phobias and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Psychology A2 level Content of Course Unit 3: Child Development and Applied Options  Child Development - Moral Development – i.e. how do children learn right from wrong?  Psychology of Atypical Behaviour - The symptoms, explanations and treatments of mood disorders and schizophrenia  Cognition and Law – How do we recognise faces? The study of the accuracy of eye-witness testimony. Unit 4: Perspectives, Debates and Methods Perspectives  Behavioural  Cognitive  Psychoanalytic  Humanistic Biological Debates in Psychology  Ideographic / Nomothetic  Freewill / Determinism  Nature/Nurture  Holism / Reductionism  Psychology and science Methods Inferential Statistics Ethical Issues in Research

Psychology Extension Classes The aims of the Psychology Extension Class is to foster interest in and enthusiasm for the subject; to help further develop the talents of students showing high potential; to help equip students considering applying to study Psychology at University with the analytical and evaluative skills and wider reading experience needed for success in gaining offers in a highly competitive field. For more information please contact the Head of Department.


Sixth Form Enrichment Programme (SFEP) Head of Department: The

Mrs N Meredith

Sixth Form Diploma is available to both Lower and Upper Sixth Form students.

Sixth Form Diploma for the Lower Sixth. In the Lower Sixth SFEP is taught as a non-examined skills based course, looking at the following units in a carousel: Compulsory Communication Critical Thinking Life Skills for Uni and Beyond Optional Cooking on a Budget Gardening ICT Italian Russian

Sixth Form Diploma for the Upper Sixth In the Upper Sixth students continue to learn new skills in a 3 Unit carousel as follows: Cookery Design for your own space ICT Those students in Upper Sixth who study 4 A Levels or undertake the Psychology AQA Extended Project are not required to attend Sixth Form Diploma lessons


Spanish Head of Department: Contact No:

Mr John Wilson

0161 488 3330 ext. 3301

The Spanish Department aims to give students confidence in their ability to use Spanish as a real-life communication tool and to make students aware of the diversity of the Spanish-speaking world, with its rich artistic, musical and literary heritage. At the same time, we hope to allow students and teachers to develop their special interests and share them with others.

Studying Spanish at Cheadle Hulme School The Department offers courses in AS and A2 Level Spanish as well as Extension Classes. By the time you finish your Spanish studies at Cheadle Hulme School, we hope that you will have developed a love and understanding of the Spanish-speaking world, will have acquired a specialist knowledge of the topics that most interest you from that world, will have visited at least one Spanish-speaking country on an educational visit, and will feel comfortable speaking to Spanish native-speakers on most topics.

Co-Curricular Activities

We have regular visits to see films and plays. In March we also attend workshops at the Viva Film Festival and the Instituto Cervantes. The Sixth Form also help staff run a Spanish Clinic which younger students can attend to obtain advice or help in aspect of their course, as part of the School's Leadership Scheme. Through this Scheme they can also help with the Department's involvement with the Junior School and with other local Primary Schools. The Spanish Department, in conjunction with the French and German Departments, host the annual Northwest Schools' Debating Competition for Modern Languages. There are study trips to Spain including a long weekend in Barcelona also taken place for Sixth Form students.

Entry requirements

Minimum GCSE or IGCSE Grade A in Spanish. Exam Board: AQA

Course details

The aim of the course is to develop the ability to use Spanish effectively for purposes of practical communication, and to provide the confidence and linguistic skills to understand, discuss and write about contemporary events and issues in Spain. The course also aims to provide enjoyment and intellectual stimulation and offer insights into the cultures and civilisations of Spain and Spanishspeaking countries. It also aims to foster independent learning and provide a strong basis for further study of the language at degree level or equivalent.

Career/HE opportunities •

transferable linguistic and communication skills

opportunities in expanding European Union and global markets

importance of language skills for employers when recruiting in the world of business, industry, commerce, media and education


Links:

www.kerboodle.com - support material to accompany A Level topics www.cornerhouse.org – local independent cinema often showing films in Spanish and also the host venue for the annual ¡Viva! Spanish Film Festival in March www.manchester.cervantes.es - the Instituto Cervantes, Manchester Branch, based on Deansgate in Manchester a public institution founded in 1991 to promote Spanish language teaching and knowledge of the cultures of Spanish speaking countries throughout the world. www.llas.ac.uk – for ideas on Careers with languages www.elpais.com – respected Spanish daily newspaper www.lanacion.com.ar – respected Argentinean daily newspaper T:\public\spanish – for departmental resources, students’ work and photos from trips.

Spanish AS Level Content of Course The AS course will cover: • Media: TV, advertising and communication technology • Popular culture: cinema, music and fashion/ trends • Healthy living/lifestyle: /exercise, health and well-being and holidays • Family/relationships: relationships within the family, friendships and marriage/partnerships. The AS specification has 2 units: Unit 1: Listening, Reading and Writing Assessment Externally Examined. Written Paper: 2 hours Weighting: 70% of total AS / 35% of total A Level marks Candidates will answer a range of questions based on approximately 5 minutes of heard material and on a selection of written stimulus texts. They will also respond in writing to a question based on one of the AS topics. Unit 2: Speaking Test Written Paper: 35 minutes (including 20 minutes preparation time) Weighting: 30% of total AS / 15% of total A Level marks Speaking. Candidates will discuss a target-language stimulus card based on one of the AS topics and take part in a conversation covering three further AS topics.


Spanish A2 level Content of Course • Environment: pollution, energy and protecting the planet

• The multi-cultural society: immigration, integration and racism • Contemporary social issues: wealth and poverty, law and order and the impact of scientific and technological progress • Cultural topic: the study of a target language speaking region/community or the study of a period of 20th century history from a target language-speaking country/community or the study of a novelist/ dramatist/poet from a target language-speaking country/community or the study of a director/architect/ musician/painter from a target language-speaking country/ community. The A2 specification has 2 units: Unit 3: Listening, Reading and Writing Assessment Externally Examined. Written Paper: 2 hours 30 minutes Weighting: 35% of total A Level marks Listening, Reading and Writing. Candidates will answer a range of questions based on approximately 6 minutes of heard material and on a selection of written texts. They will also respond in writing to a question based on one of the four A2 cultural topic areas. Unit 4: Speaking Test Assessment Externally Examined. Written Paper: 35 minutes (including 20 minutes preparation time) Weighting: 15% of total A Level marks Speaking. Candidates will present a point of view based on a target-language stimulus card from one of the A2 topic areas and take part in a conversation covering three further A2 topics.

Spanish Extension Classes The Spanish Extension Classes provide students with a broad insight into the cultures, politics and societies of the Spanish-speaking world. There will be five series of weekly, teacher-led introductions to topics. These will be followed by a student-led seminar session in which students give further discussion of chosen topics from those covered in the given session. Students will deliver no more than 3 seminar papers each but all will be expected to contribute to discussion following the papers. This structure is subject to change as events such as the ‘Viva Spanish and Latin American Film Festival' occur. There will be regular film showings, related to the various topics. These will be shown at stated times, outside the timetabled lessons. A list of recommended reading for each of the five series of the course will be provided.


Sport Science Head of Department:

Mr A Wrathall

Contact:

0161 488 3330

Sport Science is offered as an examinable option at AS and A2 level. The Department is housed in its own dedicated classroom in the Main Building. A wide range of teaching styles and resources are used in a variety of ways to enhance students` learning and understanding. The Department also offers Extension Classes.

