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IASCE Conference 2015 In partnership with the University College Lillebaelt

Cooperative Learning: Meeting the Challenges of the 21st Century 1-3 October 2015 Odense, Denmark


Table of Contents Welcome and Introduction to the Conference

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Acknowledgements

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Keynote Speakers

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IASCE Awards

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Conference Special Events

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Detailed Conference Schedule

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IASCE Membership Details

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IASCE Board Members

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Danish Conference Team

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Presenter Contact Details

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Please note that spellings used throughout this brochure have respected those of the authors and have not been amended.


Welcome and Introduction to the Conference A warm welcome to Odense Denmark and the 2015 IASCE conference, Cooperative Learning: Meeting the Challenges of the 21st Century. We are delighted to greet participants from 28 countries in Europe, North and South America, Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and the Pacific Rim. The IASCE Board and our partners for this conference, the University College Lillebaelt, anticipate an energising, inspiring and motivating event. The conference has been designed so that participants have the opportunity to experience an event based on cooperative models and values: an event that fosters dialogue, respect, and reflection through intentional engagement. The conference seeks to: ď ś deepen the understanding of how cooperative learning can be appropriately implemented and expanded in differing contexts to encourage learning across a wide variety of dimensions; ď ś explore the role of cooperative learning as an effective pedagogy for the 21st Century; and ď ś examine the essential nature of cooperation in developing and sustaining responsible citizenship. The six conference strands have been developed to encourage stimulating conversations on the conference theme across a wide-variety of topics and participants. Strand 1: Classroom Practice and Teacher Education A focus on (a) the practical implementation of cooperative learning in a wide variety of education settings and (b) teacher education and teacher professional development at all levels. Strand 2: Social Inclusion in Learning A focus on (a) the role of cooperative learning and cooperative strategies in supporting teaching and learning for diversity and inclusion and (b) the development of social integration, social justice, and equity in schools and communities. Strand 3: Cooperative Leadership and School Development A focus on the use of cooperative learning and cooperative strategies in whole school/institutional contexts, or in large scale district, regional or national programs. Highlights the impact of innovative applications of cooperative principles and approaches on policies for educational improvement and management. Strand 4: Creativity, Innovation, and Problem Solving A focus on the intersections of creativity, innovation, and problem solving with cooperation. Strand 5: Information, Communication, and Information Literacy A focus on the modern realities of technology and its impact on communication, the availability of information, and the heightened need for information literacy. Strand 6: Responsible Citizenship A focus on the knowledge, skills, and values needed to (a) facilitate active local and global engagement and (b) shift from individual consumerism towards mutual responsibility and sustainability. 3


Acknowledgements This conference has been organised through the wholly voluntary efforts of the planning committee of the IASCE Board and the conference planning team at the University College Lillebaelt, without whose contributions the conference would not have been possible.

Keynote Speakers Lynda Baloche Cooperation 2.0: Daring Synergy As cooperative learning has entered the mainstream, we might ask “Where do we go from here?” In this interactive session, we will explore three themes that might inform future directions in our work, our networks, and our efforts to shape a sustainable and responsible future. Lynda Baloche, IASCE Co-president, is Professor Emerita of Education at West Chester University of Pennsylvania, USA. In 2008 she received the University’s Trustees’ Achievement Award for her work in cooperative learning, program assessment, and collaborative university governance; she has been the only Education Faculty to receive this honor in its 30-year history. For 13 years Lynda taught children in school settings and, during that time, conducted research in the nurturing of creativity and cooperation in children; she continues to explore the interface between creativity and cooperation. Lynda is the author of The Cooperative Classroom: Empowering Learning, a text published in both English and Simplified Chinese. She enjoys working with teachers committed to developing cooperative communities of learners and with university faculties who wish to design curricular, assessment, and governance approaches that emphasize collaboration.

David and Roger Johnson Why Cooperative Learning Will Never Die In the past three decades, cooperative learning has become a widely used instructional procedure at all school levels, in all subject areas, and in all aspects of learning. When students work together to accomplish shared learning goals, it affects many different learning outcomes from achievement to psychological health. While other educational "innovations" come and go, cooperative learning continues. In this interactive session, David and Roger will share the research from their current meta-analyses and reflect on how the practicality and effectiveness of cooperative learning ensure that it will never die.

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David W. Johnson is a Professor Emeritus of Educational Psychology at the University of Minnesota, USA. He is Co-Director of the Cooperative Learning Center. For the past 35 years David has served as an organizational consultant to schools and businesses in North America, Central and South America, Western and Eastern Europe, Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and the Pacific Region. He is also a psychotherapist. David Johnson received his doctoral degree from Columbia University. He has written 40 books and more than 400 research articles and book chapters. He has been is the recipient of numerous awards for outstanding research and teaching. Roger T. Johnson is a Professor Emeritus of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Minnesota, USA. He is Co-Director of the Cooperative Learning Center. Roger is a former elementary teacher and has taught in teacher-preparation programs from undergraduate through PhD levels. He has consulted with schools throughout North America, Central and South America, Eastern and Western Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and the Pacific Region. Roger is a leading authority on inquiry teaching and science education. Roger Johnson received his doctoral degree from the University of California at Berkeley. He is the author of numerous research articles, book chapters, and books. He has been honored with several national awards.

Bodil Nielsen Focusing on Learning Goals In 2014, the Danish public schools for primary and lower secondary education underwent an important reform. The Danish Ministry of Education set new common learning objectives, and Danish public schools are currently transitioning to a new and different school day. This presentation, based on experience from consulting at a number of Danish schools, will paint a picture of the transition, and focuses on the opportunities and the difficulties that teachers, child and youth workers, supervisors and managers, experience in adapting to the new practice. Bodil Nielsen has been an Associate Professor at the Department of Teacher Education and the Department of Continuing Professional Development in University College Copenhagen. She has done research and has been the head of projects in teacher training colleges and in primary and secondary schools in Denmark. Bodil has published books about evaluation and assessment for learning and about differentiated teaching and evaluation. Bodil Nielsen holds a Ph.D. in educational research. Currently she is a freelance consultant and teaches courses for in-service teachers.

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IASCE Awards The IASCE Awards are intended to recognise individuals or groups who have made outstanding contributions to the field of cooperative learning. There are two main types of awards—The Achievement Awards and the Award for Outstanding Dissertation/Thesis. 

The IASCE Achievement Awards are intended to recognise individuals or groups who have made outstanding contributions to the field of cooperative learning. Categories include: Lifetime Achievement, Research, Original Materials, Service and Activism, and Leadership. The IASCE Elizabeth Cohen Award for Outstanding Thesis or Dissertation recognises researchers in the early stages of their career who demonstrate strong potential for contributions to the field.

Awards are typically announced in conjunction with IASCE Conferences, with applications being posted on the IASCE website, and announced in the IASCE newsletter, approximately one year in advance. We are pleased to announce the awards for 2015.

