Issuu on Google+

Speculator Lake Pleasant   

Community Revitalization Plan 2013 

This document was prepared for the  New York State Department of State  with funds provided under Title 11 of the  Environmental Protection Fund. 

 

THE CHAZEN    COMPANIES


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS  The Speculator Lake Pleasant Community Revitalization Plan would not be  possible without the support, expertise and input from the following people and  organizations:  The Speculator Lake Pleasant Community Revitalization Committee  Joan Braunius  Lynne Brown  Bob Camoin  Del Cook  Mary Finckle  Mitzi Fox  Cheryl Paestella  Georgine Rausch  Special Thanks  Letty Rudes, Mayor  Village of Speculator Village Board  Neil McGovern, Supervisor  Town of Lake Pleasant Town Board  Andrew Labruzzo ‐ NYS Department of State, Division of Coastal Resources  Ann Melious ‐ Hamilton County   Anna Smith ‐ Adirondack Speculator Region Chamber of Commerce/Office of  Tourism  Lake Pleasant‐Sacandaga Association  Consultant Team     

   


TABLE OF CONTENTS    INTRODUCTION ..................................................................... 1  BACKGROUND ....................................................................... 1  PLANNING STUDY AREA .......................................................... 2  REVITALIZATION VISION & APPROACH ........................................ 4  PLANNING PROCESS & KEY FINDINGS ......................................... 6  Community Revitalization Committee ............................. 6  Inventory & Analysis ....................................................... 6  Business Characteristics ................................................ 16  Strength, Weakness, Opportunities, Threats Analysis .... 21  RECOMMENDATIONS ............................................................ 24  FUNDING & IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY ................................. 46   

APPENDICES   

APPENDIX A:  

COMMUNITY PROFILE 

APPENDIX B:   

BUSINESS OWNER SURVEY RESULTS 

APPENDIX C:  

PUBLIC WORKSHOP SUMMARY 

APPENDIX D:  

PRELIMINARY COST ESTIMATES     

   


INTRODUCTION  The Speculator Lake Pleasant Community Revitalization Plan (Revitalization Plan)  is a blueprint that provides the communities of Speculator and Lake Pleasant with  a strategy to grow and sustain in a manner that capitalizes on its existing  community, cultural, recreational, and natural resources. Prepared with funds  provided by the New York State Department of State (NYSDOS) under Title 11 of  the Environmental Protection Fund (EPF), the Revitalization Plan includes an  analysis of the area’s existing land use conditions and economic outlook. When  preparing this plan, an advisory committee comprised of residents, business  owners, and local officials examined demographic, land use, and economic data,  conducted a business owner survey, hosted public workshops, and reached out  many individuals within the community. The Speculator Lake Pleasant Community  Revitalization Plan includes recommendations and concept plans that are  intended to improve the quality of life for residents and visitors alike. The plan  also includes a strategy that outlines the steps necessary for its implementation. 

BACKGROUND  Over the last few years, a dedicated group of  residents have worked tirelessly to beautify the  Speculator and Lake Pleasant community. With  significant help from local businesses and elected  officials, beautiful flower arrangements and  plantings now adorn street corners, sidewalks,  storefronts, and parklands during the warmer  spring and summer months. Thoughtfully placed,  locally crafted benches are now situated  throughout the community offering pedestrians a  quiet place of respite. And where there was once a  vacant piece of waterfront land is now a beautiful  community park and public dock. This plan is an extension of these efforts and is  built on the spirit of volunteerism that is so prolific within this community. 

1 | P a g e    


PLANNING STUDY AREA  The study area for the Speculator Lake  Pleasant Community Revitalization Plan  focuses on the NYS Route 8 and Route 30  corridors, the commercial core and  community gateways. The central focal  point of the study area is the NYS Route 8  and Route 30 corridor from the ‘Four  Corner’ intersection to the Village Beach,  Pavilion, and Pathway Park areas.  Community gateways include the  southern entrance along NYS Route 8 and  the northern entrance along NYS Route  30. Key land uses within study area  include local businesses, municipal  facilities (e.g., Village Hall, Lake Pleasant  Library, Speculator Fire Department,  etc.), recreational and open space  facilities (e.g.,  Village Beach, Pavilion and  Pathway Parks, Osborne Park, etc.), Lake  Pleasant School, Camp of the Woods, and  Oak Mountain.  The area with the vicinity  of the Hamilton County Municipal Center  in the Town of Lake Pleasant (located  along NYS Route 8 to the south) is also  considered a gateway and this activity  center was evaluated during this planning  process. The Speculator Lake Pleasant  Study Area figure is provided on the next  page.   

2 | P a g e    


SPECULATOR LAKE PLEASANT COMMUNITY  REVITALIZATION STUDY AREA 

3 | P a g e  


REVITALIZATION VISION & APPROACH  The word “revitalization” means  many things to many people. For  some, it is ensuring that good paying  jobs are once again available to  everyone. For others, it means that  businesses are doing well, growing  and customers are satisfied. Some  feel it is about restoring certain  1960’s Speculator Post Card  things to the way they once were.  Finally, there are those that think revitalization means enhancing a community’s  spirit and promoting civic engagement. For the communities of Speculator and  Lake Pleasant, revitalization means all of these things and more.  Through this planning process, Speculator and Lake Pleasant have identified a  number of physical and programmatic initiatives that are intended to improve the  economic condition and aesthetic quality of the community. This approach seeks  to retain existing residents and businesses while simultaneously attracting new  residents, investment, and visitors. Some of the key recommendations that are  intended to achieve this goal include the following (please note that a complete  list of fully detailed recommendations is included in the Recommendation section  on page 23):  

Cultivate economic development leadership via the creation of an  economic development working group and help to facilitate respective  economic development initiatives. 

Develop a comprehensive events strategy via an events leadership  committee. 

Develop and execute a marketing and branding initiative that capitalizes on  local and regional assets and initiatives. 

Advance streetscape and public facility improvements that enhance the  community’s “curb appeal” and user experience.  4 | P a g e  

 


Create a well‐planned and attractive wayfinding signage system. 

Improve community aesthetics by addressing site design, sign related  issues, and other concerns within the community. 

There are many components associated with each of these recommendations; in  order to bring them to fruition it will require a significant amount of time and  resources. While each of these projects will contribute to revitalization, the goal  of this plan is to implement each component over the next several years as part of  a coordinated strategy.  This approach may seem daunting given its scope. However, as the saying goes,  when it comes to getting anything done, “think big, start small, and act now!”  With this in mind, it is important to consider those projects that might serve as  catalysts, inspiring continued commitment to implementing the plan. The Funding  and Implementation Strategy section (see  page 46) identifies short, medium, and  long‐term priorities, and it is important to  recognize that any one project may rise  to the top at any time and inspire  individuals to action. To this end, such  projects as organizing an events  Volunteers and Village employees  leadership committee, improving Oak  help construct Osborne Point Park  Mountain, restoring the old theater for  local performances, attracting a new convenience store, expanding mountain  biking or ice skating opportunities, or reconstructing the Four Corners  intersection, are all worthwhile and may be implemented at any time if it stirs the  imagination and engenders a feeling of success.     

5 | P a g e    


PLANNING PROCESS & KEY FINDINGS  Speculator Lake Pleasant Community Revitalization Committee  The Speculator Lake Pleasant  Community Revitalization Committee  (Revitalization Committee) consisted of  year‐round and seasonal residents,  business owners, and local officials  representing a broad spectrum of the  community. Throughout the planning  process, the Revitalization Committee  sought input from the entire community  as they gathered information, explored issues and opportunities, and developed  the recommendations that are outlined in this plan.  The Revitalization  Committee hosted two (2) public workshops, conducted a comprehensive  business survey, took part in a recommendations prioritization exercise, and  maintained a project website that was used to distribute information and solicit  input from the public throughout the planning process. The Revitalization  Committee also conducted outreach to land owners, local businesses, Hamilton  County officials, the NYS Department of Transportation (NYSDOT) and NYS  Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), as well as many other  stakeholders that will play an important role in the implementation of this plan.   Inventory & Analysis  The first step in the planning process was to conduct an inventory and analysis of  the study area’s existing social, economic, built, and natural resource conditions.  The Revitalization Committee gathered and examined information from a wide  range of sources including the U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics,  NYS Department of Environmental Conservation, NYS Department of Labor, NYS  Department of Transportation, Adirondack Park Agency, Hamilton County Real  Property Tax Department, and Village and Town officials. The Revitalization  Committee also reviewed previous planning initiatives and studies (e.g., Town of  Lake Pleasant Comprehensive Plan, Adirondack Park Regional Assessment Project  6 | P a g e    


data, etc.) and examined nearby municipal facilities and infrastructure such as  roads, pedestrian networks, parks, and emergency, sewer, and water services.  Geographic Information System (GIS) and Computer Aided Design (CAD) software  was also used to analyze and map relevant data and proposed initiatives.   Much of the information gathered was utilized to prepare a Community Profile.   The Community Profile is provided in Appendix A.  Key findings are provided in  the following section.   Population Trends:   Population within the study area has consistently declined since its peak  population of 348 residents in 2000.1 According to 2010 U.S. Census figures there  are now approximately 324 year‐round residents, which represent a seven  percent decline in population. During this same period, Hamilton County has  experienced a 10 percent decline in population. These figures illustrate the need  to retain existing residents and attract new ones. They also illustrate that the area  is slightly more resilient to population loss when compared to Hamilton County as  a whole.  Population Trends  6,000 5,000 4,000

Study Area

3,000

Speculator & Lake Pleasant

2,000

Hamilton County

1,000 0 1950

1960

1970

1980

1990

2000

2010

 

                                                            

1

 Given the limits of the study area, U.S. Census Information is based on the Village of Speculator “County  Subdivision” level data. 

7 | P a g e    


While the U.S. Census Bureau does not estimate the number of seasonal residents  in a community, it does tally the number of seasonally occupied housing units.  According to these figures there are 354 seasonal housing units within the study  area, which accounts for approximately 68 percent of all the housing units (522).  Assuming an average of two (2) to three (3) persons per unit, the area’s  population has the potential to increase by as much as 700 to 1,000 seasonal  residents during the busy summer months.   In addition to a dwindling year‐round population, the age divide within the study  area continues to widen. In 1990 the median age was 38 and in 2010 it had  increased to 53. This trend is predominantly a result of significant decline in  residents between the ages of 0‐17 (56 percent decline) and 18‐64 (19 percent  decline). In comparison, Hamilton County and New York State median age is two  to 15 years younger, respectively. While these trends are regional in scope, the  need to attract a younger demographic in order to sustain essential services and  to provide for future growth is even more critical at the local level.  These trends  also highlight the importance of engaging the senior population, and fully  leveraging personal and professional experience of this demographic.  Furthermore, with an aging population the need to develop a more universally  accessible community with regards pedestrian mobility and safety is more  important.  Study Area Age Cohorts  300 250 1990 2000 2010

Population

200 150 100 50 0 0‐17

18‐64

65+

Median Age

 

8 | P a g e    


The importance of being responsive to this demographic trend becomes more  poignant when future population projections are taken into consideration.  According to the Cornell Program on Applied Demographics it is estimated that   Hamilton County is projected to experience a 56 percent decline in population by  2040. Mirroring the aforementioned aging trends, Cornell’s analyses estimates  that Hamilton County will only have 128 people between the ages of 20 and 29 by  the year 2040. Currently the study area has approximately 32 people that  accounts for 9.8 percent of the total population within this age cohort.  Extrapolating the County’s projected rate of decline for the same age cohort (±64  percent), it is estimated the study area would have approximately 11 to 12 people  between the ages of 20 and 29 by the year 2040.  Projected Population: Hamilton County  6,000 5,000 Population

4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 0 2010

2015

2020

2025

2030

2035

2040

Land Use Highlights:  There are many community, cultural, open space, and recreational resources  within the study area. The following is a select list of these resources that were  identified during the inventory and analysis process.  

Recreation and Pavilion Park   This 12‐acre park (located opposite the Village Beach) is composed of a  covered pavilion that is used for numerous events (including winter ice  9 | P a g e  

 


skating), a ball field, bocce and basketball courts, a playground, and a  gazebo. The pavilion houses public restrooms that are in desperate need of  upgrades. The Park’s large parking area is used throughout the year,  particularly for the local farmers market and parking for snowmobile  trailers. The nearby boat launch provides entry to the Sacandaga River and  Lake Pleasant for small watercraft such as canoes, kayaks and, small  motorboats. It also provides water access for the Speculator Fire  Department.  