Co-Curricular Activities

The Department runs an extensive programme of Co-curricular activities, in conjunction with the PE and Games Department. Clubs specific to Sport Science include: - A Question of Sport: an occasional lunch time or after school session where guest speakers from the world of sport are invited in to give a presentation and allow students to quiz them about life in sport. - Sport Science Clinic: a regular clinic aimed at helping students with their understanding of the course.

Course Entry requirements

No prior knowledge of the subject is required. The Department sets no formal entry requirements, other than those for entry into the Sixth Form.

Exam Board: AQA

Course Details

To develop an interest in, and enjoyment of the subject, through theoretical, applied and practical aspects of Sport Science. It is a broad based course with scientific, psychological and sociological components that link well with many other A Level options. A2 level further develops a holistic approach to the improvement of individual performance.

Career / HE Opportunities

Sport Science is recognised as a creditable subject for entry at all universities. It is an excellent foundation for students intending to pursue careers in a wide range of disciplines. Examples include teaching, coaching, sports development, sports science, recreation, health and fitness, physiotherapy, psychology and professional sport.


Aims of AS and A2 Sport Science This subject encourages students to: Become increasingly physically competent by: developing the skills and techniques they require to perform effectively in physical activities applying and adapting a wide range of skills and techniques effectively in different types of physical activity developing and applying their skills in different roles, such as performer, leader and official within physical activities applying their skills in different contexts within a physical activity Maintain and develop their involvement and effectiveness in physical activity through developing their knowledge and understanding of factors that enable them and others to be physically active as part of a balanced lifestyle, and as part of a lifelong involvement in an active and healthy lifestyle Develop their knowledge and understanding of the relationship between skill, strategy/ composition, and body and mind readiness in ensuring effective and efficient performance in their own and others’ roles such as performer, leader and official Be informed and discerning decision-makers who understand how to be involved in physical activity through helping them to understand how they and others make the most of the opportunities and pathways available to be involved in physical activity understand and critically evaluate how contemporary products and consumer-focused influences related to physical activity affect and inform young people’s decisions about being involved in a range of physical activities understand and critically evaluate current key influences that might limit or encourage young people’s involvement in physical activity.

AS Level Content of the Course Unit 1- Opportunities for and the effects of leading a healthy and active lifestyle (60% of AS marks – 2 hour exam) 1. Applied Exercise Physiology • Health, nutrition, fitness, respiratory system, cardiovascular system, joint movement analysis, training principles & methods, fitness testing 2. Skill acquisition • Types & classification of skill, information processing, learning & performance, teaching styles, feedback & guidance 3. Opportunities for participation • Play, leisure, sport, historical, social, cultural, sport in school, sports initiatives


Unit 2 – Analysis and evaluation of physical activity as a performer and/or in an adopted role(s) (40% of AS marks – internal assessment) Candidates will be assessed in two sections: • Section A – The ability as a performer, official or leader via demonstration in a practical situation (internal assessment and external moderation) • Section B – Application of theoretical knowledge for effective performance and development of skills in a practical situation. This is assessed in Section B of the Unit 1 question paper.

A2 Level Content of Course Unit 3 – Optimising performance & evaluating contemporary issues within sport (30% of A Level marks – 2 hour exam) 1. Section A - Exercise physiology • Energy systems (aerobic & anaerobic), muscles, sports supplements, training, sports injuries, mechanics of movement 2. Section B - Sports psychology • Personality, arousal, anxiety, attitudes, aggression, confidence, attribution theory, groups, leadership 3. Section C - Contemporary influences • World Games, Sport England, world class performance, recreation, sportsmanship, violence, drugs, legislation, sponsorship, media Unit 4 – Optimising practical performance in a competitive situation (20% of A Level marks – internal assessment) 1. Section A – The ability to perform and analyse relevant core skills/techniques as a performer, official or leader/coach within a fully competitive situation/equivalent scenario. (Internal assessment and external moderation - 60 marks). 2. Section B – The ability to analyse and critically evaluate their own/others’ weaknesses within a fully competitive/equivalent situation in relation to an elite level performer. (Internal assessment and external moderation - 30 marks). 3. Section C – Their ability to identify theoretical causes for weaknesses in performance and suggest appropriate corrective practices to optimise performance. (Internal assessment and external moderation - 30 marks).

Sport Science Extension Classes The aims of the Sport Science Department Extension Class are to foster interest and enthusiasm for the subject; to help further develop talents of students showing high potential; to help equip students considering applying to study Sports related courses at University with the practical skills and wider reading experience needed for success in gaining offers in an ever expanding and competitive field. More information is available from the Course Co-Coordinator


Theatre Studies Head of Department: Contact No:

Ms C Harms

0161 488 3330 extension 3221

The Drama Department consists of 3 teaching studios, with blackout facilities and theatre lighting. Exam performances and main School productions take place on the stage in Holden Hall. Theatre Studies is offered at AS and A2 level and there is also an extension course for pupils in the Upper Sixth.

Co-Curricular Activities

The Drama Department produces major School productions each year. Sell-out performances have included 'The Sound of Music' and a dramatic production of 'Antigone' and 'A Kind of Alaska'. There is the opportunity for Sixth Form students to produce and perform their own self-directed Play. The Department also arranges numerous Theatre Trips for students, and there is a biennial joint A Level trip to New York with the Art department.

Careers/HE opportunities

The course is useful for those considering degrees and careers in the following areas: Acting; Performing Arts; Film, Television and Theatre work; Law; Teaching; Media & Print journalism; Arts Administration; Sales & Marketing; Social Sciences; Psychology and Drama Therapy; Art & Design.

Entry requirements: Minimum GCSE Grade B in Drama, minimum GCSE Grade B in English. Exam Board: AQA

Course details: At AS, candidates will gain a knowledge and understanding of theatre practice as both participant and informed audience member. Candidates will develop performance and/or production skills appropriate to the creation and realisation of drama and theatre. At A2, candidates will demonstrate a more advanced level of performance and/or production skills alongside the ability to think independently, make judgements and refine their work in the light of research. They will also demonstrate the ability to analyse the ways in which different performance and production elements are brought together to create theatre. At AS, candidates will gain a knowledge and understanding of theatre practice as both participant and informed audience member. Candidates will develop performance and/or production skills appropriate to the creation and realisation of drama and theatre.


Unit 1 will cover: • Candidates’ personal response to live theatre seen during the course • Interpretation of a set play from a performance perspective. Written paper – 30% 2 essay questions Unit 2 will cover: • working in groups to develop and present an extract from a published play chosen by the candidates • Study of an influential director, designer, theatre company or other practitioner, linked to the candidate’s practical work. Practical Script Performance and Supporting Research Notes – 20% At A2, candidates will demonstrate a more advanced level of performance and/or production skills alongside the ability to think independently, make judgements and refine their work in the light of research. They will also demonstrate the ability to analyse the ways in which different performance and production elements are brought together to create theatre. Unit 3 will cover: • Study of a pre-twentieth century set play • Study of a twentieth century or contemporary set play (synoptic) Written paper – 30% 2 essay questions Unit 4 will cover: • working in groups to develop and present a devised drama, performed in a theatrical style of their choice (synoptic) • Research into a theatrical style chosen by the group for their practical work. Practical Devised Performance and Supporting Research Notes – 20% The course is useful for those considering degrees and careers in the following areas: Acting; Performing Arts; Film, Television and Theatre work; Law; Teaching; Media & Print journalism; Arts Administration; Sales & Marketing; Social Sciences; Psychology and Drama Therapy; Art & Design. The aims of the Drama Department Extension Classes are to help to equip students applying to study Acting courses at Drama Schools or Drama at University, with the audition and interview skills and wider experience needed for success in gaining offers in a highly competitive field; to foster interest in and enthusiasm for the subject; to help further the talents of students showing high potential. More information is available from the Head of Department.


