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ISSUE

01 SUMMER 2009

An End to Hip Pain Page 8 Dancing Again After Back Surgery Page 4 When to Use the Emergency Room Page 10 Navigating a Cure for Cancer Page 6


President’s Message: Anna Cheung Welcome to St. Mary’s Medical Center’s updated magazine renamed 450health. The look of the magazine may have changed, but our purpose remains the same – to keep you

450health, I would like to tell you more about our community education efforts, new programs, websites and other developments.

apprised of all that we are doing at 450 Stanyan Street and to keep you, your family and our community healthy.

We have added educational classes to help people with joint pain learn more about treatment options and this fall we will

With the goal of being your community hospital of choice, we

host seminars for patients suffering from back pain. In May

continue to make enhancements in our services to meet your

we kicked off a monthly health seminar series open to the

needs and those of your family. In this and future issues of

public. At our seminar in July, we’ll be focusing on cancer, and prevention. I encourage you to participate in any of our classes, seminars, or support groups, all listed on page 14. Patients have often told us they appreciate the timely care that we provide in our Emergency Room. We continue to refine the care and timeliness of care in our ER and aim to get you in to see a provider in 30 minutes when you come in. In this issue of 450health we will share with you some of our long-term patient success stories. We are proud of these stories and find it gratifying to know our physicians provide excellent care and restore the quality of life for our patients.   We encourage you to use 450health as a reference guide for our services and we hope you enjoy the genuine stories about our very own real people. St. Mary’s is your community hospital – specializing in orthopedics, cardiology, oncology, emergency medicine and personal care. At St. Mary’s we are committed to providing highquality, affordable health care to you, your family and our entire community. We look forward to continuing your care.

Anna Cheung

President and CEO St. Mary’s Medical Center

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152 years ago,

eight Sisters of Mercy from Ireland sailed to San Francisco with a few medical supplies and a plan: To cure suffering.

From smallpox in the 1890s, to AIDS in the 1980s,

St. Mary’s has always been, and is still today – committed to a cure.

We believe in our city. We started health care in San Francisco. And are as committed today as we were in 1857. We believe in greatness. Through research, teaching, and smart medicine. We believe in distinction. From orthopedics to cardiology and oncology – in everything we do. We believe in personal care. Because we treat people. Not numbers. We believe in kindness. Through charity, advocacy and compassion. We believe in a better health system. Everyone has the right to be healthy. We believe there is power in spirituality and faith. Including yours.

We are St. Mary’s. We are San Francisco. We are committed to a cure. dr. ritu bansal


Meet Ruth She won’t reveal her age but she feels 17 when she dances

James Zucherman, MD invented and developed with the help of Ken Hsu, MD the X-Stop Interspinous Process Device for symptoms of lumbar spinal stenosis. Approved by the FDA in 2005, the X-Stop has been used by more than 40,000 patients worldwide. Drs. Zucherman, Hsu and Kondrashov at the St. Mary’s Spine Center have done over 600 X-Stop procedures on patients including Ruth Green.

St. Mary’s Spine Center is a comprehensive center with a variety of specialists who specialize in cervical, thoracic and lumbar non-surgical and surgical treatments. Our staff includes: osteopaths, orthopedic spine surgeons, interventional pain specialists, physiatrists, electrodiagnostic medicine physicians, neurological monitoring specialists and clinical researchers.

Ruth is not like every other senior out there. Every Monday

A mother of two and grandmother of five, Ruth has not

We are highly experienced and offer patients the most advanced non-surgical and surgical techniques including:

evening you will find her dancing at a church hall on Judah

slowed down with age. She is able to walk, drive and do all

osteopathic manipulative medicine (OMM), acupuncture, physical medicine and rehabilitation (PMR), spine injections,

Street in San Francisco where she has been a member of

of the things she has always loved to do. She still travels to

motion preservation devices, disc replacements, minimally invasive surgery, deformity correction and pain management.

the San Francisco Caper Cutters Square Dancers Club for

visit her family in Sonoma and Los Angeles. According to

nearly 15 years. Ruth has been dancing for more than 25

Ruth, “There is nothing I can’t do these days. I always have

years because she says dancing makes her feel like she is

something to do.”

If you suffer from back pain, please call our experts at the St. Mary’s Spine Center for an appointment at 1-800-444-2303.

