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chicago nights stay

issue 02


issue 02 | chicago nights stay editor-in-chief charlie kane editor, market, fashions charlie kane designer eric gupana inquiries & advertising info@23blvd.com www.23BLVD.tumblr.com contributing photographers KP nosaj thang judson bernardo katrina tarzian eric gupana charlie kane muses melanie christmas elly jimenez 23BLVD is made in Chicago, printed at Dyna Ink Ltd. reproduction without permission is prohibited. for melinda alcantara. rest easy, mom.

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HUMBLE BEGINNINGS

credits | table of contents | editor’s note

8 A GOOD DAY

a day in the life of Shelby Steiner

12 BLOCK STYLE

trend report: denim | hawaiian inspired

16 MADE TO ORDER

featured interview with Stock Mfg. Co.

30 CHICAGO NIGHTS STAY

photoshoot: inspired by various locations in chicago

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EDITOR'S NOTE

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I used to associate one person as the embodiment of the Windy City. In retrospect, it was a relationship that coupled, then crippled Chicago into a dry and sheltered trance. On the way to its final days, I thought I was ready to leave, as if there was nothing left to trace in the lifelines of this city’s palms. What I shortly discovered, through the silences and bottomless whiskey, was the secret wonders Chicago genuinely has to offer. What we Midwesterners are usually doomed with is a sense of complacency to comfort. It’s not a cliché reminder to seize the day we need dosage of, but a simple awakening, a simple moment to appreciate the urban surroundings that cradle us. And if you haven't noticed, Chicago is beautiful. What I’ve discovered prior to and during the execution of this issue, is that Chicago's beauty is somewhat secretive, keeping hidden gems in rarity so when discovered, it’s an experience — a memory engraved in the books, instead of a day’s worth of likes and hype. Unwrapping the potential offerings of this city continues outside this issue. We each have something to offer; we each have a duty to discover these offerings. The survival and longevity of this city depends on it. Whether it's the expanse of our blue-collar work ethic to the undiscovered talent and creativity Chicago residents bleed, there’s a common denominator between all the obvious and unsaid. It takes something greater, the people, to play the back beat of our city's landscape in order to give meaning of “Second City” into a new, personal heightened level. The company and ambition from those who have been featured in this issue, to those who volunteered their skills are forever interlaced within the confines of these pages and beyond city limits. Today I associate not one person, but the people, as the embodiment of the Windy City— now synonymous for the places they’ve carried me into. There hasn’t been a date forgotten, no more important to each other, because each have made memories (now in text and photo form) into the epitome of what this city represents for me. It’s these days, and of course, these Chicago nights, that stay beyond the time I hold the privilege of living here.

Charlie Kane 7


chicago nights stay

A GOOD DAY WITH

SHELBY STEINER

words from Shelby Steiner, with an intro by Charlie Kane | photos by Eric Gupana

On the 11th floor of Chicago’s Macy’s flagship location, holds a number of undisclosed rooms that are cultivating some of the city’s most promising fashion designers. One of the 2013-2014 residents for Chicago Fashion Incubator is Shelby Steiner, a Columbia College alumni, whose background in graphic design, blogging (a cult lovers blog, Garçon et Fille), visual merchandising for Topshop, and advertising, has shaped her today with extensive artistic knowledge. While Shelby’s design aesthetic has flourished and developed immensely since her thesis collection, only a year ago, her passionate demeanor has kept intact. As a result, Shelby has developed a current collection that speaks volumes as to what type of designer and person she is. The epitome of this collection is nothing less of the representation of her drive and attitude -- cool chic, with an array of possibilities. 8


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7:15am- Alarm sounds (1+1 by Beyonce). 7:23- Walks blindly to the bathroom. Showers, or throws dry shampoo on. Spends around 20-25 minutes annoyingly sort of brushing hair, and putting on makeup (black liquid cat eyeliner, mascara, and filling in blonde, almost nonexistent eyebrows). 7:41- Makes an English muffin and grabs pre-made smoothie. 8:20- Walks to Wellington Brown Line. Observes what others are wearing, questioning where they are heading, creating assumptions or

scenarios

of

what

his/her

life potentially consists of.

8:24- Transfers at the Fullerton Red Line. Mazzy Star or Coldplay blaring in headphones. 8:57- Arrives at Chicago Fashion Incubator at Macy's. Spots Ali, my rad intern; enters together and gives brief recap of previous day then continues to discuss what we have to accomplish for the day. 9:17- Organizes list of everything to be completed by end of the week (ex: creating patterns, or blueprints of garments, drop-off/pick-ups from sewing contractor, prepping samples, creating CAD designs etc.). 9


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10:00- Cut fabric while climbing on tables. Each of us listening to music and in our own worlds (Me - Kendrick Lamar or Kanye West;

Ali

-

Kenny

Chesney).

Subtle interruptions except for questions or opinions. 10:27rad)

Marketing arrives.

intern

Helps

(also

organize

EVERYTHING. 11:00- Attend an intense seminar on fashion law, time management, hiring contractors, how to sell line etc. Wheels are turning while trying to focus on 1,000 things-from the distance between each button emails,

placement,

answering

contacting

potential

boutiques, to engineering the in/ outside of a garment in my mind 12:00pm- Quick lunch break. Both brought lunches, but still find the need to go to Macy's awesome food court for milkshakes. 12:37- Back to work. Continues working

on

line

intensely

throughout the day. 1:00- Meets with design mentor Andrea Reynders, former head of the Fashion Chair at SAIC. Talks of

struggles,

listens

to

any

suggestions she has, and calms me down / reiterates that I am on the right track, despite my frazzled state. 3:15- Group meeting. All of the designers meet in a beautiful, allwhite conference room to recap our status (currently prepping for our runway show August 29th). We talk 10


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about what is going well, what we

4:43- Ali packs up. I continue

need help with, and what resources

to sew or make patterns until

we have to share with each other.

everything

We are all in different places,

following day.

but it's comforting to know that I

7:27-

have five other incredibly talented

Disappointed on all of the things

and like-minded individuals that

I didn't complete, but then reflect

I can relate to and rely on. (And

on how close I am to completion

yes, we are all willing to help

of the entire collection -- a

each other.)

glimmer of hope.

is

prepped

Questioning

for

my

the

sanity.