Careers The sheer level of support we give Cheadle Hulme School Sixth Formers at this crucial point in their lives is another differentiator of the School from other A level centres. This is the jumping off point between school and university and, from there the rest of your life. We want to make sure that students are as prepared as possible to make informed decisions on universities, courses and careers.

UCAS Applications For Sixth Formers, the UCAS process can seem, and often is, very daunting. However our expert staff are on hand to process and support each student's application from start to finish. All students are interviewed individually by members of the Schools' Careers Department during the Lower Sixth year, so that students can discuss their plans for the future and their academic progress so far, as well as shaping course choices and careers decisions. Form Tutors and Heads of Year are also very much involved in getting students ready to make their UCAS applications.

Interview Practice Each year a 'Mock Interview' evening is held for Upper Sixth Form students. We are fortunate to have a large body of parents and friends of the School, with a variety of experience in many different fields, who give up their time to 'interview' pupils. This not only gives students a great opportunity to practice interview technique; it also encourages the student to find out about a particular career choice straight from 'the horse's mouth' and provides invaluable feedback. Students gain confidence and techniques via this safe environment for university and job interviews.

Challenge of Management In July each year, all members of the Lower Sixth Form take part in the 'Challenge of Management' conference. This is run by advisors who come from industry, education and commerce. More information about this is available on the Sixth Form Events page.

Careers Events and Courses The Careers Department organises a number of special events, including a biennial Careers Convention, involving about a hundred representatives of various professions, which is open to all members of the Upper School and Sixth Form, together with their parents. There are also a number of more specialised workshops and talks throughout the year. Many of our Sixth Form use the School holidays to undertake Work Shadowing or attend University Taster Courses. All have the chance to attend University Open Days. With the benefit of these opportunities and expert careers advice, Cheadle Hulme School has a very strong record of its pupils securing places at the top universities.


Academic extension is an integral part of the 6th Form Curriculum. Much of this is delivered through the challenging programmes of study at A Level and Pre-U, as well as through extra-curricular clubs and competitions. Extension Classes have played an important role since their introduction in 2007. The courses, which run from September to May, are designed to take Upper 6th students beyond the boundaries of their A Level or Pre-U specifications, providing an excellent opportunity to enrich their experience in a chosen subject in preparation for university application and undergraduate study. Extension Classes take place each week - Period 3 on Fridays. Subject

Course teachers

Art & Design

Ms Baker & Ms Craig

Biology

Mr Hedwat

Business Management

Ms Curl

Chemistry

Mr Taylor

Classical Civilisation

Mrs Johnson & Mrs Barfoot

Design Technology

Mrs Buxton

Economics

Mr Matthews

English Language

Mr Parkin

English Literature

Mr Westbrook

French

Mr Watts

Geography

Mr Cawtherley & Mrs Shallcross

German

Frau Meredith

History

Mr Bell

Latin

Mrs Johnson

Law

Mrs Barfoot

Mathematics

Mr Barnett

Further Mathematics

Mr Norton

Medicine

Mr Chippendale

Music

Mr Dewhurst & Mr Hall

Philosophy

Mrs Firth

Physics

Mr Ahmed

Politics

Mr Axon

Psychology

Mrs Stafford

Spanish

Senorita Marti単ez

Sports Science

Mr Wrathall

Theatre Studies

Ms Harms

Further details on the courses can be obtained from the relevant Head of Department or Course Teacher.

Extension Classes in the Upper 6th

Extension Classes in the Upper 6th


Aims to foster interest in and enthusiasm for the subject beyond the set weekly lessons; to help further develop the talents of students showing high potential; to help students considering applying to study Art & Design at university with the practical skills and wider experience needed for success in gaining offers in a highly competitive field. Autumn Term: Students are naturally stretched on an individual basis within a project or scheme of work. Work is further developed or taken into a different direction according to the strengths, interests and preferences of the individual student. Work would be extended in class, at lunchtimes and after school. Session 1: Preparatory work for folder for application to specific University Course. This would be mounting and displaying coursework to fullest potential and extending further lines of enquiry into other media, sketchpad work or Art History further reading. The majority of students, post A2 level, apply for a Foundation Course (1 year) which prepares them for a Specialist Degree Course, e.g. Fine Art, Graphics, Textiles, Photography, Three Dimensional Design. Students are usually asked to complete a practical project to take to interview. Session 2: Students who apply direct to Degree Courses will obtain help and support with work, mounting and folders. Specialist courses e.g. Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Art History Medical Illustration, Combining Practical Art & Design with other subjects e.g. Languages, business studies, media, finance, marketing Session 3: Conducting Mock interviews with students applying for Art & Design Practical Courses. Session 4: Promoting the ‘Life Class’ Course and ensuring regular attendance – one 1½ hour session per week, after school, as an addition to the folder for interview. Session 5: Promoting and recommending Gallery Visits to view specific work relevant to ongoing practical projects. Visiting practical workshops at Galleries or studios to enhance and develop personal skills. Session 6: Preparing folders and conducting mock interviews for specific courses e.g. Architecture, Art History, Fine Art. Suggesting wider Art History reading, Gallery visits or practical workshops tailored to individual requirements. Session 7: The Art & Design Department would welcome students who do not take A2 practical Art and are applying for Degree Courses e.g. Architecture, Art History and would given support with folders, further practical work, suggest Gallery visits and conduct mock interviews. Session 8 to 12: Students will focus on completing preparatory work, developmental ideas and final pieces before their Controlled Test Examination begins in the Spring Term. Spring Term: students focus on their Controlled Test and completing coursework for final exhibitions. Those applying for Art and Design courses at University complete work for interviews. We continue to focus on individual requirements, projects, interview techniques and personal development of projects.

Extension Classes in the Upper 6th

Art & Design Extension Classes


Extension Classes in the Upper 6th

Biology Extension Classes Aims 

To develop students’ knowledge and interest in biological topics

To develop critical thinking skills to use during debate and when answering written questions

To inform students about contemporary issues

To prepare students for the demands of university interviews This is the basic scheme of work for the Biology Extension classes; although we do take up other issues in the news as they arise. Week

Topic

Content

Aims

1,2

Bad Science

Comparing credible scientific research with hearsay and sensationalist articles

To assess the reliability of Biological findings reported through various media

3,4

Biological journals

Examining current research published through journals and assessing their impact

To understand how data is presented from academic research

5,6

An introduction to animal behaviour

Debating the evolutionary origins of unusual behavioural traits in a range of organisms

To explain how behavioural traits can originate and perpetuate through time

7,8

Earthworm behaviour

Using experimental means to ascertain the different behavioural strategies of earthworms

To choose appropriate practical methods to investigate Earthworm behaviour and present findings.

9,10

Bee behaviour and social organisation

Examining the behaviour of Bees and their unusual social organisation in the colony

To establish how Bee’s use different behaviours to communicate and assess how their genetics contributes to their social organisation.

11,12

Communication and signalling

Researching the different forms of communication in animals e.g. Electrocommunication, olfactory, auditory.

To explain the adaptations of organisms for different means of communication and present findings to the class.

13,14

Project Nim

Watching the documentary ‘Project Nim’: the story of a chimpanzee raised by humans.