17-years-old all over again. Ruth’s active lifestyle was put in jeopardy in 2001 when she was diagnosed with spinal stenosis. “One day I could hardly walk on my leg. I was in so much pain. I went on a trip with my 60+ Club to Santa Barbara and I could only walk half a block. During the trip I would go in the bathroom and cry with the shower running so no one could hear me. That is when I knew I needed to see a doctor,” said Ruth. Shortly after the trip she went to her doctor, “they tried everything [to ease my pain] including epidurals, but nothing worked. After six months of treatments they finally said I needed to see a surgeon,” said Ruth. Her doctor said that the spine surgeons at St. Mary’s Medical Center were at the forefront of a new, non-invasive back surgery, something called the X-Stop. Continued on page 14.

ON THE COVER: Ruth Green had the X-Stop Spacer back surgery performed over seven years ago by Dr.

Dr. Jim Zucherman

St. Mary’s Spine Surgeon pictured with a whale vertebrae

James Zucherman at St. Mary’s Medical Center.

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450health | Summer 2009


Committed to a cure C ancer nav igator Cheri Goudy

Q: What extra (special) services do you offer patients?

Q: What is the most common question you hear from your patients?

My position is new to St. Mary’s and I am the first Cancer

Most people want to know if they are going to survive the

Navigator. I follow all my patients and I coordinate

disease, “Am I going to make it?” They want to know their

as many services as I can for them, whether it is the

prognosis. The doctors will leave the room and they will say

American Cancer Society or breast cancer support groups.

to me, “What did he/she just say?” They don’t really hear it;

I help them to get their medication covered, talk to their

they just hear the word, “Cancer.”

insurance company or whatever has to be done to get their

Q: Tell me about yourself?

patient and you get it all; the patient is physically sick and

I am a third generation native of San Francisco. My parents

they need emotional support. Cancer is so all encompassing.

are Italian and were both born and raised in North Beach.

It affects everyone around the patient – their family, their

I grew up in Sunset, went to Mercy High School and then

friends, their work and their leisure. Oncology nursing allows

went to college at USF and received a BSN. I am a local girl

you to formulate a plan of care that is very individualized.

and have never lived anywhere but San Francisco. All of my

You deal with a multitude of symptoms and managing all of

family receives health care at St. Mary’s. I have been married

those is challenging, it is never boring and always important.

for almost 20 years and have 2 boys, ages 18 and 14.

Q: What cancer services does St. Mary’s Medical Center offer patients?

Q: What makes being an oncology nurse so special?

We offer a variety of services. We can see any kind

Oncology care is the core of nursing. It is everything

of medical or surgical oncology patient. We do all

I went to nursing school for. You care for an oncology

chemotherapies. We take care of infusion patients; we have inpatient and outpatient units for cancer patients. We have a very specialized melanoma center and there are not a lot of places that have clinical trials like we do for melanoma patients. We have a breast cancer support group for both veteran cancer patients as well as newly diagnosed patients. We have a breast consultation panel with Dr. Michael Lagios. Patients can self-refer to [this panel] and they can come from another hospital or organization. There is no cost and they get a second opinion about their breast cancer diagnosis. As far as I know, we are one of the only hospitals to offer this service. You get a wide variety of physicians discussing your pathology/

Cheri Goudy R.N.

results and offering a second opinion.

St. Mary’s Cancer Navigator

on lab/test results. Patients are overwhelmed when they

Q: What is the most satisfying thing about your job?

get a cancer diagnosis. I try to keep them focused and

First of all I love my job! I love my patients. At the end of the

make sure they are moving forward. I also do a significant

day I feel like I have done something and helped someone.

amount of support and teaching.

Even if I have had a bad day, if I had to hold someone’s hand

care handled. I arrange scans for them and I follow-up

while they heard bad news. I thank St. Mary’s for allowing I call patients at home and it makes a big difference

me to work in this environment. I also have to say that I

to them. I call anywhere from five to ten patients

work with the greatest oncologists in the world; they treat

depending on the day. I can have ten voicemails when

me as part of the team. Our doctors are bright and caring

I come in to work with patient questions/concerns and

individuals who make my days much more rewarding.

then I go through those and call the patients back and I give a lot of reassurance and make sure the patient

Q: What’s your philosophy on life? How do you live your life every day?

knows someone cares.