IASCE Lifetime Achievement Award Morton Deutsch, David W. Johnson, and Roger T. Johnson 2015 marks the first time that the IASCE presents its Lifetime Achievement Award jointly to three distinguished individuals who have worked both separately and together to advance our understanding of what grounds effective cooperative teamwork, conflict resolution, constructive controversy, peace education, and distributive justice. Each one stands tall among theorists, researchers, and practitioners. Morton Deutsch is E.L. Thorndike Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Director Emeritus of the Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (MD-ICCCR) at Teachers College, Columbia University in New York City, USA. David W. Johnson is Professor Emeritus of Educational Psychology and Roger T. Johnson is Professor Emeritus of Curriculum and Instruction, both at the University of Minnesota, USA. At the university, David Johnson and Roger Johnson are founders and long-time Co-Directors of the Cooperative Learning Center (CLC) in the College of Education and Human Development. Mort (a doctoral student of Kurt Lewin, credited founder of social psychology) originally conceptualized and pioneered validation of social interdependence theory. It was further extended and refined by David (a doctoral student of Deutsch) and Roger (David’s brother and professional collaborator for over 45 years at the University of Minnesota). They examined and validated this theory and built a model of cooperative learning often referred to as “Learning Together.” It is defined by five basic elements that support successful cooperative groups. Of particular note are their continuous, long-term programs of research conducted on every continent and prolific book publications, chapters, and journal articles that have been translated into numerous languages. Their professional development trainings have helped to transform theory into practice. They have developed original materials for application across diverse contexts including education, business, law, government, non-profit, health, and social-service settings. They have worked with global leaders and international organizations such as the United

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Nations to support social justice by applying findings to issues of oppression and injustice. They encourage networks around the world that are dedicated to enhancing peoples’ productivity, achievement, positive peer relations, and social/emotional well-being. Cumulatively they hold over 100 honors, awards, and recognitions for their significant contributions to theory, research, and practice on effective cooperation, constructive conflict, and social justice. The IASCE recognizes Morton Deutsch, David W. Johnson, and Roger T. Johnson as living legacies whose scope of work has significantly influenced our collective understanding of what contributes to successful teamwork, constructive conflict, and interpersonal dynamics for a just and humane world.

Everyone is warmly invited to the Awards Reception and Presentation on Thursday 1 October, 18:00 to 19:00, at the Odense City Hall.

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Conference Special Events Wednesday 30 September  Visits to local schools: Pre-registration essential Thursday 1 October through Saturday 3 October  We invite conference participants to offer optional activities during the morning and afternoon breaks and at lunch time. Perhaps you would like to teach juggling. Maybe you would like to organize a cooperative game or teach a traditional dance from your region. How about gathering a group to learn a song about cooperation and then surprising us with a mini Flash Mob during the conference dinner! Here is what you need to know:  Plan for 15-20 minutes and supply any equipment or props you need.  Look around the conference venue to find an appropriate space.  We will advertise your activity in a daily announcement. You could also create a fun poster.  Remember that this is a conference about cooperation—avoid competitive activities.  Use your imagination! Take a risk! Have fun! The success of these informal activities depends on your willingness to plan and share. Thursday 1 October  A Reception and IASCE Awards Presentation will be held in the historic Odense City Hall from 18.00 to 19.00. All are welcome.  Networking Dinners Grab the opportunity to meet and dine with people from all over the world who share your professional passions and an interest in a specific conference strand. Socialize, network, and share professional experiences over a plate of great food.  Time and Place: Meet your group at 19.30 at the Conference venue (Asylgade 7-9). After initial introductions, you will walk to the restaurant for a lovely evening. If you haven’t already booked this opportunity as part of your initial registration, ask as you register for the conference. 250 DKK Friday 2 October  Conference Dinner Take the opportunity to relax and socialize in a casual atmosphere while enjoying a dinner that includes local food from Funen with wine and soft drinks. On your plate you could find fish, chicken, duck, a variety of vegetables, bread and butter.  Time and Place: The conference venue (Asylgade 7-9) at 19.00. If you haven’t already booked this opportunity as part of your initial registration, ask as you register for the conference. 225 DKK 8


Saturday 3 October  Guided Tours of Odense Join one of our guided tours and experience Odense in the early evening. All tours are from 17.00 to 18.30.  A trip around Odense with a watchman This trip with a watchman begins at 17.00 from Hotel Radisson. A watchman will meet you and take you on a lovely journey around the centre of Odense. The watchman will tell stories about old days in Odense, as well as all about the duties of a watchman. During the trip you will see many historic places in Odense, while the watchman entertains you by singing traditional old songs.  A guided bike ride in Odense This trip begins at 17.00 from beside the Town Hall of Odense, Flakhaven. Cycling with your guide, you will enjoy the river of Odense and learn about the history of the river. Furthermore, you will pass the place where Hans Christian Andersen’s mother earned money for the family, and you will also see Sankt Knuds Kirke (Church), Munke Mose, and many other beautiful sculptures around the city.  In the footsteps of Hans Christian Andersen This trip begins at 17.00 from the museum of Hans Christian Andersen near the Hotel Radisson. A guide will walk you through the old part of Odense, where many old and exciting stories will be told. The trip will take you to the river, to the Fairy Tale Garden, and to the Cathedral, where the story of Knud den Hellige (King Canute IV), who was King of Denmark from 1080 until 1086, will be told. You will end the trip at the house where Hans Christian Andersen was born. If you haven’t already booked one of these tours as part of your initial registration, you may book a place when you register at the conference. 140 DKK  Dinner at restaurant Den Grimme Ælling (The Ugly Duckling) Dinner begins at 19.00 and is a short and pleasant walk from the conference venue and hotels. The Ugly Duckling is a charming restaurant on a cobbled lane in Odense’s historic center. It is housed in an old ocher-colored building that was built in about 1850 and emulates an old Danish wayside inn. It specializes in an extensive and adventurous buffet of typical Danish food. Meat lovers, fish lovers, and vegetarians will all find that their preferences are satisfied. A glass of wine or a soft drink is included in the price. Additional beverages may be purchased on site. If you haven’t already booked this opportunity as part of your initial registration, ask as you register for the conference. 200 DKK

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Cooperative Learning: Meeting the Challenges of the 21st Century 30 September 2015 through 3 October 2015 Detailed Conference Schedule Wednesday, 30 September 2015 8:30 to 9:00 Registration Lobby (Asylgade 7-9) 9:00 to 14:00 School Visits The bus will leave the conference venue at 9:00 Advanced Registration Required. Lunch and transportation are included in the cost. 14:00 to 17:00 Leisure Time 17:00 to 18:30 Arrival and Registration of Participants Lobby Learn how to use EventMobi Optional (you may also register from 8:30 to 9:15 on Thursday) 18:30 to 19:30 Light meal at venue Atrium (near lobby) Advanced Registration Recommended 19:30 to 20:30 Getting To Know One Another Activities* with Don Plumb (IASCE Board Member) All Are Invited (Optional) *Participants are invited to take part in a variety of informal networking and sharing activities throughout the conference. IASCE would like to thank (a) the conference participants who have designed and facilitated these activities; and (b) Marcela Ramirez, a graduate student at the University of Geneva, who will be available throughout these activities to support an IASCE exploration of how such informal activities contribute to the success and meaningfulness of the conference. 11


Thursday, 1 October 2015 8:30 to 9:15 Lobby and Atrium (Asylgade 7-9)

Registration for New Arrivals Informal Mingling and Sharing Learn how to use EventMobi Refreshments Available