To examine the way in which behaviours are innate or learnt. To evaluate the research that took place on ‘Nim’

15,16

Biology Olympiad

Students are introduced to the Biology Olympiad and attempt past papers.

To begin preparation for the Biology Olympiad competition.

17,18

Evidence of common descent

Researching interesting cases of common descent in groups and presenting ideas to the class

To scrutinise the evidence for divergence of the taxonomic groups from a common ancestor

19,20

Drosophila (fruit fly) introduction and setting up genetic crosses

Using microscopes to identify the different features of fruit flies. Practise techniques in setting up a genetic cross.

To understand how drosophila can be used as a model organism in genetics experiments.

21,22

Drosophila genetic crosses and results

Anaesthetising Drosophila and setting up the first genetic crosses

To assemble the different crosses for breeding and use genetic diagrams to predict the outcomes

23,24

Drosophila genetic crosses results and statistics

Setting up the second generation of crosses and using statistics to analyse results

To use statistics to determine the significance of the second generation results.

25,26

Neurological disorders

To research and present findings on rare neurological disorders e.g. synaesthesia

To investigate how changes in the brain manifest themselves in different neurological conditions.

This extension course would be suitable for all those students doing A Level Biology who are considering University courses in Biological Sciences or Medicine. It also is accessible to other science students who find the area fascinating.


The purpose of this course is to deepen understanding of Pre-U Business Management, develop an awareness of historical and current trends in the subject and introduce students to some of the concepts which will be studied on undergraduate courses. This course is recommended for students who have an active interest in the subject and wish to engage in wider reading and discussion. Autumn Term – Business and Management

Management – what it is (and isn’t)

Enterprise – nature or nurture?

Strategy – welcome to the boardroom

Change – the hardest thing

Ethics – does it pay to care?

Global Business – saint or sinner? Spring Term – Application to current business practice

Tesco

Innocent Drinks

Microsoft

Ikea

Ford

Enterprise case-study

Stakeholder conflict case-study

Problem-solving case study

Suitable for students applying for undergraduate courses in Business, Management and Finance

Extension Classes in the Upper 6th

Business Management Extension Classes


Extension Classes in the Upper 6th

Chemistry Extension Classes Aims 

To extend students’ thinking beyond the confines of the Chemistry GCE specification

Students will be expected to apply their knowledge in novel ways to solve challenging problems. Structure Each session will be used to develop our understanding of a particular area of study linked to the A Level syllabus, through discussion and problem-solving. Students wanting to attend extension classes will be encouraged to extend their reading, to subscribe to “Chemistry Review” (which is a periodical aimed at Sixth Form chemists who wish to hear about current Chemistry), to enter the RSC Chemistry Olympiad and there is the possibility of a visit to the Chemistry Department of Sheffield University to complete a laboratory experiment and experience first-hand the spectroscopic techniques encountered in theory in the A2 modules. Some sessions will be used to prepare students for interview where appropriate. Content We will study areas from across the three main branches of Chemistry, but see how there are inter-links between the disciplines and between Chemistry and the other Sciences. New evidence will be presented to challenge the models used at A Level and we will discuss whether the new evidence can be explained by the models, requires modification of the models or needs new models. This will include studies into “The Emission Spectrum of Hydrogen”, “Hybridisation of Atomic Orbitals”, “Mechanistic Studies into the rate of Nucleophilic Substitution”, “The direction of second and further substitution on Benzene rings”, “Why He 2 cannot exist”, and “How and why O2 exhibits para-magnetism”. Other areas of students’ own interest can be brought in and developed. We will look at Olympiad Questions and use this as a basis for discussion into how best to approach difficult questions in exams and at interview, as well as looking at the interesting Chemistry behind the questions. Why should I choose Chemistry Extension? Chemistry is the “central Science”, linking areas as diverse as Biology and theoretical Physics with solutions to real world problems. It will be Chemists who will help to solve the biggest problems yet to face mankind; pollution, use of resources and the energy crisis. This course will give an insight into the next stage of your Chemical education, whether that be in a pure Chemistry degree or any of the related disciplines such as Chemical or Nuclear Engineering, Biochemistry, Environmental Chemistry, Geology and Petro-Chemistry, Materials Science and other courses too numerous to mention. Chemistry is the key which opens many doors; hopefully this course will open your mind to the possibilities in your own future.


Aims To develop students’ understanding and appreciation of a number of aspects of the classical world, including its literature, history and society. Structure Sessions will follow students’ areas of interest and students will be expected to suggest areas for study and discussion. Topics might include: An introduction to Classical Greek Greek and Roman Theatre Women in the Ancient World The influence of Classical Literature on Modern Art Forms (literature, film, art) The world of Cicero Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey Sessions will be flexible and discursive and aim to both complement and build on students’ current and/or previous areas of study. Recommended reading There is a wealth of books to choose from and students should follow their own interests, but the following are a useful starting point: Henderson J and Beard M

:

Classics: a very short introduction

Morales H

:

Classical Myth: a very short introduction

Thorpe M

:

Homer – inside the ancient world

Beard M

:

Confronting the Classics

Holland T

:

Rubicon

Extension Classes in the Upper 6th

Classical Civilisation Extension Classes


Extension Classes in the Upper 6th

Design Technology These sessions will be individually tailored to meet the needs and interests of your further studies e.g. Architecture; Engineering; Product Design. It is also useful for students intending to apply for Apprenticeship Schemes in Engineering.

Design and the Environment

The roles of Designer, Engineer and Architect in the Environment

The Utopian Environment- Social Pioneers

Environmental and sustainability Issues

Inclusive Design and Consumer safety

ICT in Manufacturing

Introduction to CAD software applications using Techsoft 2D; Solid Works 3D. Students will have the opportunity to use the programmes to develop work for their portfolio and extend their experience in using design packages that are used commercially in industry.

Implications of ICT in the Design world

Applications of ICT

Current Issues

Technological developments in areas of chosen interest

Ethical Issues

Preparation of material for interview University interviews for Design related courses often require the presentation of a portfolio of work. An application for Engineering Apprenticeships asks for a demonstration of practical aptitude. During the course of extension classes, advice and guidance will be given to individuals in the selection and preparation of suitable examples of work for presentation, again tailored to the nature of the course. Additional reading and interview practice will also be available to individuals.


The purpose of this course is to deepen understanding of Pre-U Economics, develop an awareness of historical and current trends in the subject and introduce students to some of the concepts which will be studied on undergraduate courses. This course is recommended for students who have an active interest in the subject and wish to engage in wider reading and discussion.

Autumn Term – An introduction to Economic Philosophy

Economics at undergraduate level

Discussion with students about their course choices

The Economic Problem Revisited - the purpose of Economics

How to be a social scientist – concepts and models, positive and normative

Political Economy, Economics and Postmodernism – the history, present and future?

