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Charleston Collegiate School Upper School Course Catalog 2012-2013

2024 Academy Drive John’s Island, South Carolina 29455 843-559-5506 ∙ fax: 843-559-6172 www.charlestoncollegiate.org

The mission of Charleston Collegiate School is to have a positive impact on our students so that they may positively impact the world around them. The school prepares students in a progressive learning environment to face life’s challenges with confidence, strong problem-solving skills, and a solid ethical foundation. Charleston Collegiate is a community of cultural and economic diversity which fosters compassion, social awareness, and respect for community and environment.


Charleston Collegiate School Upper School Course Catalog

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Table of Contents Overview....................................................................................................................................................................... 3 College Prep, Honors, and Advanced Placement Courses............................................................................................ 3 Dual Credit and Outside Course Programs ................................................................................................................... 3 Upper School Course Offerings .................................................................................................................................... 4 Graduation Requirements ............................................................................................................................................. 5 Recommended Schedules ............................................................................................................................................. 6 Add/Drop Policy ........................................................................................................................................................... 6 Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................................................................... 7 Grade Point Average Calculations .............................................................................................................................. 18


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Overview The Upper School at Charleston Collegiate School provides a challenging educational, college-preparatory program in a supportive, nurturing environment. There is a strong sense of tradition in the school's dedication to serving the needs of the whole student. The academic curriculum addresses the college preparatory mission of the school while athletic, arts, and enrichment courses allow students to express other aspects of their talents. Students enjoy class sizes generally ranging from 12 to 16 students with some classes being larger and others smaller. An advisor system enables students to receive individual guidance and support, and teachers offer support and/or accommodations for those who have unique needs. Through the advisory program, students also participate in group service learning projects which promote the personal qualities that are necessary to develop responsible citizens and effective future leaders. The academic year is divided into two semesters: Semester 1 runs from August to December and Semester 2 runs from January to May. Upper School students must maintain a course load of seven classes each semester; in some circumstances, seniors may carry a course load of six courses each semester.

College Prep, Honors, and Advanced Placement Courses The CCS Upper School curriculum is designed so that each student can pursue a program of study that provides the appropriate level of academic challenge. Most CCS core courses are considered college prep (CP) courses. CCS also offers Honors and Advanced Placement (AP) courses. Students should take the most challenging course schedule in which they are likely to achieve success. Honors and AP courses are intended for students exhibiting superior performance in the course content area. Students may enroll in Honors courses based on the recommendations of their teachers. In order to enroll in an AP course, students must submit an application. Participants in both Honors and AP courses must be willing to take up the challenge and extra work load of these classes.

Dual Credit and Outside Course Programs In certain circumstances, Upper School students may enroll in online courses, courses at other high schools, courses at local colleges, or courses with a private tutor for credit on a Charleston Collegiate Upper School transcript. Upper School students interested in taking courses outside of CCS must discuss their plan with the Head of Upper School and receive approval prior to enrollment. The Head of Upper School will consider alternative programs when a student is interested in taking a course that CCS does not offer, when scheduling conflicts do not permit entry into a CCS course, or when a student wishes to advance his or her transcript. In such cases, the majority of a student’s course work for a given semester must still be done at CCS. Additionally, families are responsible for the full CCS tuition as well as any fees for the outside programs and course work. No tuition discounts will be given in these circumstances. Dual credit courses are weighted the same as AP courses.


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Upper School Course Offerings English 109 Survey of Literature CP 109H Survey of Literature Honors 110 World Literature CP 110H World Literature Honors 111 American Literature CP 111H American Literature Honors 112 British Literature CP 113 AP® English Literature

History 209 Ancient History CP 209H Ancient History Honors 210 Modern World History CP 210H Modern World History Honors 211 American History CP 211H American History Honors 212 Government CP 213 Economics CP

Science 409 Conceptual Physics CP 409H Conceptual Physics Honors 410 Biology CP 410H Biology Honors 411 Marine Biology CP 412 Chemistry CP 412H Chemistry Honors 413 AP® Biology* 414 AP® Environmental Science

World Language 509 Introductory Spanish CP 510 Novice Spanish CP 511 Transitional Spanish CP 512 Intermediate Spanish CP 513H Advanced Spanish Honors 514H Superior Spanish Honors 515 Spanish for Native Speakers CP

Fine Arts 701 702 703 704 705 706 707 708 709 710 711 712 713 714 715 716 717 718 719 720 721 722 723

Creative Writing I Creative Writing II Creative Writing III Drawing & Painting I Drawing & Painting II Drawing & Painting III Film Studies Film Making I Film Making II Film Making III Sequential Art I Sequential Art II Sequential Art III Glass Studio Ceramics Printmaking Sculpture Jewelry and Metals Acting & Directing I Acting & Directing II Photojournalism/Yearbook I Photojournalism/Yearbook II Music Theory

Health, Physical Education, and Athletics 800 Health and Wellness 801 Physical Fitness 802 Strength and Conditioning 803 Football 804 Girls’ Volleyball 805 Cross-Country 806 Boys’ Basketball 807 Girls’ Basketball 808 Boys’ Tennis 809 Girls’ Tennis 810 Soccer 811 Cheerleading

Mathematics 309 Algebra I CP 309H Algebra I Honors 310 Geometry CP 310H Geometry Honors 311 Algebra II CP 311H Algebra II Honors 312 Statistics & Trigonometry CP 313H Pre-Calculus Honors 314 AP® Calculus AB Business and Technology 600 Public Speaking CP 609 Applied Technology CP 610 Entrepreneurship I CP 611H Entrepreneurship II Honors 612 Personal Finance CP

Additional Electives 420 Outdoor Education 430 Early Childhood Development

Senior Exhibition 900 Senior Exhibition

*Offerings may vary from year to year. AP® Biology will not be offered in the 2012-13 school year as it alternates with AP® Environmental Science. CCS reserves the right to determine course offerings based on student enrollment. Not every class will be offered every semester or every year.