9:15 to 9:45 Congres Hall

Welcome by Principal Erik Knudsen Introductions

9:45 to 11:00 Congres Hall

Opening Plenary Cooperation 2.0: Daring Synergy Lynda Baloche: IASCE Co-president; West Chester University USA, Professor Emerita

11:00 to 11:30

Refreshments and Informal Networking

Thursday Session 1: 11:30 to 13:00 Room 2.2

Workshop

Room 3.2

Workshop

Room 3.3

Workshop

Designing Presentations and Lectures for Active Participant Engagement (IASCE Sponsored Session) Celeste Brody and CĂŠline Buchs (USA and Switzerland) How can presenters actively engage an audience in conference presentations? This workshop will use strategies to create intentional, interactive moments during a typical paper session. These processes are similar to those used in engaging students in lecture-type classes. We will make active connections to those learning environments. Active Structures for Effective Teaching (Strand 1) Donald Plumb (Canada) Are you the hardest working person in your classroom? Join this highly interactive workshop to experience quick CL structures that you can use immediately to energise your students, engage them in active learning, make them individually accountable, and make you more effective in Math, Science and most other classrooms. Building Online Collaboration Between People and Cultures (Strand 5) Miri Shonfeld, Yehudith Weinberger, and Einat Rozner (Israel) The Internet allows us to learn about other cultures and people who are different from ourselves by actually meeting people from other cultures. However, in order to make these exchanges fruitful we must be able to build trust. In this workshop we will look at the stages for online collaboration and online tools that can further collaboration. Please try to bring an electronic device to this workshop.

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Room 4.1

Workshop

Room 1.2

Paper Presentations Education In and Through the Arts and Movement

Room 2.8

Interactive Roundtable (45 minutes) 11:30-12:15 Interactive Roundtable (45 minutes) 12:15-1:00

13:00 to 14:00

Youth-Driven Cooperative Instruction for Equity, Inclusion, and Justice: Storypath and Community Research Empowering Social Transformation (Strand 2) Laurie Stevahn and Margit McGuire (USA) This interactive workshop introduces Storypath and Community Research Empowering Social Transformation (CREST)—two cooperative instructional approaches that engage teens in grappling with social justice issues—first through role-play situations, then through self-directed community-based research projects important to students’ own lived experiences— toward empowering leaders for a just and humane world. Lights, Camera, Action!: The Tale of Drama Peer Tutoring Across Two Schools (Strand 4) Elaine Jee and Claudia Wong (Singapore) Join us in exploring how learners can develop creative problem-solving through the performing arts as communication across cultures, and as a tool for cross-age collaboration and civic engagement. Research in Cooperative Music Learning: Engaging Critical Thinking and Creativity through Student Interaction (Strand 4) Richard Cangro (USA) In an effort to bridge the gap between developing well-rounded musicians and addressing the need for students to view their learning as co-participating in a real, social practice, this virtual session provides scholarship that focuses attention on the importance of providing opportunities for music students to collaborate through creating, performing, and responding. Deploying Digital Tools for Co-operative Learning in a Physical Education Teacher Education Setting (Strand 1) Kevin Cahill (Ireland) This paper offers exemplars of best practice from our physical education teacher education programme where students cooperate through the use of digital tools and twenty-first century skills to co-construct their learning. Session participants will engage in a similar moment where de Bono's "thinking hats" will be deployed as a creative learning device. Building Cultural and Social Capital Through Cooperation with our Community (Strand 6) Alison Elliot and John Barnard (UK) This interactive Roundtable will explore how communities, using educational organisations as a hub, can develop an inclusive co-operative learning culture and community engagement. It will present as a model for consideration, a case study of the strategies employed by our co-operative school and explore the value of similar approaches in other contexts. Realising the Vision of a Co-operative School (Strand 6) Maureen Breeze and Cicely Alsbury (UK) This Interactive Roundtable will enable participants to gain an understanding of the background and features of the new cooperative schools in England and some of the practical strategies being employed by one school in realising the vision. Participants will be able to feedback and share their own ideas and experiences and discuss the potential transferability of the model and concepts.

Lunch and Informal Sharing

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Thursday Session 2: 14:00 to 15:30 Room 4.1

Workshop

Room 3.3

Workshop

Room 3.2

Workshop

Room 2.2

Workshop

Supportive Teaching: An Inspiring Development in Danish School Reform (Strand 2) RenĂŠ Kristensen (Denmark) Supportive teaching is a new phenomenon in Danish school history. A number of lessons have been dedicated and developed to support the subjects facilitating new ways of teaching, new structures, new participants in the learning processes. The workshop will present the idea and the possibilities in learning processes in Danish contexts. (Info: www.kortlink.dk/gggz) Participants are encouraged to bring an electronic device. Sustaining CL through Heart, Head and Hand (Strand 1) Lalita Agashe (India) Come CL practitioners: after this workshop you will say that sustaining CL is not tough! This workshop will offer an opportunity to develop an effective perspective of CL practice through sharing your experiences and understanding of CL in your context of classroom, culture and organization. Can Cooperative Learning be Reproduced Everywhere in the Same Way? (Strand 1) Yael Sharan (Israel) Cooperative learning is spreading world-wide, yet misunderstandings of CL principles and practices prevail. This calls for careful consideration of the essential elements of CL and of ways to present them in different countries and cultural contexts. In this workshop, participants will (a) explore views of essential elements of CL; (b) design ways of presenting these elements in classrooms and in teacher education programs in various cultural contexts. Fun Cooperative Learning Activities for Foreign Language Classes (Strand 1) Kumiko Fushino (Japan) In this workshop, I will introduce some fun activities that can be used in foreign language classes with students with limited language proficiencies. Participants can experience these activities and think about why these activities are effective. Since they can be used in all kinds of classes, every teacher is welcome!

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Room 2.8

Paper Presentations Developing Interactions

Room 1.2

Paper Presentations Using Cooperation to Enhance Language Learning

15:30 to 16:00

Building Participation: Why Cooperative Learning in the Curriculum Matters (Strand 2) Deborah Crook (UK) Child-led research provides inclusive opportunities to develop self-determination and cooperation in the classroom. This builds on children’s capacities for participation in both their learning and wider society. The study with two classes of year-six children in northern England reveals the importance of time and relationships to this process. Flipping Participatory Learning (Strand 5) Elaine Jee (Singapore) This interactive presentation describes a study where secondary school students read and interacted outside class via technology tools. In class, students learned technological, cognitive and social skills for peer interaction. Thus, not only was knowledge gathering flipped to outside of class, but so was the peer interaction. First Steps Towards Successful Group Activities (Strand 1) George Jacobs and Elaine Jee (Singapore) This paper offers ideas about what to do even before your workshop or other session begins to facilitate its success. These two ideas centre on preparing before the event and doing warm-up activities. Participants will experience some of these warm-up activities. Cooperative Learning as an Alternative Approach to Language Learning in the 21st Century: Research Review (Strand 1) Umi Mahbib (Malaysia) Group work has many advantages and has become popular in Malaysia as part of a nation-wide effort to get ready for learning in the 21st century. In my paper I will explain the benefits of using cooperative learning in language teaching, as demonstrated in my review of research. Reading in Pairs: Peer Tutoring for Reading Competence in English as a Second Language (Strand 1) Maite Oller Sánchez (Catalonia) Reading in pairs is an educational programme promoted by Research Group on Peer Learning of Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona that promotes cooperation and English as a second language, through peer tutoring and family involvement. The programme emerges from the development and research in more than 200 schools in Spain and Chile. The Effectiveness of Reflective Learning with Pre-service Teachers: Action Research on Storytelling (Strand 4) Tsu Chia Julia Hsu (Taiwan) The study presents the findings of a group of EFL pre-service teachers (PT) practice teaching experiences with the use of storytelling/narrative skills. PTs designed different story/lesson contents with the use of collaborative learning strategy. Findings show that PTs are able to establish good connections with the English-language teaching strategy.