How Economists Changed The World – an introduction to Smith, Marx, Mill, Marshall, Keynes, Friedman and others Liberalism, Globalisation and Sustainability - Economics in the 21st Century

Spring Term – Application of the Economist’s Toolkit

The price of milk

The sugar industry

Economics of football

The EU single market - labour

Global markets - cars

The Economics of starvation

The Economics of global warming Suitable for students applying for undergraduate courses in Economics and Econometrics

Extension Classes in the Upper 6th

Economics Extension Classes


Extension Classes in the Upper 6th

English Language Extension Classes The main aim of the English Language Extension Class is to encourage students to develop further their interest in the study of English both from a theoretical and analytical perspective. Active participation is expected so that students become confident and knowledgeable when discussing and evaluating a variety of language issues. The course will begin with an overview of language as a system of communication. This will focus on both the spoken and written word and explore different language systems that humans use and adapt for a variety of purposes. There will be revision of phonology, lexis, grammar and semantic change as well as a greater focus on pragmatics. The classes will presume as well as expand upon knowledge of topics covered at AS Level such as gender, power and technology. New topics to be explored will include: language and society; accents and dialects; language and occupation; the role of the media in shaping language in the 21 st Century. The course will also include wider reading for the A2 Unit 3 topics of Language Change and Child Language Acquisition. There will be a strong focus on exploring theoretical research as well as background reading from a course textbook selected for the Extension Class. Students will be expected to undertake their own wider reading throughout the year (eg David Crystal; Steven Pinker). The classes will be predominantly discussion based with some preparatory work/reading being set in advance. These classes will help those students who are particularly interested in pursuing a university course which is either wholly or in part Language/Linguistics based.


Aims To foster interest in and enthusiasm for the subject; to help further the talents of students showing high potential; to help equip students considering applying to study English at university with the practical skills and wider reading experience needed both for gaining the top grades at A2 essential for success in achieving offers in a highly competitive field and for preparing for the first year of undergraduate study. Structure A sequence of weekly lessons, timetabled in Year 13, built around a close reading of a wide range of texts, both provided by the teacher and suggested by students themselves, and designed to give valuable insights into areas of the literary canon not otherwise covered in AS or A2 classes. Sessions provide a forum for the oral exchange of critical ideas and responses; the emphasis is very much on what the student can find in a text that is worth exploring. It is intended to allow as much flexibility as possible in choosing literary material to read and discuss, so that the programme of wider reading can both complement the works studied for A Level English and stretch readers with work that is increasingly demanding in various ways. Typically we will start with the poetry of T.S. Eliot as a prime example of early 20th Century Modernism, then proceed to other poets like Dylan Thomas, Philip Larkin, Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes who have been influenced by or reacted against his work. We also shadow the T.S.Eliot Poetry Prize awarded to the best newly published collection to keep up to date with contemporary verse, by sampling poems from the shortlisted authors and coming to our own tentative judgements before the winner is announced in late January. We explore examples of fiction writing from the 18 th century onwards, focusing on narrative techniques, and also study excerpts from drama texts, from Shakespeare to modern playwrights, to understand in what ways they differ from prose or verse in how they achieve their effects. Students will be expected to select examples of their own favourite writing for critical discussion, including the possibility of reading examples of their own creative work The course will not necessarily require the production of substantial written work, but does expect students to be prepared to give more time to extending their reading in ways that should prove enjoyable and stimulating, and should certainly enhance their chances of doing well in A2 modules.

Extension Classes in the Upper 6th

English Literature Extension Classes


Extension Classes in the Upper 6th

French Extension Classes Aims To understand French history/ culture/ literature and arts and give a better overall view of evolution of thought in that era and to nowadays To develop critical thinking from the ideas of French philosophers and to discuss themes found in literature, thus laying the foundations for university To promote interest and enthusiasm to pursue further study at university level Method Seminars will be taught by teachers from the department according to specialisms. The course will be delivered in a mixture of target language and English.

Through newspaper articles of the time, extracts from works of philosophers and writers, on the study of a painter’s work, presentations by pupils etc.

Cross-curricular input from students. Other A Level courses will be invaluable in bringing a variety of different perspectives

Translation and language work to develop skills needed for the EAL

Guest speakers will also be invited 18th century in context 1.

Setting the scene ( influences from the Renaissance to 18 th century )

2.

Historical and social context of France in the 18th century

3.

Philosophers of the 18th century ( extracts from Rousseau, Diderot and Voltaire )

4.

The Arts: What do we learn from some of the key painters of the century?

Racine: Britannicus (extracts)

Rousseau : Education Sentimentale (extracts)

Diderot: Jacques le Fataliste (extracts) Voltaire : Candide (extracts) David : Marat expirant 19th century in context 1.

Setting the scene (transition from the 18th century)

2.

Historical and social context of France in the 19th century

3.

Literature (Balzac, Flaubert, Maupassant) and Poetry (Rimbaud, Verlaine)

4.

The Arts: Gericault, Delacroix, Impressionistes ( mirrors of the society of the time )

Maupassant:Boule de suif ( Extracts )

Balzac : le Colonel Chabert ( Extracts)

Flaubert : Trois contes ( Extracts )

Gericault : Le radeau de la » Meduse »

Delacroix : La liberte guidant le peuple

Manet : Dejeuner sur l’herbe

20th century in context 1.

Historical and social context of the 20th Century

2.

Philosophers: Sartre

3.

Literature: Camus/ Saint Exupery

4.

Poetry: Eluard, Apollinaire

5.

The Arts: Matisse/Braque

Sartre : Les mains sales

Camus : L’étranger

Saint-Exupery : Le Petit Prince

Poems by Eluard et Apollinaire

Matisse : la Desserte

Braque : Nature morte


Aims 

To help further develop the breadth and depth of geographical knowledge for students intending to study Geography (or related courses – see below) at university.

To help equip students with the relevant practical, research, wider reading and referencing skills needed for success in gaining offers and adapting to the different requirements of university Geography.

Course Structure 

There will be an initial discussion about university and course choices and assistance with completing the UCAS personal statement.

The lessons are discursive and allow extension beyond the A Level specification.

Sessions will cover both Physical and Human Geography.

Themes may last several weeks depending on topicality and student interest.

Other themes may be introduced to respond to contemporary global events and issues that occur or develop through the course.

There will be a focus on the skills a Geography degree may require such as referencing, research etc.

You will be issued with wider reading lists and set extension research projects.

Course Content The broad themes of the syllabus will cover:

1. What is Geography?

2.

Climate Change

3. Desert Environments

4.

Famine

5. El Niño

6.

Geographical Information Systems (GIS)

7. Development

8.

Globalisation

9.

10.

Multiculturalism

Geography of Disease

Other topics are likely to be covered ( depending on the exigencies of events at the time ) and will concentrate in particular on contemporary issues; examining topics in the news and the way in which the media presents geographical issues such as famine, climate change, international debt and poverty, etc. Reading and Resources You will be issued with a reading list. This is by no means an exhaustive list nor is it, in any way, prescribed, as there is a wealth of information that could be read which does not appear on the list at all! The main thing is that you should read (books, magazines, periodicals, journal articles and newspapers), watch and listen to anything that is relevant! The nature of Geography as a discipline is so varied that recommending just a few books would be limiting. It is expected that you will be subscribing to A Level Geography Review. Others to look at include Geographical, National Geographic, New Scientist and The Economist. Keeping up to date with current affairs is also very important. Related subjects:

Geology, Earth Science, Meteorology, Environmental Science Sustainable Development, Real Estate, Anthropology, Sociology

Extension Classes in the Upper 6th

Geography Extension Classes


Aims To broaden pupils’ knowledge about German history/ culture/ literature/ film, especially for those considering applying for German at university but also for those who are simply interested in German literature and film To develop pupils’ language skills as well as their critical thinking skills from the aims of the authors and producers and to discuss themes found in literature and film, thus laying the foundations for university To promote interest and enthusiasm to pursue further study at university level

Method The course will be delivered predominantly in the target language: Through authentic German literature and film Cross-curricular input from pupils. Other A Level courses will be invaluable in bringing a variety of different perspectives Translation and language work to develop language skills The lessons are a lot more flexible as they do not need to prepare for an exam. Therefore, books and films for the individual periods can be agreed with pupils in advance according to their interests. There will often be set preparatory reading or watching of specific scenes so that these can be discussed in lessons. For pupils wishing to apply to very selective universities, lessons will be adapted and language and interview practice will be offered accordingly. Structure Autumn term

Period

Content

Theme/topic

-45

Das kurze Leben der Sophie Scholl by Hermann Vinke

Nationalsozialismus

Oder Die verlorenen Schuhe by Gina Mayer Oder Spring term

45-88

Der Vorleser by Bernhard Schlink

Summer term

89/90

Mauersegler-Ein Haus in Berlin-1989 by Waldtraut Lewin Oder Good Bye Lenin by Wolfgang Becker

Auseinandersetzung mit der Schuldfrage Wiedervereinigung

Extension Classes in the Upper 6th

German Extension Classes


What is the course for? The purpose of History classes is to explore and develop historical ideas, concepts and skills which are not always on the A Level syllabus. Examples would include: historiography (the study of historical debate and interpretation); causation (understanding the complex roots of historical events); ideologies that affect history, such as nationalism and federalism; revolutionary ideas and events.

