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Contents: 3-15:

Reviews of this month’s film....

4-5

10-11

6-7

12-13

14-15

18-25:

On DVD this month...

19-25:

What’s being released on DVD this May

26-27:

In cinema next month...

27:

What’s being released in cinemas next June

8-9

16-17

Creator:

Contributors:

Charlie Derry @charliederry http://www.charliederry.com charlie.derry@live.co.uk

Daniel Prinn @DanielPrinn http://filmcraziest.wordpress.com/

Editor’s Note: Ta dah.

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Darryl Griffiths @LegallyBOD Editor of Movie Marker http://moviemarker.co.uk/


Reviews of this month’s film...

3


S tar T rek : I nto D arkness Release Date: 9th May 2013

Director: J.J. Abrams

Famous Faces:

Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, Zoe Saldana, and Benedict Cumberbatch

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Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to

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to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come.

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Written by Charlie Derry @charliederry

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The Hangover Part 3 Zach Galifianakis, Bradley Cooper and Ed Helms star in an original tale of bad decisions and mayhem. The movie I’m talking about is 2009′s The Hangover. The first sequel has a severe case of sequelitis (exact same thing as the first). We now arrive at The Hangover Part III, a movie that suffers from a far more common and simple occurrence: bad movie syndrome. The movie opens at the prison where Mr. Chow (Ken Jeong) is now escaping, under the cover of a prison riot. He crawls in the sewer, but comes out clean on the other side. It then changes tone to follow the wolfpack. After the death of Alan’s father, the wolfpack take Alan (Zach Galifianakis) to a mental hospital to get his problems sorted out. On the way there, they are assaulted and Doug is kidnapped (again). They must find Leslie Chow and bring him to Marshall, Doug’s kidnapper, in order to save Doug. This isn’t able to cut ties to the original or the first sequel. The plot afoot, where Marshall (John Goodman) kidnaps Doug (Justin Bartha), in consequence to what Chow did in the first. They go to Las Vegas, again. There’s a trade-off in the desert, again. The filmmakers don’t keep some of the best components: Stu singing a song, Mike Tyson, good comedy, and worst of all, a hangover. These guys are never drunk during the movie! Frankly, these sober guys aren’t so fun to watch.

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Todd Phillips is so terrified of making the same movie three times; he changes the overall tone. Viewers who are expecting to cry from laughter will be sorely disappointed. It has some funny scenes, because you might laugh at Alan being his idiotic self; but most of the content is so dark, it can’t be considered funny. Doug (Justin Bartha) has always been a secondary presence, since this Princess Peach-esque character is kidnapped so much. Black Doug (Mike Epps), honorary wolfpack member, has always been the better Doug. He is a star of one of the only hilarious scenes in the entire movie. The other humour suddenly becomes tired because we’ve seen it in the trailers already. One joke that becomes exhausting is when Alan pretends to give someone a high five, but it’s a sike-out and he grooms his hair instead. It’s a little funny the first time; and since it’s not so funny the second time, it sure as hell won’t be funny the third freaking time. Stu (Ed Helms) is relied on to make gagging noises at disgusting parts. The only characters that have should-be funny dialogue are Alan (of course), Chow and Black Doug. The problem is, both Alan and Chow become more and more irritating as the movie progresses. Alan is more moronic than ever, and Chow is more sociopathic than ever. The hilarious content is limited.

The fact that thinking of a truly funny scene in a comedy movie, especially one of The Hangover franchise, is a huge issue. This one is memorable for all the wrong reasons. The first produces a laugh-a-minute, almost, but here you’ll be lucky to laugh every ten. This is truly the most bizarre out of the three; and the plotting is ludicrous, even if there is an evident plot. The humour is mean-spirited and, often enough, downright despicable. These sociopathic and passive-aggressive characters only seem to care about retrieving Doug. Alan, an overweight toddler with an awesome beard, has a bit of a heart because he begins to realize his actions have a very negative outcome, and he tries to fix it. Phil is still the calm and collected one, but he’s generally unfunny, here. This will be remembered as that one movie that broke Bradley Cooper’s hot streak. Do you want to know some really despicable and infuriating humour at play here? (I’ll tell you anyway.) In the trailer, Alan’s car goes under a low bridge, but the giraffe doesn’t. Todd Phillips shows the giraffe’s severed head crashing into a windshield. At a later moment, Phil says, “I think it’s kinda funny. It’s a giraffe, who the f*ck cares?” Of course this is all for shock, but Phillips is definitely receiving angry calls from PETA this weekend. This has a few forgettable


laughs, but its dark tone makes this memorable for the wrong reason. This really should be excellent, because the trailers make this look promising. Optimistic fans of the franchise will not find a bigger disappointment this summer season. If you are disappointed, don’t make the same mistake I did by walking out of the theatre right when the end credits start to roll. Apparently, there’s a hilarious scene partway through the credits. This movie is like a cruel, sad little man with a cold, sociopathic heart. The filmmakers give making a good movie the old college try; but giving something ‘the old college try’ shouldn’t mean it will feel like it’s written by mentally disturbed college students.