Refreshments and Informal Networking

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Thursday Session 3: 16:00 to 17:30 Room 2.2

Workshop

Room 4.1

Workshop

Room 3.2

Workshop

Room 1.2

Paper Presentations Teacher Education

Creating Groupworthy Tasks (Strand 1) Rachel Lotan and Alexis Patterson (USA) Groupworthy tasks provide opportunities for students to (a) access the information needed to engage productively, (b) facilitate equal-status participation, and (c) allow demonstration of multiple intellectual abilities and academic and social skills. Participants will analyze and begin to design groupworthy tasks in different disciplines and across grade levels. “We In the World”: A Curriculum for Intercultural Education for Primary Grades (Strand 1) Stefania Lamberti and Marta Milani (Italy) Investing in young people so that they can become citizens in a global world requires upgrading curricula and teaching methods. In our intervention we introduced a curriculum for children aged 3 to 11 that includes cooperative intercultural experiences to enable positive interdependence and effective face-to-face relationships. Implementation of Cooperative Learning in Denmark: Practices, Challenges and Perspectives (Strand 3) Jette Stenlev (Denmark) In this presentation we will look into the issues and challenges Danish schools meet in their work with cooperative learning. Some schools and individual teachers are quite successful, others not. Why is this so? And what are some strategies for schoolwide implementation of cooperative learning that might be useful? Developing Cooperative Learning Pedagogy in Initial Teacher Education (Strand 1) Wendy Jolliffe (UK) This paper examines research over five years into supporting pre-service teachers in implementing cooperative learning. Indicators of successful transfer to the classroom are provided, as well as barriers that some encountered. Factors that supported those students who were more successful provide indicators for developing effective teacher education programmes. The Role of Teachers’ Values in the Intention to Implement Cooperative Learning (Strand 1) Dimitra Filippou and Céline Buchs (Switzerland) This study investigates the links between pre-service teachers' personal values and their cooperative/competitive attitudes as well as their intentions to implement cooperative learning in the classroom. Results showed that self-transcendence values positively predicted cooperative attitudes and the intention to implement cooperative learning. Rather, self-enhancement values positively predicted competitive attitudes and negatively predicted the intention to implement cooperative learning. Cooperative Learning: Promoting Links Between Strategies in Pre-service Teacher Education and Their Use in School Practice (Strand 1) Hana Kasíková and Eva Vincejova (Czech Republic) This paper presents action research that relates to the long-term effects of cooperative learning groups on students’ responsibility for their own learning and the teaching of others.

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Room 2.8

Paper Presentations Investigating Strategies and Technology

Room 3.3

Paper Presentations Technology in Science Education

Co-operative Learning in Online Distance Education Using the Jigsaw Method (Strand 5) Jennifer Roberts and Ignatius Gous (South Africa) Co-operative learning strategies have been used successfully in many contact learning environments but are relatively new in online Distance Education. Practitioners and researchers have identified co-operative learning as a promising pedagogical approach to facilitate online learning. This paper reports on the results of using Jigsaw among undergraduate students at the University of South Africa. Online Collaborative Learning: Connecting Between Germany and Israel (Strand 5) Miri Shonfeld and Einat Rozner (Israel) An exploration of the potential for collaboration between different cultures. The advantages and challenges of an online learning project between graduate students from different countries are discussed. Participants will take an active part in discovering the online environments that were used in the project by using devices such as tablets, mobile phones etc. Does Cooperative Learning Improve the Academic Performance of Secondary Education Students? A Case Study in Spain (Strand 1) Miguel A. Santos Rego and Maria del Mar Lorenzo Moledo (Spain) This paper reveals the results obtained when assessing the use of the Jigsaw teaching technique, developed by Aronson, in a basic secondary school in Galicia characterized by ethnic and cultural diversity. The technique was assessed using a two-group quasi-experimental design, structured like a pretest-posttest experiment. Inquiry based Learning Using ICT on Human Digestive System (Strand 5) Zahida Mohamed Abu Baker (Singapore) The lesson examined in this session involves technology-facilitated Collaborative Science Inquiry (CSI) on the human digestive system--focusing on structure, function, and the digestion process. Students are presented with an investigative case-based scenario in which they do online research. They present their findings on a Google site where they collaborate and learn from each other. How a Cooperative Structure Enabled Deep Scientific Learning: Perspectives from a Wiki-Supported Learning Design (Strand 5) Franรงois Lombard (Switzerland) How can a cooperative structure provide guidance while maintaining student ownership of questions? Student productions in a shared writing space were analyzed for evidence of scientific understanding of complex phenomena (epistemic complexity scale), (full-year inquiry, 19-year-olds majoring biology). Question refinement was visualized. Design rules will be discussed. The Scenario-Based Science Inquiry Approach for Meaningful Science Learning in Primary Grades (Strand 5) Frederick Talaue (Singapore) This paper relates how a group of Primary 3 pupils engaged in a scenario-based science inquiry activity on Properties of Materials. In a carefully designed problem-solving context, we observed that pupils were highly involved in collective reasoning and in finding common ground towards achieving the knowledge-building goal of the activity.

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Thursday, 1 October 2015 18:00 to 19:00 Odense City Hall 19:30

IASCE Awards: Reception and Presentations All Are Invited Small-Group Networking Dinners Various Restaurants in Odense Advance Registration Required

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Friday, 2 October 2015 8:30 to 9:15 Lobby and Atrium (Asylgade 7-9)

Registration for New Arrivals Informal Mingling and Sharing Learn how to use EventMobi Refreshments Available

9:15 to 10:30 Congres Hall

Plenary Why Cooperative Learning Will Never Die David Johnson and Roger Johnson: University of Minnesota USA, Professors Emeriti

10:30 to 11:00

Refreshments and Informal Networking

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Friday Session 1: 11:00 to 12:30 Room 3.2

Workshop

Room 2.2

Workshop

Room 4.1

Workshop

Room 3.3

Workshop

Effective Workshop and Presentation Design: A Cooperative Learning Toolkit (IASCE Sponsored Session) Lalita Agashe, Don Plumb, and Yael Sharan (India, Canada, and Israel) A highly effective way to make your workshops and presentations more engaging and motivating is to build cooperative learning into your design so as to create an interactive environment. Come and join us in this “workshop about workshops” and experience a variety of strategies that will expand your repertoire of ways to have your audiences learn cooperative learning by experiencing cooperative learning. Enhancing Creativity in Cooperative Contexts (Strand 4) Lynda Baloche (USA) Participants will explore techniques and social conditions that encourage intrinsic motivation and creative thinking in cooperative contexts. Activities are designed to be fun and accessible to a wide range of participants. There will be opportunities to consider applications to different settings. How’s It Going in Your School? Using Cooperative Strategies to Lead Learning Organizations (Strand 3) Laurie Stevahn (USA) Effective schools provide stakeholders (students, teachers, parents, specialists, administrators, support staff, etc.) with a sense of purpose, direction, collegiality, accomplishment, and positive energy for moving forward. This interactive workshop presents a leader’s dozen of cooperative strategies for focusing on organizational mission/vision/values, assessing progress, and engaging in ongoing development for success. From Here to There: Designing Cooperative Learning Strategies to Assist Teachers with Pedagogical Changes of the New Junior Certificate in Ireland (Strand 1) Enda Byrt and Ann Foley (Ireland) The Junior Cycle in Ireland is undergoing a significant change in curriculum and pedagogy. We seek to actively engage the experience of participants in helping us guide our Teacher Training programme in making cooperative learning the "gateway" methodology for the realisation of the goals of our 6 Key Skills at Junior Certificate. Please try to bring an electronic device to this workshop.