Sacandaga River Community Park (Pathway Park)  Located adjacent to the Recreation and  Pavilion Park along the Sacandaga River, the  Pathway Park includes a number of  boardwalks and pathways that follow the  course of the river and nearby uplands; the  park includes educational displays, picnic  areas and moderately handicapped  accessible areas.  The park also provides an  opportunity for residents and visitors to  explore wetlands, transitional forest and  upland timber ecology. During winter  months snowmobile trails within the park provide access from Lake  Pleasant to nearby trail networks. Future plans include connecting these  trails to nearby businesses, thereby reducing the number of snowmobiles  that travel along NYS Route 8 and 30.  

Osborne Point Park and Village Beach  Across NYS Route 8 and Route 30 from the Recreation and Pavilion and  Pathway Parks is the Village Public Beach, which provides swimming and  snowmobile access to Lake Pleasant. On the opposite side of the Sacandaga  River is Osborne Point Park, which has been the focus of many new  beautification efforts including attractive landscaping, flower gardens, and  10 | P a g e  

 


places of respite. Osborne Point Park also offers public docking for those  that visit.  

Speculator Loop Mountain Biking  The Speculator Loop Mountain Biking trail system consists of two bike  loops, a seven mile trail and a 17 mile trail, which traverse wide, hard‐ packed logging roads that vary in terrain. Located along these bike loops  are several hiking trailheads, picnic spots, and parking areas. There have  been recent discussions about connecting these existing mountain bike  loops to planned mountain bike trails at Oak Mountain Ski Center.  

NYSDEC Moffitt Beach Campground  Located along NYS Route 8, the NYSDEC  campground has a total of 261  campsites, which is the largest of its  kind in the Adirondack Park. Open from  May to October, the cost for overnight  camping is $22 per night. The  campground includes day facilities and  hiking and fishing opportunities.  According to the NYSDEC, the five (5) year average attendance at the  campground was approximately 46,000 people. The availability of these  campsites helps offset the limited number of seasonal rentals and hotel  rooms during the peak summer season. Currently there are no transit or  multimodal opportunities connecting Moffitt Beach Campground to the  study area’s commercial services. 

In addition to these facilities, the Lake Pleasant School (Elm Lake Road), Friends of  Lake Pleasant Library (NYS Route 8), and Lake Pleasant Senior Citizen Center (NYS  Route 8) are important land uses within the study area. The Lake Pleasant School  has numerous community and recreational amenities that are used for a variety  of local events and programs. The Friends of Lake Pleasant Library (NYS Route 8)  not only provides traditional library services, but it also serves an important  11 | P a g e    


community center. The Lake Pleasant Senior Citizen Center (NYS Route 8) has a  number of senior support services and activities.  While every local business play an important economic role within the Speculator  and Lake Pleasant community, given their respective size, visitation rates, and  number of employees, Oak Mountain Ski Center and Camp of the Woods have  been highlighted below.  

Oak Mountain Ski Center  Located along Elm Lake Road,  approximately 0.5 miles from the  ‘four‐corners’ intersection, Oak  Mountain Ski Center is an  important community resource.  After closing in 2007, the  Hamilton County Industrial  Development Agency (IDA)  assumed ownership and granted  the Village third party  “receivership” status to operate the ski center. Working with the Village,  Friends of Oak Mountain (a locally organized non‐profit) helped reopen the  mountain in an effort to support the local economy and maintain this  regionally significant recreational opportunity.   Today, through a lease‐to‐own agreement with the IDA, Oak Mountain is  operated privately. Work to expand the facility into a four‐season‐oriented  operation is now underway. In winter months, the mountain is open for  skiing, snowboarding, and tubing. During the summertime, activities now  include a zipline and chairlift rides for mountain top picnics. The new  owners have also hosted several events that have helped to increase  visitation during “shoulder season” months, including a fall‐themed  Oaktoberfest.  

12 | P a g e    


Needed improvements to Oak Mountain include additional snowmaking  capacity as well as parking lot and access road upgrades. These  improvements would not only support increased use and visitation to Oak  Mountain, it would provide opportunities to develop the six IDA owned lots  that adjoin the access road. Improvement to the existing four inch  waterline and sewer capacity would greatly increase the areas growth  potential.  According to the Oak Mountain Ski Center’s business plan, long‐ term expansion of the facility may include a water park and hotel  accommodations.  

Camp of the Woods  Camp of the Woods is a ±90 acre  Christian family‐oriented resort  and conference center located  along Lake Pleasant. The facility  attracts over 1,600 visitors a day  during the summer months.  The  camp employs 50 people on a  year‐round basis and upwards of  300 individuals during the peak,  summer season. The year‐round facility is complemented by 1,400 foot  natural beach, a 1,300 seat auditorium, a state‐of‐the‐art sports complex,  tennis courts, a challenge course, climbing wall, and zip‐line. Camp of the  Woods offers numerous programs and activities to its guests including  special services, guest lectures, musical series, and recreational activities.  While it offers a wide variety of services and amenities, Camp of the Woods  encourages the patronage of local businesses. This was reflected in the  Business Owner Survey, where several business owners noted the  importance of Camp of the Woods to their business.   As a non‐profit organization, the facility is somewhat limited by how it can  support local events and organizations and the types of activities it can  offer non‐guests. However, within these parameters, Camp of the Woods  13 | P a g e  

 


continues to offer use of its facilities to local students during the winter  months and helps to coordinate home improvements for the needy in the  area through the Leaders in Further Training (LIFT) program. In order to  provide housing for employees, Camp of the Woods has purchased several  nearby properties, which it continues to pay local property taxes on.  Overnight Accommodations:  Equally important to the community are the number of overnight  accommodations. These businesses not only provide employment opportunities,  they are essential to the long‐term viability of the local tourism economy.  According to the 2006 Economic Impact of Expenditures by Tourists on Northern  New York State, there were 38 properties with hotel, motel, or resort  accommodations (325 total rooms), 91 properties with cabins, cottages, and  condominiums (466 total units), and 21 campground properties (1,915 campsites)  within Hamilton County. 2 These facilities had an estimate 207,966 overnight  person visits that generated over $63 million in visitor expenditures.3 Based on  input from Hamilton County’s Department of Economic Development & Tourism,  it is likely that the number of overnight accommodations has decreased in the last  several years. This is particularly true within the greater study area, which now  has approximately 55 seasonal and year‐round rooms, along with a varying  number of lodging units at nearby cabin colonies.  Transportation Considerations:  In 2006‐2007, the NYSDOT made several improvements to the NYS Route 8 and  Route 30 corridor. It installed a new sidewalk along the north side of the roadway  and several crosswalks and bump‐outs, new lighting, and pedestrian signage  throughout the corridor. While many of improvements were welcomed by the  community, a number of features have become problematic. For example, the  NYS Route 8 and Route 30 improvements included concrete curbs, which is                                                               2

 The Northern New York Travel and Tourism Research Center, SUNY Potsdam, 2006 Economic Impact of  Expenditures by Tourists on Northern New York State, 2006.  3  A “person visit” is one person staying overnight in one place. It is important to note that approximately 50  percent of overnight visitors stayed and campgrounds and generated approximately 27 percent of visitor  expenditures.  

14 | P a g e    


conducive to rapid deterioration (note that many recent NYSDOT sidewalk  improvements now include granite curbs). This issue is particularly evident at  crosswalk locations where the bump outs are more prone to impacts from  snowplows. The bump outs cause pedestrians walking along the south side  roadway (where there is no sidewalk), as well as bicyclists, into vehicle travel  lanes. Properly designed bump outs do result in reduced vehicle speeds and  provide for needed pedestrian safety and access. Modification to the current  bump outs, including at grade designs, bollards, and signage can address these  issues.  The excessive number of signs and their  respective placement was also an area of  noted concern. Specifically, large  pedestrian crosswalk signs block  attractive streetlights and banners.  Finally, the type and location of street  trees resulted in a high mortality rate,  which resulted in a streetscape that is  devoid of attractive landscaping (with the exception of the Community  Beautification Committee plantings).  According to NYSDOT Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT) data, the NYS Route 8  road segments from Piseco have significantly more trips than the segments from  Wells.4 While recent resurfacing of NYS Route 8 within Wells was desperately  needed, the Speculator and Lake Pleasant community has long advocated for  improvements to the segment from Piseco for many years. This effort has  included a call for more pedestrian‐oriented links along the NYS Route 8 corridor  including the Hamilton County Municipal Center, Moffitt Beach Campground, and  nearby businesses and residences. It also included the call for pedestrian access  and safety improvements to the Four Corner intersection. Because of its  importance to the community, this initiative has not only gained the support of                                                               4

 AADT is the total volume of vehicle traffic of a highway or road for a year divided by 365 days. NYS Route 8 road  segments from Piseco AADT data ranges from 2,093‐2,888. Whereas, the recently resurface NYS Route 8 road  within Wells has an AADT of 772. Source: https://www.dot.ny.gov/tdv. 

15 | P a g e    


local and state elected officials, it also has strong support from residents and  businesses owners. In response, the NYSDOT prepared a Transportation Project  Report (2007) and Feasibility Study (2008) that examined shared roadway  opportunities along NYS Route 8 and the realignment of the Four Corner  intersection.  The Four Corner intersection realignment is intended to improve  pedestrian and vehicle safety and the turning radius for tractor trailers (currently  tractor trailers turning southbound on NYS Route 8 cross into the adjoining  parking areas).5 Informal conversations with NYSDOT indicate that these  improvements will be part of future roadway projects, but that they have been  delayed due to budget cutbacks.   Business Characteristics   The Speculator Lake Pleasant Community Revitalization Plan study area  encompasses a wide variety of businesses that are supported by year‐round and  seasonal residents and the tourist community. Based on a review of 50 nearby  businesses, retail services accounts for approximately 45 percent of all the  businesses located within the study area. This includes a variety of clothing, gift,  craft, grocery, auto, and hardware supply stores. Approximately 23 percent of the  businesses provide services  Business Composition categorized as miscellaneous  professional services such as  Miscellaneous accounting, banking, legal, and  Professional 23% real estate services. There are a  Dining significant number of dining  45% Contractor establishments (16 percent). The  16% balance of businesses includes  Hotel hotel accommodations (nine  Retail 7% percent) and professional  9% contractors (seven percent).                                                                5

 Note that a roundabout alternative has been previously explored at Four‐Corner intersection, but has been  determined that it would require the taking of too much private property and that steep approach along NYS  Route 30 may result in safety‐related issues. 

16 | P a g e    


Given the important role local businesses play in the success of Speculator Lake  Pleasant community, obtaining feedback from business owners was considered a  vital part of the planning process. In an order to solicit business owner input  during the busy tourist season, the Speculator Lake Pleasant Community  Revitalization Committee used Survey Monkey (an online survey platform) to  conduct a business owner survey. The goal of the survey was to develop a better  understanding of local businesses and their respective issues and needs. After the  Revitalization Committee prepared the survey it was distributed through the  Adirondack Speculator Region Chamber of Commerce’s distribution list (it was  also available via hard copy at the Chamber of Commerce’s office). Public notices  regarding the importance of the survey were published in the Hamilton County  Express and on the Speculator Lake Pleasant Community Revitalization  Committee website. The survey was sent to over 60 business owners in the area  and had a response rate of over 50 percent. A summary of the business survey  findings are provided below. The complete business owner survey results are  included in Appendix B.  Business Survey Highlights:  According to the business survey, over 78 percent of the businesses are open  year‐round. A majority of businesses are categorized as lodging, professional  services, and retail business.  Over 50 percent of businesses reported having been  in operation for more than 10 years.  Business owners indicated that their employees are a mix of full and part‐time  workers. Many businesses indicated that they have less than five (5) full‐time  employees (34 percent). While many businesses employed fewer than five (5)  part‐time employees (22 percent), or have no employees (22 percent).  A majority of business owners felt that business was stable (37 percent) or  declining (40 percent) over the last few (1‐2) years. When asked what were the  major issues or obstacles to their business, owners reported that current  economic conditions, general operating costs, local and state regulations,  shrinking customer base, cash flow or working capital, availability of  17 | P a g e    


telecommunication and technological services, and cost or rent or property taxes  the most significant.  With regards to future investments, a majority of  business owners indicated that they were not  planning any investments or physical  improvements (38 percent) to their business in the  next 1‐2 years. An equal number (34 percent) of  businesses indicated that they were going to make  either physical improvements or expand  marketing and promotional activities. 