Release Date:

24th May 2013

Director: Todd Phillips

Famous Faces:

Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms, and Zach Galifianakis

Written by Daniel Prinn @DanielPrinn

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21

& Over Written by Charlie Derry @charliederry

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Written, directed by, and serving as the directorial debut of Jon Lucas and Scott Moore, 21 & Over is an American comedy that follows a promising student Jeff Chang (Justin Chon) who, the night before his big medical school interview, celebrates his 21st birthday with his two best friends, Miller (Miles Teller) and Casey (Skylar Astin). What was supposed to be just one beer, however, soon becomes a night of humiliation, over indulgence and utter debauchery. But what more would you expect? With a film like this it’s very easy to stick to a check list – alcohol, boobs, sick, a lot of unnecessary drama, a drinking game with some interesting gambles, a possible romance, a jock that just wants to fight at every given moment, a crazy/ hippy man who knows more about what’s going on than anybody else, more boobs, lots of Greek sororities and their rituals, an embarrassingly sticky situation that will be hard to explain the next morning, a typically racist gang formed of any other culture, a morning of regret and/or life changing conclusions, and more boobs – 21 & Over is check all around. From the writers of The Hangover, it’s no surprise that the story is pretty similar. But this slight intelligence is what also stops this American high school drama from becoming just another Project X. You may have easily predicted the plot

from the word go, but it’s still a film that may surprise you, as it isn’t completely awful. But whilst the dialogue is witty, having an obviously talented writing team behind it, when it comes to a film about alcohol and mayhem, at least, 21 & Over is inconsistently funny. It’s levels of immaturity and grossout humour certainly aren’t for everybody, failing to stand out from the many classic American comedies it is so obviously influenced by. But it’s not all alcohol and boobs, 21 & Over also has it’s darker moments weaved in and it focuses pretty closely on the friendship of its three main characters, so it doesn’t fall to pieces quite as you would imagine, with these serious side topics giving it more purpose than your average comingof-drinking-age-comedy. The three main characters are almost likeable, too, for their stereotypical “let’s go about everything the wrong way” roles, and the possible romance works because the female distraction, played by Sarah Wright, is free of all American drama-queen clichés. Let’s just say it has its qualities, even if they are very few. 21 & Over is simple, sparkless, and lacks any big laughs, but it’s hard not to enjoy, if only very slightly; I’ve definitely seen a lot worse from a number of films that I had high hopes for this year, so it may even surprise you too.

Release Date:

3rd May 2013

Directors:

Jon Lucas and Scott Moore

Famous Faces:

Miles Teller, Skylar Astin, Justin Chon, and Sarah Wright

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E p ic The third animated movie of 2013, Epic follows the female protoganist, M.K. (voiced by Amanda Seyfried), who is forced to re-locate to the home of her estranged father, Professor Bomba (voiced by Jason Sudeikis), after her mother’s death. Her father is an eccentric character, as he is convinced there are tiny people living out in the woods. It turns out, there is. But it’s a little more complex than that. It’s a challenge of good and evil of the Leaf Men, who, by protecting the queen (voiced by Beyoncé Knowles), preserve the life of the forest; but the evil Boggans threaten them with powers of decay. Today is the day Queen Tara must pick the pod to be the heir to her throne. M.K. is mixed up with this world when she is turned from a stomper (the Leaf Men term of

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big humans) to a little miniature human. She must team up with a crew to help keep the pod away from the malevolent leader of the Boggans, Mandrake (voiced by Christoph Waltz), in order to save their world, and ours. It must be expected that a movie called Epic really won’t be so damn epic. It really only turns out to be a good, light-hearted animated flick that teaches kids about teamwork and that, even if you feel alone, you truly aren’t. It’s a nice message, and the way the filmmakers portray it is imaginative and admirable. The animation has a great, human look and feel to it. It might as well be an animated version of The Borrowers, just with very mild action

