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ANNA m. SkALkA, Ph.D.

April 1994

Anna m. Skalka, Ph.D. Scientific Director and Senior Vice President Institute for cancer research Fox chase cancer center

title:

retroviral DNA Integration: Anatomy of a hostile takeover

Dr. Anna marie Skalka is Director of the Institute for Cancer Research and Sr. Vice President, Basic Science at the Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia. She received a Ph.D. degree in Microbiology from New York University Medical School. Dr. Skalka’s main research interest is in molecular aspects of the replication of retroviruses. She is internationally recognized for her contributions to our understanding of the biochemical mechanisms by which such viruses (including the AIDS virus) replicate and insert their genetic material into the host genome. Dr. Skalka has published more than 170 peer-reviewed scientific papers and scholarly reviews, has edited several scientific books, and is the inventor on three U.S. patents. Dr. Skalka has also been deeply involved in state, national, and international activities that impinge on the broader, societal implications of scientific research. She is a member of a number of professional societies and was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1994, to the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1996, and to the Board of Governors of the American Academy of Microbiology in 1999.

ALFreD G. kNuDSON, m.D., Ph.D.

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April 1994

Alfred G. knudson, m.D., Ph.D. elected to the National Academy of Sciences, 1988 Winner of the charles S. mott Prize of the General motors cancer research Foundation, 1988 Winner of the American cancer Society medical of honor, 1989 Winner of Albert Lasker Award, 1998 Senior Advisor to the President Fox chase cancer center

title:

the human cancer Gene

Alfred knudson, m.D., Ph.D., a native Californian, is a Senior Member in the Division of Population Science at the Fox Chase Cancer Center. At the City of Hope National Medical Center he treated children with cancer, and investigated viral and genetic causes of cancer, and wrote a book, Genetics and Disease. Later at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, he formulated his well known “two-hit” theory of cancer causation, which explained the relationship between the hereditary and non-hereditary forms of cancer, using the childhood tumor retinoblastoma as a model. The two hits were presumed to involve mutation or loss of a retinoblastoma gene. It also predicted the existence of tumor suppressor genes. In fact, the retinoblastoma gene was the first tumor suppressor gene to be cloned (by Weinberg and his colleagues). At Fox Chase Dr. Knudson has studied hereditary cancer in rats, and is currently pursuing the prevention of cancer in humans with hereditary predisposition to the disease. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and has received a Lasker Award and a General Motors Cancer Research Foundation Prize.

Biomedical Series Booklet  
Biomedical Series Booklet  

Biomedical Series Booklet