Business Owner Outlook

Growing 23% Declining 40% Stable 37%

Customer Characteristics:  According to the business owner survey the largest market areas for local  businesses were from either out of state (58 percent) or local (39 percent). The  next most common market areas (nearly 20 percent) were from North Country,  Central New York (Syracuse/Utica area), Capital Region (greater Albany area), and  from undefined statewide locations.   Business owners noted that sales to local residents accounted for approximately  23 percent of sales, while seasonal residents (38.5%), and tourists (38.5%),  Study Area Percent Consumer  70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

18 | P a g e    


accounted equally for the balance of local business sales (38.5 percent).  When asked what attractions draw a significant number of their customers to the  area, business owners indicated that owning a home in the area, proximity to  outdoor recreation, and proximity to Lake Pleasant and Sacandaga Lake were the  most important factors for local businesses. Several business owners specifically  mentioned visiting family and Camp of the Woods as major draws to the area.  Business Owner Issues & Opportunities:  When it comes to improving the local economic climate, business owners  overwhelmingly felt that additional community attractions were needed to  increase visitation to the area. This was followed by an increase in the number of  special or community events, improved hotel accommodations, improved  community facilities (public restrooms, beaches, etc.), and improved sidewalks  and pedestrian amenities (these were closely followed by streetscape  beautification and improved waterfront access). Interrelated to these needs were  what business owners felt were critical factors for the success and growth of their  business. The most important of these was tourism, followed by advertising and  marketing, technology and telecommunications, foot traffic, financing, and  qualified labor.   When asked about their own business needs, over 80 percent of business owners  noted that internet access is essential to their business, and that internet  reliability, including internet speed and bandwidth, were significant issues. When  asked about assistance and training opportunities, a significant number of  business owners identified using the internet for e‐commerce and marketing as  something that would be beneficial. Business owners also noted marketing and  advertising programs, help with market identification, and assistance with  property and building improvements as initiatives that would help them keep  their businesses healthy and competitive.       19 | P a g e    


Public Participation  The Revitalization Committee hosted two (2)  public workshops during the planning  process. The first public workshop  (Community Visioning) was held at the Lake  Pleasant School on August 1, 2012.  Approximately 42 residents and businesses  owners attended the workshop, which  included a presentation of the area’s  demographic and economic characteristics  and a summary of the area’s main amenities and attractions. Following the  presentation, attendees broke into groups and offered their ideas on what issues  should be addressed and what opportunities should be pursued. Participants  identified a series of streetscape, pedestrian, public facility, and land use  improvements, assistance to local businesses, possible events and attractions,  and implementation and funding strategies. The Revitalization Committee the  used this information to develop draft concept plans and recommendations,  which were prepared during a series of subsequent Committee meetings and  prioritized in order to identify the most important and practicable initiatives. A  summary of this Community Visioning workshop is included in Appendix C.  Following the preparation of the draft  concept plans and recommendations, the  Revitalization Committee hosted its second  public workshop on October 25, 2012 at Oak  Mountain Ski Resort. With approximately 35  residents and businesses owners in  attendance, the workshop began with a  presentation of the Committee’s draft  concept plans and recommendations. Following the presentation, public  workshop participants took part in a facilitated group discussion. During the  group discussion participants asked questions and offered their ideas and  20 | P a g e    


comments regarding proposed economic development and physical improvement  initiatives.   In support of these public outreach efforts, the Speculator Lake Pleasant  Community Revitalization Committee maintained a project website  (www.slphamletplan.com) that was used to distribute and solicit information  throughout the planning process. The website included regular updates and  public notices. Previous planning initiatives, draft concept plans, the business  owner survey, and public workshop pretentions were also posted to the website.  In addition to the website, the Committee also distributed information and  notices via press releases in the Hamilton County Express, Lake Pleasant‐ Sacandaga Association (LPSA) newsletters, Adirondack Speculator Region  Chamber of Commerce website, and direct mailers to residents and business  owners.   Strength, Weakness, Opportunities, Threats Analysis  A Strength, Weakness, Opportunities, Threats (SWOT) Analysis is a strategic  planning exercise that helps to identify and examine current conditions and  trends within a community, and organize them in such a way that helps to better  understand how they may affect its future. More specifically, a SWOT analysis  includes the following components:   

Strengths are those available and valuable assets that should be preserved  or improved on. 

Weaknesses are drawbacks or short‐term challenges that need to be  addressed so that they do not cause long‐term problems to the viability of  either the quality of life or the economy of the area. 

Opportunities are the long‐range positive trends affecting the Town as well  as the positive paths we might follow. 

Threats are long‐term weaknesses that can undermine attempts to  meeting the goals established by Speculator/Lake Pleasant. 

21 | P a g e    


The figure below outlines the results of Speculator Lake Pleasant Community  Revitalization Plan SWOT Analysis a.    Based on this analysis it was determined that the Speculator Lake Pleasant  Community Revitalization Plan needed to include a series of recommendations  that addressed the following in order to improve to quality of life for both  residents, businesses community, and visitors:  1. Revitalization initiatives and economic development strategies that support  local businesses and improve the economic outlook of the community.   2. Inviting pedestrian‐oriented improvements and community enhancements  that build upon existing community amenities and cultural, recreational,  and natural resources.  Strengths Family Destination Outdoor Recreation Facilities Public Amenities  Walkable "Downtown" Mix of Businesses Natural  & Cultural Resources Central Transportation Corridors Sewer & Water Capacity Spirit of Volunteerism Vistor Attactions (e.g., Oak Mt.,  Moffitt Beach Campground, etc.)

Opportunities Business Savvy Residents Engaged Seasonal & Retiree  Populations Larger Populations Within Driving  Distance Natural & Cultural Resource  Attractions Existing Regional Marketing &  Branding Efforts Readily Available & Unique  Branding Opportunities  

Weaknesses Lack of Funding for  Improvements and Initiatives Lack of Municipal Resources  Lack of Startup Capital Lack of Training Opportunities Lack of Coordinated Marketing Lack of Regional Identity NYSDOT Control of Roadways Existing Conditions of Roadways  and Streetscape

Threats Declining Population Stagnant Economic Growth Reduced Tourism Declining Hotel Options Impacts to Natural Resources Real or Perceived Regulatory  Constraints Community Indifference or  Apathy 22 | P a g e  


23 | P a g e    


RECOMMENDATIONS  Revitalization Consideration  As Adirondack Park communities,  Speculator and Lake Pleasant are faced  with what are often considered  competing interests and opportunities.  On one hand, many assert that the  regulatory environment limits economic  growth and prosperity. Conversely,  Courtesy of Jerome Aoustin some argue that the preservation of the  region’s natural resources have helped to preserve the hamlet areas from sprawl,  and that these communities, surrounded by open space, have helped to attract  needed tourism dollars. Regardless of one’s position, Speculator and Lake  Pleasant recognize that the issues they face are not entirely uncommon from  many other rural communities and that success, as always, begins with pulling up  your bootstraps and working with what you got.  When it comes to attracting new residents, investments, and visitors to a  community, it important to note that there are several strategies that have  proven successful. For example, creating walkable areas (i.e., downtowns) that  are rich with amenities and attractions is an essential part of creating a sense of  place that is conducive to attracting new investments and leaving a lasting  impression on visitors.   The Bookings Institution notes that “since the rise of cities 8,000 years ago,  humans have only wanted to walk about 1,500 feet until they begin looking for an  alternative means of transport.”6 While over time we have become increasingly  depended on the automobile, as a society we have bucked this trend over the last  decade as growth of “walkable” downtown areas has outpaced the growth in  areas with more conventionally developed land use patterns.7 This growing  demand is due, in part, to changing preferences among the Generation X and                                                               6 7

 The Brookings Institution, Turning Around Downtown: Twelve Steps to Revitalization (2005)   U.S. Census Bureau, Patterns of Metropolitan and Micropolitan Population Change: 2000 to 2010 

24 | P a g e    


Millennial Generation and a shift in Baby Boomer’s travel patterns and housing  needs. As a hamlet‐scale community that is seeking to grow its population and  promote new investments, it is important for Speculator and Lake Pleasant to  acknowledge and fully leverage its existing “walkability” by improving its “curb  appeal” by providing safer and more attractive pedestrian amenities.  While physical improvements are an important part of any revitalization effort, it  is equally important for communities to pursue more programmatic economic  development initiatives. This includes not only conventional business assistance  and loan programs, but also includes ways to energize local entrepreneurs, utilize  marketing and branding strategies that target select markets, and attract visitors  by hosting a variety of community‐wide events that accentuate local resources.   The return on investment from a multifaceted  approach is real. Within smaller, more rural  communities, the importance of homegrown  entrepreneurship cannot be understated. Although  public administration and education are an important  employment sectors within the Adirondack Park,  privately owned businesses employ over 65 percent of  Adirondack Park residents.8 Therefore, in order to  retain and attract the next generation of job creators,  it is essential that Speculator and Lake Pleasant find  creative ways to help support local business startups, facilitate training  opportunities, and promote professional mentoring programs.  With regards to tourism, a recent study conducted by Cornell University found  that most New York State tourists drive five hours or less to their destination.9  The study also found that sightseeing, eating at restaurants, shopping, attending  specific events, visiting friends and family, staying at a vacation hotel, and  participating in an outdoor activities were some of the main reasons one travels  to a given location. The study noted that when planning their trips, travelers were                                                               8 9

 Adirondack Regional Assessment Study, 2010 community profile data   Cornell University School of Hotel Administration, Consumer Decision Making for Tourism in New York State 2011 

25 | P a g e    


looking for “materials that contain quality information and suggestions about top  attraction in the region,” and that internet search engines and state tourism and  government websites were the most useful research tools. Finally, New York State  tourist also noted that regions, not political boundaries, were the geographic  designations that they identified with most.   In 2011, travelers spent over $68 million and  generating 47 percent of all employment  within Hamilton County.10 Therefore, in order  increase local spending of these dollars, it is  vitally important that Speculator and Lake  Pleasant coordinate local marketing and  branding efforts with key regional efforts  including Hamilton County Adirondack Wild  and Good Life initiatives, and the Adirondack Regional Tourism Council.  Because  Speculator and Lake Pleasant have so many of the attractions that tourists are  willing to drive more than five (5) hours to see and experience, it is equally  important that they leverages these assets and finds ways to expand upon them  in order to attract a broader tourist base, particularly within the Capital Region (1‐ 2 hour drive), Hudson Valley (2‐4 hour drive), and the Central New York (1‐3 hour  drive) market areas.11   

 

                                                             10

 Tourism Economics, The Economic Impact of Tourism in New York 2012 updates   According to the business owner survey only 15‐20 percent of businesses identified these as primary market  areas.   11

26 | P a g e    


Revitalization Initiatives  The following revitalization initiatives are based on extensive public input that  was obtained during the Speculator Lake Pleasant Community Revitalization Plan  planning process. Recommendations have been organized by their level of  priority, but it is emphasized that priority levels may change based on funding  opportunities and evolving community needs.  In order to implement the following recommendations, the Speculator Lake  Pleasant Community Revitalization Committee should be reestablished as the  Community Revitalization Implementation Committee and be tasked with helping  the Town and Village Boards oversee and/or coordinate key initiatives. Given the  breadth and depth of the recommendations, delegation of certain elements is  required. As such, the Funding & Implementation Strategy (see page 46)  identifies additional leadership and partnership opportunities.  1. Cultivate Economic Development Leadership and Help Facilitate  Respective Initiatives  The need for well‐coordinated economic development leadership at the  local level is essential for the future growth of the community. In the face  of declining population and limited municipal resources, it is recommended  that a Speculator and Lake Pleasant Economic Development Working Group  be established that is comprised of year‐round and seasonal residents, local  business and organization leaders, Hamilton County officials and/or staff,  Adirondack Speculator Region Chamber of Commerce representatives, local  and regional stakeholders, and skilled volunteers (e.g., retired business  professionals). The Economic Development Working Group would  empower the community to take ownership of its economic development  initiatives.   The economic development working group’s mission could provide the  following economic development support to the community:      27 | P a g e    


Serve as a “one‐stop‐shop” for business grants, loans, and other  financial assistance information. This includes the development of a  business grants, loan, and financial assistance program inventory that  the economic development working group could make public and  use to solicit participation through localized word‐of‐mouth, print,  and social media outreach. One‐stop‐shop support services may also  include technical assistance with grant and loan applications and  fulfilling program requirements. For example, Hamilton County  currently receives Microenterprise funds from NYS Office of  Community Renewal.  Both grants and loans are available to local  business. However, based on communications with Hamilton County  representatives, local business have not fully utilized this program. 12  The economic development working group could help promote and  encourage participation in such programs.  