The work I have chosen helps me appreciate life more than

decide which issues need to be referred to the physician.

most. My philosophy is to learn to appreciate life. I have a

Q: How do you approach a new cancer patient?

lot of fun especially when I am not working. I also try to

It depends on the patient and how they come to me. I get

people ask how I am doing. I love being with my family

physician referrals and often have staff call a referral. Most

and experiencing all they have to offer. I know that I am

times I try to meet the patient with the oncologist. I try to let

blessed with my health as well. Life is not a dress rehearsal.

the patient talk and tell me where they are with their cancer.

You can’t re-do most of what happens in your life, so love

People are at different stages of their illness. Some people

this time. Just like I tell my kids, “You are not going to be

are really sick in the middle of treatment and sometimes

14 again, enjoy it!”

keep a smile on my face and have a happy response when

people are at the end of their illness. Every patient is an individual and I think that is the beauty

To learn more about St. Mary’s Cancer Navigator, please call (415) 750-5686. St. Mary’s is committed to a cure.

of this job. People ask me all the time to write down what I do, but it is hard to put into words. Every day is different and every person is different. Usually just listening is a huge part of my day.

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A Walk on the Beach PATIENT PROFILE: Suzanne Kaye Patient of Dr. William McGann by Christina Chandler, St. Mary’s Public Relations Specialist

“Yesterday I had my one month follow-up needed to blow warm air in the gown to increase her body temperature before surgery. “If your body is warm it is supposed to help with the anesthesia and surgery,” she said.

with Dr. McGann and I was able to throw out my walker, now I am using a cane,” said Suzanne Kaye. Kaye had both her hips replaced on April 13, 2009. Ironically, the first time I called to speak with Kaye I missed her because she was out on a walk, a walk that would not have been possible for her six weeks ago.

In the morning after the surgery Esther Pong, a physical therapist, came to Kaye’s room with a walker. Esther asked Kaye to stand up, but Kaye was hesitant. “I thought what have I done, have I broken myself? I stood up for a moment, it was exhausting and then I napped for two hours,” said Kaye. However, the following day Kaye found she was able to walk, with the aid of a walker, to the door of her room and then down the hall to the elevator. Finally on day three, Kaye walked a big loop around the 7th floor of the hospital without resting.

The breaking point for Kaye was in October 2008 when she and her husband visited Hawaii together for the first time. Kaye was in too much pain to walk on the beach. For two years Kaye has been taking pain killers prescribed by an arthritis specialist with the hopes of avoiding surgery. However less than two months after returning from Hawaii, Kaye was in Dr. McGann’s office at St. Mary’s Medical Center (SMMC). McGann compared Kaye’s recent X-rays to her X-rays two years prior and the deterioration was evident. Kaye needed to have both of her hips replaced.

Soon after, Kaye learned how to walk on inclines and to step over curbs. “Esther took me into the stairwell and I practiced on a step to make sure I could handle a curb,” said Kaye. Meanwhile Hannah Stevenson, an occupational therapist, spent time with Kaye preparing her for the daily tasks she would encounter when she went home. Stevenson showed Kaye how to complete rudimentary tasks like putting on her socks and pulling on her pants. “She had a bunch of gizmos and grabber tools to help you do things,” said Kaye.

In January 2009 Kaye attended a pre-surgery orientation with other SMMC joint patients where she had all of her questions answered. “I was comfortable asking questions because it was such a small group. They divided us into groups based on what we were having, either hip or knee surgery,” said Kaye. The staff, which included an occupational therapist and physical therapist, went over general procedures, expectations, and pre-and post-surgery preparation. With advice from the physical therapist, Kaye continued doing regular exercises for three months prior to surgery to strengthen her legs and upper body. This would greatly help in the recovery process.

By Friday morning, only four days after having both of her hips replaced, Kaye was able to go home. Her surgery was a complete success. “Everything about my surgery was really positive,” said Kaye. She used her walker constantly for the first two days and then gradually used it less and less. Now she uses a cane, just to warn others to watch out for her. and walks with her husband daily.