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Graduation Requirements The curriculum for the Upper School offers a challenging series of core subjects well-suited for the college-bound student. Students are expected to complete 25 credits for graduation. Transfer students may qualify for waivers only after the Curriculum Committee approves a request. Once enrolled at CCS, a student may not take courses outside the school toward graduation requirements without advance approval of the Head of Upper School. The specific departmental requirements follow. One credit is a full-year course.

Department

Minimum Stipulations Requirement

English

4 credits

Mathematics

4 credits

One each year of Upper School; a fifth credit may be earned in the eighth grade for high school level math

History

4 credits

Including one semester of Government and one semester of Economics

3 credits

All credits earned must be lab sciences. Physics and Biology are required; Marine Biology counts as a lab science if taken following Biology. (All CCS science classes are lab sciences)

World Languages

3 credits

All credits must be earned in the same language. Students must also pass the Intermediate level of proficiency (thus some students must take 4 credits); one credit may be earned in the eighth grade for high school level language courses, and at least two additional credits must be earned in Upper School

Business and Technology

1 ½ credits

Applied Technology and Public Speaking are required. ½ credit of an additional business class is required as well beginning with the Class of 2015.

Fine Arts

1 credit

Health, Physical Education, and Athletics

1 ½ credit

Electives

2 credits

Senior Exhibition

1 credit

Science

1/4 credit may be earned for each season in which the student participates in CCS Varsity or Junior Varsity athletics. ½ credit in Health is required beginning with the Class of 2015 Elective classes may be taken in any department when the student has completed the graduation requirement. May only be taken in senior year.


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Recommended Schedules With the guidance of the advisor and Head of Upper School, each student must individually consider the courses in which he or she would like to enroll. Freshmen are encouraged to map out their 4-year plan toward graduation and carefully select courses based on the appropriate level of challenge (CP, Honors, AP), the appropriate proficiency level of math and Spanish classes, and the desired elective courses based on personal interests and graduation requirements. The student and advisor should revisit this plan every year. The following are typical schedules for CCS students at each grade level. These are intended to help guide decision making when enrolling for courses, although individual schedules may vary and teacher recommendations will impact enrollment. Students must take a course load of six to seven classes each semester. Study halls are also available for students who need extra time during the school day to complete academic work. 9th Grade        

Survey of Literature Ancient History Algebra I or Geometry Conceptual Physics Spanish (proficiency level will vary) Applied Technology (one semester) Public Speaking (one semester) Elective (often in the arts)

10th Grade       

11th Grade       

American Literature or AP® English Literature American History Algebra II or Pre-Calculus Marine Biology, Chemistry, or AP® Environmental Science Spanish (proficiency level will vary, some students th may have already fulfilled this requirement by 11 grade) Economics (one semester) Electives

World Literature Modern World History Geometry or Algebra II Biology Spanish (proficiency level will vary) Health (for the class of 2015) (one semester) Electives

12th Grade         

Senior Exhibition British Literature or AP® English Literature Government (one semester) Economics (one semester, some students may have th already fulfilled this requirement by 12 grade) Statistics and Trigonometry, Pre-Calculus, or AP® Calculus Chemistry or AP® Environmental Science Spanish (proficiency level will vary, some students may th have already fulfilled this requirement by 12 grade) Personal Finance (one semester) Electives

Add/Drop Policy The Head of Upper School determines class composition and assigns students to classes after a spring preregistration process has allowed teachers to assess and assist each student in his or her academic plan. During the first week of each semester, students may add courses with the approval of the Head of Upper School and his or her parents. To add a course, students must fill out an add/drop form. When a student wishes to drop a course, he or she must consult with his or her parents, the course instructor, and the Head of Upper School, and must fill out an add/drop form. A student has 10 days after the start of the year to request to drop a year-long course and five days after the start of the semester to request to drop a semester-long course. If a student wishes to be taken out of a class after the drop period has passed, he or she can request to be withdrawn from the course but a grade of withdrawn passing or withdrawn failing will be reflected on the student’s transcript. The Head of Upper School may remove students from courses at any time (especially in the case of Honors or AP classes) if they are not placed in the correct level course or if the student’s grade drops to an unacceptable range.