sequences, in a very fun, but forgettable story. This is that good vs. the forces of evil, predictable and formulaic ride. The imaginative action sequences are fun and have intensity present. There’s a lot of room for imagination at play, but there are only a few notable characters. The main Boggan, Mandrake, is often psychotic and threatening for a children’s movie, but nothing that will have kiddies waking up in the middle of the night with nightmares. He has some memorable lines, but he’s more underwhelming than anyone could believe a character portrayed by Christoph Waltz could ever be. Nod (Josh Hutcherson) is a misfit Leaf Man who needs


to learn about teamwork, and the primary Leaf Man, Ronin (Colin Farrell), is precisely the man to teach it to him. He’s a no-nonsense character, and Queen Tara desperately wants to see his smiling face. She requests this in a truly dull fashion. I don’t have much praise to hand out to Knowles, Hutchison, Seyfried or really even Farrell, but I don’t have anything to fault them for, either. They just don’t stand out so well. Many of the characters have good lines, but you’ll forget their names (most notably Bomba, Bufo, and M.K.) as soon as you walk out of the theatre. There are four characters whose names and presences no one will forget anytime soon. Nim Guluu is the “rockstar” information keeper of the miniature world, appropriately voiced by rock star Steven Tyler. There’s also a silly, three-

legged dog who mostly just runs in circles. The laid-back slug called Mub (Aziz Ansari) and his uptight snail associate, Grub (Chris O’Dowd), are the true scene-stealers of the movie. They’re hilarious in the way Mub thinks he has a chance with M.K., and how Grub is an aspiring Leaf Man. (Let that irony sink in for a second.) They’re never annoying, always funny, and the movie is at its most lively when they’re on-screen. Who would have thought slimy little things could be so appealing? Epic isn’t quite epic, but it’s a predictable and funny ride that is a blast once it really gets going. For the most part, it’s about as memorable as its generic title. Christoph Waltz, to his best ability, rocks his role and he shines when Mandrake is at his most psychotic. You care for the protagonists, because no one wants to see a forest rot to the ground, right?

Release Date:

22nd May 2013

Director:

Chris Wedge

Famous Voices: Colin Farrell, Josh Hutcherson, and Amanda Seyfried

Written by Daniel Prinn @DanielPrinn

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T h e G r e at G at s b y Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to

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come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to Written Prinn come. Reviewby to Daniel come. Review

@DanielPrinn

to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come.


Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come. Review to come.

Release Date:

16th May 2013

Director:

Baz Luhrmann

Famous Faces:

Leonardo DiCaprio, Joel Edgerton, Tobey Maguire, and Carey Mulligan

Written by Charlie Derry @charliederry

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Fast and Furious 6 Hobbs has Dom and Brian reassemble their crew in order to take down a mastermind who commands an organization of mercenary drivers across 12 countries. Payment? Full pardons for them all. The earlier additions to the Fast and Furious franchise are mostly just fun movies about criminals who steal merchandise, and enjoy a lifestyle of family, fine hunnies and, of course, fast cars. It started to lose steam at the second. Slowly, but surely, each movie improved in terms of quality. It was a change in pace for Fast Five, because it ended up being a great action movie. Since Fast Five is such a good movie, many believed it would be a hard movie to top, as the franchise did set the bar fairly high. That is precisely the one hundred million dollar question... Is this better than the fifth? You bet your bottom dollar, it is. In fact, buckle up for the best of the franchise. If you weren’t a fan before, you certainly will be now. If Fast Five didn’t make

you a salvating fan of this franchise, though, you’re

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probably just an action movie Scrooge. This has the necessary components that made the fifth such a good movie; and it’s all enhanced. Hobbs is back, and the action is somehow amped up. The fight choreography is more impressive, and there are actually two bigger scenes that both feel like a finale action extravaganza. They surprisingly out-do even the fantastic scene with the vault running through the streets of Rio de Janeiro. How exactly? I don’t know, but they truly achieve it. Luke Evans as Shaw is the best villain of the franchise so far. He is a worthy, ruthless adversary for Dom and his crew. It’s his value of presicion against Dom’s value of family. Frankly, no matter how awesome the antagonist is, it’s not such an impressive feat in this franchise. None of the antagonists have been so worthwhile or memorable. The cast is on-point. Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson has a blast with Dom’s crew. He’s still the badass he’s

always been, and everyone’s probably forgotten about Snitch, where it just felt like normal ole Dwayne Johnson. The cast’s chemistry is becoming even better. Justin Lin brings equally good direction to this. I admire how this has equal amounts of fun, action, and its fair share of sheer intensity. Previously in the series, the dialogue has been pretty silly, but funny. This time around, a lot of it is almost smart - and it has some downright hilarious lines and sequences. This is not only the best in the franchise, but it’s also the funniest. The plot is actually intelligent, as well, and not just a bunch of racing scenes strung together. It’s always intense, in a few scenes where you just think they’re