Kaye had surgery on April 13, 2009. The day of surgery she found herself wearing an enormous hospital gown, and warm, cozy yellow socks. She was relieved to find out that the gown was so large because the surgical nurses 450health | Summer 2009

Dr. William McGann

Chairman St. Mary’s Orthopedics

Do you think you are a candidate for total joint replacement surgery? Take our online Joint Pain Quiz at www.jointpainquiz.org and sign up to attend a free informational seminar.

Or call 1-800-444-2303 for a referral to one of our orthopedic surgeons. Dr. William McGann is a board-certified orthopedic surgeon and performs both hip and knee replacements at St. Mary’s Medical Center.

Kaye says she feels better, “There isn’t the sharp, debilitating pain like there was before. It is just gone.” 8

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450health | Summer 2009


Is it an emergency? At St. Mary’s we Treat People. Not Numbers. Sometimes it can be confusing to know when you should head to the Emergency Room. Tin Do, MD, an emergency physician, and the other staff of St. Mary’s ER tell patients who call: “If you believe it to be an emergency and don’t think it can wait to see your doctor, you should come in. You know your body best and only you know when your body feels strange.” According to the American College of Emergency Physicians, there are specific health conditions that are considered life threatening and others that require seeking immediate medical attention. If you or someone you know have an emergency, come to the ER. If it is a life threatening emergency or if you think the condition will worsen on the way to the hospital, always call “911.”

Below are guidelines of conditions that warrant visiting the ER. LIFE THREATENING emergencies include: Heart attack (chest pain/chest pressure with or without neck or arm pain)

Dr. Tin Do

Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath

Medical Director St. Mary’s Emergency Department

Bleeding which does not stop after applying pressure Loss of consciousness Unexplained stupor, drowsiness or disorientation Significant trauma (to the head, stomach, chest) Stroke (sudden weakness/numbness of the face, arm or leg; sudden vision loss or inability to speak) Allergic reactions (when breathing becomes labored or feeling like your throat is swollen)

Why You Should Get a Primary Care Doctor In instances when a health condition is non life-threatening it is best to call your primary care physician (PCP). PCPs can typically advise you and recommend treatment over the phone based on your symptoms. Everyone should establish care

Broken bones

Instances when you should call your doctor (Primary Care Physician):

Persistent unexplained fever even with Tylenol use

Cough/cold

she will become familiar with your medical history, medications and treatments. Another added benefit of having a PCP

Persistent or severe vomiting

Earaches

is that they are generally available 24 hours a day or have colleagues on call to answer your questions anytime.

Vomiting or coughing blood

Fever/Flu

Poisoning (if possible first contact local poison control)

Minor burns (including sunburns)

Severe burns

Minor cuts (bleeding has stopped)

Suicidal or homicidal feelings

Sore throat (but without difficulty breathing or swallowing)

Unusual or persistent abdominal pain

Sprains

Animal bites (may require rabies or tetanus shot)

STD

Other times when you SHOULD come to the ER:

with a PCP and see them regularly. This physician relationship will enable one doctor to be your health advocate and he/

If you need a primary care doctor, call our referral line at (415) 750-5599 or go to docin48hours.org We’ll get you in, get you better, and get you going again.

Note: The above conditions generally do not require an ER visit, but if any of these conditions are severe and/or persistent and you cannot reach your physician, please do visit an ER.

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450health | Summer 2009


Meet Ruth continuted from page 3

St. Mary’s Medical Center

Foundation News Through charitable gifts to St. Mary’s Medical Center

Palliative Care Suite, $60,000

Foundation, donors help doctors, nurses, and other team

With a generous gift from Ken Hsu, MD and James

members to bring together their expertise, deploy the latest

Zucherman, MD, St. Mary’s completely renovated an end-

technology, and continue the tradition of personalized and

of-life suite for patients and their families. It was designed to

thoughtful care.

provide comfort and assist with extended family visits.