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Course Descriptions ENGLISH

4 credits for graduation

109 Survey of Literature CP, 109H Survey of Literature Honors Full year ∙ 1 credit Survey of Literature is the first course in the Upper School English curriculum. It incorporates all of the components of language arts including reading, writing, speaking, vocabulary building, and grammar study. Students study ancient, world, and American literature with the unifying theme of self-exploration and discovery as they read works from a variety of genres and begin to analyze and interpret what they read. Significant emphasis is also put on further developing writing skills with a focus on expository and persuasive essays. Students also continue to refine their research and presentation skills. 110 World Literature CP, 110H World Literature Honors Full year ∙ 1 credit In World Literature, students study, read, and write about works sparked by revolutionary historical events such as The Reformation, The Scientific Revolution, The Enlightenment, The French Revolution, The Industrial Revolution and World Wars I and II. The objective is for students to be able to connect literature and history to the larger environment and apply that synergy to modern life. Students continue to perfect grammar skills, enrich their vocabulary, work on the writing process, analyze and compare primary sources, and further their research skills. This course is taught in tandem with World History. 111 American Literature CP, 111H American Literature Honors Full year ∙ 1 credit The American Literature course is taught in tandem with the American History course. Students in this course investigate the evolution of America’s unique literary tradition and how it reflects the changing attitudes of our nation as they study the major cultural events of the twentieth century. In addition, this course focuses on SAT preparation including English usage, and an intensive study of punctuation and editing written work, analytical and persuasive writing, interpretation and analysis of literature, reading comprehension, and vocabulary development. 112 British Literature CP Full year ∙ 1 credit British Literature is a survey course designed to acquaint students with prose and poetry from the Anglo-Saxon period through the 21st century. Throughout, students gain experience in critical textual analysis and interpretation in historical and rhetorical context. They continue to refine their essay writing, creative writing, research, and presentation skills. They also further their in-depth study of grammatical structures and continue to advance their vocabularies. 113 AP® English Literature and Composition Full year ∙ 1 credit AP® English Literature and Composition is an introductory college-level course which builds students’ skills in literary analysis and composition by using a variety of rhetorical modes. By the end of the course, students should be able to approach a poem, a prose work, and a play and respond to it analytically and critically, both orally and in writing. Students learn to develop well thought out responses that use literary terms and key concepts to illuminate insights rather than to simply show familiarity with them. The course emphasizes that students read deliberately and thoroughly and to understand that form follows function. Students examine how the style in which an author writes is connected to what they are writing about. In addition, students attain working knowledge of style analysis, literary terms, diction, narrative voice, critical reading and analytical writing from a study of works from the 16 th century to present. This course is designed for motivated juniors and seniors with an interest in pursuing the humanities in college. Students must be prepared for the rigors that such a class demands. They may elect to take the AP exam in May; a successful score on this exam may earn students college credit. Prerequisite: Successful completion of World Literature or American Literature at the Honors level with a grade of 85 or better, teacher recommendation, and submission and acceptance of an application. N.B. This class is offered every other year and will be offered in the 2012-2013 school year.


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HISTORY

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4 credits for graduation

209 Ancient History CP, 209H Ancient History Honors Full year ∙ 1 credit Ancient History covers the Neolithic Revolution through 1600 AD. Students study ancient civilizations in Europe, Africa, and Asia, and analyze how progress and ethics developed over time within these changing societies. They compare and contrast the global human rights among these civilizations and analyze the progression of these human rights. They interpret historical documents and consider the impact of the written word on the development of government and also identify historical trends and apply them to current events. In addition, students learn to use historical reasoning skills, including chronological reasoning and recognizing change over time, comprehending and analyzing historical literature, and recognizing the concept of historical causation. 210 Modern World History CP, 210H Modern World History Honors Full year ∙ 1 credit This course delves into world history from the Protestant Reformation to World War II. Specifically, students study The Reformation, The Scientific Revolution, The Enlightenment, The French Revolution, The Romantic Period, The Industrial Revolution, and World Wars I and II as they continue to develop their ability to use historical reasoning skills, comprehend and analyze historical literature, and recognize the concept of historical causation. Students further their understanding of global human rights and recognize the progression of these human rights during these time periods. Students continue to interpret historical documents and consider the impact of the written word on the development of government, recognize the different political systems and how these systems affect society, identify historical trends and apply them to current events, and distinguish the role of the individual as an agent of change throughout history. Students use geographic tools and technology to explain the interactions of humans and the larger environment and the evolving consequences of those interactions. This course is taught in tandem with World Literature. 211 American History CP, 211H American History Honors Full year ∙ 1 credit This course is a thematic and chronological survey of American History from the first colonists to the present day. The major topics of investigation include the Colonial Period, Reason and Revolution, Shaping the Government, Expansion, Industrialization and Urbanization, Emergence of Modern America, Depression and War, and Liberalism vs. Conservatism. Students discuss democracy, individualism and what makes America unique. They continue to analyze the value of “authentic” sources as they evaluate the development of society in terms of political, social, and economic terms. In addition, students further use geographic tools and technology to explain the interactions of humans and the larger environment, and the evolving consequences of those interactions. This course is taught in tandem with the American Literature course. 212 Government CP One semester ∙ ½ credit The Government course is intended to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the operation of American national government and politics. Specifically, students study the Constitution and Federalism, American political culture, political institutions and policy making, and civil liberties. Students explore the rights and responsibilities of an American citizen within the world community and compare and contrast global human rights. As students study and interpret historical documents, they consider the impact of the written word on the development of government and discuss the different political systems and how these systems affect society. 213 Economics CP One semester ∙ ½ credit The Economics is designed to introduce students to basic financial concepts. Students discuss the economic system of the United States and how it operates. They also explore the roles of various components of the American economic system as they examine their roles as consumers, workers, investors, and voters. Topics discussed include the stock market, current events affecting the economy, comparative economic systems, and the impact of political and social decisions on the economy.