certain to run out of road. Some of these guys are great drivers, and equally agile in a fist fight. This is an awesome movie, even it’s often entirely unrealistic. People go places without their cellular phones, and much like that, you’ll have to go to the movie without your brain. You’ll enjoy it so much more. Because this is just pure fun! A sequel that ends on a cliffhanger, one that makes me gain respect for earlier installments in the franchise, and a sequel that makes me giddy with excitement for the next one is a truly great movie in my book. This is not only the best in the franchise; but also the best action movie and (arguably) the best movie of the year thus far. This runs on NOS the whole way through; the action scenes rarely stop, and when they do, it’s for a funny scene. If people want a breather from fun, intense, beautifully filmed action scenes, there’s probably a screening of The Great Gatsby over in Theater #2. We fans like our action fast, and, you guessed it, furious!

Release Date:

17th May 2013

Director: Justin Lin

Famous Faces:

Vin Diesel, Paul Walker, and Dwayne Johnson

Written by Daniel Prinn @DanielPrinn

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Release Date:

10th May 2013

Director:

M

ud

Jeff Nichols

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Famous Faces:

Matthew McConaughey, Reese Witherspoon,Tye Sheridan, and Jacob Lofland

Written by Daniel Prinn @DanielPrinn


Mud is a modern-day fairy tale, a crisp chase thriller, and a coming-of-age drama all in one. It’s a gritty fairy tale because Mud is waiting for his love on an island; and there are themes of happily ever after, true love; but it’s less “Repunzel, Repunzel, lay down your hair!” and more like “Mud, Mud, let down that boat!” It’s a chase movie because Mud is a fugitive on the run, attempting to evade some lethal bounty hunters. As for the coming-of-age tale, that mostly lies with Ellis (Tye Sheridan). He’s at a delicate age of fourteen, the age where one begins to choose role models. His parents are on the brink of divorce, and they really aren’t there to offer much advice; so the role model he chooses is Mud. Ellis must make his way through adult lies and learn his own way through hardships of love. Neckbone doesn’t latch onto Mud the way Ellis does, mostly because he finds a solid role model within his Uncle Galen (Michael Shannon). Mud is a superstitious character, but he’s also a serial liar. He tells great story after great story, and as the film progresses, the audience learns he is appropriately named, because he really is full of shit. The character contrasts are fascinating; Mud wants things to be done, but Ellis (and Neckbone) are the two to do them. Ellis seems to have a lot more backbone than Mud ever would. The lady loves of the story, Juniper (Reese Witherspoon), Mud’s love, and May Pearl (Bonnie Sturdivant), is the gal that Ellis has his eyes set on; some of their character traits have striking similarities, and the way Jeff Nichols makes them mirror each other is truly

stunning and creative. Jeff Nichols writes in a lot of themes, and while it may make the story feel suffocated at times, they’re still very beautiful. Nichols suggests that the water current could really make one’s hardships more difficult, because Ellis lives on a makeshift boat on the banks of an Arkansas river, and his parents are struggling with their relationship. Nichols seems to have a true handle on some natural elements. The symbols of snakes and Mud’s wool shirt are thought-provoking and, often enough, poignant. Nichols’ third feature film states that he just didn’t become lucky with a few winners, this states that he is an artist; and most will love the story Nichols has to tell. The story has a comfortable pace and it knows where it wants to go. It’s slow, but engaging. There are some scenes that might feel redundant at the time, but they don’t interrupt the flow of the film. The cinematography has a crisp feel to it, and it’s stunning when the camera is looking out into the hopeful horizon. The characters will keep you engaged. The relationship that blossoms between Mud and Ellis is about as beautiful as a relationship between a thirtysomething sandy-haired fugitive and a fourteen-year old boy can get. Juniper and Mud want to be together; and even if we do not feel we can always trust Mud, he’s always very intriguing and has a lot of depth. Matthew McConaughey delivers a tour de force performance, and seeing what he does here, it’ll make you much more excited for the upcoming Dallas Buyers Club. Tye Sheridan portrays Ellis very well; he’s capable of being tough, sweet, confused