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Room 1.2

Paper Presentations Views from Higher Education

Room 2.8

Paper Presentations The Power of Context

12:30 to 13:30

Using Cooperative Learning as Preparation for Transition into the Workplace (Strand 1) Jill Clark (New Zealand) This presentation reports on an undergraduate programme in a New Zealand tertiary institution where business students work in cooperative learning groups to complete ‘real life’ industry projects. Effectively managed projects, it is suggested, may be used to align higher education with long-term learning both for work and for life. Co-construction Plus Controversy: Two Ways of Learning Cooperatively in the University Classroom (Strand 1) Rosa Maria Pons and Céline Buchs (Spain and Switzerland) We investigate how to organize the university classroom in order to maximize students’ learning. We compared one individual work condition and two different cooperative formats (focused either on co-construction or on socio-cognitive conflicts). Students learned more in the two cooperative conditions, with no differences among them, than in individual condition. Fostering Ethical and Responsible Consumer Behavior Among Japanese High School and College Students Using Cooperative Learning (Strand 6) Makiko Hashinaga and Emiko Ishijima (Japan) This research project aimed to identify the impact of consumer citizenship education in fostering 21st century competency traits among high school and college students. Discussion, debates, and case studies were used in order to enhance “career development,” “communication skills,” and “social involvement with ethical and responsible living.” Confronting Challenges and Discovering Capabilities Through Cooperative Learning: An Ethnography at an Urban Marginalized School in El Salvador (Strand 2) Christine Schmalenbach (Germany) Teachers and students working with CL at urban marginalized schools in El Salvador are confronted with challenges that differ from situations known by teachers in other contexts. However, there are also local resources that can facilitate CL. The paper will present the results of an ethnographic study. Village Institutions in Turkey and Cooperative Learning (Strand 6) Ayfer Kocabaş (Turkey) This paper presents an evaluation of the educational methods used by the Village Institutions in Turkey and the features they have in common with cooperative learning. The system is based on students’ active participation in all aspects of their education resulting in knowledgeable critical thinkers and creative citizens of society. Secondary Education Teachers in the Context of Cooperative Learning: Searching for Evidence in Practical Training (Strand 1) Miguel A. Santos Rego and Maria del Mar Lorenzo Moledo (Spain) The main purpose of this contribution is to show the reactions of several secondary education teachers participating in an educational program especially designed to improve the learning skills of students of the above-mentioned level of education in the Autonomous Community of Galicia in northwestern Spain.

Lunch and Informal Sharing

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Friday Session 2: 13:30 to 15:00 Room Congres Hall

Workshop

Room 4.1

Workshop

Room 3.3

Workshop

Room 3.2

Workshop

15:00 to 15:30

Cooperative Learning: From Theory to Practice David Johnson and Roger Johnson (USA) Participants will examine the Basic Elements from Social Interdependence Theory and how they influence the educators' role in structuring cooperation in classrooms and schools. The Educational Teaching Approach inAgorà "For a New World" (Strand 3) Stefania Lamberti and Marta Milani (Italy) In our presentation we introduce the InAgorà approach to learning that combines principles of CL and dimensions of neuroscience and bio-psycho-social sciences. We present a curriculum for primary school children that includes cooperative intercultural experiences to enable positive interdependence and effective face-to-face relationships necessary for their future roles in a global world. Design Reflections on Collaborative Learning in Synchronous Online Learning Environments (Strand 5) Annette Dalsgaard and Charlotte Lærke Weitze (Denmark) The workshop will focus on synchronous online learning design for collaborative learning in web conferencing or video conferencing learning environments. We will present two learning design cases and guide the participants through a reflection and development process with the innovative IT-pedagogical Think Tank model to create new collaborative learning design. Please try to bring a computer or tablet to this workshop. Subskills: A Key to Successful Implementation of Cooperative Learning Structures (Strand 1) Janet Reid (Denmark) Cooperative Learning structures work wonders for student learning, both academically and socially – but only if the necessary social and communicative subskills are taught to the students. Learn how to identify and teach the subskills of specific cooperative learning structures, thus helping each of your students become successful learners.

Refreshments and Informal Networking

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Friday, 2 October 2015 15:30 to 17:15 Congres Hall

Plenary and Follow-up Discussion Focusing on Learning Goals Bodil Nielsen: Independent Consultant, Denmark

19:00 Conference Site

Conference Dinner: Please come together with colleagues to enjoy food of the region Advanced Registration Required

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Saturday, 3 October 2015 8:30 to 9:00 Registration for New Arrivals Lobby and Atrium Informal Mingling and Sharing (Asylgade 7-9) Refreshments Available Saturday Session 1: 9:00 to 10:30 Room 3.2

Workshop

Room 2.2

Workshop

Room 3.3

Workshop (45 minutes) 9:00-9:45

Room 3.6

Workshop (45 minutes) 9:45-10:30

The Role of Talk in Promoting Thinking (IASCE Sponsored Session) Robyn Gillies, Rachel Lotan, Rosa Maria Pons, and Michael Boyle (Australia, USA, and Spain) Research over the last three decades indicates that students have much to gain when they work cooperatively in groups where they learn to listen to what others have to say, discuss different ideas, and respond to others' requests for help or perceived need for help. In so doing, they learn that talk is a way of sharing their thoughts and developing new understandings. The presenters will draw on their experiences to illustrate how talk can promote thinking among students at all levels, including university settings. The Study2Succeed Program: A Research Study using Co-operative Learning Strategies to Facilitate Effective Learning Among Medical Students (Strand 1) Ignatius Gous and Jennifer Roberts (South Africa) Even successful students often say they do not know how to learn properly. A group of medical students were taught learning strategies based on recent neuro- and cognitive research, and they applied them in cooperative learning sessions. The results were self-confidence, a more positive experience and better performance. Participants are asked to bring a laptop, tablet, or smartphone. Itscool – Where Learners Lead the Way! A Group-based, Self-directed Approach to Learning Integrating Virtual and Face-toface Learning Strategies (Strand 1) Phillip Pulfrey (Switzerland) Itscool – a radical rethink of the top-down traditional school structure. Students collaborate in self-directing groups to decide what they want or need to learn, how to go about learning this and who or what they need to consult to achieve their goals. The teacher acts as guide and consultant. Roots and Branches: Early Co-Operative Learning in UK Working Class Organisations (Stand 6) Julie Thorpe and Linda Shaw (UK) Examining the education programmes of the UK Co-operative Women's Guild and Woodcraft Folk youth organisation, this workshop explores the extent to which co-operative learning was integral to citizenship education for working class women and youth in early 20th-century Britain, and the extent to which these practices have contemporary relevance.