Provide business counseling through the establishment of a local  business development mentoring program. This could include  assistance from retired professionals that volunteer to work with  business owners and aspiring entrepreneurs. I may also include  mentoring support from the Service Corps of Retired Executives  (SCORE) and other partners and networking opportunities in the  region and state. Mentors could provide informal and formal  assistance, ranging from startup advice to ownership transition  suggestions. 

Coordinate locally hosted business training opportunities. In an  effort to address needed capacity building and business skills  training, the proposed economic development working group could  help identify and host local programs or seminars on a variety of  topics includes businesses plan development, startup logistics, 

                                                             12

 The Hamilton County Microenterprise program requires participation in an eight (8) session business counseling  programs that focus on providing developing key business skills; from developing a business plan, to payroll and  accounting skills. Such programs are often the mainstay of many local/regional economic development programs,  and often help to improve the viability of local/start up enterprises. 

28 | P a g e    


capitalization, financing, and improved business operations. When  surveyed, business owners specifically expressed a need for technical  training and support regarding internet usage for e‐commerce,  marketing and branding, market identification, and property and  business improvements. As broadband becomes more widely  available and reliable, local businesses and aspiring entrepreneurs  will need more technical training in the use of this medium for  business support purposes.  

  Formation of the Economic Development Working Group may include the  following action steps:  

Establish a nominating committee; 

Establish a working group membership; 

Establish an organizational structure and support network; 

Preparation of strategic plan and key priorities; 

Learn and understand successful approaches and key funding  programs;  29 | P a g e  

 


Preparation of policies and procedures; 

Schedule regular meetings; 

Establish community and media presences (e.g., informal and formal  communications with business owners, website, publications, etc.); 

Initiate program delivery; 

Report regularly to the Speculator and Lake Pleasant Boards and  County Supervisors; and, 

Celebration of success. 

As the economic development working group matures it may be  appropriate to incorporate as a 510(c)(3) or explore use of the Friends of  Oak Mountain as an organizing structure. Establishment of a recognized  Local Development Corporation (LDC) may be of value if the goals of the  organization include acquisition of property to facilitate the development  of future projects. Such organizational structures may eventually allow for  the creation of local business development funds that could be used to  implement strategic economic development initiatives and attract select  business (e.g., hotel operations, etc.).  2. Develop a Coordinated Events Strategy and Leadership Structure  It is recommended that a well‐organized local and regional events strategy  be prepared for the area. The goal of this strategy is develop a range of  seasonal and signature events that leverage existing community,  commercial, cultural, and natural resources, thereby attracting visitors  year‐round. This includes the creation of a committee or organization that  would be tasked with developing a plan for annual or reoccurring events  that reflect the region’s character. It may be appropriate to incorporate as  a 510(c)(3) or explore use of the Friends of Oak Mountain as an organizing  structure in order to raise funds and to have operation flexibility.  The Speculator and Lake Pleasant region has several advantages when it  comes to establishing itself as an Adirondack destination. This includes  existing natural resources and recreation opportunities, a walkable  30 | P a g e    


community with existing commercial services, waterfront access, quality  public spaces and community facilities. With a significant number of visitors  already drawn to such key land uses as Oak Mountain Ski Resort, Camp‐of‐ the‐Woods, and Moffitt Beach Campground; Speculator and Lake Pleasant  already have a competitive advantage when compared to many other  Adirondack communities.   Traditionally, events are  organized by individuals,  businesses, groups, and  organizations. These events are  often singular in nature and are  often held to promote a  business, raise funds, provide  community entertainment, or to  celebrate a holiday. However, larger‐scale, community‐wide events that are  designed to increase local revenue involve much more planning,  coordination, and promotion. Nearby examples of these include:  

Saranac’s Winter Carnival; 

Tupper Lake’s Woodsmen's Days; 

North Creek’s Whitewater Derby; 

Old Forge’s Adirondack Canoe Classic (90 Miler); 

Warrensburg’s Town‐wide Garage Sale; 

Warren County’s (Queensbury and Glens Falls) Adirondack Balloon  Festival; and, 

Lake George’s Americade. 

Organizing larger scale/community wide events requires a coordinating  body/organization and a greater level of commitment of resources.  In  addition to large‐scale events, it is recommended that Speculator and Lake  Pleasant events strategy includes a calendar of activities throughout the 

Speculator July 4th Parad

31 | P a g e    


year. For example, many communities host well‐organized weekly,  monthly, or seasonal events that help to attract and sustain year‐round  visitors (e.g., reoccurring fireworks, seasonal restaurant promotions, arts  and theater performances, etc.).   When developing an events strategy, it is important to leverage Speculator  and Lake Peasant’s existing facilities, businesses, and attractions. For  example, local hotels, lodges, bed and breakfasts, and housing rentals  should be marketed for overnight stays. Restaurants and retail stores  should help with sponsorships and take part in broader marketing efforts  by offering various deals and promotions. Event organizers should use  existing community facilities and local businesses for hosting activities and  as staging grounds. This includes Pavilion Park, Village Beach, Lake Pleasant  School, along NYS Route 8 and Route 30 sidewalks, and Oak Mountain Ski  Resort.  While the number and types of  event opportunities are  limitless, people are often most  interested in experiences that  involve local food and drink,  history, art and culture, outdoor  adventures, and theater and  Runners line up at the start of  music.13 Authentic, locally  the Lake Placid Marathon  connected, and reflective of  what is unique to the region are key approaches to creating successful and  memorable events.  Events that cater to retirees (who often have more free  time and are willing to spend more while traveling) and families (who tend  to look for well‐organized and affordable activities) are more likely to  benefit Speculator and Lake Pleasant given the strengths and opportunities  identified in the SWOT analysis.  Speculator should consider the following  event ideas:                                                               13

 Cornell University School of Hotel Administration, Consumer Decision Making for Tourism in New York State 2011 

32 | P a g e    


Adventure Sports: Oak Mountain Ski Resort, Speculator Loop   Mountain Bike Trails, Lake Pleasant, Lake Sacandaga, Pavilion and  Pathway  Parks, Lake Pleasant School recreation facilities, and nearby  roadways and hiking trails can all be used for a variety of large‐scale  sporting and recreation events. This includes marathons, triathalons,  iron man, road races, skiing, snowshoeing, mountain biking, boating,  orienteering, fishing, and snowmobiling competitions.  

Adirondack Heritage Celebration(s): This includes community‐wide  event(s) that highlight interesting aspects of traditional Adirondack  lifestyles, including the area’s early guides and loggers (e.g., French  Louis, etc.). This type of event could include historic reenactors  illustrating traditional Adirondack wilderness living. Adirondack  artisans (boat builders, basket weaver, timber framers, maple syrup  producers, etc.) could demonstrate traditional Adirondack skills and  display their equipment and tools. In addition, craft and antique fairs,  birding, fishing, and hunting activities, historic tours, and local  performances could complement this experience. 

Arts & Food Cultural Events:   Manayunk,  PA annual  This type of event may include the use  fall food  the local theater for movies and  festival performances by the Mountain Arts  Consortium (similar to the Indian Lake  Theater), outdoor concerts series (e.g.,  folk festivals, Orchestra of the  Adirondacks, etc.), or seasonal food  events, all of which would help attract  visitors that are interested in arts, live  music, and culinary experiences. While the summer is a logical time  for such events, events during the fall, winter, and spring could be  marketed as opportunities to alleviate cabin fever or be based  around seasonal foods (e.g., harvest festivals, wild game, maple  syrup production, etc.).  33 | P a g e  

 


Winterfest: Many winter communities and ski resorts host winter  concerts, carnivals, and festivals, including ice sculpture contest,  fireworks, races, parades, and event reggae weekends. Speculator  and Lake Pleasant have the opportunity to combine these two events  into one magical experience. This may include outdoor concerts,  fireworks, snowmobiling and skinning events, ski ticket and  instruction specials (including demos), snow sculptures, outhouse  races, and restaurant and lodging specials. 

When developing a strategic plan for events here are few additional  things to consider:14  

Make sure you are ready for visitors before marketing to them. For  example, several ideas for events and attractions were identified  throughout the planning process, including ice skating lanes on Lake  Pleasant and improved  mountain biking trails (e.g.,  links to Oak Mountain and  access through the NYSDEC  Jessup River Wild Forest Area).  If these attractions are to be  part of a broader revitalization  Ice skating lanes along a frozen lake  offer recreational opportunities  strategy they need to be  during winter months  planned for and developed  well in advance. This is particularly true when it comes to Oak  Mountain, which requires expansion of its snowmaking capacity and  improvements to its access road. 

People are willing to travel for something that appeals to them. It is  also important to consider the “4‐Times Rule,” which states that  people will go when an activity or event keeps them four (4) times  longer than it took them to get there. For example, if the target 

                                                             14

 Destination Development, Inc. 25 Immutable Rules of Successful Tourism 

34 | P a g e    


market for an event includes areas that are two (2) hours away,  activates should keep them busy for eight (8) hours.   One of the challenges that Speculator and Lake Pleasant will face is  lodging during multi‐day events. A 2006 survey of Hamilton County  found that there are 640 rooms in motels, hotels, resorts, cottages  and cabins (please note that individual cottages and cabins are  counted as one‐room units during this study).15 In recent years, the  number of available rooms has decreased. It is now estimated that  there are approximately ±55 motel and hotel rooms within the  vicinity of the study area. While attracting new lodging opportunities  is vital to the community and region, it is equally important to  leverage existing lodging opportunities via coordinated marketing  through Hamilton County Tourism’s existing lodging database  (www.adirondack experience.com/lodging), or through the use of  such websites as Adirondack by Owner (www.adkbyowner.com).  These sites allow people to filter their searches for lodging by  location, type, availability, number of rooms, and features and  amenities. Encouraging businesses owners (including seasonal home  rental owners) to use of these sites is important because increased  lodging options are needed in order to fill existing and future  demand. Finally, providing existing hotels and motels with current  market trend information regarding consumer expectations may also  help business owners make informed decisions about how best to  improve their facilities expectations.  3. Develop and Execute a Marketing & Branding Strategy  Similar to businesses, it important for communities and regions to develop  and execute well‐coordinated marketing and branding initiatives that  effectively broadcast to desired visitors, markets, and investors. There are  several things to consider regarding successful marketing and branding                                                               15

 The Northern New York Travel and Tourism Research Center, 2006 Economic Impact of Expenditures by Tourists  on Northern New York State 

35 | P a g e    


strategies. According to the Brookings Institution, particular attention must  be paid to “re‐positioning,” or creating a certain image or identity in the  minds of target markets. As a place of interest, the Speculator and Lake  Pleasant competes with other Adirondack and North Country communities.  Therefore, a branding and marketing strategy should include a position  statement and collateral material that helps define Speculator and Lake  Pleasant as a unique place of interest to outside audiences.  Marketing and branding strategies often involve the following components:    Compelling location identity;   Memorable tagline; and,   Creative logo or signal art designed for repeat impressions on  travelers when used on the internet or in print. 

The Town of Newcomb is in the process of  developing a marketing and branding strategy that  will be incorporated into all of its print and web  media and wayfinding signage 

Once a strategy is outlined, it is  rolled out in several phases  including the establishment of an  identity through print and media  (e.g., banners, maps, brochures,  press releases, websites, etc.), a  broader advertising and marketing  campaign (e.g., media publications  and outlets, target marketing, social  media outreach), and an extended  outreach phase (e.g., web  promotions, social media outreach,  monthly advertising, magazines,  direct mailing, etc.). 