How will it be taught? The skills, ideas and concepts will be taught in the context of subjects that you have not touched on yet, which might be anything from German unification to African history and a range of one-off historical issues.

What will the lessons be like? The lessons will feel a lot more freestyle than those that are preparing you for exams, as the intention is to develop your skills through interaction and testing of ideas. There will often be reading for lessons, which you will need to do in advance, so this is probably not the course for those who don’t enjoy reading. There will be a focus on discussion, debate and stretching your thinking with challenging ideas.

Who is it for? Clearly, if you are considering applying for History, especially at a very selective university, this would be an ideal course. We provide a separate and complementary course in the Autumn Term for candidates for the most selective universities, which focuses on the skills required for those universities that have pre-tests and interviews (e.g. Oxford and Cambridge). This additional course is mandatory for Oxbridge History candidates. However, the skills of argument and analysis that the extension course would develop might also appeal to someone studying a subject like Law.

Extension Classes in the Upper 6th

History Extension Classes


Extension Classes in the Upper 6th

Latin Extension Classes Aims To develop further translation skills and an appreciation of Latin literature through practising the techniques of literary criticism; to read a wider selection of Latin authors; to place the literature read in some kind of historical and social context. Structure Books used will be: Unseen Practice

‘Latin Unseens for ‘A’ Level’

A Carter

Literary Criticism

‘Aestimanda’

M G Balme & M S Warman

‘Stilus Artifex’

C Stace & P V Jones

‘Aere Perennius’

D G Fratter

‘The Ancient World’

R J Cootes & L E Snellgrove

Historical Background

and a selection of other books on Roman history and social customs. Short extracts from the works of Roman writers (in translation). The course will be split into twelve modules: 1.

Historical Background

1 - The beginnings of Rome. The Republic. Livy

2.

Unprepared Translation

1

3.

Literary Criticism

1

4.

Historical Background

2

5.

Unprepared Translation

2

6.

Literary Criticism

2

7.

Historical Background

3

8.

Unprepared Translation

3

9.

Literary Criticism

3

10. Historical Background

4

- The final years of the Republic. Cicero, Caesar

- The Age of Augustus. Vergil, Horace, Ovid

- The Julio-Claudian & Flavian Emperors Tacitus, Juvenal, Pliny

11. Unprepared Translation

4

12. Literary Criticism

4

Help will be given with the writing of essays and interview technique ( as required ). The study of Latin in the Sixth Form will lead to University courses in: Classics, Classical Civilisation, Ancient History, Archaeology Classics scholars often go on to study Law, English, Linguistics, Modern Languages, History


Aims To foster interest in and enthusiasm for Law as an academic subject; to develop students’ skills in critical thinking and contentious essay writing; to enable students to perform to the best of their ability in the National Admissions Test for Law (“LNAT”) and to gain offers in a highly competitive field.

Structure Autumn Term An introduction to critical thinking, focusing on the best way to approach the critical thinking section of the LNAT and the skills required accurately to analyse passages of complex English prose. Work will focus on more detailed preparation for the LNAT and will include:

An overview of the LNAT. Students will gain familiarity with the format of the paper and the general skills required to complete it

Critical thinking practice

Essay writing practice Spring Term Sessions will aim to develop students’ interest in and knowledge of legal issues. Topics covered will follow the interests of the students. In recent years we have considered the relationship between law and morality, the English Penal System, the basics of Contract Law and euthanasia.

Recommended reading Students should be regularly reading a quality newspaper, particularly the Law and Editorial Opinion sections. In addition, the following provide a useful introduction to law: -

The English Legal System: Jacqueline Martin

-

Law in Focus: Simon Jackson

-

Learning Legal Rules: James Holland & Julian Webb

-

The Woman who tickled too much: Jonathan Herring

Whilst the Law extension class is aimed primarily at those intending to study Law, it may also be of use to those applying for related degrees such as Criminology.

Extension Classes in the Upper 6th

Law Extension Classes


Extension Classes in the Upper 6th

Mathematics Extension Classes Aims

To develop the ability of students to think through problems and apply their knowledge in novel and unusual ways. To give opportunities for students to express themselves within a mathematical context both verbally and in written form. The material covered within these extension classes will complement the work already covered within ordinary mathematics at AS and A2 Level. It is clear, however, that those students who are taking Further Mathematics are already extending their mathematical knowledge. In both cases the emphasis is on solution of problems requiring insight, ingenuity, persistence and the ability to work through substantial sequences of algebraic manipulations. The aims will be achieved by: tackling more demanding questions from past STEP and Oxford Entrance papers. Regular written solutions will be submitted and analysed to develop all three disciplines of Pure, Mechanical and Statistical Mathematics, considering the work covered in ordinary lessons and allowing students to present a favoured topic in whatever form they choose, looking at and solving mathematical puzzles at all levels to develop the ability to think ‘outside the box’, developing the ability to apply mathematical knowledge in novel and unfamiliar ways through application to ‘interview’ type questions, encouraging wider reading of both factual and recreational books on different aspects of Mathematics.


The Further Mathematicians will also be introduced to mathematical ideas that will be taken up at university, and have included the following topics to extend their thinking: Integration from first principles. Integration in more than one dimension. The idea of a limit in Calculus. Number Theory topics including Euclid’s algorithm, Continued fractions, Linear Diophantine equations. 'Rocket Science' - modelling variable mass problems. Topics in Calculus on surface area and volume. Partial derivatives. The idea of minimising an integral, and applications including finding geodesics. Conic sections and polar co-ordinates. The use of Newton’s laws to describe rotational dynamics of rigid bodies, and planetary motion. Both of these Extension Classes provide an insight into University level Mathematics and offer some enrichment into closely related disciplines such as Engineering, Physics and other scientific subjects. Readable Textbooks

Devlin, K., The Millennium Problem (2004)

Allenby, R.B.J.T. Numbers and Proofs (1997)

Devlin, K., Mathematics: The New Golden Age (1998)

Baylis, J. What is Mathematical Analysis?. (MacMillan, 1991)

Dunham, (1991)

Burn, R.P. Groups: A Path to Geometry. (CUP, 1987)

Du Sautoy, M. The Music of the Primes (2003)

Bryant, V. Yet Another Introduction to Analysis. (CUP, 1990)

Gibilisco, S. Reaching for Infinity. (Tab/ McGraw-Hill, 1990)

Harel, D. Algorithmics -- The Spirit of Computing. (Addison-Wesley, 1992)

Gleick, J. Chaos. (Minerva/Random House, 1997)

Liebeck, M. A Concise Introduction to Pure Mathematics. (Chapman& Hall/CRC Mathematics)

Gowers, T. Mathematics: a very short introduction. (OUP, 2002)

Lunn, M. A First Course in Mechanics. (OUP, 1991) Spiegel, M.R. Probability and Statistics. (Schaum's outline series; McGraw-Hill, 1982)

W.