8:00- Walks out of the wrong doors of Macy's (also known as, the secret entrance to the Red Line). 8:07- Hops on train. Reads "The Gift"

to

recalibrate.

Feeling

optimistic. 8:23- Finally home. Watches an episode of "The Killing," while texting close friends like Bryan Whitely and Grant Legan. Discusses the process and patience. 9:21-

Tries

everything

to

that

understand

just

happened

in a day, then falls asleep and restarts from where I left off -one step closer to the end goal of sharing my vision, and being able to do what I love daily, longterm. Follow Shelby Steiner: www.shelbysteiner.com Instagram: shelbysteiner

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DENIM, DENIM, DENIM. Denim is no longer another synonym for your jeans. Alas, denim inches closer to become your favorite type of material, serving itself for shirts, buttonups, dresses, jackets, jeans, etc. Moving away from Casual Fridays, denim is a trend treatment for your wardrobe, a makeover with subtleties of the 90s and an overlay of sweet Americana. A more forward approach to denim becomes an upcoming trend itself, basking and covering yourself in its twill-woven magic. Americana at its best, more is more. 12


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1. 3. 5. 7.

Mala La’i Classic Shirt by Reyn Spooner - $89 | 2. Hendrix Shirt by Life After Denim - $84.99 Authentic Lo Pro in Cheetah by Vans - $55 | 4. Moto Short Sleeve Crop Shirt by Topshop - $60 Clarissa Dress by Need Supply - $82 | 6. Dylan in Seychelles by Citizens of Humanity - $129.99 Mr. Pocket Tee in Denim by MISTER - $30 | 8. Backpack in Light and Dark by Dusen Dusen - $105

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HAWAII VICE Kitschy Hawaiian-inspired prints are no longer for

destination

floral

landscapes

attire. to

Bring

your

the

stoop,

islands backyard,

and or

urban playground while the heat prolongs. And the brighter or resonation of tapestry, the better. An all-over print floral is a design detail enough to awaken any type of clothing. Choices that this seasonal trend brings forth unite personality and clothing through the balance of boldness and romanticism for the wearer. 14


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1. Black Blossom Hawaiian Bucket by Huf - $40 | 2. Baseball Jacket with Contrasting Floral Sleeves $80.99 | 3. Cute Floral Printed Dew Waist Dress by Choies - $41.99 | 4. Oli Classic Shirt in Charcoal by Reyn Spooner - $89 | 5. Classic Cortez Nylon QS Aloha in Red by Nike - $85 6. Floral Beach Shorts - $36.99

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MADE TO ORDER In Garfield Park, a 45-year old military, specialty clothing factory shelters a year old company with a milliondollar idea. Stock Mfg. Co. engulfs the value of modern technology by utilizing e-commerce, social media, and influentials to cater, design, and manufacture clothing -- all, proudly made in Chicago.

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high street written by Charlie Kane photos by nosaj thang

Where once, thousands of cows stood cluelessly waiting to be slaughtered and served, I now sit during the waking hours of a Monday work day, wedged between the sounds of an alive factory and residential life. Before me are two of the five founders from Stock Mfg. Co., Jim Snediker and Tim Tierney, ready and always talking shop before, during, and after our sit-down. Their dynamic is comparable to the assemblies

that

were

once

here.

Operative

and

fluid, it's only a wonder of the work ethic and the collaboration between the rest of the founders -Mike Moriarity, Jason Morgan, and Ariel Ives. Yet, this only humbly introduces the awe of this one-year old company. Stock introduces an innovative approach to clothing design and manufacturing, highlighting democracy and transparency to customers in order to sell their garments and products in wholesale prices. Aspiring

designers

and

influentials

collaborate

to design, but customers vote for what garment/ products get made. Mark-ups are not welcome here, but quality Japanese fabrics, and minimalistic, tailored construction are. The further phenomenon heightens, that such a manufacturing company exists in Chicago with creative solutions to beat fast trends and mass production. C.Kane: Stock combines classic clothing craftsmanship with e-commerce technology. How did this business model form? Tim: I guess it's a fusion of a couple different businesses and concepts. Jim: . . . We wanted to make a website where we would actually collaborate [with] different designers and help them get their clothing made. . . Mike, Ariel, and Tim have been working on the concept of Stock 17


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Manufacturing

as

a

vertically

Jim: Right. . . [we] were originally

integrated clothing line.

going to look to get sales reps and

Tim: Yea, [so] everything under one

[sell] to clothing stores. Then we

roof. We do design, development,

decided together, "Hey, why don't

sampling, sourcing, production,

we charge everything basically

and sales, all here at the factory.

half of what it costs in stores

We cut out, threw various jobs

and just try to build an online

in the industry. We realized how

shop?" And that kind of moved

many inefficiencies there were. So

into, “Why don't we collaborate

we decided to create a stripped

with different, influential people

down

Because

-- to get some traffic, and get our

it's not cheap to make stuff in

name out there, and have some fun

America, and we wanted to promote

projects to work on?� And that's

that, especially in Chicago. We

kind of where Stock has ended up

stripped it down to the essentials

now.

-- got everything in one place

C.Kane: You kind of touched upon

so we wouldn't be upcharging with

this, but maybe you can elaborate

contractors at every step. And

more. Many start-ups really do rely

all we were left with was a very

on buyers and try to get in the

efficient model [enabling us to

big-name stores. What attracted

sell] at wholesale directly to the

you to take out the middle-man

customer.

and retailers in your production?

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business

model.