A revamped community website should incorporate branding logos and  signal art and have fresh content, be visually appealing, user friendly, and  integrate social media (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, You Tube, etc.). The website  should include simple online features that list attractions, events, and  36 | P a g e    


activities and should have interactive online maps and events calendars. 16   Because marketing and branding efforts seek to increase visibility within  target markets, collateral material, logos and online content should include  synergies between other successful regional and state‐wide marketing  efforts such as Hamilton County’s Adirondack Wild and Good Life marketing  efforts, Adirondack Regional Tourism Council, and NYS I Love NY  Adirondack initiatives. For example, online content should seamlessly  connect with Hamilton County Tourism, Adirondack Regional Tourism  Council, and NYS I Love NY Adirondack websites, all of which have greater  outreach capacity and more unique visits.17 By integrating with these sites,  the likelihood of pass‐through visits is increased exponentially.   4. Advance Streetscape & Public Facility Improvements  The overall design philosophy for the  Speculator Lake Pleasant Community  Revitalization Plan is centered on the  idea that the streetscape should  accommodate all users. This includes  pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists,  representing people of all ages and  abilities, including children, older adults,  and people with disabilities. While  traditional roadway designs used a  classification system based on increasing volumes and speed, a more  “complete street” integrates various design elements to control access and  speed, thereby making for a more safe and efficient experience for all  users. This integrated design approach helps to reduce vehicle miles  traveled and promotes pedestrian mobility. Finally, a complete street  design offers more opportunities to improve the aesthetic quality of the                                                               16

 Cornell University School of Hotel Administration, Consumer Decision Making for Tourism in New York State 2011   According to Cornell University School of Hotel Administration, search engines, state tourism, regional, and  county websites, and travel website were the most helpful search sources for travelers (see Consumer Decision  Making for Tourism in New York State 2011).  17

37 | P a g e    


community, thereby helping to retain and attract residents and new private  investments, and increase visitation.    The Speculator Lake Pleasant Community Revitalization Plan  recommendations are illustrated in the Speculator Lake Pleasant  Community Revitalization Plan concept figures, which are located at the  end of this section. The concept figures highlight improvements for the  following areas along NYS Route 8 and Route 30 (please note that the Key  Plan Figure identifies the location of these areas along with additional  design features):   

Corridor South Figure: Proposed improvements to this area are  intended to improve connectivity to existing community facilities.  Improvements are also intended to provide visual continuity in order  to enhance user experiences and offer a centralize location that can  be used for a wide‐variety of events and activities.   Recommendations include new sidewalks along both sides of the NYS  Route 8 and Route 30 corridor that link to the Village Beach and  pedestrian trails in the Pavilion Park. A proposed pedestrian bridge  over the Sacandaga River would provide a link between Osborne  Pointe Park’s waterfront and public dock to the Village Beach  (thereby reducing the distance pedestrians must walk along the  roadway). Proposed access improvements to the Village Beach will  enhance the visual quality of the area and reduce the impact of  snowmobile access during the winter months.   An improved parking area (including pervious surface parking   spaces), rebuilt restroom facilities, a designated farmers market area,  improved boat lunch with an invasive species wash station and trailer  turnaround loop, and a pedestrian walkway around along the  recreation fields would make the Pavilion Park (and adjoin Pathway  Park) a catalyst revitalization project for the community.18 Finally, the 

                                                             18

 Please note that any improvements to the Pavilion Park should be designed to accommodate continued  snowmobile access and respective trailer parking.  

38 | P a g e    


closure of the roadway between Pavilion Park and the Speculator Fire  Department will not only reduce the amount of impervious surface, it  will reduce potential conflicts with emergency responders.19  

Corridor North Figure: This figure includes proposed improvements  to the NYS Route 8 and Route 30 and Elm Lake Road corridors. It also  illustrates proposed improvements to the Four Corners intersection  that incorporates NYSDOT preliminary design plans. As a complete  street concept plan, proposed improvements include the following:  Pedestrian Access, Safety & Mobility  Sidewalks along both sides of NYS  Route 8 and Route 30, improved  crosswalks with at grade bump  outs, bike access (e.g., sharrows,  bike racks, signage, etc.), landscape  buffers between vehicle traffic and  Sharrows help to  pedestrians, and signage are  identify bicycle access  proposed. Together, these features  can make for a safer and more pleasant experience for pedestrians  and provide access to nearby residences, businesses, recreational  facilities, trail network, and parking.  Access Management  The exiting condition of the NYS Route 8 and Route 30 corridor  includes open road shoulders and many wide curb cuts. Access  management calls for orderly, well planned, and narrower points of  access throughout the corridor. By reducing the number of existing  curb cuts and narrowing the remaining ones, while simultaneously  improving interconnectivity between adjacent land uses, the number  of potential conflicts between motorist and pedestrians can be 

                                                             19

 Please note that proposed modifications to the helicopter landing pad meet emergency response and aviation  standards. 

39 | P a g e    


significantly reduced. These features also help to regulate the flow of  traffic by minimizing the number of midblock turns.  Traffic Calming Techniques  Design features such as curb at‐grade bump‐outs with bollards, the  narrowing of NYS Route 8 and Route 30 travel lanes, pedestrian and  bicyclical signage, reduced speed limits from 40 mph to 30 mph, and  textured surface crosswalks (pressed asphalt to reduce tire noise and  reduced maintenance costs). Together, these features help define  pedestrian spaces and are conducive to safe and alert driving.  Corridor Beautification   Additional sidewalks, access  management, and buffer  strips along roadways will  provide for additional  opportunities to improve the  visual quality of the NYS  Route 8 and Route 30  corridor. This includes  attractive lighting, pavers  (pressed asphalt), street  furniture (this includes the existing benches donated by Jerry’s  Woodshop), street trees, planters, grass areas, gateway treatments,  and wayfinding signage and banners. These features not only  enhance user experiences, but will help to attract new investments  and promote tourism.20                                                                   20

 Many economic development, real estate, planning, and transportation studies indicate that improved  walkability and corridor beautification can increase nearby property values and attract new business. 

40 | P a g e    


Green Infrastructure   The use of native trees and plantings  and alternative stormwater designs  that focus on infiltration (e.g., rain  gardens, disconnected curbs,  bioretention basins, pervious  surfaces, etc.) will help to reduce  nonpoint source pollution runoff  Pervious pavers help to  into Lake Pleasant and the  reduce stormwater runoff Sacandaga River. Additionally, street  trees can help preserve road surfaces by shading them from the  summer sun and reduce heating cost to nearby buildings by blocking  cold winter winds.  In addition to these improvements, additional mobility opportunities within  the study area may include improved snowmobile access to local and  regional trail networks (via improved signage and new connections) and  shuttle service to and from Moffitt Beach Campground, which would  provide thousands of visitors with easier access to local businesses.  It is estimated that the total cost of these improvements is approximately  $6.9 million. This is inclusive of NYSDOT corridor improvements, which  accounts for approximately 80 to 85 percent of the total. Please note that  this estimate does not include suggested improvements to private  properties as illustrated on the concept plans that are located at the end of  this section. See Appendix D for additional cost estimate information.  5. Create a Wayfinding Signage System  The installation of a wayfinding signage system that incorporates the  proposed marketing and branding design elements noted above will help  strengthen the usability and enjoyment of the NYS Route 8 and Route 30  corridors. The term signage encompasses an array of functionalities  including: regulations, warnings, directions and distances, services and  41 | P a g e    


amenities, and interpretation. Key features of a wayfinding signage plan  include:  

Attractive and coherent fonts, color contrast, and symbology,  including branding and marketing logos or signal art and the use of  high quality materials (e.g., custom woodwork, fabricated metals,  stone, high‐grade polymers, etc.). 

Appropriate scales and heights that are designed around the  intended user (e.g., vehicular traffic, pedestrians, etc.). 

Use of landmarks and key sites to provide orientation cues and  memorable locations. 

Placement of signs at decision points to help wayfinding decisions. 

The proposed wayfinding signage may be divided into several categories  (see below) that are intended to work in concert with one another in order  to create a unifying user experience. With regards to regulatory signage,  the proposed wayfinding signage is intended to complement NYSDOT and  the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) signage standards.   

Gateway Signage:   Gateway signage announces to the traveler  that they have arrived within the limits of  an area, and should provide a sense of  arrival in a manner that celebrates  the unique character of Speculator  and Lake Pleasant. Current gateway  signage is somewhat confusing to  newcomers because the entrance to  each community is within a short  distance of one another. As previously  noted, because the traveling public  identifies with regions more than 

Example  gateway  signage 

42 | P a g e    


political boundaries, it is important that gateway signage reflect both  local and regional marketing efforts. Gateway signs should be located  near existing welcome signage. Signage should be monument signs  made of natural materials (e.g., woodwork that reflects the areas  logging history) and should have attractive landscaping to create a  lasting first impression.   

Pedestrian, Parking & Places of Interest Signage: Attractive and  appropriately scaled directional signage should help direct travelers  to places of interest and landmark locations (e.g., Pavilion and  Pathway Park, Village Beach, Oak Mountain, local businesses, etc.). It  may also include signage for historic sites identified on the Lake  Pleasant CSD Tour Our Past map. Signage should also be located at  road intersections and near restroom facilities. Uniform parking  signage should be located at public parking facility (separate signage  may be used to identify private parking opportunities as well).  Secondary signage should include facility specific parking regulations.  An example of a wayfinding signage system is depicted below.  Example wayfinding signage

 

43 | P a g e    


Information Kiosk: Kiosks should be clearly identifiable and placed at  central locations throughout the study area including the Pavilion  Park and/or Village Beach and the near Four‐Corner Intersection.  Kiosks should have permanently mounted information such as maps,  business locations, and points of interest. They should also include  space to post information about upcoming community events and  possibly incorporate display lighting. Kiosks may also include QRC  codes for smart phone owners. This would allow user to scan the  codes and link to up‐to‐date information and maps.  Example information kiosk

  6. Improve Community Aesthetics by Enhancing Adjoining Land Uses.  While much of the Speculator Lake Pleasant Community Revitalization  planning process focused on economic development and physical  improvement initiatives, many also commented on the need to encourage  improved site design in order to enhance the community’s curb appeal,  increase visitation, and promote new investments. Suggested  improvements included storefront enhancements and more orderly and/or  fewer commercial signs. The Recommended Site Design Figure (next page)  illustrates preferred design elements and is intended to be used as a visual  44 | P a g e    


Recommended Site Design Site Layout & Pedestrian Access: Building styles and materials should complement existing community character. Setbacks should allow for attractive landscaping with strong pedestrian connections. Side, rear, and/or shared parking is preferred. Narrow curb cuts will help reduce the potential for pedestrian and vehicle conflicts and make for a more attractive streetscape. Lighting: Attractive, pedestrian-scale lighting should be used throughout the study area.

Private Signage: Limited to monument and building mounted signs in order to reduce clutter and confusion. Monument signs should be located along sidewalks or roadways and made of natural materials (not backlit). Building mounted should be visible from roadway and made of natural or pressed materials (not backlit).

Wayfinding Signage: Attractive and appropriately scaled directional and point of interest signage should help direct travelers to points of interest and landmark locations.

Street Banners: Event and seasonal banners should be hung throughout the study area in coordination with local and regional marketing and branding initiatives.

Parking: Simple to read, color-coded parking signs should be used to identify public and private parking opportunities. Note coordinated wayfinding signage style and colors.


aid during Planning Board reviews or as a basis for possible zoning  revisions, which could include the adoption of community design  guidelines.  7. Consider Developing Shared Municipal Facilities  The future success of Speculator and Lake Pleasant depend upon a spirit of  cooperation. While many of their respect needs are unique, it is essential  that the two communities work together and leverage one another’s  resources. While this plan has identified a number of initiatives that the  two communities can collaborate on, many individuals noted throughout  the planning process that shared municipal facilities should be explored.  The current Town Hall and Village Hall are separated by only a few short  miles. Preliminary evaluations of these facilities have indicated that they  are both in need of significant upgrades. Therefore, it is recommended that  the Town and Village examine the development of a shared municipal  building. A shared municipal building could house much needed community  meeting space, incorporate a regional visitor center, and offer additional  public restrooms (currently the only public restroom facility within the  study area is located at the Pavilion). Additional administrative functions  and/or local organizations could be collocated in order to help offset  construction and operations costs. Ideally a new shared municipal center  would be located where residents and visitors can walk in order to promote  its use and enhance the vibrancy of the area. One possible location that  was identified during the planning process was the former service station  site near the Four Corners intersection.         

45 | P a g e    


FUNDING & IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY  The implementation of the following recommendations outlined in the implementation table below (see next  page) will depend upon the availability of funding and/or partnership opportunities. The timing to initiate each  project is indicated as short (1‐2 years), medium (2‐5 years), and long term (5‐10 years). However, it is important  to note that short term projects may require a significant amount of resources and time to complete. Conversely,  long term projects may be accomplished in a brief amount of time or with limited effort. Therefore, while it is  recommended that Speculator and Lake Pleasant communities first focus on higher priority or short term  projects, it should also consider taking advantage of any opportunity that may advance an initiative. In order to  implement these recommendations we offer the following organizational chart.    Speculator Village Board &  Lake Pleasant Town Board

Based on this plan, the Town and Village Boards,  via budget and administrative leadership, will  establish and/or formalize committees, help set  priorities, and endorse grant applications. 