St. Mary’s is very proud to be a hospital that provides old

Speaker Nancy Pelosi Provides Funding for New

fashioned medical care with state-of-the-art technology. All

Cancer Center, $470,000

of us appreciate a kind word and a warm helping hand, and

Through Speaker Pelosi’s sponsorship, St. Mary’s Foundation

the assurance that advanced equipment is readily accessible.

is scheduled to receive federal funding to help purchase a new linear accelerator (radiation therapy) for the new Cancer Center. The Center will bring together radiation

Having been a United State Air Force hospital and medical

and chemotherapies with other services to provide a full

center commander, and medical inspector, I can say from both

continuum of treatment.

an expert and a patient perspective, the caring, compassion,

Now seven years later, Ruth is still square dancing every

Zucherman and Kenneth Hsu had already been working

week to keep herself young. She says, “I don’t want to tell my

on the X-Stop device for 10 years. The X-Stop was still

current [dance] partner my age because he is much younger

undergoing clinical trials (the X-Stop was approved by the

than me.” Ruth always dresses up to square dance, “Some

FDA 2005). Ruth was in miserable pain so she was very

people wear jeans, but I like to wear my fancy dresses, they

excited when Dr. Zucherman told her she was a candidate

make me feel feminine.” Ruth says she gets a lot of attention

for surgery. When given the option to try a new surgical

when she wears her square dancing dresses to class and

procedure that may get her up and dancing again, Ruth says

sometimes around town.

the answer was “YES from the start.”

X-Stop devices placed in her spine to alleviate the pain in her back and legs. Ruth’s daughter traveled from Los Angeles expecting to take care of her mother for a week or more, but

When asked if she would go through the surgery again Ruth

she soon realized that her services weren’t required. Ruth

did not hesitate, “Oh yeah, and I always recommend it to

was able to take care of herself again after only three days

others.” And as for her dancing, Ruth says, “I have always

of rest. “I also did some physical therapy at St. Mary’s and it

loved to dance! I am good at it, I am light on my feet and it is

was not painful at all,” says Ruth. She did walking exercises

just fun. I even danced with Lawrence Welk one time!”

and other rehabilitation with a physical therapist in order to

If you want to learn more about the X-Stop, or make an appointment with one of St. Mary’s Spine Center experts, call 1-800-444-2303.

get her moving again.

“Meet Dr. Right”

Play on the New Greens at The Olympic Club The Foundation will host its 30th Annual Golf & Tennis

John R. Haydon, Jr., MD

Ruth says, “I never see myself slowing down, I will be dancing forever.”

Ruth had the X-Stop surgery in June 2002 and had two

Upcoming Events & Projects

and courtesy from your staff was superb.

At the time of Ruth’s surgery in 2002, Drs. James

Classic at The Olympic Club on Monday, August 31, 2009. Greens have been re-designed for the U.S. Open 2012. To Foundation Dollars Improve the Delivery of Health Care

reserve your foursome, please call (415) 750-5790.

At St. Mary’s, we’re committed to

Acute Rehabilitation Unit Renovation, $500,000

Help Support St. Mary’s Future of Healing

For persons facing the challenges of rehabilitation, daily

St. Mary’s is addressing two major health threats that touch

surroundings become part of their mental and emotional

our lives far too often: cancer and vascular disease. Your gift

healing. The renovation includes new furniture and

To see a Primary Care Physician at

can help create a new Cancer Center, new Vascular Suite,

amenities for all patient rooms, remodeling of the kitchen,

and purchase a second digital mammography machine for

St. Mary’s, call 415-750-5599

upgrades to the rehabilitation gym, and new flooring

breast cancer screening. To make your tax-deductible gift

and paint. It provides our patients with a comforting

or for more information, please call (415) 750-5790 or visit

environment and a sense of hope.

www.stmarysmedicalcenter.org/Foundation.

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access, prevention, and advocacy.

or go to docin48hours.org

Primary Care Physician St. Mary’s DocIn48Hours Program

dr. gene kim 13

450health | Summer 2009


Classes and Support Groups

St. Mary’s Medical Center: Frequently Called Phone Numbers

All SMMC programs and classes are FREE. Please note classes and programs are not held on holidays.