Jim Snediker (left) and Tim Tierney (right)


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Tim: retail

Well, is

we

realized

really

that

changing

--

our goods, especially as a new brand.

especially with high end, higher

Jim: So it's basically, we thought

price point brands. We realized

we had a better chance to get a big

when the economy went down the

following and get larger market

tubes in '08, a lot of companies

penetration by having accessible

we manufactured for either went

price points.

out of business or . . . stopped

C.Kane:

buying. We realized that retailers

this model as you become more

were taking fewer chances with

prestigious?

smaller brands, and they’re just

Jim: Yea. So, an example of that

going into just staples. Or, they

is the relationship we have with

were just going into just cheaper

Bloomingdales. . . We're not making

things

[aren't]

traditional wholesale margins by

spending as much money. And then

selling to Bloomingdales, which

at the same time . . . all these

is how most clothing companies

discount, huge online sites were

survive and make money. But we're

emerging and kind of distorting

getting

customer's views on buying because

it's worth kind of not making as

nobody wanted to pay full price.

much money. [Now we're in nine

. . So we didn't want to have to

Bloomingdale's.]

depend on those retailers to sell

stuff in Bloomingdales is priced

because

people

Are

so

you

much

able

to

exposure

But

even

keep

that

the

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the same as in our site. We're sticking very strictly to our "no retail mark-up." Tim: [And] our products are doing real well. We get updates on sales and stuff. Jim: . . . [For smaller boutiques, we'll] work with [them] in designing a capsule collection, specifically for [their] store, and we'll sell it to [them] and [they] price it how [they] want. . . C.Kane: So what can a consumer expect from a Stock product? In a manufacturing standpoint, what can you guys do or cannot do? Tim: Well we certainly work within our realm. . . But when you're buying

a

Stock

garment,

we've

sourced the highest quality of fabrics from Japan. We actually rep Zentex, which is a Japanese fabric label. And their quality, is much better than anything I’ve seen. The construction is great. Our fits are good. Jim:

I

think

a

consumer

can

expect from Stock to get either a

solid

basic,

like

a

white

oxford or something a little more interesting, . . . but it's always going to fit really well. We price affordably. And be made of the highest quality. Tim: Yea, it's something that'll stay in your wardrobe. C.Kane: So like a staple product that won't go out of season. Tim: Yea, and we mix in some other riskier designs with our basics. 20

"WE PRICE AFFORDABLY. AND BE MADE OF THE HIGHEST QUALITY."


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That kind of appeals to a more fashion forward type of crowd. . . But, as far as quality is concerned -- our factory, like 90% of what we do is tailored military garments, which is like the highest standard quality. The factory has to be certified, having 3 different certifications to make military garments. And it's those same operators who are making all of our clothes. C.Kane: Yea. I read you guys were MIL-SPEC certified. Tim: Yea, there aren't a lot of fashion brands that are [MIL-SPEC certified]. C.Kane: So when selecting your designers or creative individuals to

work

with,

are

you

basing

your selection out of forming or curating a brand lifestyle for Stock, or is strictly promising designers? Jim: So we definitely only try to work with people who have designed garments that fit with our general aesthetic or at least we, the five of us personally like. You know? Not everyone who's a customer of Stock will buy or wear everything that we make. There's plenty of guys that will buy a white oxford shirt, but aren’t going to buy a

camo,

5-panel

hat.

It's

all

things between the five of us, [the founders], or at least most of us think are cool or would wear ourselves. 21


chicago nights stay

Tim: Yea, and we all have very

.

different tastes.

when he's designing, so we try

Jim: So we try to kind of stay in the same vain of like, interesting and quality. We like a lot of minimalist design in a lot of things. We like things basic and clean. . . If we like it, that's sort of what we stick with as our brand. C.Kane: Although Chicago's up-andcoming in being a little bit more style conscious, the Midwest is proclaimed to be more focused on function versus style. Does this affect your designs or do you try to marry both at all? Tim: We still know that we're in Chicago . . . We're not in Paris. So we try to design with that sense of sensibility . . . Our

.

He's

very

function-minded

to apply that. But then we have clients . . . [that] we do series of collaborations [and] it's kind of tailored to the creative people that we're working with. . . Like, we're creating some pieces for [Goose Island right now]. One of which is an apron, and so we're meeting

with

their

servers

to

see what specifically they need in an apron -- what types of events

they're

going

to,

what

types of tools they're using. We [also] have an upcoming one this Fall with three mixologists in Chicago. . . There's going to be a “bartender theme� with all the garments, but they could be worn

lead designer, Mike, comes from

by anybody. So an example would be

an industrial design background.

maybe waterproof pants at the top

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because they're leaning up against

manufacturing

a wetbar all the time. . .

Chicago.

Do

companies

you

think

in

Chicago

Jim: Yea I mean, that's only where

has or has a potential garment

the

district that can uphold its own

into

real

functionality

play.

Companies

[comes

approach

against major cities?

us with] problems they have, and

Tim:

we'll solve them. We did that for

own underground network. All the

Alinea and Aviary restaurants. . .

factories work very closely. . .

C.Kane:

American manufacturing has really

It's

like

special,

I

mean

[Chicago

has

its]

concentrated clients.

died down. . . [and it's really

Tim: Yeah, I think as we've gained

been] survival of the fittest. . .

exposure, we found that there’s a

So each shop has their specialty

need for manufacturing and design.

because of the necessity. So if

We've had a lot of people reach

we

out to us. So the nice thing about

with another shop and do that.

being a smaller start-up still, is

We'll cut everything here, maybe

that we're nimble enough to shift

they'll finish it there, and take

gears, and we can take on projects

it

that normally people wouldn't be

it. There's no concentration [in

able to. . .

Chicago], everything's spread out.

C.Kane:

Until

recently

I

hadn't realized there had been

need

knits,

someplace

we

to

could

work

screen-print

There’s people down in Chinatown, there’s people up in Ravenswood.

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chicago nights stay The Por Homme Trench Designed By: Atif Kazmi of Por Homme Sleek and minimalistic with versatility. ---------------------------------------------Center Back Vent 2 Exterior Pockets 1 Ticket Pocket 2 Interior welt pockets with button closure Hidden placket Water resistant Japanese polycotton poplin.