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Room 1.2

Paper Presentations Second Language Learning

Room 2.8

Paper Presentations Connectivity and Empathy

10:30 to 11:00

Does Cooperative Learning Help to Improve Foreign Language Fluency? (Strand 1) María Isabel Velasco Moreno (Spain) This study investigates if cooperative learning brings more opportunities to speak in a foreign language to students in structured teams than in unstructured group work. Co-constructing Knowledge for Enhancing L2 English Writing Skills: Building on Cooperative Learning (Strand 1) Hiromasa Ohba (Japan) The purpose of this study is to investigate (a) how peer interactions in trust-based cooperative learning conditions facilitate Japanese learners’ writing skills in English and (b) what learning mechanism is involved in co-constructing and deepening their knowledge to better write in English. When My Peers Are Not Nice To Me: Classroom (In)civility (Strand 1) Harumi Kimura (Japan) This study investigates students’ (in)civility toward their peers in L2 interaction. Pair/Groupwork Incivility Scale for the impact of students’ inconsiderate attitudes and behaviors was administered to examine the relative influences on their L2 learning motivation and behavior. The results will help us better understand the social environment of classrooms. The Dance of Life: A Cooperative Experience with Junior High-School Students Centered on the Theme of Loss and Grief (Strand 1) Daniela Pavan and Claudia Matini (Italy) We describe a cooperative experience centered on loss and grief in adolescence. Students related to sorrow and loss through CL activities such as Blackboard Share, Think/Pair/Share, Learning Together, Group Interview, Carousel Brainstorming and their own narratives, and by meeting and interviewing people at a hospice for the terminally ill. A Pedagogy of Tenderness and the Promotion of Integral Protagonism: A Peruvian Approach and Its Potential for Cooperative Learning (Strand 6) Christine Schmalenbach (Germany) Pedagogía de la Ternura (or Pedagogía del Protagonismo) was developed in a context of internal conflict. It emphasizes the relevance of emotions, connectivity, responsibility for self and others and the capability of raising one’s voice. I would like to discuss its potential as theoretical framework for CL in similar contexts. Structure and Mechanism of Problem-Based Learning (PBL) (Strand 1) Satoru Takahashi (Japan) PBL, with cooperative learning at its center, may contribute to broadening learners’ perspectives and promoting personal transformation. It may go far beyond personal interests, concerns, and desires and create a stronger awareness of an individual’s social mission and responsibility to serve others.

Refreshments and Informal Networking

25


Saturday Session 2: 11:00 to 12:30 Room 3.2

Workshop

Room 2.2

Workshop

Room 3.3

Interactive Dialogue (45 minutes) 11:00-11:45

Room 3.6

Interactive Roundtable (45 minutes) 11:45-12:30

Morton Deutsch’s Legacy: Social Interdependence Theory David Johnson (USA) Morton Deutsch has left a legacy of seminal theory and research on social interdependence (i.e., cooperation and competition). His theory will be reviewed and the research it has generated will be summarized and discussed. How others have operationalized his procedures, so that teachers and other educators can use the theory, will be covered. The session illustrates the interrelationships among theory, research, and practice. It also recognizes one of the greatest living social psychologists. Cooperative and Collaborative Learning: How are they alike, how are they different? (Strand 1) Neil Davidson (USA) Are you puzzled by the distinction between cooperative and collaborative learning? In this session, we'll compare and contrast them along several dimensions: root disciplines, underlying philosophy, role of the teacher, instructional practices, classroom management, and research base. We will identify common and varying attributes in small group approaches, to distinguish between cooperative and collaborative learning. Participants will engage in both collaborative and cooperative activities. Teachers’ Conceptions of Diversity in Promoting Intercultural Education through Cooperative Learning (Strand 1) Marialuisa Damini and Paolo Trubiano (Italy) This interactive dialogue draws from an ongoing action-research programme involving Italian secondary school teachers in cooperative learning activities promoting intercultural education. Cooperative learning activities are related to deconstructing prejudices and to the development of intercultural competence. Teachers’ conceptions of diversity are being explored through focus groups. Teachers' Conceptions of Diversity in Promoting Intercultural Education through Cooperative Learning Using Cooperative Learning Pedagogy: A Way to Cope with Education Policy Churning (Strand 3) Cicely Alsbury (UK) If you research or work in education, you know that we are all experiencing the effects of ever changing government policies because of the constant pressures of globalisation. The question remains, how can cooperative learning pedagogy enable success against these top-down reforms?

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Room 1.2

Paper Presentations Investigations of “Learning Together”

Room 2.8

Paper Presentations Engaging Learners

12:30 to 13:30

Developing Social Skills to Promote Academic Success for All Students (Strand 2) Giovanna Malusà (Italy) This paper reports some results of a longitudinal study which followed, from 2005 to 2011, a multicultural class in Italy, characterized by the model ‘Learning Together’. The author will present from a systemic perspective the four steps of an effective process to promote academic success for all students. How Elementary Teachers Implement Cooperative Learning After a Short Training (Strand 1) Céline Buchs and Yann Volpé (Switzerland) This survey documents elementary teachers' implementation of cooperative learning after two days training based on Learning Together. Teachers indicated to what extent they prepare their students to cooperate and structure a group task. Moreover they reported perceived efficacy regarding different roles and what they perceived as obstacles or facilitators. What is Needed for a Truly Cooperative-Learning Class? (Strand 1) Takue Ohno (Japan) “Cooperative learning” is often interpreted just as a simple group/pair work by many teachers in Japan. The author was among them before knowing Smith (1996). Now that she has gained some knowledge about cooperative learning, she analyzes her past classes in terms of Smith’s five essential elements for cooperative learning Storyline: A Framework for Implementing Cooperative Learning in Foreign Language Teacher Education (Strand 1) Sharon Ahlquist (Sweden) In Storyline, a fictive world is created with learners taking on the roles of characters in a developing story. This paper highlights the affective dimension Storyline brings to cooperative learning, presents reflections of student teachers on the benefits and challenges of working cooperatively and demonstrates a cooperative Storyline task. Exploring Student Leadership in a Co-operative School Setting: ‘Doing With’ Rather Than ‘Doing To’ (Strand 3) Debbie Ralls (UK) This paper explores alternative approaches to engagement that challenge the widely accepted notion that professionals “do to” students, parents and communities (Dyson and Kerr, 2013). Can becoming a co-operative school support the development of a more relational, democratic approach to engagement policy and practice--doing with' rather than 'doing to'? Cooperative Learning as a Democratic Learning Method (Strand 6) Deniz Gökçe Erbil and Ayfer Kocabaş (Turkey) Democracy and cooperative learning are strongly interrelated concepts and elementary schools have a significant role in developing democratic attitudes in children. The relationship between these concepts may be used to benefit students’ democratic attitudes. This research investigated the effects of using the Learning Together model in elementary schools.