and vulnerable. The performances are superb all across the board. Jacob Lofland (who portrays Neckbone) gets outshined by Sheridan, but he’s a great comic relief, and a nice presence. His name also reminds us that this is truly a Southern film. Some of the actors have characters that just don’t do much. Reese Witherspoon portrays Mud’s love, Juniper. She has about ten minutes of screen time. Witherspoon does well with what she has, but if she gets an Oscar nomination for what little she does; it will only be a smaller farce than Jacki Weaver’s nomination for Silver Linings Playbook. Though, Witherspoon being under-utilized is not Nichols’ biggest crime. Michael Shannon has a criminally low amount of screen-time. He portrays Neckbone’s uncle, Galen, where he works as a role model for Neckbone and he wears this huge, comical scuba diving gear - and that’s about it. Shannon is a go-to guy of Nichols, as he is been in his two prior films, as the lead in Take Shelter and Shotgun Stories. It’s great to see Shannon in anything, but if you’re not going to use a guy of Shannon’s talent extremely well, don’t use him at all. The cast is an excellent ensemble, also including Sarah Paulson, Ray McKinnon and Sam Shepard. The story is impressively engaging, even if it has little wiggle room because of its many themes. Jeff Nichols writes a story that has enough power to strike you down like a mighty current, and raw emotion that will maul at your tear ducts. One thing is for certain, you will never believe a movie with such a dirty title could become such a beautiful work of art.

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On DVD this month...

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May DVD Releases: Quartet Date: 6th May At a home for retired musicians, the annual concert to celebrate Verdi’s birthday is disrupted by the arrival of Jean, an eternal diva and the former wife of one of the residents.

Alex Cross Date: 6th May

The Sessions Date: 20th May

A homicide detective is pushed to the brink of his moral and physical limits as he tangles with a ferociously skilled serial killer who specializes in torture and pain.

A man in an iron lung who wishes to lose his virginity contacts a professional sex surrogate with the help of his therapist and priest.

Playing For Keeps Date: 20th May A former sports star starts coaching his son’s soccer team as a way to get his life together. His attempts to become an adult are met with challenges from the attractive soccer mums who pursue him.

Parental Guidance Date: 27th May

Trouble With The Curve Date: 20th May

Artie and Diane agree to look after their three grandkids when their parents need to leave town for work. Problems arise when the kids’ behaviour collides with Artie and Diane’s old-school methods.

An ailing baseball scout in his twilight years takes his daughter along for one last recruiting trip.

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The Impossible Directed by Juan Antonio Bayona, The Impossible is based on one family’s real-life experience of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. Hoping for a relaxing vacation in Thailand, Maria (Naomi Watts), Henry (Ewan McGregor), and their three sons, Lucas (Tom Holland), Thomas (Samuel Joslin), and Simon (Oaklee Pendergast), spend the morning of 26th December relaxing by the pool. But when a tsunami triggered by an Indian Ocean earthquake floods the area, the town and its people are left to face its overwhelming, destructive effects. From the team responsible for the accomplished Spanish horror movie The Orphanage and based on actual events and on one of the worst natural disasters ever, The Impossible is a carefully researched account of one family’s sufferings, as we are told a story that is both terrifying and heart-achingly emotional. As an audience, we are immediately immersed in the shocking experience of this tsunami, making The Impossible a constantly tense and engaging film from the beginning. However, I do also have to agree with the film’s main criticism, as it probably isn’t the best first story to tell about such a national disaster. What

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we must remember, though, is that it is still somebody’s story. More precisely, it is the story of María Belón and her family. The criticism comes from the fact that Belón was actually Spanish, however. With their story being transformed into an English-speaking one, designed for worldwide acceptance, and director Bayona commenting that he didn’t want to specify the nationalities of the main characters in order to create a universal film in which nationalities were irrelevant to the plot, it is almost disrespectful that the film focuses on a rich, white family, but I guess it has its reasons. One thing for certain is that The Impossible is a brilliant piece of physical film-making. The special effects are stunning, especially the underwater scenes which are intensely gut-wrenching, as the director committed to working with real water rather than using computer generated waves. This authentic feel compliments the film incredibly, with the tsunami itself being recreated with a mixture of digital effects and real water surges, using miniatures that were destroyed by a huge wave which was created in a massive water tank. Using real water also his meant that many of the actors

had to spend weeks filming physically and psychologically demanding scenes in this water tank, which also meant that the film’s performances benefited from this too. The performances are all incredibly strong, with Naomi Watts, especially, giving one of her best performances yet. It is through her and Tom Holland‘s on-screen relationship that provokes so much of an emotional response to the film, but you can really feel the connection between the whole family. The Impossible may not be a masterpiece, but it is impressive for many reasons and most audiences will be moved by it in some way.