Jim: . . . I think there's definitely

kind of a symbol of the utilitarian

a lot of people in Chicago that

background of Chicago here. We were

want

in

built by butchers and shippers.

motion. But it takes at least one

It's a hard working, kind of blue-

person, to get big and [have] some

collar city. We wanted to reflect

notoriety. Or else, it's just a lot

that in our branding, and the way

of small shops kind of dreaming.

we represent the brand.

C.Kane: The name Stock comes from

Jim:

the Union Stock Yards in Chicago.

creation of hundreds of thousands

Are

of

in

to

put

there

things

other

history

instances

or

I

jobs,

think the

along

with

stockyards

the were

current

also kind of a focal point for

influences that inspired the brand?

innovation in business, as well --

Tim: . . . We wanted to promote

like the auto-assembly line. Henry

job growth. And nothing did that

Ford took a tour of the stockyard,

better than the Union Stock Yards

saw the way they were butchering,

in Chicago that created millions

and decided "Oh, we could do that

of jobs and was around about a

for cars." . . . [Then there's]

hundred years. And I think it's

futures trading. Like basically,

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Chicago

any

those


high street Micro Corduroy Polka Dot Shirt - $95 A fine gauge corduroy with a subtle polka dot all-over pattern. ---------------------------------------------Back Collar Button Flat-Felled Seams Box Pleat Back Single Chest Patch Pocket

the Board of Trade type stuff came

Tim: While we're still peppering in

through [from] people speculating

the collaborations with aspiring

which slaughterhouses would do

designers to give them a chance

well that year. . . Tim:

There

are

a

lot

of

derivatives from the stockyards that are thriving right now. And the stockyards aren't even here anymore. C.Kane: Your innovativeness and mission is truly inspirational, are

you

hoping

to

kickstart

businesses in implementing this model?

Are

you

encouraging

to really get their pieces made and get out there, in order to grow the business for us, we're really

enjoying

collaborating

with these, more like influential people who aren't really designers [like

bloggers,

photographers,

and stylists]. C.Kane: Yea, I saw your concept series, and you'd ask them, "What

manufacturing back in the U.S.?

garment do you want to have?" Then

Jim: That's the overall arching

design from there.

goal, for sure. . . 25


chicago nights stay

"WE WERE BUILT BY BUTCHERS AND SHIPPERS. IT'S A HARD WORKING, KIND OF BLUECOLLAR CITY. WE WANTED TO REFLECT THAT IN OUR BRANDING, AND THE WAY WE REPRESENT THE BRAND."

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chicago nights stay Blue Color Flecked Shirt - $88 A classic "blue collar" button-down made of a soft, color flecked chambray. ---------------------------------------------Back Collar Button Flat-Felled Seams Box Pleat Back Single Chest Patch Pocket

Jim: Right, and . . . it's a very

-- but, I noticed that a lot of

targeted demographic. . . It's

the people who come out of design

people we know [who'd] appreciate

school end up working for giant

what we're doing.

companies. . . I think it kind

C.Kane:

creative

of primes the students to work

folks, designers, are cultured and

for a big company like that. . .

nurtured in Chicago, but choose

But we're working on creating jobs

to move away in order to support

here. . .

their talents. Do you have any

Jim: If you're at the stage right

words or advice to 23BLVD readers

now where you want to get out

on how to live their dreams in

of school and make a career for

Chicago?

yourself in [the] fashion industry

Tim: Well, we're working on it.

in Chicago, you kind of have to do

All: [laughs].

it on your own. There's no company.

Tim: There are a lot of design

There's no one here. There's no

schools in Chicago and not a lot

fashion house. . . People always

of design jobs. And one thing,

talk about the fashion industry

and this might kind of be cynical

in Chicago -- "We're going to make

28

Many

artists,


high street The Ryan Designed by: Ryan Plett Short-sleeved white button-down with contrasting chambray. ---------------------------------------------Slim-fit with tri-panel back French seams 100% lightweight cotton Chambray lower panels

the fashion industry in Chicago as

internet. Stuff changes so we need

big as New York." That's not going

to be nimble. We can't lock in

to happen. It's so in entrenched

design and say, "Ah shit, nine

in New York.

months later. We got to deliver

C.Kane: [New York] has years and

this."

years of experience. It’s where it

Jim: Yea, so we don't necessarily

started in the U.S.

consid er

Jim: . . . So yea. We're kind of

fashion

more interested in making really

manufacturers.

ou rselves industry."

We're

"t he more

good stuff and building a business for it, as opposed to like...

Follow Stock Mfg. Co.

Tim: ...adhering to the fashion

www.stockmfg.co

schedule.

Twitter: @StockMfgCo

C.Kane: And mass production.

Instagram: stockmfgco

Tim: Right. . . Trends move. Very fast. Especially with Tumblr, and

For the extended interview, visit

other social media stuff, and just

www.23blvd.tumblr.com

the availability of style on the 29


chicago nights stay

CHICAGO NIGHTS STAY

30

starring

photographed by

Melanie Christmas

Katrina Tarzian

Elly Jimenez

styled by

Charlie Kane


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CHICAGO NIGHTS STAY starring

photographed by

Melanie Christmas

Katrina Tarzian

Elly Jimenez

styled by

Charlie Kane

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chicago nights stay

NO WAVES, NO GLORY Alike the emcee upbringing of DotKom through the group, The Kitchen, and the backdrop of J. Arthur’s

nine-to-five,

theWHOevers have kept to their roots -- in the kitchen, where the musical magic is cooked, stirred, and served.