Lunch and Informal Sharing

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Saturday Session 3: 13:30 to 15:00 Room 3.2

Workshop

Room 2.2

Workshop

Room 1.2

Paper Presentations The Challenges of Implementation

Cooperative Learning for Social-Emotional Competence (Strand 1) Celeste Brody (USA) Cooperative Learning can be an excellent pathway for students to develop social-emotional (S-E) competence such as empathy and effective communication. This workshop will engage participants in connecting the phases of groupwork with S-E competencies closely aligned with learning in groups. Participants will learn to use a few strategies for teaching S-E within groupwork. Butterflies and Caterpillars: A Metaphor for Teaching and Learning (Strand 1) Bertha Paredes (Mexico) Butterflies and Caterpillars is an activity that will be used to raise teachers’ awareness of how students take in what we teach. It will involve the workshop participants in cooperative roles in order to realize that It is not as easy as It looks to just teach. An Italian Model of Teacher Training in Cooperative Learning (Strand 3) Claudia Matini and Daniela Pavan (Italy) Is there a “good enough” method of teaching cooperative learning? What theory of learning underlies teachers’ training and to what extent is it possible to evaluate progress in their learning? This paper describes an Italian model of teacher training for cooperative learning and promotes metacognitive reflection on method and results. Assessment of Knowledge and Abilities in Cooperative Learning (Strand 1) Eva Hammar Chiriac and Karin Forslund Frykedal (Sweden) The aim of this project is to study assessment of knowledge and abilities in cooperative learning, and also study the possibility of training teachers’ and students’ assessment abilities. Some preliminary results from the study will be presented and problematized. Experiencing, Applying and Disseminating Cooperative Learning in Brazil (Strand 1) Frank Viana Carvalho (Brazil) In this paper I will report experiences in the application and dissemination of cooperative learning and present some new strategies that we developed in Brazil on cooperative learning.

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Room 3.3

Workshop (45 minutes) 13:30-14:15

Room 3.6

Interactive Roundtable (45 minutes) 14:15-15:00

The Learning Network: Using Multi-skill Group Projects and Inter-group Collaboration to Create a Cooperative Learning Environment Within the Context of University Education (Strand 1) Caroline Pulfrey (Switzerland) Experience a new approach to university learning! We combine theoretical and experiential learning about team functioning by means of multi-faceted, group-research projects, including report-writing, data-collection, film-making and reflexivity analyses. A custom-built, multi-level website that draws on the functions of the major social media networks facilitates seamless communication within and between groups. Creating a Positive Classroom Climate: Supporting Deliberation and Dialogue to Enhance Civic Knowledge, Skills and Dispositions (Strand 6) Norsidah Suadi and Brenda Siew (Singapore) Cooperative learning creates a positive classroom climate that gives students opportunities to develop and practice trustbuilding, communication and decision-making skills, in a classroom environment that promotes social interactions. It purports to give all students a “voice� to converse and deliberate about issues and, thus, increases political efficacy.

15:15 to 16:15

Closure Activity/Reflections on the Conference All Are Encouraged To Attend

16:15 to 17:00

Refreshments and Informal Sharing

17:00 to 18:30

Guided Tours of Odense Advanced Registration Required

19:00

Dinner at The Ugly Duckling: Typical Danish Buffet Advanced Registration Required

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IASCE Membership Details IASCE supports those who are interested in the study of cooperation in education by providing a forum in which to share research and lessons regarding the practice of cooperative learning. One way IASCE does this is through our membership benefits, which include our newsletter and opportunities for networking. The IASCE Newsletter Three times a year the IASCE newsletter provides:  research and project reports from an international perspective,  new ideas from leaders in the field,  reports on the latest research and journal publications,  book and media reviews,  new online resources for cooperative learning, and  news of our international conferences, which bring together educators from around the world to share ideas, compare successes, discuss challenges, and review the latest research. Conferences IASCE holds regular conferences, typically every two-to-three years and often in partnership with other organisations. IASCE members benefit from a discounted registration fee. IASCE members are eligible to apply for a bursary to help meet the costs of conference attendance. Networking Our opportunities for networking include a membership directory (upon request), a list of board members to contact for consultation and professional assistance, and discounts on our conferences. Further benefits We offer occasional discounts on publications. Please join us. You can do this from the IASCE website – www.iasce.net. Membership Fees (in $US) Receiving newsletter electronically:  Basic Individual Membership - one year ($20)  Basic Individual Membership - two years ($35)  Basic Individual Membership - three years ($50) Receiving newsletter by post:  Basic Individual Membership - one year ($30)  Basic Individual Membership - two years ($55)  Basic Individual Membership- three years ($80) Receiving newsletter by post:  Institutional Memberships - one year ($35)  Institutional Memberships- two years ($65)  Institutional Memberships - three years ($95)

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IASCE Board Members 2015 Attending the 2015 Conference *Lalita Agashe: Membership Coordinator *Lynda Baloche: Co-President *Celeste Brody: Co-President Emerita Céline Buchs: Secretary Jill Clark: Newsletter Editor Kumiko Fushino Robyn Gillies Wendy Jolliffe *Don Plumb *Yael Sharan: Membership Coordinator Presenting Virtually *Maureen Breeze: Co-President *Rich Cangro George Jacobs Not in Attendance Christine Lee Kathryn Markovchick *Members of the IASCE Conference Planning Team 2015 IASCE Board Member elections take place every two years. We are always pleased to receive nominations from IASCE members interested in joining and working with our volunteer board. If you would like to know more, please speak to a Board Member at the conference, contact IASCE secretary Céline Buchs at celine@iasce.net., or watch for an announcement in our newsletter.

The Danish Conference Team 2015 Project Manager: Bent Alminde Educational Advisors: John Kraaer, Signe Schmidt Rye Secretary: Sussi Skjoldan Registration, Events, and Hotels: André Jensen Communication: Anne Mygind, Karen Gemal, Louise L. Sørensen Additional Support and Contributions: Annette Dalsgaard, Thorbjørn Hertz Jensen, Jane Ahrendt Preference Group: Jette Stenlev, Cooperative Learning Denmark; Frans Ørsted Andersen, University of Aarhus; Peter Andersen, Dafolo Publishing; Annette Hildebrandt Jensen, UC Metropol; Peter Rasmussen, Foundation of Entrepreneurship; Stefan Ting Graf, UC Lillebaelt University College Lillebaelt Vice Directors: Jørgen Hansen (before 1 June); Poul Skov Dahl (current)

We would like to thank the student workers and the various staff at University College Lillebaelt for their work and thoughtfulness throughout the conference. 31