Written by Charlie Derry @charliederry Release Date:

6th May 2013

Director:

Juan Antonio Bayona

Famous Faces:

Naomi Watts, Ewan McGregor, and Tom Holland


Les Miserables Ever since that fatal day back in 1985 at the well renowned Barbican theatre based in the heart of London’s glitzy West End, one musical more than most has captivated international audiences and set the benchmark for this particular art form. A cinematic interpretation has been stuck in limbo for many a year.. until now. Annointed the King of the Oscars back in 2011 with ‘The Kings Speech’ and with an enthusiastic fanbase ready to warm up the vocal chords if a failure, did Hooper earn ‘One Day More’? 19th century France, a time when poverty, inequality and living in squalor reign supreme. Spanning across a mere two decades, we’re immediately thrown into the world of Jean Valjean (Hugh Jackman). A remarkably strong ex-con albeit minor in his offence, his movements are forever mirrored after breaking parole by the remorseless Inspector Jalvert, played by fellow Aussie Russell Crowe. A chance encounter however with the sympathetic factory worker by day/lady of the night Fantine (Anne Hathaway), lays the foundations to mount a relentless defence of his ‘freedom’ to roam. Weighed down by overwhelming disapproval from her fellow work colleagues, Fantine resorts to desperate tactics to provide for her beloved daughter Cosette. With her sense of dignity at

its lowest ebb, Valjean shows no hesitation in taking on the responsibility of looking after the young girl. Cue unrequited love, revolutions and the obligatory vocal gymnastics. Audaciously favouring the authenticity of a live performance instead of the monotonous nature of ‘lip synching’ is Hooper’s trump card here, amplifying the emotional heft to overwhelming levels. Anchoring the film with distinction, Jackman as Valjean relishes the theatricality with a sincere and electrifying turn. Crowe’s grovelly and one-dimensional tone doesn’t always sit well with the operatic ‘complexion’ of the material, but his unflinching intensity (especially in exchanges with Jackman) and commitment to the role is undeniable. The youthful talents of Eddie Redmayne (Marius) and Amanda Seyfried (Cosette) thoroughly impress, whilst Helena Bonham Carter and Sacha Baron Cohen excel as a conniving double act providing crucial comic relief. The real show-stopper here, is Hathaway. Her portrayal of Fantine is nothing short of heartbreaking, with her version of ‘I Dreamed A Dream’ achingly perfect in delivery and the sequence’s composition. If there is one drawback to the film, it’s Hooper’s hit and miss direction. For every soaring moment through intimate close-

ups as characters emotions pour out as if wounded, there’s a disconcerting and sweeping aerial shot that whilst complimentary of the exemplary production value, feels a misguided move. With no benefit of an interval, its potentially exhausting 160 minute run time and emphasis on ‘suffering’ may prove an endurance test for some. However, the miniscule gripes don’t detract from the quality of Victor Hugo’s work’s transition from stage to screen. Brimming with remarkable performances and heart, ‘Les Miserables’ is a rousing and consistently brilliant cinematic experience worthy of immersing itself in the company of the genre’s top bracket. BRAVO.

Written by Darryl Griffiths @LegallyBOD Release Date:

13th May 2013

Director: Tom Hooper

Famous Faces:

Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe, Anne Hathaway, and Amanda Seyfried

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Django Unchained With his trained eye for postmodernism and intertextuality, you may wonder if Hollywood could tame Quentin Tarantino’s enthusiasm by now and confine him to traditional narrative conventions. Never one to be dictated to, 2009′s ‘Inglorious Basterds’ marked a new chapter for QT. Marrying a historical context (World War II) to his unique visual style and rhythmic dialogue, he effectively blurred the lines between fact and the fantastical. Almost serving as a ‘companion piece’ to ‘Basterds’, the director attempts the same feat here with a delve into the ‘Spaghetti Western’. Immersed in 1850′s American ‘South’, we’re immediately knee deep in the horrific subject matter that coerces through the film’s narrative vein. As a character who originally made a sizeable mark back in 1966, Academy Award winner Jamie Foxx plays Django. Baring the scars relentlessly applied by his former owners whilst dealing with the emotional trauma of being ‘removed’ from his beloved Broomhilda (Kerry Washington), our lead protagonist is led to his new plantation. The last figure he imagines to clap eyes on en route, is a mischievous German speaking bounty hunter posing as a talented dentist. Enter Dr King Schultz (Christoph Waltz), with his own finely tuned ‘flesh for cash’ agenda. Eagerly acquiring the services of one Django offering in exchange the ‘freedom’ he