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J. Arthur (Left) and DotKom (right)


main street written by Charlie Kane photos by KP

There exists a flat on Pierce Street that is a hub for influential music and art in Chicago. Each end of the hallway serving a different purpose, with J. Arthur’s corner echoing with tomorrow’s music. I’ve watched them work on songs and lyrics together, being silenced as they slay beats and bars throughout the night. Upon seeing the accompaniment of Little Caesar’s pizza boxes, Dunkin' Donuts coffee, bad and good beer, “O” rings from hookah smoke, and the sounds of when pen touches paper or finger taps on phone screens, only have I realized the humans and boyhood in the duo. On writing about theWHOevers from today versus back in 2010, not much and everything has changed for the duo. For instance, the fate for them to work together has perfectly synced since their start. Witnessing them in that Humboldt Park apartment for 2 years, theWHOevers have made it look effortless. The comparison between the past and present display otherwise -- three years in the making filled with beats, sweat, passion, and persistence. From their monthly gig at The Abbey Pub, and now opening for respected artists such as Elzhi, and Evidence from Dilated Peoples. From having their closest friends following their music, to being verified on Twitter. From slumming work in the corners of a kitchen, to making home in a new studio. From a classic boombap flow, to experimentation in song-making. They are as hungry for progression in their craft, now carry a name that’s surfaced in Chicago to recognize its familiarity, and still, completely appreciative of those who have come to support and collaborate with them. In many ways they have arrived, but as artists who continue to strive better for themselves and their fanbase, they are just on the brink to catch a wave. 49


chicago nights stay

C.Kane: The discography between

But now, a lot of lyrics we write

J. Self to J. Arthur, The Kitchen

is definitely through experience

to DotKom, and now to theWHOevers

and things we’ve been through in

dates back almost to a decade

the last couple of years.

now. From the beginning of your

DotKom: Also, we try to make our

emcee paths, how has your sound

music as simple as it can be now.

or flow changed, individually and

J. Arthur: Definitely.

collectively?

DotKom: I mean studying The Beatles

J. Arthur: Well, it’s changed a

and all that, you can tell like

lot really. It all has to. Through

their songs are really simple. And I

time, from the different genres

guess most simple songs, nowadays,

we’ve gotten involved with and

they end up to be the classic ones

influenced by... it definitely has

that people remember.

changed a lot.

J. Arthur: If you think about it...

DotKom:

Yea.

I

think

for

me,

The Beatles [are a great example].

instead of just focusing on the

Look at their discography.

aspect on being really ‘lyrical,’

DotKom: Yea, I mean with this

I slowed down my flow a lot more

next album too, "Ridin’ Waves,"

and focused on melodies. Not just

you could tell the definite change

rapping,

within [its] sound, our flows. [Our

but

[making]

sure

my

lyrics mean something.

style is] still there. We kind of

J. Arthur: Of course.

sound the same still, but it’s a

DotKom: Other than just putting

different type of genre plugged in

crazy words together and make it

there.

a good song, you know? Like even

C.Kane: It’s really interesting

our choruses -- we try to make

that you said you’re trying to keep

it as catchy as we can, and have

it simple. Because even though you

different melodies for it, as well.

guys are going towards that, I

So,

be

feel like you’re not compromising

better artists -- studying other

yourselves at all. That says a

people, from house artists to R&B,

lot.

to soul -- we learn a lot from

DotKom: Mmhm.

different genres definitely.

C.Kane:

C.Kane: J., when you said that

sound

it’s changed a lot through the

description

years, do you mean your topics

“underground” influence. Do you

have changed?

enjoy that association or niche of

J. Arthur: I would think so. At

your sound?

first it was like “wapping.” Trying

J. Arthur: Yea, I mean it’s stuff

to out-do somebody with big words.

we were brought up on. It’s very

50

[we’re]

just

trying

to

Reviews always

about include

of

“90s”

your the or


main street

"AT FIRST IT WAS LIKE 'WAPPING.' TRYING TO OUT-DO SOMEBODY WITH BIG WORDS. BUT NOW, A LOT OF LYRICS WE WRITE IS DEFINITELY THROUGH EXPERIENCE..."

51


chicago nights stay

us

DotKom: Or if they change their

in that category. But, this new

sound or not, there’s always going

flattering

for

them

to

put

album will definitely show a lot of people that we’re not just about 90s, boom-bap, R&B, soul music. This new album has a lot of different sounds that we’ve been trying to cook up. It’s going to be interesting. DotKom: We’re definitely stepping out of the box a lot more. We do have our boom-bap tracks in there, of course. Because it’s our sound. It’s what made us. J. Arthur: It’s our soul. It’s our group. DotKom: I think whatever artist, no matter who they are, always has that piece of essence. Regardless if they blow up or not. J. Arthur: That they do. 52

to be that little something that they had when they first came out, that’s still in their music today. But yea, I’m really proud that people could... J. Arthur: [Associate us]. It’s an honor. It really is. C.Kane:

In

mainstream

music,

Chicago bursts of musical talent once in a blue moon in comparison to other major cities. Contrary to

popular

sound,

local

and

underground talent beams across our

neighborhoods.

Is

there

something about Chicago’s talent that influences your music as well? DotKom: I think [house music], . . . the fast-rapping from Twista, the creativity from Lupe, the variety of sound that even Kanye brings,


main street

and the boom-bap of Common... we

J.Arthur: A juke track.

all learn from that. We learn from

DotKom: We all pick up from each

everybody.

other.

C.Kane: What about local talent?

C.Kane: Do you think Chicago has

Does anybody make you want to

a specific sound right now?

work harder?

DotKom: You know what? I don’t

DotKom: ShowYouSuck, man. That

think we do. I think we grab from

guy. We started at the same time

the West Coast, East Coast, and we

and look at him now. And, Lili K.

add something unique to it.

She’s definitely doing something.

J. Arthur: It’s sort of a twang

J. Arthur: There’s a lot of young

that we have.

cats in the city though, like Alex

DotKom:

Wiley and Chance The Rapper, they

describe Chicago music right now,

have some great, quality music.

because it’s coming from different

DotKom:

angles.

Right.

It’s

kind

of

Yea,

you

really

can’t

refreshing, too. They’re not just

J. Arthur: We got everything in

doing boom-bap. They’re bringing

it.

in the new wave of sound which I

C.Kane: DotKom, you’re the wild

think is [influential]. They have

child of the group. Beyond your

a big [pull] on everyone that’s

lyrical twisters and beneath that

around the local scene. So I think

infamous voluptuous hair, I think

every new artist, nowadays, on the

followers would be surprised to

come up in Chicago, influence each

hear that you are a teacher. Does

other or takes a little piece,

this

whether it’s singing a vocal or...

music at all?

profession

influence

your

53


chicago nights stay

54


main street

"...THE FASTRAPPING FROM TWISTA, THE CREATIVITY FROM LUPE, THE VARIETY OF SOUND THAT EVEN KANYE BRINGS, AND THE BOOM-BAP OF COMMON... WE ALL LEARN FROM THAT. WE LEARN FROM EVERYBODY."