The Community Revitalization Implementation Committee uses this plan  as a roadmap when overseeing the implementation of short, medium,  long term recommendations. The committee is acts as project  coordinators/ liaisons between the respective Boards and Committees 

Community  Revitalization  Implementation  Committee

Events Leadership  Committee

Economic Development  Leadership Committee

 

The Committees are tasked with implementing the various  recommendations outlined in this plan. They meet regularly to discuss  strategy, execute initiatives, and working with the Village and Town  Boards and Community Revitalization Implementation Committee 

46 | P a g e    


Initiate  Short  Term 

Project  Cultivate Economic  Development  Leadership and Help  Facilitate Respective  Initiatives 

       

 Short  Term 

Develop a  Coordinated Events  Strategy and  Leadership Structure   

Leadership &  Partnerships 

Potential Funding Source 

Establish a nominating committee;  Establish working group membership  Establish of organizational structure and  support network  Prepare strategic plan and key priorities  Learn and understand successful  approaches and key funding programs  Prepare policies and procedures  Schedule regular meetings  Establish community and media presences  (e.g., informal and formal communications  with business owners, website,  publications, etc.)  Initiate program delivery 

Village & Town Board,  Community  Revitalization  Implementation  Committee, Select  Business Owners,  Chamber of Commerce,  Hamilton County 

Limited Village, Town,  and Hamilton County  Funds, I Love NY  Tourism Funds 

Establish events committee and  subcommittee group membership  Establish organizational structure, Develop  an inventory of existing and proposed  events.  Develop events hosting strategy (e.g.,  staging, lodging, etc.)  Identify funding sources and sponsorship  network  Improve or construct event locations  and/or attractions (e.g., Pavilion Park, 

Village & Town Boards,  Community  Revitalization  Implementation  Committee, Proposed  Events Committee 

Limited Village & Town  Funds, Non‐Profit  Raised Funds 

Implementation Steps 

 

  

47 | P a g e    


Initiate 

Project 

Implementation Steps 

Short  Term 

Develop and Execute  a Marketing &  Branding Strategy 

 

Leadership &  Partnerships 

Potential Funding Source 

mountain bike trails through Jessup River  and at Oak Mountain Ski Resort, Oak  Mountain Ski Resort snowmaking capacity,  parking lot, and access improvements, ice  skating lanes on Lake Pleasant, etc.)   Identify strategy to promote new events  that integrates marketing and branding  initiatives  Help to identify long‐term funding and  organizational solutions for successful and  repeating events  Prepare local strategy (e.g. budgeting,  capital improvement plan, etc.) to fund  initiative.  Consider consulting with a professional  marketing and communications firm.  Develop marketing and branding strategy  that incorporates place identification and  median contentment (e.g., logo, slogan,  web design, print material, etc.)  Establish identity through print and media  (e.g., banners, maps, brochures, website,  etc.)  Conduct broader advertising and  marketing campaign (e.g., media  publications and outlets, target marketing,  social media support) 

Village & Town Boards,  Village & Town Funds, I  Community  Love New York Tourism  Revitalization  Funds, NYSDOS EPF  Implementation  Committee, Proposed  Economic Development  & Events Leadership  Committees, Hamilton  County, Adirondack  Regional Tourism  Council 

48 | P a g e    


Initiate 

Medium  Term 

Project 

Advance Streetscape  & Public Facility  Improvements   

Implementation Steps  Maintain extended outreach via internet  and social media, monthly advertising,  direct mailing, etc. 

Prepare local strategy (e.g. budgeting,  capital improvement plan, etc.) to fund  project components or grant match(s).  Prepare and submit grant applications.  Work with NYSDOT on right‐of‐way,  highway design standards, and funding  opportunities.  Seek public input on overall design and  amenities.  Prepare design and engineering drawings  for select improvements and/or  coordinate with NYSDOT.  Select contractor and construct  improvements and/or coordinate with  NYSDOT. 

Village & Town Boards,  Community  Revitalization  Implementation  Committee, Proposed  Economic Development  & Events Leadership  Committees 

Village & Town Funds,  NYSDOT, NYSDOS EPF,  OPRHP EPF 

Prepare local strategy (e.g. budgeting,  capital improvement plan, etc.) to fund  project components or grant match(s).  Prepare and submit grant applications.  Consult with signage and wayfinding  specialist to develop a��comprehensive  strategy that incorporates marketing and  branding components (see below). 

Village & Town Boards,  Community  Revitalization  Implementation  Committee, Proposed  Economic Development  & Events Leadership  Committees 

Village & Town Funds,  NYSDOT, NYSDOS EPF,  OPRHP EPF 

 

Create a Wayfinding  Signage System   

Potential Funding Source 

Medium  Term 

Leadership &  Partnerships 

49 | P a g e    


Initiate 

Project 

Implementation Steps   

Leadership &  Partnerships 

Potential Funding Source 

Consult with NYSDOT on uniform signage  requirements.  Manufacture and install in accordance  with strategy and streetscape  improvements. 

Medium  Term 

Improve Community  Aesthetics by  Enhancing Adjoining  Land Uses 

 Review existing provisions that relate to site  design and any identify issues   Review existing code enforcement policy  any procedures and identify issues   If necessary, identify new standards or  guidelines through a public participatory  process that encourage attractive site  designs 

Village & Town Boards,  Local Planning & Zoning  Boards 

Limited Village & Town  Funds, NYSDOS EPF 

Long  Term 

Consider Developing  Shared Municipal  Facilities   

 Seek shared municipal service funding to  study ROI of share municipal facility that  includes a visitor center, meeting spaces,  and restroom facilities.   Explore opportunities to locate the  Speculator Volunteer Ambulance Corps and  the Speculator Fire Department into one  facility (preferably within an improved  Speculator Fire Department building) 

Village & Town Boards,  Volunteer Ambulance  Corps, Speculator Fire  Department 

Village Funds, NYSDOS  Shared Municipal  Service Funds 

    50 | P a g e    


APPENDIX A: COMMUNITY PROFILE   

 

   


Speculator Lake Pleasant Community Revitalization Plan  Community Profile  1. Study Area Boundary     The study area for the Village of Speculator and Town of Lake Pleasant Community Revitalization  Plan focuses on the NYS Route 8 and Route 30 corridors, the respective commercial core and  community gateways, and the Lake Pleasant shoreline. As such, the central focal point of the  study area is the NYS Route 8 and Route 30 ‘four corner’ intersection. The community gateways  include the south and eastern entrances along NYS Route 8 and the northern entrance along  NYS Route 30. Key land uses within study area include several Town and Village recreational  facilities, Osborne Park, the Pathway, Lake Pleasant School, Camp of the Woods, and Village  Hall. In addition to these land uses, Oak Mountain Ski Center and the Town of Lake Pleasant’s  APA designated Hamlet (located along NYS Route 8 to the south) are important community  assets within the vicinity of the study area.    2. Community Characteristics   Population Trends   Population within the study area has consistently declined since its peak population of 408  residents in 1980.1  Over the past three decades, the study area has experienced a decline in  population of 22 percent, or 84 residents.  In contrast to the study area, statistics for the Town  of Lake Pleasant indicate consistent population increases through 2000.  However, from 2000  to 2010 the town experienced a 13 percent decline in population.  Study Area Population Trends 1950‐2010   Source: US Census Bureau 

500 400 300 200 100 0 1950

1960

1970

1980

1990

2000

2010

 

Age Cohorts  Data from the US Census Bureau continues to support trends identified in the Adirondack Park  Regional Assessment Project.  In the study area, the age divide in residents continues to widen.   In 1990 the median age was 38 and in 2010 it had increased to 53, which represents a 39  percent increase.  This trend is predominantly a result of significant decline in residents                                                               1

 U.S. Census Information is based on “County Subdivision” level data, which encompasses the Village of  Speculator. 

1   


between the ages of 0‐17 (56 percent change) and 18‐64 (19 percent change).  This represents  a significant change in the demographic makeup of the community over a 20 year period.  In  addition to a decline in younger residents, the study area, like most others areas within the  Adirondack Park, has also seen an increase in residents above the age of 65 (194 percent  change).   Comparatively, the median age in New York State in 2010 was 38.    Aging Trends 1990‐2010  Source: US Census Bureau  300 1990

250

2000

200

2010

150 100 50 0 0‐17

18‐64

65+

Median Age

 

  Year Round vs. Seasonal Figures  It is difficult to get a clear picture of a community’s year round and seasonal population  because there is no standardized way of collecting, or reporting such information.  However,  the US Census Bureau does record occupancy rates for housing units.  In 2010 the study area  had a total of 522 housing units, of which 149 were occupied, 9 were for rent, 3 were for sale, 7  were vacant, and 354 were considered seasonal.  As in many other Adirondack communities,  seasonal housing makes up a considerable percentage of the total.  Within the study area, 68  percent of all housing units are considered to be seasonal by the US Census Bureau, an increase  from 61 percent in 1990.    3. Economic Characteristics  Employment Characteristics  Year 2010 American Community Survey data for the study area shows that a majority of  employed residents were private wage and salary workers (51 percent).  Approximately 43  percent of employed residents were government workers, while 7 percent were classified as  self employed.  A closer look at the employment data indicates the industries with the greatest  percentage of employment are Public Administration (28 percent), Educational Services and  Healthcare and Social Assistance (21 percent), and Arts, Entertainment, and recreation, and  Accommodation and food services (16 percent).  Construction (10 percent), Retail Trade (8  percent), Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting and Mining (7 percent), Finance and  Insurance, and Real Estate and Rental and Leasing (5 percent), Other Services except Public  Administration (2 percent), Wholesale Trade (1 percent), and Information (1 percent) are the  remaining employment sectors for residents of the village.    2   


The table below shows the total number of establishments by industry within the greater study  area, which includes the Village of Speculator and Town of Lake Pleasant.  As the Table  indicates, 11 of the 15 establishments employ one (1) to four (4) employees.  Excluded from  these figures are jobs related to public administration, government, and community services.    Study Area Employment Characteristics by Size of Establishment  Industry Code Description  Construction  Manufacturing  Retail trade  Real estate and rental and  leasing  Management of companies  and enterprises  Administrative and Support  and Waste Management  and Remediation Services  Arts, entertainment, and  recreation  Accommodation and food  services  Other services (except  public administration)  Total for all sectors  Source: US Census Bureau 

Establishments  with 1‐4  Employees 

Establishments  with 5‐9  Employees 

Establishments  with 10‐19  Employees 

4  1  0 

0  0  0 

0  0  1 

11 

  The mean travel time to work for employed residents of the study area is 19 minutes.  Based on  additional data collected from the US Census Bureau,  approximately 34 percent of residents  travel within the Town of Lake Pleasant for work, and an additional 23 percent travels to the  Town of Indian Lake.  Location Quotients  Location Quotients (LQs) are ratios that allow an area's distribution of employment by industry  to be compared to a reference area's employment distribution. The reference area can be the  U.S., a particular state, or a metropolitan area. Industries within a given area divide into two  categories – basic and non‐basic. Basic industries are those exporting from the region, whereas  non‐basic are either supporting basic industries or are underdeveloped industries within the  given area.    The Regional Location Quotients figure below illustrates the LQs of 988 area jobs in Hamilton  County using New York State as a reference area. If an LQ is equal to one (1), such as  Educational Services, then the industry has the same share of its area employment as it does in  the reference area (i.e., New York State). However, when an LQ is greater than one (1), it  indicates an industry with a greater share of the local area employment than is the case in the  3   


reference area (i.e., agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting).  Industries that do not have a  value in the figure below either have a location quotient of zero (0), or it is not disclosable.      Location Quotient for Hamilton County  Source: US Bureau of Labor Statistics  Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting

8.07

Arts, entertainment, and recreation

6.38

Accommodation and food services

2.83

Construction

2.24

Other services, except public administration

1.88

Retail trade

1.68

Manufacturing

0.34

Information

0.28 0.1

1

10

Salary Trends 

 

While identifying base industries is an important step in understanding a community’s economy,  it does not necessarily identify what a community should do in the future because such figures  are only a snapshot of what is occurring, and not necessarily a reflection of what ought to be  occurring. For example, a community may consider bolstering its base industries as an economic  strategy, or it may consider building or developing deficient, non‐base industries. The figure  below illustrates the change in wages for Hamilton County’s base industries from 2005‐2011.  When evaluating which industries to support or develop, such figures may help determine what  might provide the greatest return on investment with regards increased local revenues.  Wages for Hamilton County Base Industries  Source: US Bureau of Labor Statistics   $40,000 Accommodation and Food Services Retail Trade