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craves, they instantly strike up an understanding and join forces to fulfil their ‘objectives’. Schultz, without the luxury of seeing the potential victims first hand, is on the hunt for a blood splattering brotherly collective called the Brittles. Reluctantly buying into the remorseless nature of Schultz’s work for the Winter, Django sets his sights on ‘Candyland’ owned by the devilish Calvin Candie (Leonardo Dicaprio) where Broomhilda is held ‘captive’. Accentuating the ‘Spaghetti’ aspect in the genre’s title, it’s no surprise Tarantino soaks the film in ‘tomato sauce’. Retaining the sudden jolty fashion of previous works for such gun/whip play, the execution is sublime as the stakes are ramped up for a fierce final third. ‘Django’ doesn’t skimper on the classic visual aesthetics, as the sharp zooms into focus and picturesque shots of the landscape as characters ‘glide’ across the screen are on display here in all their distinctive glory. With well thought out dynamics between the heavyweight cast, Tarantino draws out outstanding performances. Waltz’s Schultz, a figure defiantly against ill treatment of black people yet works it to his advantage, juxtaposes brilliantly with Stephen’s (Samuel L Jackson on fine form) house slave’s misjudged loyalty. Foxx’s rise from timid slave to all conquering bad ass with peculiar taste in uniforms is

thoroughly engaging and whilst Schultz may acknowledge Django has an eye for the theatrics, Dicaprio’s Calvin ultimately steals the show. In a real departure of a role, Leo’s unashamedly OTT and despicable portrayal of Candie whilst remaining understated in his character’s nuances is wonderfully played. The excessive use of the infamous ‘N’ word may prompt frequent gasps and ‘Django’ may drag his heels occasionally within the leisurely 165 minute running time. However, Tarantino’s undeniable passion wins out. Complete with a memorable soundtrack paying homage to Leone and Morricone, ‘Django Unchained’ is an electrifying and thought provoking piece of filmmaking that rightfully takes its place among QT’s finest work.

Written by Darryl Griffiths @LegallyBOD

Release Date:

20th May 2013

Director:

Quentin Tarantino

Famous Faces:

Jamie Foxx, Christoph Waltz, and Leonardo DiCaprio


Gangster Squad Many declare ‘three is the magic number’. Making his mark on the scene through ‘Zombieland’ and ’30 Minutes Or Less’, ‘Gangster Squad’ marks director Ruben Fleischer’s step up to the big leagues. Even he, mustn’t have anticipated the hampered production the project had the misfortune of suffering. Reshoots prompted via the tragedy of the Aurora shootings mirroring a memorable ‘cinema burst’ sequence from the film’s glossy trailer, reservations soon reared their ugly heads in many a mind. Does ‘Squad’ succumb to being at the bottom of the ‘food chain’? Inspired by true events, we’re immediately thrown into the glitz and glam of 1940′s Los Angeles. Looks can be deceiving however, as LA is very much a ’damsel in distress’. With a grisly opening salvo, it’s clear from the outset who runs proceedings. One Mickey Cohen (Sean Penn), a larger than life boxer turned mobster with all the ‘Bada Bing, Bada Boom’ bravado you expect from the genre. Smuggling drugs into the city at the drop of a dime. Corrupting the minds of once morally sound cops. Cohen is at the height of his powers. Keeping it strictly off the books, respected Chief Bill Parker (Nick Nolte) deems it the perfect opportunity to hire the ‘heavy artillery’ and strike at the heart of his ever increasing empire. Headed up by crime fighting Sergeant John O’Mara

played by Josh Brolin, he is bestowed the responsibility of recruiting and forming together an efficient team of street smart ‘outsiders’ to aid him in the fight against Cohen. The crew of misfits includes fellow Sergeant Jerry Wooters (Ryan Gosling), sidetracked as he attempts to romance Cohen’s latest squeeze Grace Faraday (Emma Stone). ‘Gangster Squad’ is far from the serious heavyweight genre entry many anticipated, which may prompt bemusement from hardened cinephiles taking into account the talent involved. Opting for more of a playful and deadpan approach, the film doesn’t quite possess the narrative punch or refinement of the classics it owes a debt to. However, Fleischer still proves efficient in amping up the entertainment value. The brutal bullet littered action sequences are impeccably staged within the confines of such a stylish period production and fittingly explosive, with only the indulgent visual trickery of ‘slo-mo’ wearing thin. Performance wise, Sean Penn’s portrayal of Mickey Cohen inevitably steals the show. Spouting his venomous dialogue with almost a gleeful sense of enthusiasm, his memorable villain may make you wonder if Flesicher was aiming for ‘pastiche’ here. Elsewhere, Gosling’s dry wit is on display once again as he slaughters the

‘gung-ho’ approach of his team, whilst retaining the magnetic intensity that has made him a household name. The camaraderie between the ’team’ is undeniable, with the likes of Robert Patrick, Giovanni Ribisi and Anthony Mackie developing a fun dynamic to proceedings. Unfortunately chained to the superficial handling of her beautiful ’femme fatale’, Emma Stone however is fatally under used and offered little opportunity to rekindle the spunky chemistry with Gosling born out of ‘Crazy Stupid Love’. Granted, it never threatens to reach the giddy heights of its illustrious genre counterparts. Nonetheless, ‘Gangster Squad’ is still an unashamedly entertaining film elevated by a game cast.