55


chicago nights stay

DotKom: Yea, because I gotta watch

though. But, I [treat] music as

what I say a lot more. And of

a big responsibility, too . . .

course I can’t say any stupid,

C.Kane: Are you ever thinking of

ignorant things . . . I’m pretty

beats at work?

sure some of my students will

J. Arthur: Oh of course, all the

catch up that I do music, because

time. [laughs].

I tell them all the time that

sample this. I should sample that

I was into it in college, and I

. . .” But, I don’t put both of them

still do music now. I really gotta

together. Like I know [cooking] is

watch myself. Being a teacher also

[my] day job, but I know [music]

makes you aware of a lot of things

is my passion. And I feel like

going on [with] the city . . .

[music] is the only thing I got

and it does shape up what I write

right now. It means a lot.

about in my lyrics, as well.

C.Kane:

C.Kane: J. Arthur, beyond that

together, but could you explain

exterior

exactly what your process is when

of

the

collective

of

wavy

hooks,

song

the

calm,

cool,

group, and

the

beneath

I’ve

I say, “I should

seen

you

work

making a song? DotKom:

We

take

our

time,

the mastermind of theWHOevers’

nowadays. Before, we would just

production,

followers

cruise through beats. We find one

would be surprised to hear that

that we like, and just write to

you are a cook during the day.

it right away. Nowadays, it’s more

Are there some similarities in

like, [J. Arthur] plays a couple

preparation between the two?

of

J. Arthur: It’s totally separate.

a new one. We have the hookah

[Cooking is] a big responsibility,

going. Usually, coffee. And really

56

I

think

beats

or

he

starts

making


main street

take our time with it -- think of

Like [J. Arthur] said earlier, it’s

what’s the concept, what should we

our passion. We don’t really think

write about. And, instead of going

about it as work, whenever we

to the usual 16 bars, we try to

do make music. It’s really a fun

switch it up a lot more and see

process. We don’t have a deadline

how we can be a lot more creative

for anything. I mean we do, but we

and different.

just keep on working at our own

J. Arthur: Just thinking outside

pace. Which I think, makes it fun.

the box. Yeah.

C.Kane: What could we expect for

C.Kane: a

It’s

musician,

easy

the rest of 2013?

years,

J. Arthur: Well, we’re trying to wrap up the next album titled,

an artist. How have you guys kept

Ridin’ Waves, which is hopefully

persistence throughout?

due

J. Arthur: Just working on it,

fingers. But yea, it’s coming along.

and being influenced by, you know,

We’re just working on it, trying to

not just our favorite artists,

perfect it for everybody, And see

[but] people around us, and the

where it goes, see where it takes

experiences that we have overcame

us. See where the waves takes us.

and

C.Kane: Where does the album title

through.

takes

become

patience, and dedication to become

gone

but

to

It

plays

a

in

October.

Crossing

our

big deal in music, and sharing

come from?

it with somebody is an amazing

DotKom: Well first of all we’re

feeling . . .

thinking, [we’re] both Pisces.

DotKom: I think just ‘cause we’re

J. Arthur: Oh yea, yea, yea. I

so in love with music, it makes

wanted something along the lines

it easy for us to keep on going.

of our zodiac but nothing really 57


chicago nights stay

came to mind. So then somebody brought it up, about "Ride the waves, riding waves." And then we sat on it and were like, “Okay, you know what? This could actually be pretty cool.” DotKom: Yea. Riding waves kind of goes along with your life. You’re

basically

riding

waves.

[They] could be big. [They] could have calm days. [They] could have crazy days. You just really don’t know; you just have to keep on riding it. So it’s kind of like a metaphor, I guess. Even the sound of the album. J. Arthur: It’s pretty loose. DotKom: It’s pretty loose, right? Trippy sounds, almost. We have our slow songs, our exciting, big sounds... J. Arthur: So yea, it’s everywhere. DotKom: It’s everywhere, like a big ocean. J. Arthur: Yea. [laughs]. DotKom: Surfing. J. Arthur: Surf boys. DotKom: That’s why I grew my hair. J. Arthur: Let’s call it “Surf Boys.” C.Kane: Any last words to your fans and 23BLVD readers? J. Arthur: Peace to 23BLVD, always. DotKom:

Yes,

yes.

Make

sure

you guys check out the monthly WHO

Wednesdays

.

.

.

[and]

pay attention to when we drop Ridin’ Waves coming out hopefully October 2013. 58


main street

J. Arthur: Make sure you take your vitamins. And exercise. DotKom: Oh yea! Don’t eat too much sugar. J. Arthur: Yea, don’t do that. DotKom: Keep a balanced diet. And don’t just listen to one type of music. J.

Arthur:

Don’t

bite

anyone

either. DotKom: Don’t bite. Wash your body everyday. Both: [laughs]. DotKom:

Yea,

wash

your

body

everyday. Eat tacos. Follow theWHOevers Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/thewhoevers Facebook: theWHOevers Twitter: @theWHOevers For the extended interview, visit www.23blvd.tumblr.com

59


chicago nights stay

CROP IT OUT

A current staple for a lady’s closet is the crop top. Its versatility from its loose or tight fits, raised or lowered hems, and the extent of its design from simplistic to an opportunity for unique details, graphics, and branding -- gives crop tops the continued edge for foregoing seasons. There’s a certain play on proportions that crop tops provide. The nudge of sex appeal plus the ability to spice up or casually wear makes this top accessible, a favorite, and an overall upgrade to the plain graphic tee. 60


main street

1. Blackstone Egypt Cropped Tee - $44 | 2. Boss Angeles Crop Tank by Dimepiece - $44 | 3. Cool-Girl Cut-Out Top by Forever 21 - $15.80 | 4. VOGUE Mesh Top by Patricia Field - $24.99 | 5. Blind Faith Crop Top by Nasty Gal - $32 | 6. Garcon Crop Top by Topshop - $32