Jouney

through

Genius

Hall, N. (ed.) The New Scientist Guide to Chaos. (Penguin, 1991) Hoffman, P. (Penguin, 1991)

Archimedes'

Revenge.

Kaplan, R. & E. The Art of The Infinite. (2003) Körner, T.W. The Pleasures of Counting. (CUP, 1996)

Readable Mathematics Acheson, D. 1089 and All That (2002) Bondi, C. (ed.) New Applications Mathematics. (Penguin, 1991)

of

Lauwerier, H. Fractals. Images of Chaos. (Penguin, 1991) Maor, E. e: The Story of A Number (1994)

Cipra, B. What's Happening in the Mathematical Sciences. (AMS, 1993, '94, '96, '99) Clegg, B. A Brief History of Infinity (2003)

Paulos, J. A. (Penguin, 1991)

Beyond

Numeracy.

Polya, G. How to Solve It. (1945)

is

Stewart, I. From Here to Infinity. (OUP, 1996)

Davis, P.J., Hersh, R. The Mathematical Experience. (Penguin, 1990)

Wells, D. The Penguin Dictionary of Curious and Interesting Numbers. (Penguin, 1997)

Courant, R., Robbins, Mathematics?. (OUP, 1996)

H.

What

Extension Classes in the Upper 6th

Further Mathematics Extension Classes


Extension Classes in the Upper 6th

Recreational Gardner, M. Penrose Tiles Ciphers. (CUP/Math. Assoc. 1997)

to of

Trapdoor America,

Feynman, R.P. Surely You're Joking, Mr Feynman. (Arrow Books, 1992) Hardy, G.H. A Mathematician's Apology. (CUP, 1992)

Or any other book by Martin Gardner: he has written numerous books in similar style, all excellent. His Mathematical Puzzles and Diversions and More Mathematical Puzzles and Diversions (both available in Penguin) and The Unexpected Hanging (Chicago) are classics.

Hodges, A. Alan Turing, the Enigma. (Vintage, 1992)

Stewart, I. Game, Set and Math.. (Penguin, 1997)

Kanigel, R. The Man Who Knew Infinity. (Abacus, 1992)

Maor, E. To Infinity and Beyond. (Princeton, 1991)

McLeish, J. Number. (Bloomsbury, 1991)

Historical and General (edited by B. Bollobas) Miscellany. (CUP, 1986)

Littlewood's

Fauvel, J., Flood, R., Wilson, Mathematician’s Apology (1940)

R.

A

Hollingdale, S. (Penguin, 1989)

Makers

of

Mathematics.

Hoffman, P. The man who loved only numbers. (Fourth Estate, 1999)

Singh, S. Estate)

Fermat's Last Theorem. (Fourth


NB: in June of the L6 there is a meeting for all potential medics run by Mr Chippendale. Any students wanting to do the BMAT paper are given text books, a mini question paper and will start to have a go at the essay questions. The format of the extension lessons is as follows

The overall focus of the sessions is on the process of applying to medical school. So we discuss and fine-tune personal statements, all of which will be read by IC, research all the key areas students are expected to know about medicine (such as the role of the GMC) and prepare for interviews by practising technique. In addition each student must prepare a presentation and use it to lead part of the one of the sessions. Much time is spent discussing current news concerning medicine and the NHS and also looking at all the tricky ethical issues such as abortion and euthanasia. By the middle of the Spring Term we usually switch to this being a Chemistry class where IC helps all students achieve their maximum grade as after all, to get into medical school students must get an A in Chemistry.

The initial areas researched in the first sessions are: - The role of the GMC - The current make-up of the NHS and how it is managed, plus any changes that are being proposed by government - Career pathways in medicine

Ethical issued discussed will cover areas such as: Attitudes to death and how death is managed Euthanasia Abortion

New drugs and NHS funding

Private vs NHS

The role of the GP and confidentiality

The obesity crisis and how this can be managed Stem cell research

Compulsory organ donation

Animal testing

Topical medical issues will be discussed, so it hard to know in advance what they might be. However topics covered last year included: Epigenetics following the talk at the RNCM

The role of statins

Stem cell function

New methods to restore sight

GP working hours Interview preparation includes: Discussions of what to wear

The role of body language and eye contact

Travelling to the interview

Peer interview each other and feedback

Discussions of the general types of questions asked and how to respond to them. IC interviews all those who are called up for interview about a week before their date. Those doing the BMAT exam continue to prepare for their exam, which is in early November, by looking at the critical thinking and science multiple choice and by writing essays. The essays open up some very interesting areas of discussion that the whole group can share. There is a BMAT mock exam about two weeks before students break up for October half term.

Extension Classes in the Upper 6th

Medicine Extension Classes


Extension Classes in the Upper 6th

Music Extension Classes Aims to foster interest in and enthusiasm for the subject; to help further develop the talents of students showing high potential; to help equip students considering applying to study Music at university with the practical skills and wider reading experience needed for success in gaining offers in a highly competitive field.

Introduction

University or Conservatoire – a look at courses What is Music? A brief introduction to music history through reading, listening and score analysis. Wider Reading: The Cambridge Music Guide ed. Sadie, The Oxford Companion to Music: ed. Latham.

Core Listening and analysis Listening to and analysis of music of the Renaissance, Baroque, Classical and Modern periods

Practical skills

choice of recital material

keyboard harmony composition portfolio

Harmony and Counterpoint

Practice mock interview

This course is suitable for those wishing to read Music at university or those who wish to pursue a performance course at a conservatoire.


Course Text Philosophy: the Basics - Nigel Warburton Other books are available for reading from the Philosophy, Theology & RS Departmental Library. Programme of Study Aim: to introduce candidates to the major ideas of western philosophy and to enhance their skills in philosophical discussion. It has become increasingly clear that interviews at universities may be made easier by knowledge of particular philosophers and ideas, but that the development of skills in handling difficult philosophical questions on the spot are the most important part of a candidate’s preparation. There is one timetabled lesson per week. The course will cover some major issues in philosophy: What is philosophy? What is human nature? Is mind distinct from body? Is there an enduring self? Are we social beings? What is real? How do we encounter the world? Do we have free will? Is time real? Does God exist? Can we know God through experience? Is reason the source of knowledge? Does knowledge depend on experience? Does the mind shape the world? How does science add to knowledge? Does science give us truth? Are interpretations true? Is morality relative? Does the end justify the means? Can rules define morality? Is ethics based on virtue? Can ethics help solve moral dilemmas? What justifies the state? What is justice? What is art? What is the meaning of life? Not all these issues can be covered. The interests of students and the direction of discussions will determine which topics predominate. Students interested in Philosophy at degree level should inform the course leader of the main areas of study of their preferred UCAS choice. Written work: this should be set and completed as much as seems reasonable in terms of the heavy demands on the time and energy of students. At least two major essays should be attempted.