Written by Darryl Griffiths @LegallyBOD Release Date:

27th May 2013

Director:

Ruben Fleischer

Famous Faces:

Sean Penn, Ryan Gosling, and Emma Stone

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The Last Stand Written by Daniel Prinn @DanielPrinn

The most notorious, wanted drug kingpin in the Western hemisphere escapes a prisoner transfer and speeds to the Mexican border, where the only thing in his path is a town sheriff (Arnold Schwarzenegger) and his inexperienced staff. The Last Stand is director Jeewon Kim’s American film debut, and it is also Schwarzenegger’s comeback vehicle. The uneven movie has an effectively simplistic plot, but generally poor characterization and storytelling. The movie tries to develop the characters more than other fun action flicks, but we still really don’t care for them at all. Jerry’s just a rookie cop trying to move to the big city due to boredom; Sheriff Ray Owens is developed as a former narcotics officer who wanted to take it easy for awhile; Sarah and Frank are established as ex-lovers; and Lewis Dinkum (Johnny Knoxville) is established as an average Weapon Museum owner, who only opens his museum once a month for three hours. This is all the attempt at development. Everyone is just established as a movie character stereotype, rather than a real character. There’s the angry FBI agent (Forest Whitaker), damsel

in distress (Genesis Rodriguez), insane criminal (Eduard Noriega), and deputy (Luis Guzmán). The only ones one could care for are only good presences (Schwarzenegger, Guzmán, Knoxville). The storytelling just wasn’t good. I think it’s established that Cortez is a ruthless drug kingpin; but if it is, it will immediately go out of your mind. He just has a really fast car... And he seems to be a bit crazy, I guess... Anyway; one must keep in mind, however, that this is mostly a fun action flick, and any attempt at character development or plot development is a bonus. I think it’s a worthy comeback flick for Arnie. Though, he is surprisingly forgettable presence put beside the show-stealing Knoxville. He gets some of the biggest laughs. He has finally found a role (besides playing himself in Jackass) where his maniacal laughter and crazy comedy works absolute wonders. He and Guzmán make an excellent team, because at some points they’re both confused by which time period they’re in (there are swords and shields from the Medieval Times and Tommy Guns from the 1940s).

The fine pacing all leads up to a fun shoot-out that lasts an appropriate amount of time. If your stomach can handle all the blood, it’s even more fun. If your idea of a good time is bloody violence, forgettable laughs, poorly formed characters, an effectively simplistic plot, and fast cars; then check out Arnie’s return to the big screen.

Release Date:

27th May 2013

Director:

Kim Jee-Woon

Famous Faces:

Arnold Schwarzenegger, Forest Whitaker, and Johnny Knoxville

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In cinemas next month...

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June’s Cinema: Man Of Steel Date: 14th June A young journalist is forced to confront his secret extraterrestrial heritage when Earth is invaded by members of his race.

After Earth Date: 7th June

The Company You Keep Date: 7th June

A crash landing leaves Kitai Raige and his father Cypher stranded on Earth, 1,000 years after events forced humanity’s escape. With Cypher injured, Kitai must embark on a perilous journey to signal for help.

A former Weather Underground activist goes on the run from a journalist who has discovered his identity.

This Is The End Date: 28th June While attending a party at James Franco’s house, Seth Rogen, Jay Baruchel and many other celebrities are faced with the apocalypse.

Much Ado About Nothing Date: 14th June

World War Z Date: 21st June

A modern retelling of Shakespeare’s classic comedy about two pairs of lovers with different takes on romance and a way with words.

United Nations employee Gerry Lane traverses the world in a race against time to stop the Zombie pandemic that is toppling armies and governments, and threatening to destroy humanity itself.

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In Retrospect - Issue 22  

A film guide for May 2013 including reviews for The Great Gatsby, Star Trek: Into Darkness, Fast and Furious 6, Mud, Epic, 21 & Over, and Th...

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