61


chicago nights stay

HOT MESH Styled correctly, jerseys and mesh fabric can always emulate the confidence of Geoffrey Beene’s 1960s designs or the hip collective of Chanel runway shows during the mid 1990s. Classy and cool, jerseys leave room for imagination of the wearer -- playful, trendsetter, athletic, or bandwagoner. Above all else, they're blunt and territorial towards representation. Whether this trend trickles up or fades in the next couple of seasons, the jersey will always remain a staple for the everyday Joe and Jane who just wants to kick back with a drink in hand. 62


main street

1. Pro Top by Belle of The Brawl - $75 | 2. Mesh Army Tank by Stussy - $44 | 3. Chicago Mesh Tank by Body Rag - $32 | 4. Blank Panther Mesh T-shirt by Topman - $44 | 5. Black/White Homies Trucker Mesh Hat by Reason - $48 | 6. House Mesh Sporty Lace Sandals by Topshop - $70

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chicago nights stay

A GOOD DAY WITH

INEBRIATED BREWING

words from David Gibbons, with an intro by Charlie Kane | photos by Judson Bernardo

The introduction of brewing began four years ago for David Gibbons as a Christmas present. Two years later, a transformation from hobby to passion emerges as Inebriated Brewing -- craft beers made by the mind and hands of Gibbons. Mirrored from the brewer's personality rises the essence of a new batch-- chill and approachable, vast yet familiar. Prepared in his kitchen, brewed on the back porch, and packaged in the dining room, the humble beginnings of Inebriated Brewing are no reflection of the beers itself. With sophisticated tastes and a kick of quirkiness, beers such as Palate Fucker, Butt Nut, and Chocolate Trip-

bears only a small example of what this micro-brewery has to offer.

A good day with Inebriated Brewing includes the therapeutic pleasures of experimenting with recipes, drinking, and being surrounded by the like minds of Chicago's beer community. 64


main street David Gibbons: Here is a brief, yet descriptive summary of the day in the life of a typical brew day (Brewing Tessera - An all Mosaic extra pale ale). 9:00AM – Awake. Brush my teeth, and grab the laptop to get some noise going (John Coltrane on Pandora) while I gather the equipment for my brew day, consisting of a 38-gallon converted cooler mashtun (acquired from LowDive Brewing Co.), a ½ barrel boil kettle w/ side pick-up dip tube and ½ inch ball valve, hoses, propane tank and banjo floor burner. 9:22 – Fill my boil kettle. Throw it on burner and submerge floating thermometer. And wait. Meanwhile, I grab what grains I need -- pre-measured and sealed in buckets, and get together what carboys I need (filling 'em with sanitizer) which I will ferment in. 9:40 – I switch to DJ Shadow, turn it up, and dump mash water in tun. Pour grains in, slowly stir, and take a temp. Then close lid and set timer for an hour (for conversion of sugars). This grain bill consists of 2 Row, Aromatic, Carapils and White Wheat Malts. 10:05 – Now that I got things going, I make some instant coffee (yea I keep it old school) and spark one up to get my day started. I also measure out whatever water I need to sparge with (rest of hot water needed to acquire our final boil volume) and begin to heat that water up to my desired temp. 10:40 – I grab two pitchers, a square folded tinfoil and the sparge water I just heated up. I slowly open valve on mashtun and pour thru tube to pitcher to start vorloufing (basically filling pitchers up and dumping back over top of mash via tinfoil to avoid channeling until there are no grains coming out valve i.e. creating a steady flowing grain bed). 10:55 – Now that my wort is clear and no grains are running thru, I start draining into boil kettle. As I am draining original water from the mashtun, I add my sparge water back on top, this is called fly sparging. 11:39 – When my sparge water and mash tun is completely drained and dry, and our volume of wort is where we want it, I put the kettle back on the burner and begin to bring this sweet wort to a boil. I change up the music to Bonobo and crack a Two Bros Sidekick (one of my favorite session beers) and wait until I get a rollin' boil. 12:21PM – My beer is boiling. I set the timer for 15 min. and wait to achieve the hardest consistent boil, then set the timer again for 60 min. (time needed for hop additions and to boil off all dms). 65


chicago nights stay 12:36 – Shit is rollin' and I'm ready to add my first hop additions. In this beer, I am adding a small amount of Mosaic hops for bittering (Known as HBC369, Mosaic is the first born child of Simcoe. Some have described it as Citra on steroids, but it’s much more than that. Rich in mango, lemon, citrus, earthy pine, tropical fruit, herbal and stone fruit notes.) The rest will be late additions known as aroma addition, which I'll add a shit ton of!

12:46 – What do you think!? I crack another sidekick and spark a little more! Half of a brewday is about waiting around, dude!

1:00 – I have some more prepping to do. . . I empty the sanitizer from

my

carboys

(fermenters)

and

let

them

dry,

grab

everything else I need to sanitize, and throw them in a bucket filled with StarSan (anything that comes in contact with beer after it is boiled and cooled must be sanitized to avoid infection).

1:21 – It’s the last 15 minutes of boil, so I throw in more Mosaic hops, wort chiller (device used to cool wort to yeast pitching temps

quickly),

and

a

clarifying

agent

called whirlfloc. I continue to boil and add a crap load more of hops every 5 minutes until flameout.

1:37 – Boil is done. Now it's time to chill this bitch out! I connect wort chiller to the sink via hoses that are submerged in ice bath (copper coiled tubing that when

cold water is ran through, the coils cool the hot wort to a healthy pitching temp for yeast), and crank the cold water to get this wort to a 65 degree temp.

2:04 - I pull out the chiller (that’s what she said) and whirlpool (stirring cooled wort in circular motion to get a whirlpool) cover and let sit for another 15-20 minutes. This pretty much whirlpools the hops and sediment to the center of kettle, so when you drain the kettle the hops stay in center forming a cone. You run off clear, clean wort, which gives you a clearer beer in the end.