Presenter Contact Details Lalita

Agashe

Maharshi Vinod Research Center; IASCE Board Member

lalitaagashe@gmail.com

India

Sharon Cicely

Ahlquist Alsbury

Kristianstad University Tavistock College

sharon.ahlquist@hkr.se cicely.alsbury@live.ca

Sweden UK

Lynda Michael Maureen Celeste

Baloche Boyle Breeze Brody

Independent Consultant; IASCE Board University of Queensland Schools Co-operative Society; IASCE Board Independent Consultant; IASCE Board

lbaloche@wcupa.edu mjboyle@uq.edu.au m@ureenbreeze.co.uk brody886@gmail.com

USA Australia UK USA

Céline

Buchs

University of Geneva; IASCE Board Member

celine.buchs@unige.ch

Switzerland

Enda

Byrt

G.M.I.T Letterfrack Galway Ireland

enda_byrt@yahoo.com

Ireland

Kevin

Cahill

University College Cork

k.cahill@ucc.ie

Ireland

Richard Jill

Cangro Clark

Western Illinois University; IASCE Board Wellington Institute of Technology; IASCE Board

rm-cangro@wiu.edu jilliandc@gmail.com

USA New Zealand

Deborah

Crook

University of Central Lancashire

djcrook@uclan.ac.uk

UK

Annette

Dalsgaard

Aalborg University

adv@learning.aau.dk

Denmark

Marialuisa

Damini

CIRSIM - University of Padova

marialuisadamini@gmail.com

Italy

Neil

Davidson

University of Maryland

neild@umd.edu

USA

Maria Alison Deniz Gokce Dimitra Ann

del Mar Lorenzo Moledo Elliott Erbil Filippou Foley

University of Santiago de Compostela Lakers School Dokuz Eylul University University of Geneva G.M.I.T Letterfrack Galway

mdelmar.lorenzo@usc.es elliotta@lakers.gloucs.sch.uk denizgokceerbil@gmail.com dimitra.filippou@unige.ch ann.foley@gmit.ie

Spain UK Turkey Switzerland Ireland

Karin

Forslund Frykedal

karin.forslund.frykedal@liu.se

Sweden

Kumiko

Fuchino

Dept. of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University Tokyo Keizai University; IASCE Board

fushino@tku.ac.jp

Japan

Robyn

Gillies

University of Queensland; IASCE Board

r.gillies@uq.edu.au

Australia

Augustin

Godás Otero

University of Santiago de Compostela

agustin.godas@usc.es

Spain

Ignatius

Gous

University of South Africa

gousigp@unisa.ac.za

South Africa

Eva

Hammar Chiriac

Dept. of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University

eva.hammar.chiriac@liu.se

Sweden

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Makiko

Hashinaga

Nagaoka University

makikohashinaga@gmail.com

Japan

Tsu Chia Julia

Hsu

Lunghwa University of Science and Technology

hsuinuk@gmail.com

Taiwan

Emiko

Ishijima

Ibaraki University

ishijima@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp

Japan

George

Jacobs

James Cook University Singapore; IASCE Board

george.jacobs@gmail.com

Singapore

Elaine

Jee

Bukit Panjang Government High

jee_elaine@moe.edu.sg

Singapore

David

Johnson

University of Minnesota

USA

Roger

Johnson

University of Minnesota

USA

Wendy

Jolliffe

University of Hull; IASCE Board

w.m.jolliffe@hull.ac.uk

UK

Hana

Kasíková

eva.vincejova@ff.cuni.cz

Czech Republic

Harumi

Kimura

Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Dept. of Education MIyagi Gakuin Women's University

kharumi@mgu.ac.jp

Japan

Ayfer

Kocabas

Dokuz Eylul University

ayferkocabas@gmail.com

Turkey

René Charlotte

Kristensen Lærke

University College Lillebelt Aalborg University

rekr@ucl.dk cw@learning.aau.dk

Denmark Denmark

Stefania

Lamberti

University of Verona

stefania.lamberti@univr.it

Italy

François

Lombard

TECFA-IUFE, Geneva University

francois.lombard@unige.ch

Switzerland

Rachel

Lotan

GSE Stanford University

rlotan@stanford.edu

USA

Umi

Mahbib

University of Tun Hussin Onn, Batu Pahat, Johor

umikalthommahbib@gmail.com

Malaysia

Giovanna

Malusà

University of Trento

giovanna.malusa@unitn.it

Italy

Claudia

Matini

Scintille.it; Co-Opera

claudiamatini@scintille.it

Italy

Margit Marta

McGuire Milani

Seattle University University of Verona

mmcguire@seattleu.edu marta.milani@univr.it

USA Italy

Zahida

Mohamed Abu Baker

Ministry of Education

zahida_mohamed_abu_baker@moe.edu.sg

Singapore

Hiromasa

Ohba

Joetsu University of Education

hohba@juen.ac.jp

Japan

Takue

Ohno

Hokkaido Pharmaceutical University

ohno-t@hokuyakudai.ac.jp

Japan

Maite Bertha Alexis

Oller Sánchez Paredes Patterson

Education Department, Catalan Governement Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo University of California at Davis

molle2@xtec.cat bparedesz2000@hotmail.com adpatterson@ucdavis.edu

Catalonia Mexico USA

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Daniela Donald Rosa Maria Diana

Pavan Plumb Pons Priegue Caamaño

Scintille.it Independent Consultant; IASCE Board University of Murcia University of Santiago de Compostela

danielapavan@scintille.it d.plumb@sympatico.ca rmpons@um.es diana.priegue@usc.es

Italy Canada Spain Spain

Phillip Caroline

Pulfrey Pulfrey

Ecole Romande des Arts de La Communication University of Lausanne

ppulfrey@mac.com caroline.pulfrey@unil.ch

Switzerland Switzerland

Debbie

Ralls

The University of Manchester

deborah.ralls@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk

UK

Janet

Reid

Cooperative Learning DK

janet@cooperativelearning.dk

Denmark

Jennifer

Roberts

University of South Africa

buckjj@unisa.ac.za

South Africa

Einat

Rozner

Kibbutzim College of Education

rozner@macam.ac.il

Israel

Miguel A.

Santos Rego

University of Santiago de Compostela

miguelangel.santos@usc.es

Spain

Christine

Schmalenbach

TU Dortmund University

christine.schmalenbach@tu-dortmund.de

Germany

Yael

Sharan

IASCE Board Member

yaelshar@015.net.il

Israel

Linda

Shaw

lmshaw46@gmail.com

UK

Miri

Shonfield

The Kibbutzim College and the Mofet Institute

mirish@macam.ac.il

Israel

Brenda

Siew

Ministry of Education

siew-gee_brenda@moe.edu.sg

Singapore

Jette

Stenlev

Cooperative Learning DK

jette@cooperativelearning.dk

Denmark

Laurie

Stevahn

Seattle University

stevahnl@seattleu.edu

USA

Norsidah

Suadi

Ministry of Education

norsidah_suadi@moe.edu.sg

Singapore

Satoru

Takahashi

Osaka Seikei College

takahashi-sa@osaka-seikei.ac.jp

Japan

Frederick

Talaue

National Institute of Education

Julie

Thorpe

Co-operative College

julie@co-op.ac.uk;

UK

Paulo María Isabel

Trubiano Velasco Moreno

Cordoba University

paolo@dream.tn.it mvelasco@andaluciajunta.es

Italy Spain

Frank

Viana Carvalho

fvc.frank@gmail.com

Brazil

Yann

Volpé

Federal Institute of Technology and Education of São Paulo, São Roque campus Boudines School

yann.volpe@edu.ge.ch

Switzerland

Yehudith

Weinberger

Kibbutzim College

judy.weinberger@smkb.ac.il

Israel

Claudia

Wong

Xingnan Primary School

wong_shi-lei@moe.edu.sg

Singapore

Singapore

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IASCE Conference Program 2015