Main Hospital Operator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (415) 668-1000

450health Seminar – Cancer 101

Lymphedema Awareness for the Community

Specialist Referral Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (800) 444-2303

Wednesday, July 15, 2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Cafeteria, Level B 415-750-5524

Second Wednesday: 6:00 p.m. 3rd Floor East Conference Room 415-750-5900

Primary Care Physician Referral Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (415) 750-5599

Back Pain Class

Maintaining Independence after Stroke

Physical Therapist Karl von Tiesenhausen will teach you tips and tricks for having a healthy spine and reducing pain. Wednesday, August 19, 5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. Cafeteria – Level B 415-750-4991 or Leigh.Allen@chw.edu

For stroke survivors and their caregivers - strategies for leading the most fulfilling life possible Wednesday, September 23, 5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. Cafeteria – Level B 415-750-4991 or Leigh.Allen@chw.edu

Cardiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (415) 750-5779

Blood Pressure Screenings

Mall Walkers

Foundation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (415) 750-5790

Mondays: 12:15 p.m. – 1:15 p.m. Sister Mary Philippa Clinic, 2235 Hayes St. Fifth Floor, Room F 415-750-5959

Get Fit at Stonestown Mall! Thursdays: 9:00 a.m. Center Court 415-750-5800 or 415-564-8848

Breast Cancer Support Group

Menopause Matters Support Group

Outpatient Infusion Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (415) 750-5635

Tuesdays: 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. 6th Floor – Room T630 415-750-5775

Second Tuesday: 7:15 p.m. – 8:45 p.m. 6th Floor – Room T630 415-750-5775

Physical Therapy/Outpatient Therapies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (415) 750-5900

Diabetes Educational Classes

Running Without Injury

Mondays: 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Cardiology Conference Room – Level C 415-750-5513

Get ready for marathon season with the help of physical therapist and athletic trainer, Ashley Scott Bernstein. Wednesday, July 15, 6:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Cafeteria – Level B 415-750-4991 or Leigh.Allen@chw.edu

PROS (Plastic Reconstructive Orthopedic Surgery Center) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (415) 750-5588

Senior Movies

Senior Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (415) 750-5800

Gentle Yoga Classes

Thursdays: 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. St. Mary’s Hall, 2255 Hayes St. Room H2-4 415-750-5800

Welcome Back – Movie kick-off in June Enjoy free, full-length, newly released movies! First and Third Tuesdays: 1:30 p.m. St. Mary’s Hall, 2255 Hayes St. Room H2-7 Call 415-750-4849 for movie schedule.

Total Joint Replacement Surgery Lectures

4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Thursdays: July 16, Sept. 3, Sept. 17, Oct. 8, Oct. 22 and Nov. 5 3rd Floor East Conference Room 1-888-457-5202

T’ai Chi Classes

Tuesdays: 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. St. Mary’s Hall, 2255 Hayes St. Room H2-7 415-750-5800

Lifeline Personal Help System (CHW Community)

Independence for Seniors – 24 hour Emergency Response System $45.00 per month and $50.00 installation fee (one time) Call 415-750-5530 for more details.

450health | Summer 2009

Weight Loss Surgery Support Group

Second Wednesday: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. Cafeteria – Level B 415-668-3200 14

Admitting/Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (415) 750-5705

Diabetes Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (415) 750-5513 Financial Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (866) 240-2087

Laboratory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (415) 750-5750 Medical Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (415) 750-5767

Pre-Surgical Admissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (415) 750-4900

Radiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (415) 750-5770 Same Day Surgery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (415) 750-5754

Spine Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (415) 750-5570 Spiritual Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (415) 750-5718 Volunteer Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (415) 750-5646 San Francisco Wound Care and Reconstructive Surgery Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (415) 750-5535 Volunteer Opportunities

Do you have time on your hands? Dedicate your time and talent to serving others a few days a week! St. Mary’s has a wide variety of volunteer opportunities. To learn more call 415-750-5646. St. Mary’s Medical Center (SMMC), 450 Stanyan Street, San Francisco, CA 94117/ (415) 668-1000 www.stmarysmedicalcenter.org / President: Anna Cheung / 450health is produced quarterly by the SMMC Marketing and Communications Dept. as a community service to its friends and neighbors. Information contained in 450health is not intended for the purposes of diagnosing or prescribing. Please consult your physician before undertaking any form of medical treatment or adopting any exercise program or dietary guidelines. If you wish to be removed from our mailing list, email christina.hayeschandler@chw.edu; or write to her at 450 Stanyan St., San Francisco, CA 94117.

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450health | Summer 2009


450 Stanyan St. San Francisco, CA 94117

We Treat People. Not Numbers. St. Mary’s ER Care in 30 minutes See one of our ER docs in 30 minutes or less. Because your emergency is our emergency. Stanyan at Fulton


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