2:20 – Whirlpool is settled, so I begin to run out beer through hose into my clean and sanitized carboys.

2:40 – Fermenters are filled and kettle is drained. I grab the aerator (a stainless steel wand with air stone attached to oxygen tank) and begin purging straight O2 into the beer to give a good healthy environment for the yeast to do its thing.

2:50 – I grab my yeast starter and pitch this built-up goodness into both fermenters, grab some stoppers and tubes, and set up a blow-off airlock (a 66


main street

tube running from fermenter into a bucket of sanitizer, just in case if any beer is pushed out and top doesn’t fly off. I’ve had plenty of beers blow up leaving beer all over my walls .. not a good way to keep the lady of the house happy). 2:52 - Placed both fermenters in my converted chest freezer, set temp at 68 degrees, and take a breath. Another batch of brew under my belt! 3:00 - Now comes the worst part… cleaning up! I scrub, dump and soak my equipment in a cleaning agent called

another to get me through the lack of motivation of scrubbing out every nook and cranny in this kettle. 3:45 - The brew day is now officially done. Equipment is clean, beer is fermenting, and this 'Day in the Life' article is complete! I grab my Jack Russell named Mika, keys, and head out to pick up my lovely fiancé Rebecca for an evening out… Follow Inebriated Brewing www.inebriatedbrewing.webs.com Facebook: Inebriated Brewing

PBW while I finish my beer, and crack

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chicago nights stay

69 HUMBLE BEGINNINGS

credits | table of contents

64 A GOOD DAY

a day in the life of Inebriated Brewing

60 BLOCK STYLE

trend report: crop tops | mesh

48 NO WAVES, NO GLORY

featured interview with theWHOevers

46 CHICAGO NIGHTS STAY

68

photoshoot: inspired by various locations in Chicago


main street

23BLVD caters and concentrates on documenting urban style and the subcultures surrounding them, by fusing main street and high-street to capture both influences while blurring the boundaries of these different lifestyles. Our main focus is to instigate a positive drive. This zine serves as a visual journal, combining imagery and design, strong text, and overall good content that documents talent and tempo — evidence that urban youth culture is expansive and influential, not wasted.

COVER PAGES. Chicago Hot Dogs from Portillos; food styling and prep by Raul Polidario; nails done by Spifster Sutton; anaglyph glasses from American Paper Optics; photographs by Eric Gupana | CREDITS. Photobooth pictures from Beauty Bar. | Page 58. photographs by Judson Bernardo - judsonnotjustin.com | Page 56. photographs of products are from respective brand sites: Nasty Gal, Dimepiece, Forever 21, Choies, Topshop | Page 57. photographs of products are from respective brand sites: Topshop, Topman, Hellz Bellz, Stussy, Urban Outfitters, Reason | Page 44. photographs by KP - knowpassion.com | Page 26-43. photographs by Katrina Tarzian facebook.com/katerjayne ; modeled by Melanie Christmas and Elly Jimenez; (cricket hill, 26, 34-37) on Melanie: Cheetah Circles Earrings by H&M $12.95; Fancy Jersey Dress by H&M $9.95; Striped Pencil Skirt in Black and White by Forever 21; Jelly Cut-Out Shoes by Urban Outfitters $29.95; on Elly: Stripe Mock Crop Top by A'gaci $24.95; Pineapple Woven Skirt by H&M $12.95; (north ave. beach, 38) on Melanie: Nouveu Knitwear Jersey Crop Top by H&M $24.95; Neon Circle Skirt by Forever 21; Chicago Roller Skates from Belmont Army Surplus; (pilsen walls, 28-31) on Melanie: Colorblock Envelope Skort in Blue by A'gaci $26.50; Roundsnake Chain by A'gaci $13.50; BOOM Cat Comic Tank by A'gaci $11.50; Ankle Fringe Boots in Black by Kelsi Dagger $109.00; Midi Nail Rings by H&M $12.95; 312 bomber; on Elly: Hmmm Commic Seamless Tank by A'gaci $11.50; Zipper Pocket Net Tank by A'gaci $10.95; Canvas Lace-ups in Black by A'gaci $11.50; Polka Dot Socks by A'gaci $9.95; Nickel Skateboard by Penny; Pabst Blue Ribbon Tall Boy; Crescent Moon Necklace by Forever 21; (mary bartelme park, 32-33) Chicago Flag from Bye Bye Chicago $19.99; Chicago Hot Dogs from Mr. Greek's Gyro; on Melanie: Rowells Jacket by H&M $59.95; Urban Renewal Overalls by Urban Outfitters $49.95; Black Bandeau by Urban Outfitters; 5-panel Hat in Gray by Supreme; Mista Flatforms in Periwinkle $170; on Elly: Tie Back Polka Dot Mesh Crop Halter by A'gaci $19.50; Windowpane Shortalls by A'gaci $23.50; Padded Seamless Bandeau in Nude by A'gaci; Polka Dot Socks by H&M $9.95; (orange line, 40-43) on Melanie: Dip Hi-Lo Open Back Tank by Windsor $22.90; Fringed Shorts in Black by Cheap Monday; Suede Platform Clogs by Ecote; on Elly: Motorcycle Leather Vest in Pink by American Heritage; Wavy Sequin Micro Mini by A'gaci $24.50 | Page 12. photographs by nosaj thang - instagram: nosajthang; all clothing featured is available on Stock Mfg. Co.'s website. | Page 10. photographs of products are from respective brand sites: Topshop, Need Supply, Urban Outfitters, Karmaloop, Mister | Page 11. products are from respective brand sites: Choies, HUF, Reyn Spooner, Need Supply | Page 6. photographs by eric gupana | VELLUM. photograph by charlie kane

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chicago nights stay issue 02

23BLVD | Issue 02 - Chicago Nights Stay  

Issue 02 entitled, "Chicago Nights Stay," revolves around and is inspired by Chicago. All features including the talented individuals who co...

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