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MATHEMATICS

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4 credits for graduation

309 Algebra I CP, 309H Algebra I Honors Full year ∙ 1 credit In Algebra I, students explore the language of algebra and the nature of the real number system. Students analyze, manipulate, and express linear, non-linear and polynomial functions numerically, graphically, and algebraically. 310 Geometry CP, 310H Geometry Honors Full year ∙ 1 credit In Geometry, students are introduced to the geometric reasoning needed for problem solving. Students explore properties of geometric figures, practice the use of mathematical symbols and language to express ideas, and justify conclusions by building a geometric proof. They work collaboratively to learn new concepts and practice skills and are expected to use writing to communicate their mathematical understanding of a problem. Algebra skills are reviewed and reinforced throughout the course. Topics include properties of triangles, quadrilaterals, and other geometric figures, area, perimeter, volume, and surface area. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I with a grade of 70 or better or demonstrated proficiency and readiness on the placement test. 311 Algebra II CP, 311H Algebra II Honors Full year ∙ 1 credit In this course, students collect real-world data to derive quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, and exponential relationships. They compare and contrast graphical, algebraic, numeric, and verbal representations of each particular function on an abstract and conceptual level. Students interpret real-world events by creating equations to fit particular data. Students justify all mathematical processes through direct and indirect proof. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Geometry with a grade of 70 or better or demonstrated proficiency and readiness on the placement test. 312 Statistics and Trigonometry CP Full year ∙ 1 credit In Statistics and Trigonometry, students solidify their understanding of fundamental mathematics, solve authentic problems that apply to their lives, and reason with quantitative issues likely to be encountered in college, career, and life. They collect, summarize, and analyze data using both algebraic and graphical statistical methods. Logical interpretation of data is emphasized and technology is integrated throughout the course. Students also gain an understanding of probability, an essential tool for interpreting more sophisticated statistical tests. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II with a grade of 70 or better or demonstrated proficiency and readiness on the placement test. 313H Pre-Calculus Honors Full year ∙ 1 credit In Pre-Calculus students obtain the understanding and skills needed for success in AP® Calculus. The course involves a more in-depth and thorough look at some topics introduced in Algebra II. In Pre-Calculus, students become more proficient with the use of mathematical language and symbols, analyze the behavior of functions (including polynomial, rational, radical, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions), and explore various methods of solving equations and inequalities. Students also learn how to apply their knowledge of functions to real-world problems. The course also includes some work with polar coordinates, complex numbers, and conic sections. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II Honors with a grade of 85 or better and teacher recommendation, or demonstrated proficiency and readiness on the placement test. 314 AP® Calculus AB Full year ∙ 1 credit AP® Calculus AB is the highest mathematics course offered at CCS. It is the equivalent of a college-level course and students must be ready for the rigors that such a course demands. Students in this course analyze graphs and functions of real-life relationships and interpret data. They compare and contrast graphs of functions and their derivatives/ integrals. Students communicate justification of algebraic manipulations graphically, numerically, algebraically, and verbally. They exhibit their calculus skills in their formal presentation on the standard AP® examination and have the potential to earn college credit. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Pre-Calculus with a grade of 85 or better, teacher recommendation, and submission and acceptance of an application.


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SCIENCE

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3 credits for graduation

409 Conceptual Physics CP, 409H Conceptual Physics Honors Full year ∙ 1 credit In this course, students use the inquiry-based approach to investigate the question, “What governs the functioning of our world?” Students undertake a lab-based, algebraic study of the central concepts of physics, including: Newtonian mechanics, sound and light, electricity and magnetism, and atomic and nuclear physics. Students create projects for in-depth analysis of topics. They continue to work on laboratory safety, application of the Scientific Method, scientific inquiry, observation and measurement, data collection, analysis and interpretation, scientific writing, and viewing the world from a scientific perspective. 410 Biology CP, 410H Biology Honors Full year ∙ 1 credit In Biology, students explore the question: “Is our biology our destiny?” They undertake a lab- and inquiry-based study of cells, genetics, genes and DNA, biological diversity, plants, and animals. The course also includes a survey of the organisms found in each kingdom. Hands-on labs give the students the opportunity to learn about each of these organisms. Skills emphasized include: laboratory safety; collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data; thinking critically; and comparing and contrasting viewpoints, perspectives, and information. 411 Marine Biology CP Full year ∙ 1 credit In Marine Science, students investigate the local Charleston marine environment as well as the global marine environment. Lab- and inquiry-based units include: marine ecosystems, mammals, invertebrates, oceanic currents and patterns, oceanic chemistry, tidal ecosystems, and critical issues facing the marine environment. The following skills are reinforced throughout the year: lab safety; collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data; thinking critically; and comparing and contrasting viewpoints, perspectives, and information. The curriculum puts continued emphasis on understanding our world from a scientific viewpoint. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology with a grade of 65 or better. 412 Chemistry CP, 412H Chemistry Honors Full year ∙ 1 credit Chemistry is an interactive, lab-based study of essential chemical principles. The curriculum asks the question: “How is everything put together?” The course emphasizes relationships and patterns, atomic structure, nomenclature, basic stoichiometric and thermochemical relationships, solutions, and nuclear chemistry. Students create projects for in-depth analyses of topics. Skills include: collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data; applying the Scientific Method; thinking critically about chemistry in their lives; and comparing and contrasting viewpoints, perspectives, and information. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II with a grade of 70 or better. 413 AP® Biology Full year ∙ 1 credit AP® Biology is a college-level course and students must be prepared for the rigors that such a course demands. Students in this course study the question “Is our biology our destiny, and how do we find out?” Major topics include cells, genes and DNA, biological diversity, and the phyla and families of plants and animals. Students are asked to think critically about the material presented and consider the material at a collegiate level by analyzing, interpreting, and comparing and contrasting viewpoints, perspectives, and information. The Scientific Method requires that students continually justify their answers and reasoning. Students exhibit their skills and knowledge in their formal presentation on the standard AP® examination and have the potential to earn college credit. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology with a grade of 85 or better, teacher recommendation, and submission and acceptance of an application. N.B. This class is offered every other year and will not be offered in the 2012-2013 school year.


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414 AP® Environmental Science Full year ∙ 1 credit This rigorous college-level course integrates earth science, biology, chemistry, physics, ecology, economics, sociology, and political science in order to assess and discuss problems and solutions facing our planet in the next 50 years such as pollution and waste, global climate change, biodiversity, sustainability, and energy use. Students analyze their actions and choices and explore how politics and economics combine with the energy exchanges in their lives by analyzing, interpreting, and comparing and contrasting viewpoints, perspectives, and information. Students exhibit their skills and knowledge on the standard AP examination and have the potential to earn college credit. Prerequisite: Successful completion of previous science courses with a grade of 85 or better, teacher recommendation, and submission and acceptance of an application. N.B. This class is offered every other year and will be offered in the 2012-2013 school year.