 $35,000  $30,000

Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation Construction

 $25,000  $20,000

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing Hunting Total, All Government

 $15,000  $10,000 2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

            4   

2010

2011


4. Existing Land Use Characteristics  APA Land Use Classification Analysis    Established by the New York State Legislature in 1971, the Adirondack Park Agency (APA) is  tasked with developing “long‐range land use plans for both public and private lands within the  boundary of the Park.”2  The Adirondack Park Land Use and Development Plan, divides private  lands into six (6) land use classifications: Hamlet, Moderate Intensity Use, Low Intensity Use,  Rural Use, Resource Management, and Industrial Use. The plan also divides public lands into  seven (7) use categories, which determine the type and intensity of public use allowed for that  area. In addition to the APA’s long range planning responsibilities, the Agency has permitting  responsibility for significant private projects that may have a regional impact.     According to the APA’s land use map, a majority of the study area is located within in an area  that is designated as Hamlet. Section §570.3, Definitions Used in These Regulations, of the  Adirondack Park Rules and Regulations, provides the overall intensity guidelines for  development of the private land use areas of the Park. It also illustrates the total acreage,  allowed development intensities, and percentage for each land use. However, Section §570.3,  there are no guidelines for the Hamlet classification. APA private land use classifications within  the immediate vicinity of the study area include Moderate Intensity, Low Intensity, and Rural  Use.    Zoning  Both the Town of Lake Pleasant and Village of Speculator have local zoning provisions, including  site plan review and subdivisions regulations.3 Within the Village of Speculator, the Study Area  encompasses the Commercial Business (CB), Residential Village (RA and RB), Residential Mobile  (RM), and Residential Resort (RR) districts. Portions of the Study Area along the Sacandaga River  are within the Land Preservation Overlay (LP) district. Permitted as‐of‐right or special uses  within these districts includes one‐, two‐, and three‐family dwellings, mobile homes, home  occupations, professional offices, tourist accommodations, banks, eating and drinking  establishments, retails stores, and service stations. Minimum lot sizes range from 10,000 square  feet (SF) to five (5) acres.   While the limits of the study area are primarily within the Village of Speculator, a small portion  extends along Route 30 within the Town’s Hamlet Commercial (HC) zoning district, which allow  for a range of land uses including one‐, two‐, and multi‐family dwellings by as‐of‐right or via a  special use permit. The HC district also allows for commercial uses including banks, beauty and 

                                                             2

 www.apa.state.ny.us   The Town and Village have non‐APA approved Local Land Use Programs. An APA Local Land Use Program  provides local government the administration and enforcement of certain Agency authority over land use and  development in their town. The APA Act, Section 807 & 808, provides for the transfer of certain authorities from  the Agency to the Town.  3

5   


barber shops, grocery stores, hotels and motels, mixed use buildings, restaurants, and retail  stores.  Land Use Analysis   While APA Classifications and Zoning Districts illustrate the allowable uses within a given area,  actual land use characteristics were derived from recent Hamilton County Real Property Tax  Service data. According to the tax data, over 62 percent of the study area’s land use (by number  of parcels) is residential, and approximately 18 percent is vacant.  Commercial (12 percent),  Recreation and Entertainment, Public Services, Community Services, Industrial, and Wild,  Forested, Conservation Lands and Public Parks make up the remaining land uses within the  study area.  The study area land use table below details land use characteristics.    Study Area Land Use  Land Use  Parcels  Agriculture  0  Residential  182  Vacant Land  54  Commercial  34  Recreation and Entertainment  5  Community Services  11  Industrial  1  Public Services  4  Wild, Forested, Conservation Lands and Public Parks  1  Total  292  Source: Hamilton County Real Property Tax Service *Portion of properties may extend beyond study area boundaries 

Acreage*  0  ±175  ±120  ±137  ±128  ±43  ±0.5  ±7  ±0.12  ±610 

  5. Pedestrian Access & Recreation Opportunities   There are numerous public recreational facilities within the study area.  Along NY Route 8/30 a  12‐acre park is composed of a covered pavilion, ball field, and basketball court (referred to as  Ballfield Park). The Sacandaga River Community Park (Pathway Park) is located adjacent to the  Ballfield Park.  A number of boardwalks and pathways follow the course of the river and include  educational displays, picnic areas and moderately handicapped accessible areas.  The park also  provides an opportunity for residents and visitors to explore wetlands, transitional forest and  upland timber ecology.   Waterfront recreation facilities include a limited access boat launch and fishing site is located  the Ballfield Park’s parking area along the Sacandaga River, which provides entry to Lake  Pleasant for small watercraft such as canoes, kayaks and small fishing craft.  Across NY Route  8/30 is the Village Beach that provides swimming and snowmobile access to Lake Pleasant.  Immediately adjacent to the beach is Osborne Park, which provides public docking facilities and  has been the focus of many new beautification efforts.  Oak Mountain Ski Center, located just north of the study area, but within the Village of  Speculator is another recreational asset.  The Friends of Oak Mountain have helped keep the  6   


mountain open as a year‐round recreational facility in recent years.  During the winter season,  the mountain is open for skiing, snowboarding, and tubing.  While in the summer they have  recently added a zipline and operate the chair lift to the mountain top picnic area. Recently the  mountain was sold to private individuals who intend to make numerous improvements,  including continued efforts to make it a year‐round destination. 

 

In addition to these local recreational facilities, two New York State campsites are located in  close proximity to the study area.  Moffit’s Beach Public Campground has a total of 261  campsites and Lewey Lake Public Campground has a total of 207 campsites.  The availability of  campsites helps offset the limited number of seasonal rentals and hotel rooms during the peak  summer season.    6. Infrastructure  Wastewater Services  The current wastewater treatment facility was constructed in 1974 and was designed to handle  variations in flow created by summer tourism. It consists of two primary package treatment  units, each with 0.15 million gallon per day (MGD) capacity. During the off season (when the  village population drops below 400), only one unit is kept in operation. The second unit is  activated from June to September to service 3,000 additional summer and fall customers. The  units have identical configurations.  The collection system is completely within the hamlet area of the village and primarily runs  along Elm Lake Road and New York State Route 8.  A number of extensions have been built off  these main lines as increasing residential development has created a greater need.  New homes  in the Black Bear Run subdivision and some along Route 8 contributed to the growth of the  village.  Additional growth allowances along Route 8 west to the Village line and Route 30 north  to the village line were examined as part of a 1995 engineering study. It appears that the current  system still has the capability to meet this expansion.  In February 2012 it was announced that the village would be the recipient of a Water and Waste  Disposal Loan and Grant totaling $2,322,000 from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural  Development.  The funding will be used to extend the collection system within the Village of  Speculator, ultimately improving sewer access and reducing water pollution into regional lakes  and aquifer.  Water Services  The much of the study area is serviced by the village water system with the exception of the  area south of Camp of the Woods on Routes 8/30.  Water is supplied by two deep bedrock  drilled wells, and evaluation of the system shows there are ample reserves for expansions.   

7   


APPENDIX B: BUSINESS OWNER SURVEY   

 

   


Community Revitalization Plan Business Owner Survey

1. What is the nature of your business? Response

Response

Percent

Count

Lodging

33.3%

9

Professional Service

29.6%

8

Recreation

7.4%

2

Restaurant

11.1%

3

Retail Store

18.5%

5

Other (please specify)

10

answered question

27

skipped question

5

Response

Response

Percent

Count

2. What best describes your operating timeframe?

Year-round

78.1%

25

Seasonal

21.9%

7

If seasonal, please specify what time of year you operate your business.

1 of 12

4

answered question

32

skipped question

0


3. How long have you been operating this business? Response

Response

Percent

Count

Less than 1 year

6.3%

2

1-3 years

15.6%

5

3-5 years

3.1%

1

5-9 years

18.8%

6

More than 10 years

56.3%

18

answered question

32

skipped question

0

4. How many employees do you have? Response

Full Time Employees

Part Time Employees

63.6% (7)

36.4% (4)

11

61.1% (11)

38.9% (7)

18

5-10 employees

50.0% (2)

50.0% (2)

4

More than 10 employees

50.0% (2)

50.0% (2)

4

None Less than 5 employees

2 of 12

Count

answered question

32

skipped question

0


5. What are the primary market areas from which the majority of your sales or business is derived (select up to three answers)? Response

Response

Percent

Count

Local

38.7%

12

North Country

19.4%

6

Central New York (Syracuse/Utica)

19.4%

6

19.4%

6

Western New York

3.2%

1

Hudson Valley

16.1%

5

6.5%

2

Statewide

19.4%

6

Out of State

58.1%

18

Capital Region (greater Albany area)

Metro New York (including Long Island)

Other (please specify)

3 of 12

4

answered question

31

skipped question

1


6. Which type of customer is responsible for a 'majority' of your sales or business? Response

Response

Percent

Count

Local Residents

23.1%

6

Seasonal Residents

38.5%

10

Tourists

38.5%

10

Other (please specify)

4 of 12

8

answered question

26

skipped question

6


7. Which of the following categories do you think attracts a majority of your customers to the area (select up to three answers)? Response

Response

Percent

Count

Own a home in the area

63.3%

19

Employed in the area

13.3%

4

10.0%

3

53.3%

16

60.0%

18

Proximity to State campgrounds

13.3%

4

Walkability of the community

0.0%

0

Attractiveness of the community

13.3%

4

Local events

3.3%

1

Cultural amenities

0.0%

0

Proximity to other local services/amenities Proximity to Lake Pleasant/Sacandaga Lake Proximity to outdoor recreation opportunities

Other (please specify)

5 of 12

6

answered question

30

skipped question

2


8. Based on customer comments and personal experiences, which of the following should be addressed in order to increase visitation to the area (select up to three answers)?

Improved community facilities

Response

Response

Percent

Count

20.0%

6

20.0%

6

Street landscaping/ beautification

13.3%

4

Public access to waterfront

16.7%

5

Marina Services

3.3%

1

Improved hotel accommodations

56.7%

17

50.0%

15

73.3%

22

(public restrooms, beaches, etc.) Improved sidewalks and pedestrian amenities

Increased number of special/community events Additional community attractions

Other (please specify)

8

answered question

30

skipped question

2

9. How would you characterize your business activity level over the last 1-2 years of operation? Response

Response

Percent

Count

Decreasing

40.0%

12

Stable

36.7%

11

Increasing

23.3%

7

answered question

30

skipped question

2

6 of 12


10. Please check any type of investment or improvement you plan on making in the next 1-2 years?

New/expanded marketing &

Response

Response

Percent

Count

34.4%

11

25.0%

8

Physical improvements

34.4%

11

Additional employees

9.4%

3

none

37.5%

12

promotional activities New/expanded products, services, or inventory

Other (please specify)

7 of 12

2

answered question

32

skipped question

0


11. In addition to a strong economy, what are the critical factors for the success and growth of your business (check all that apply)? Response

Response

Percent

Count

Advertising/marketing

44.8%

13

Financing

20.7%

6

Foot traffic

24.1%

7

Public access

6.9%

2

Qualified labor

17.2%

5

Technology/Telecommunications

37.9%

11

Tourism

75.9%

22

Other (please specify)

8 of 12

5

answered question

29

skipped question

3


12. What are some of the major issues or obstacles facing your business today (check all that apply)?

Availability of employees

Response

Response

Percent

Count

13.3%

4

30.0%

9

Cash flow/working capital

33.3%

10

City/state codes or regulations

43.3%

13

Cost of rent/property taxes

30.0%

9

Current economic conditions

66.7%

20

General operating costs

40.0%

12

Insurance costs

16.7%

5

Limited property improvements

3.3%

1

Outdated facilities or equipment

10.0%

3

Payroll costs

16.7%

5

Shrinking customer traffic

33.3%

10

Skill level of employees

3.3%

1

Availability of telecommunication/technological services

Other (please specify)

9 of 12

4

answered question

30

skipped question

2


13. Please select from the following to describe the importance of internet access to your business.

Internet access is essential to my

Response

Response

Percent

Count

80.6%

25

9.7%

3

9.7%

3

answered question

31

skipped question

1

business I sometimes use the internet for my business Access to the internet is not important to my business

14. Is your business internet access limited in any of the following ways? Response

Response

Percent

Count

Overall access related issues

15.0%

3

Internet reliability issues

45.0%

9

Internet speed or bandwidth issues

40.0%

8

Other (please specify)

10 of 12

4

answered question

20

skipped question

12


15. To keep your business healthy and competitive, which of the following types of information or assistance are important (check all that apply)?