Extension Classes in the Upper 6th

Philosophy Extension Classes


Extension Classes in the Upper 6th

Physics Extension Classes Aims To explore the wider thinking and use of techniques that can be applied in the topics already covered at AS Level and which will be covered at A2 in the Autumn Term. To practise expressing good, clear Physics both in writing and verbally in classroom discussion. This is achieved by: (i) completing more advanced questions from past STEP papers, British Physics Olympiad papers and past Oxford Entrance papers. (ii) looking in particular at more advanced techniques that can be called for, e.g. use of different frames of reference; a more sophisticated understanding of the role of centre of mass, in mechanical problems; use of energy relations in mechanical problems, where this can avoid otherwise complex force processes; interference, involving light paths of differing refractive indices; problems requiring values to be estimated; use of calculus techniques. (iii) covering areas of Physics outside the A Level specification, e.g. Archimedes Principle; variation of pressure with depth; superconductivity alternating current theory and resonant circuits. (iv) discussing questions of Physics in class, particularly examples from ‘everyday life’ – and which might, therefore, arise in an interview, e.g. Why are pressure vessels, for storing fluids under high pressure, spherical in shape? Why do street lamps glow red when first turned on, before glowing their normal yellow colour? Why does a kettle make so much noise before the water in it boils? (v) encouraging wider reading around the subject by suggesting books from the School Library on different Physics or Physics related topics. (vi) students giving a PowerPoint presentation to the rest of the class after doing research on a topic that interests them. Finally: Interview techniques and a practice mock interview. Summer Holiday Reading Surely You’re Joking Mr Feynman – Richard Feynman Mr Tompkins in Paperback - by George Gamov The Character of Physical Law – by Richard Feynman Any book by Paul Davies British Physics Olympiad All students attending the extension classes will be encouraged to enter the British Physics Olympiad Competition. It is designed to provide opportunities for candidates expected to attain an ‘A’ Grade, to demonstrate a much greater depth of understanding than that required at Advanced GCE and to demonstrate the ability to think critically and creatively. Awards are made on a five-point scale: gold, silver, bronze 1, bronze 2 and commended. University courses: Physics, Physical Sciences, Engineering, Mathematics, Materials Science, Electronics, Computing and Philosophy


Politics extension classes seek to broaden and deepen students’ knowledge of a wider variety of subjects than that covered by the A Level syllabus. Specifically, classes address 3 other branches of political science that could be further explored at university: political thought, political history and international relations. Weekly lessons will be mainly discussion-led, and based on suggested reading or a film. Autumn Term: Political Thought Why study Politics? Uses and abuses of political concepts Democracies ancient and modern Conservatism Socialism Anarchism Spring Term: Politics of the UK ‘Losing an empire, finding a role’: British political history since 1945 Margaret Thatcher The making of New Labour Democracy in crisis? Political participation in Britain Spring/Summer Term: World Politics in the twenty-first century Manufacturing Consent: The role of the mass media Responding to terrorism: The post 9/11 world A Clash of Civilisations? The New World Order

Extension Classes in the Upper 6th

Politics Extension Classes


Extension Classes in the Upper 6th

Psychology Extension Classes Aims To foster interest in and enthusiasm for the subject; to help further develop the talents of students showing high potential; to help equip students considering applying to study Psychology at university with the analytical and evaluative skills and wider reading experience needed for success in gaining offers in a highly competitive field. Structure A detailed reading list will be provided for all students taking the extension course. Sessions will be on topics selected from the following: Animals and language

Brain and Behaviour

Sleep and Dreams

Cultural bias in Psychology

Sport Psychology

Gender bias in Psychology

Perception

Research on sensitive topics

Attachment

Ethical Issues

Cognitive Development

Use of psychology in interrogation

Evolutionary Psychology

Animal research in psychology

Happiness and Resilience

Research Methodology

Parapsychology

Environmental psychology

Stress

Attraction

Key People

Intelligence

Bystander behaviour

Aggression


This exciting course provides students with a broad insight into the history, politics and societies of the Spanish-speaking world. The sessions, delivered in Spanish, will combine teacher-led activities and student-led reflective seminars. Students will be very well prepared for continuing with courses involving Spanish/Hispanic Studies at university level. As well as the programme detailed below, all students will enter the national Canning House Essay Competition which our students have won in the past: Historia de España Los reinos de Taifas (El Cid) – palabras heredadas de los musulmanes Los Reyes Católicos y la Reconquista (Granada y la Alhambra (arquitectura) – Boabdil – El descubrimiento de América y Colón) Felipe IV (Las Meninas de Velázquez - pintura) Primera y Segunda República y la Familia Real Española Guerra Civil / La dictadura franquista / La transición (23F: El Tejerazo) Política España: Partidos políticos Gobierno central – gobiernos autonómicos Presidentes del Gobierno (Aldolfo Suárez) – elecciones

Chile: Salvador Allende – Augusto Pinochet (El golpe de estado) Pablo Neruda (poesía) ¡No! – Gael García Bernal (cine) (Comparaciones entre el español de España y el español de Sudamérica)

Argentina: Evita Perón Ernesto (Che) Guevara Diarios de motocicleta – Gael García Bernal (cine) (Comparaciones entre el español de España y el español de Sudamérica)

Extension Classes in the Upper 6th

Spanish Extension Classes


Extension Classes in the Upper 6th

Sport Science Extension Classes Aims To foster interest and enthusiasm for the subject; to help further develop the talents of students showing high potential; to help equip students considering applying to study Sports related courses at university with the practical skills and wider reading experience needed for success in gaining offers in an ever expanding and competitive field.

Scheme of Work The classes will include extension of the following topics:

University study/careers

Stress management

Goal setting

Sports Development Officers

Successful teams

Coaching young athletes

Being an elite athlete

Training diary

London 2012 Olympics – legacy

Performance enhancing drugs

Diet of an athlete

Biomechanical analysis of the high jump

Sports injuries

Technology in sport

Sports supplements

Great leaders in sport

Recovering from exercise

Fitness testing

Pupils will use a variety of presentation techniques when analysing different topic areas and there will be some additional reading in preparation for the course over the Summer break. University courses This extension class will be beneficial to any pupils who are considering applying for any sports related course at university.


Who should take the course? Anyone considering applying to study Acting or Design/Technical courses at Drama Schools Drama/Theatre/Performance Studies at University (single or joint degrees) Aims 

To help equip students with the audition and interview skills and wider experience needed for success in gaining offers in a highly competitive field

To foster interest in and enthusiasm for the subject

To help further develop the talents of students showing high potential

What will the course cover? Initial Introduction: Drama Courses: The Two Routes  Introduction to the academic or vocational training courses available at Universities and Drama Schools (Single/Joint Honours, Acting, Musical Theatre, Stage Management, Technical and Design) 

methods of application

researching the requirements (auditions, workshops, interviews)

preparing the personal statement

The following aspects will be covered but not necessarily in this order as we will respond to requirements for particular auditions/interviews as they arise throughout the year. 

My Favourite… A discussion of a student’s personal favourite plays, performances, actors etc. Suggestions for further research, wider reading and development of interview techniques

From Greek Theatre to Ibsen and the Realists

An overview of the History of Theatre up to the 20th Century

Contemporary theatre (1900 – the present)

An overview of modern theatre practice

Finding & performing classical monologues (contrasting and alternatives)

Finding & performing contemporary monologues (contrasting and alternatives)

Preparation of Audition pieces

The Improvisation Workshop

Mock Interview

You should be prepared to read several plays from different periods and research aspects of contemporary theatre practice.

Extension Classes in the Upper 6th

Theatre Studies Extension Classes


Sixth Form Curriculum: Subjects 2015-16  
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