WORLD LANGUAGE

3 credits for graduation

509 Introductory Spanish CP Full year ∙ 1 credit Introductory Spanish is the first course of two courses which serve as the beginning study of the Spanish language and as the foundation for subsequent study. It is designed to introduce the Spanish language and the culture of the growing Spanish-speaking world. The course includes vocabulary, grammar, culture and the essential tools to begin communicating in Spanish. Students learn to perform basic communicative functions in Spanish, and also learn to manipulate the present tense. The course is also designed to develop skills in all modes of communication (reading, writing, speaking, and listening). The goal is to give the language learners an overview of the Spanish language, excite them about the practices and perspectives of Spanish speakers, and foster cultural awareness. 510 Novice Spanish CP Full year ∙ 1 credit This course is the second of two courses which serve as the beginning study of the Spanish language and as the foundation for subsequent study. In this course, students learn to perform basic communicative functions in Spanish as they further develop their vocabulary. The structural focus is on improving students’ accuracy in the use of the present tense. Students also learn to appreciate the correspondence between what they hear and say in Spanish and how to spell as they continue to develop their skills in all modes of communication. They also look at various aspects of Hispanic culture in order to foster cultural awareness and appreciation. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Introductory Spanish with an average of 70 or better or demonstrated proficiency and readiness on the placement test. 511 Transitional Spanish CP Full year ∙ 1 credit This course is a continuation of study designed to further proficiency in Spanish. The goal of the course is to continue to develop effective and efficient communication in Spanish with an increased focus on producing spontaneous speech. Students continue to expand their vocabulary and learn to manipulate the structure of the language with more accuracy and sophistication. Again, cultural material is included in order to promote an appreciation for and understanding of the Spanish-speaking people and their culture. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Novice Spanish with an average of 70 or better or demonstrated proficiency and readiness on the placement test. 512 Intermediate Spanish CP Full year ∙ 1 credit This course continues the study of the Spanish language and culture of the Spanish-speaking world. It is designed to increase proficiency in the target language. The goal of the course is to continue to develop effective and efficient communication in Spanish both spontaneously and in rehearsed formal situations. Students’ vocabularies continue to grow and expand, and they continue to improve their ability to manipulate the structure of the language through the study of increasingly more advanced grammar topics. Again, cultural material is included in order to promote an appreciation for and understanding of the Spanish-speaking people, their culture, civilization, and customs. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Transitional Spanish with an average of 70 or better or demonstrated proficiency and readiness on the placement test.


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513H Advanced Spanish Honors Full year ∙ 1 credit This course is a continuation of Spanish at a more advanced level of study. It is designed to increase students’ proficiency in the language, challenge the student in all language skills previously learned, and prepare for college study by increasing the amount of class time in which Spanish is used exclusively. Speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills are strengthened; accuracy increases as students develop a better understanding of the structure of the language. A major goal is to develop greater oral proficiency by focusing on extemporaneous speech. Particular emphasis is placed on the acquisition of extensive, practical vocabulary and idiomatic usage. The culture of the countries studied is integrated with listening and reading activities as literature is introduced at this level. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Intermediate Spanish with an average of 70 or better and teacher recommendation, or demonstrated proficiency and readiness on the placement test. 514H Superior Spanish Honors Full year ∙ 1 credit This course is the highest level of Spanish offered at CCS for non-native speakers. It is designed to challenge the student in all language skills previously learned. Advanced vocabulary topics as well as the finer points of grammar are studied and continue to be perfected. Students read and analyze literary selections to enhance their interpretive skills. Students must speak only Spanish in class and oral proficiency continues to be stressed as students engage in extended conversations and interact appropriately in Spanish in a variety of real-life situations. Written composition is also emphasized through the creation of in-depth written reports on research-based topics. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Advanced Spanish with an average of 70 or better and teacher recommendation, or demonstrated proficiency and readiness on the placement test. Students have the option to take the Advanced Placement (AP) Spanish Language exam in the spring if desired. 515 Spanish for Native Speakers CP Full year ∙ 1 credit This course is designed for students who have grown up speaking Spanish in the home. The focus is on further developing and improving Spanish writing, reading, and presentation skills at an academic level. All assignments and projects require the use of critical thinking skills and foster independent learning. Students study the intricacies of the formation of words and sentence structure. A variety of literary works are used as resources to analyze and better understand students’ feelings, attitudes, ideas, and opinions about a variety of subjects that influence the Spanish-speaking world. Juniors and seniors have the option to take the Advanced Placement (AP) Spanish Language exam in the spring if desired.

BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY

Class of 2013 and 2014: 1 credit for graduation Class of 2015 and beyond: 1½ credits for graduation

600 Public Speaking CP One semester ∙ ½ credit The public speaking course aims to learn about and improve communication skills through oral presentation. Students examine varied themes of speech including biographies, delivery of song lyrics, and persuasive speeches. During the course, students write, rehearse, and deliver multiple speeches as they study the significance of thorough preparation, professionalism, and attention to all elements. 609 Applied Technology CP One semester ∙ ½ credit Applied Technology introduces students to the use of technology and the world of nonprofit organizations. Each student creates a mock nonprofit organization and learns how to use Microsoft Office and the Internet efficiently to design, run, and publicize the organization. The course is designed to encourage active learning, independent thinking, and problem-solving, enable students to use computers productively in the Upper School and beyond, and introduce them to how small organizations operate and to the world of charitable giving. 610 Entrepreneurship I CP One semester ∙ ½ credit The Entrepreneurship program introduces students to all aspects of starting a business. Students create a business with a marketable product and idea for the purpose of serving a small community. Students learn the daily


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operational elements of businesses and create a business plan for starting and financing a small business. They then continue to acquire skills for expanding business opportunities and develop the ability to adapt to the changing environment of their consumers. 611H Entrepreneurship II Honors One semester ∙ ½ credit Students interested in continuing their study of the business world have the opportunity to become leaders of the school business through the Entrepreneurship II course. After successful completion of the preliminary Entrepreneurship class, students may elect to further their knowledge in this field and help direct students taking the course for the first time. Prerequisite: Entrepreneurship I and recommendation from the Entrepreneurship teacher. 612 Personal Finance CP One semester ∙ ½ credit From how to write a personal check to minimizing the risk in your 401(K) program, the Personal Finance course covers a wide variety of financial topics that all young adults should know. This course helps students set personal financial goals, know how to use credit wisely, understand the importance of savings and investments, buy a car efficiently, and decide when to rent or purchase a home. The students also study current economic events to try to understand that finance is not just personal, but all around them, and that it affects them every day. Students take part in a semester long stock market competition that should leave each of them with a basic understanding of how to invest in the market and of how critical the success of the stock market is for business growth and retirement planning. Personal Finance provides students with the knowledge, the skills, and the processes required to make sound financial decisions and manage their own personal finances as they enter college and the work force. Prerequisite: Economics

ART

1 credit for graduation

701 Creative Writing I One semester ∙ ½ credit Students in Creative Writing explore the major topics that all writers are faced with and learn how to work through them. They grapple with discovering where, when,what, and how much to write and how to begin writing a piec, as they work to find their place in the world as writers. Students are guided to find the appropriate place, pace, and subject matter to write in the genre of their choice. They also read two novels or other works in their chosen genre. In addition, students present their own work on a weekly basis as well as critique each other’s writing. 702 Creative Writing II One semester ∙ ½ credit Students who have already taken the Creative Writing I course and wish to continue to pursue their writing may take Creative Writing II. In this course students add to their portfolio of work and receive guidance and feedback as they work through the writing process and move to published pieces. Prerequisite: Creative Writing I 703 Creative Writing III One semester ∙ ½ credit Creative Writing III is for the serious writer wishing to pursue this field beyond high school. In this course students have the opportunity to expand their portfolios and continue to receive guidance and feedback as they work though the writing process and move to published pieces. Prerequisite: Creative Writing II 704 Drawing and Painting I One semester ∙ ½ credit The Drawing and Painting course utilizes several different rendering styles to help students communicate artistically. Students will learn multiple artistic disciplines within the realm of painting and drawing to help them successfully communicate images and ideas. The specific media used will be graphite, charcoal, pastels, ink, watercolor, acrylic, and mixed media. Students create still lifes, landscapes, portraits, and illustrations. At the end of the course students complete a thesis piece which reflects their knowledge of the artistic disciplines learned throughout the course.


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705 Drawing and Painting II One semester ∙ ½ credit Students who have already completed the first class in Drawing and Painting may wish to continue their study of this art form in the second level of the course. In Drawing and Painting II students have the opportunity to further their own repertoire in this genre and work to produce additional pieces for their portfolios with guidance and feedback from skilled instructors. Prerequisite: Drawing and Painting I 706 Drawing and Painting III One semester ∙ ½ credit Drawing and Painting III is for the serious artist wishing to pursue this field beyond high school. Students have the opportunity to further their repertoire in this genre and work to produce additional pieces for their portfolios with guidance and feedback from skilled instructors. Prerequisite: Drawing and Painting II 707 Film Studies One semester ∙ ½ credit In Film Studies, students learn basic film terminology while watching films and reading to understand what comprise the essential elements of a good film. They study photography, editing, acting, writing, story, directing, Mise en Scene, and synthesis. Students write a critique on each topic, create storyboards for a short film, and write a final paper on a film that includes all topic areas. 708 Film Making I One semester ∙ ½ credit After studying the elements of a good film in the Film Studies course, the aim of the Film Making course is to instill in young film makers the entire process of creating and producing their own successful pieces. Students learn to tell a coherent story using moving pictures and sound. They are responsible for the completion of four short films as well as a business plan for an independent film. For each film, students create an outline, storyboard, and shooting script. They also film and photograph, edit, develop the sound design, and write a business plan. Prerequisite: Film Studies 709 Film Making II One semester ∙ ½ credit Film Making II is for students who wish to continue their study of film making after completing the preliminary level course. It is designed for students who are considering studying this art form after high school and who would like to add to their portfolio of self-created films. Students in this course will continue to receive guidance and feedback from skilled instructors. Prerequisite: Film Making I 710 Film Making III One semester ∙ ½ credit Film Making III is for the serious film maker who plans on pursuing this art form after high school. Students in this class must be self-motivated to write, create, film, and produce their work with the guidance and feedback of the instructor in order to add to their portfolios. Prerequisite: Film Making II 711 Sequential Art I One semester ∙ ½ credit The Sequential Art course trains students in the juxtaposition of images to generate a story. Throughout the course students learn penciling, inking, storyboarding, script writing, concept design, character design, and cartooning. They analyze, interpret, and arrange created images and words into a story format and produce a culminating thesis piece displaying the knowledge they have garnered from the course. 712 Sequential Art II One semester ∙ ½ credit Sequential Art II is for students who would like to continue to study this art form after taking the first level course. Students in this course must be self-motivated to expand their portfolios as they receive guidance and feedback from the instructor. Prerequisite: Sequential Art I 713 Sequential Art III One semester ∙ ½ credit Sequential Art III is for the serious art student who plans to study this art form beyond high school. Students in this course must be self-motivated, independent workers who will continue to develop their portfolios with the guidance and feedback of the instructor. Prerequisite: Sequential Art II