Assistance with loan preparation

Response

Response

Percent

Count

4.0%

1

4.0%

1

Business management training

16.0%

4

Business planning and cash flow

24.0%

6

Employee hiring/skills training

16.0%

4

Marketing/advertising program

56.0%

14

Market identification

32.0%

8

48.0%

12

68.0%

17

Business expansion/relocation assistance

Property and building improvements Using the internet for ecommerce and/or marketing

Other (please specify)

2

answered question

25

skipped question

7

16. What public improvements to the community, if any, would you like to see completed in the next 5-10 years? Response Count 23

11 of 12

answered question

23

skipped question

9


17. How would you suggest needed services and businesses be attracted to the area and what might those services and businesses be? Response Count 18 answered question

18

skipped question

14

18. What type of programming, events, etc. would you like to see in the community? Response Count 19 answered question

19

skipped question

13

19. Please share any other comment you may have. Response Count 9

12 of 12

answered question

9

skipped question

23


APPENDIX D: PUBLIC WORKSHOP SUMMARY   

 

   


Speculator Lake Pleasant Community Revitalization Plan Public Workshop Summary August 1, 2012 7:00pm Paul Cummings (The Chazen Companies) presented an overview of the Speculator Lake Pleasant Community Revitalization Plan planning process, business survey results, and community profile analysis. Following the presentation, participants were divided into two (2) groups and took part in facilitated discussions. Participants were asked to explore opportunities to improve the physical attributes and the overall economic climate within the community. The following is a summary of the topics discussed during the public workshop: 1. Improved pedestrian and bicycle facilities (e.g., sidewalks, multi-use trails/lanes, etc.) should be explored. a. Improvements along Route 8 & 30 should be pursued. Such access should be included on the south side (lake side) of Route 8 & 30 and along Route 8 to the Courthouse building. The extension of pedestrian access along Route 8 was previously examined in a NYSDOT feasibility study. NYSDOT intends to widen this portion of the road; however, funding is limited and the project has not been scheduled. b. Improved pedestrian connections to Moffitt Beach should be explored. c. Where possible, multi-use paths should be separate from curb/road edge. d. Speed limits need to be reduced within the area. Vehicles often travel in excess of 55 mph. 2. Improve public access to waterfront should be explored. a. Existing public access is located at Osborne Park, Town Beach, and the nearby canoe and kayak launch (located near the Pavilion parking area). However, there are no other waterfront access opportunities that are located within the study area. The noted locations do not include a boat launch and allow car top launches only. 3. Streetscapes within the study area should be improved. a. Streetscapes should include additional street trees and historic/period lighting. Trees should native species and have a local flavor. Efforts to beautify the streetscape have been very successful and should be continued. b. At grade bump outs (possibly with removable bollards) are desirable. This would allow for bicycling and snow removal. As an alternative, road lanes could be narrowed and additional sidewalks and designated bike lanes could be installed. This document was prepared for the New York State Department of State with the funds provided under Title 11 of the Environmental Protection Fund


4. The four-way intersection has many safety and design issues. One issue is that it is not a right angle intersection. There is a need for additional crosswalks, particularly within the “suicide alley� portion. Tractor trailers swing through the pizza shop’s parking when turning. A traffic light and roundabout are undesirable solutions. A roundabout was previously considered (including the preparation of NYSDOT preliminary design plans), but it appeared that it would require the taking of too much private land. There are many regulatory and design related issues with making a four-way stop. It was recommended that part-time police/peace office be used during the summer months to control traffic. 5. Signage within roadway corridors is cluttered, confusing, and unattractive and should be improved. a. Public (NYSDOT) and private signage along roadway and on properties looks cluttered and is confusing. It was noted that some businesses have over 20 signs on their property. It was suggested that existing signage regulations should be enforced and/or new signage provisions be considered. b. Improved wayfinding signage, should be installed throughout the corridor. They should identify points of interests, services and facilities, and local business. 6. Central location(s) for visitor information and amenities should be established. a. An informational kiosk at a high visibility location should be explored. Ballfield Park may be an appropriate location. b. A large scale community-wide map identify all local trails, parks and attractions should be established. c. The public restrooms at the pavilion need to be better identified and improved (sign at parking area), including existing drainage issues. 7. Parking improvements. a. Encourage walking by providing adequate and identifiable public parking that is attractive site design a used landscape screening/buffers to minimize visual impacts. This may include the use of existing or new parking facilities. b. Shared parking opportunities should be explored, including parking at the Lake Pleasant School and Pavilion during the summer months. Improved pedestrian connections from the school should be explored to encourage the use of such parking. c. Parking at the Bellfield and pavilion should be improved aesthetically. 8. The existing sewer and water infrastructure and capacity is and asset and should be fully leveraged.

2


a. This may include attracting new users that require such capacity and/or the extension/connection to such new users as Moffitt Beach Campground in order to preserve the area’s water quality. b. Explore redevelopment opportunities in the hamlet that would use this resource. Speculator is one of very few hamlets with excess capacity. 9. Some feel that many of the existing business (note that some are converted residences) are unattractive and/or need improvements. a. There is no architectural continuity or design theme. However, it was noted that getting too “cutesy” is undesirable. Unique character is an asset. b. Some properties need façade/building improvements and/or to be cleaned up. c. Improvements to properties should be encouraged by using incentives as opposed increased taxes or code enforcement actions. d. Information and studies that illustrate how improved physical appearance of buildings and streetscapes helps to improve business may be helpful. 10. Consider creating or working with an existing committee that could focus on business assistance and improvements. The committee could also work with the Chamber and Hamilton County to attract businesses. The committee could also collaborate with SCORE, a nonprofit association dedicated to educating entrepreneurs and helping small business startups and providing technical assistance. 11. It was noted that there was a need for additional services or businesses. There is also a need to identify future reasons to stop and stay within the area. a. New businesses might include a drug store, a waterfront restaurant, improved hotel facilities, new hotel facilities, RV campsite (note that one was approved near the Timber Ridge Cabins). b. New or improved hotel facilities should seek to match the public’s lodging expectations with regards to condition and types of amenities. However, it was noted that homogenous looking, franchise style hotels may not complement the existing community character and that such new and/or improved facilities should. c. It was noted that there was a need for more nighttime events and business that catered towards families (in addition to the existing business and restaurants). 12. The following opportunities for events or attractions were discussed: a. July 4th parade (further promote as a regional event)

3


b. Sports and recreation (e.g., Oak Mountain races, miniature golf, candlepin bowling, etc.) c. Mountain biking racing/tours d. Antique/craft fairs e. Festivals/music events (e.g., Mountain Arts Consortium) f. Summer theater and movies (this may include the use of the old 1930 vintage movie theater, which could serve as a hub for additional cultural events). g. Local history (French Louise Adirondack camping event) 13. Historical and cultural assets should be fully leveraged. a. This may include working with the Museum to develop a walking tour map, improved signage, and marketing of historical sites and resources including Colonel Peck and French Louise gravesites, historical markers, and Sled Harbor. 14. Opportunities to use the school during the summer months should be explored. This may include regular events for kids (e.g., arts and crafts, music classes, etc.) and the use of the gym (e.g., pickup basketball games, etc.). 15. Fully leverage Oak Mountain as a local asset: a. Cross-marketing and event partnership opportunities should be explored. This may include communitywide, year-round events and promotional packages. b. Friends of Oak Mountain is a formal entity and could be utilized for programming events at the mountain and elsewhere in the community. c. This may also include an effort to improve and/or expand Oak Mountain’s facilities to include a conference center and/or hotel facility, which was identified in its business plan. 16. Existing mountain biking opportunities should be fully leveraged. This may include improved marketing and high visibility, wayfinding signage/information kiosks. Existing trails include a six (6) mile and 20 mile loop. If these existing trails were connected to Oak Mountain, a 30 mile loop could be created. 17. The placement of an historic fire tower at the Ballfield Park should be considered. This effort is being pursued by a local resident with assistance from the 9th Grade Class/Boy Scouts. Behind the Pavilion is a possible location. The fire tower could be a local attraction and be included as part of the proposed historic walking tour. Notes prepared by Paul W. Cummings, AICP, LEEDŽ AP (pcummings@chazencompanies.com).

4


APPENDIX D: PRELIMINARY COST ESTIMATES   

   


CHAZEN ENGINEERING, LAND SURVEYING & LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE CO., P.C. 547 River Street, Troy, NY 12180

Dutchess County Office  Phone: (845) 454‐3980

Glens Falls Office Phone: (518) 812‐0513

              Phone: (518) 273‐0055  Fax: (518) 273‐8391

Web: www.chazencompanies.com            

Opinion of Probable Cost for Lake Sacandaga-Pleasant Water Quality & Economic Revitilization Plan Chazen Project No. 91203.00

Date: November 2012

Description

QTY

Unit

Unit Price

Total Cost

Roadway Corridor Improvements (Inc. State Highway 30, Elm Lake Rd, and State Route 8) Roadway Resurfacing5 Pavement Striping Granite Curbing Concrete Sidewalk (4" Thick) Grass Strip (Inc. 6" Topsoil) Large Street Trees (Inc. planting material) Small Street Trees (Inc. planting material) Brick Pavers Removable Bollards Information Kiosk Historic Pedestrian Lighting

29,125 SY $10.00 $40.00 $291,250.00 to $1,165,000.00 20,000 LF $30,000.00 $1.50 13,100 LF $524,000.00 $40.00 60,200 SF $361,200.00 $6.00 50,000 SF $100,000.00 $2.00 $600.00 105 EA $63,000.00 $500.00 65 EA $32,500.00 $16.00 2,500 SF $40,000.00 60 EA $1,800.00 $108,000.00 $10,000.00 1 EA $10,000.00 $980,000.00 140 EA $7,000.00 Total Roadway Corridor Improvements $2,539,950.00 to $3,413,700.00 Park and Waterfront Improvements (Inc. Osborne Point Park, Village Beach, and Pavillion Park & Recreational Fields) Asphalt Pavement (1.5" Top & 2.5" Binder) 725 TON $65,250.00 $90.00 Subbabse Type 2 (12") 1,150 CY $48,300.00 $42.00 Permeable Pavers 21,100 SF $126,600.00 $6.00 Pavement Striping 1,500 LF $2,250.00 $1.50 Walkway/Trail 14,000 SF $70,000.00 $5.00 Concrete Helipad 2,500 SF $37,500.00 $15.00 Large Street Trees (Inc. planting material) 30 EA $18,000.00 $600.00 Brick Pavers 8,100 SF $129,600.00 $16.00 Information Kiosk 1 EA $10,000.00 $10,000.00 Prefabricated Wooden Pedestrian Bridge 1 EA $165,000.00 $165,000.00 Total Park and Waterfront Improvements $672,500.00 Construction Estimate Subtotal Signage Contingency Maintenance & Protection of Traffic (4%) Mobilization (4%) Project Contingency (30%) Construction Total Legal, Technical, and Administravtive Allowance (20%) Total

$3,212,450.00 to $4,086,200.00 $12,000.00 $128,498.00 to $163,448.00 $134,117.92 to $170,465.92 $1,046,119.78 to $1,329,634.18 $4,533,185.70 to $5,761,748.10 $906,637.14 to $1,152,349.62 $5,439,822.84 to $6,914,097.72

1

This Opinion of Probable Cost is intended to be used for order of magnitude pricing for budget purposes. Estimate is based on approximate dimensions measured from aerial imagery. A more detailed estimate can be prepared following land survey services and advancement of design. 2

Utilities (Water, Sanitary Sewer, Storm Sewer, Gas, etc.) have not been estimated as part of this Opinion of Probable Costs. If the Village/Town determine that they would like to advance underground utility replacement/improvements, those items would need to be

3

Estimate for walkways & trails for Osborne Point Park, Village Beach, and Pavillion Park & Recreational Fields assumes a mix of concrete sidewalk and crushed stone pathways. 4

Signage contingency assumes pedestrian signage at every major crosswalk, a minimum of 4 speed limit signs, 3 stop signs at the Four Corners intersection, plus additional custom wayfinding signage. 5 6

Cost ranges represent the cost differential between pavement milling/overlay and full depth pavement removal/replacement.

Estimate does not include Bathroom Improvements, Boat Washing Station & water service, or conceptual improvements on private properties.


Speculator Lake Pleasant Community Revitalization Plan (Final)