Charleston Collegiate School Upper School Course Catalog

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714 Glass Studio One semester ∙ ½ credit CCS is lucky to have the equipment and tools to offer students a Glass Studio course. During this class students not only learn about the history of glass but also learn to create their own pieces utilizing the copper foil technique invented by Louis C. Tiffany. In addition, they are introduced to mosaic glass art and fused glass pieces fired in our kiln. When possible, students take field trips to the studios of local glass artists. N.B. This course may not be offered every year as it is offered on a rotating basis. 715 Ceramics One semester ∙ ½ credit The aim of this course is to offer students a more thorough exploration of the discipline of ceramics. Students explore the history of ceramics in civilization and produce original works. They learn about the materials, processes, and techniques used in ceramics so as to better prepare them to create works which portray their individual outlooks and perceptions. The focus throughout the course is on personal growth and craftsmanship. N.B. This course may not be offered every year as it is offered on a rotating basis. 716 Printmaking One semester ∙ ½ credit This class is an opportunity for students to get an indepth understanding of printmaking and its various techniques while developing their artistic talents. Students discuss and create monoprints, editions of prints from linoleum blocks, silkscreens for multi-colored prints, and collagraphs. N.B. This course may not be offered every year as it is offered on a rotating basis. 717 Sculpture One semester ∙ ½ credit This is an exploratory studio class in Three Dimensional Design which includes a review of the vocabulary used in art making as well as the principles of art. Students who enroll in this class have the opportunity to create several sculptures in different media including clay, plaster, cardboard, steel, and found objects. Emphasis is on the personal growth, creativity, and craftsmanship of the student. N.B. This course may not be offered every year as it is offered on a rotating basis. 718 Jewelry and Metals One semester ∙ ½ credit Jewelry and Metals is an introductory level course. While no previous metal experience is needed, the student must have previous design/art experience. Students learn the tools and techniques that artists use when designing and creating jewelry and small sculptural works, including filing, piercing and forming, soldering, and finishing. Although this is a class on metals, use of other materials will also be encouraged, including glass, resin, clay, and fibers. N.B. This course may not be offered every year as it is offered on a rotating basis. 719 Acting and Directing I One semester ∙ ½ credit Acting and Directing I focuses on the acting techniques outlined in Respect for Acting by Uta Hagen (the class text). The emphasis of the book is on character development for the actor. Performances are built through finding the answers to the Ten Essential Questions that are emphasized in the book. Students first use the practice exercises outlined in the book which are designed to allow the actor to continue refining their craft on their own throughout their acting life. Then they develop characters in one-act plays. These plays are rehearsed in class and publicly performed. 720 Acting and Directing II One semester ∙ ½ credit This course focuses on directing with special emphasis on helping actors with character development. Students learn to design and block a play for the stage, analyze a script, develop a rehearsal schedule, manage a cast, and lead their actors to confident and meaningful performances. Class members direct selected scenes, featuring their fellow students as actors, and direct one-act plays that will be publicly performed. Prerequisite: Acting and Directing I


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721 Photojournalism/Yearbook I One semester ∙ ½ credit The photography class explores the basic fundamentals of using a digital point and shoot camera as well as the core functions of a DSLR camera. Core concepts of study are compositional skills, aperture control, shutter speed, ISO, focus, depth of field, exposure, lighting, and digital printing. Students will explore the basic artist’s statement and will learn to defend their work via writing exercises such as articles coupled with photography, food reviews (with photography) and presentations. Students will each have a gallery of their work online which they are responsible for updating regularly. In addition, students will work to produce the school yearbook. Using online technologies, they will be responsible for designing the layout, taking and inserting photographs, writing articles, and editing each page of the production. Students are urged to already own a digital camera; however, accommodations can be made for those who do not already own a camera. 722 Photojournalism/Yearbook II One semester ∙ ½ credit Photography II explores the further development of the concepts of Photo I (compositional skills, aperture control, shutter speed, ISO, focus, depth of field, exposure, lighting, and digital printing) with a specific focus on compositional skills and creating photo essays. This course expands upon the basic artist’s statement and helps to create a focused photography portfolio. Students will become more adept with taking a larger body of photography at a faster pace. They will also be the leaders and editors of the school yearbook. Student leaders will oversee the whole production of the book including designing layouts, taking and inserting photographs for each page, writing articles, and editing pages. Prerequisite: Photojournalism/Yearbook 1 723 Music Theory One semester ∙ ½ credit This course is an introduction to music theory and song writing notation. The music theory software program Practica Musica 4.0 by Ars Nova will be used. Students are challenged in 24 different activity types, everything from pitch matching to rhythmic dictation and are able record their progress. As the course progresses, students learn to use Finale SongWriter 2010 from MakeMusic. This music notation software allows the user to hear music played back, print sheet music, share songs, and save MP3 files. Students learn to notate their favorite song or write and notate an original piece for production.

HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, AND ATHLETICS

Class of 2013 and 2014: 1 credit for graduation Class of 2015 and beyond: 1½ credits for graduation

800 Health and Wellness One semester ∙ ½ credit This focuses on the health and wellness issues with which face today’s teenagers. The goal of the class is to encourage students to make smart and healthy decisions in all facets of life including social/emotional, mental, and physical health. Through discussions and activities, students address topics such as nutrition and eating disorders, human reproduction and sexual wellness, mental health, drugs, and alcohol. Beginning with the Class of 2015, students must take this course to fulfill the Upper School graduation requirement for Health. 801 Physical Fitness One semester ∙ ½ credit Students in this course learn about the importance of physical fitness. At the beginning and end of the semester, students’ physical fitness skills are assessed. Each student sets personal goals, and they are each encouraged to improve their skills throughout the semester. Students engage in physical activity beyond team sports and have the opportunity to work in the weight room, participate in activities such as badminton and dance, and learn other forms of fitness such as yoga. N.B. This course may not be offered every year. 802 Strength and Conditioning One semester ∙ ½ credit Strength and Conditioning is designed for CCS athletes to continue to work out, maintain, and improve their physical fitness during their off-season. It may be scheduled on an individual basis with CCS coaches.


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Athletic Teams Students who participate in CCS Junior Varsity or Varsity team sports may earn ¼ Physical Education credit for each season of participation. The credit will be awarded upon successful completion of the athletic season.

ADDITIONAL ELECTIVES

1 credit for graduation

420 Outdoor Education One semester ∙ ½ credit The Outdoor Education course aims to increase awareness of how we impact one another’s lives and the impact we have on our environment. The immediate goal is to reconnect students with their natural surroundings and with their fellow man. Subject material will run the gamut of biodiversity, sustainability, teamwork, group dynamics, effective communication skills, and risk management. Students in this course have the opportunity to be leaders in the school and facilitate outdoor education opportunities for younger students. 430 Early Childhood Development One semester ∙ ½ credit The Early Childhood Development program is not a traditional course but rather a field experience designed for students who are interested in pursuing a career in teaching at the elementary school level. Upper School students may apply to this program. Those chosen to participate learn the basics of child development and lesson plan creation through hands-on experience. Upper Schoolers work with a Lower School teacher to create and implement activities for the younger children in that teacher’s class. Prerequisite: Interested students must be recommended by the Head of the Lower School in order to be considered for this program.

SENIOR EXHIBITION

1 credit for graduation

900 Senior Exhibition Senior Exhibition is a defining experience for Charleston Collegiate School's 12th grade students; it is a personal affirmation and a public celebration of what they have gained from their time at the school. Throughout the Senior Exhibition process, students meet demanding evaluation criteria and exhibit habits of mind and heart characteristic of inquisitive, responsible, and caring young adults ready for the demands of college. Supported by a joint committee of adults and peers, each senior pursues a yearlong, self-defined, scholarly research project resulting in a paper and "product." Past products created by seniors have included films, original art and photography collections, interior designs, novels, business plans, furniture, etc. The Product Exhibition and Senior Symposium held in May give these students an opportunity to present their ideas, creations, and research to members of the Charleston Collegiate community. Successful completion of Senior Exhibition is a requirement for graduation. During the Senior Exhibition class period, significant time throughout the first semester is also dedicated to the college application process. Students are guided by both the Senior Exhibition teacher and the College Counselor to research, select, and apply to colleges and universities best matched to each student’s preferences, interests, abilities, and talents.


Charleston Collegiate School Upper School Course Catalog

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Grade Point Average Calculations CCS reports two GPA calculations for each Upper School student: the CCS GPA and the SCUGS (South Carolina Uniform Grading Scale). The CCS GPA is calculated on a 4.0 unweighted scale; i.e., no extra points are awarded for Honors or Advanced Placement (AP) courses. This scale is based on the CollegeBoard’s recommended scale. For South Carolina college/university admission decisions and for consideration for SC lottery scholarships, a GPA is reported using the SCUGS. Students must have a minimum of a 3.0 on the SCUGS to be considered for a an SC lottery scholarship. Grade Point Average Equivalents Average 100 99 98 97 96 95 94 93 92 91 90 89 88 87 86 85 84 83 82 81 80 79 78 77 76 75 74 73 72 71 70 69* 68* 67* 66* 65* 64** 63** 62** 0-61**

CCS 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 3.67 3.67 3.67 3.33 3.33 3.33 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 2.67 2.67 2.67 2.33 2.33 2.33 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 1.67 1.67 1.67 1.33 1.33 1.33 1.00 1.00 0 0 0 0

SCUGS College Prep 4.875 4.750 4.625 4.500 4.375 4.250 4.125 4.000 3.875 3.750 3.625 3.500 3.375 3.250 3.125 3.000 2.875 2.750 2.625 2.500 2.375 2.250 2.125 2.000 1.875 1.750 1.625 1.500 1.375 1.250 1.125 1.000 0.875 0.750 0.625 0.500 0.375 0.250 0.125 0.000

SCUGS Honors 5.375 5.250 5.125 5.000 4.875 4.750 4.625 4.500 4.375 4.250 4.125 4.000 3.875 3.750 3.625 3.500 3.375 3.250 3.125 3.000 2.875 2.750 2.625 2.500 2.375 2.250 2.125 2.000 1.875 1.750 1.625 1.500 1.375 1.250 1.125 1.000 0.875 0.750 0.625 0.000

SCUGS AP/ IB/Dual Credit 5.875 5.750 5.625 5.500 5.375 5.250 5.125 5.000 4.875 4.750 4.625 4.500 4.375 4.250 4.125 4.000 3.875 3.750 3.625 3.500 3.375 3.250 3.125 3.000 2.875 2.750 2.625 2.500 2.375 2.250 2.125 2.000 1.875 1.750 1.625 1.500 1.375 1.250 1.125 0.000

*grades below 70 = no credit for math and Spanish classes unless it is the last class in the series. **grades below 65 = no credit for courses in any other discipline.


2012-13 Upper School Course Catalog