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CHARLES VAN AUSDELL

DESIGN PORTFOLIO [ARCHITECTURAL WORKS] undergraduate+graduate

2006.2012


Design is about bold conjectures sometimes forward, sometimes back, incorporating new ideas at every step. As architects, individuals must realize that they are not designing for personal gain, but for the betterment of society; we have begun to pull away from this belief and have started to design with only our own personal aesthetics in mind. This is wrong. It is the job of the designer to improve society as a whole through a healthier and healing built environment while designing with human needs and function in mind. Just because a design is functional doesn’t mean it can’t be beautiful. We must seek to design in order to make life easier and more pleasurable for the user.


TABLE OF CONTENTS ELLIPTIGO WORLD HEADQUARTERS [undergraduate] 5 UNFLESHED: AN ENVELOPE STUDY [graduate] 7 SERPENTINE PAVILION [graduate] 9 BOISE FIRE STATION #5 [undergraduate] 11 VERTICAL COMMUNITY [graduate] 17 SUPPLEMENTARY DESIGN [undergradute+graduate] 25 MICRO TO MACRO: UNIFICATION THROUGH SCALES [graduate] THESIS PROJECT: PORTLAND COMMUNITY ART CENTER [graduate] 3

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ELLIPTIGO UNFLESHED: AN ENVELOPE STUDY SERPENTINE PAVILION BOISE FIRE STATION #5 VERTICAL COMMUNITY

DESIGN STUDIO


ELLIPTIGO WORLD HEADQUARTERS solana beach california Focusing on interior design and detailing, this was a re-design project of an existing business park space for the Elliptigo design team. The existing space was constructed through a standard CMU method, with a glulam beam and lumber roof structure. Overall project goals included creating a more welcoming, multi-purpose space that could be used to showcase the Elliptigo product, and create space for general office use, as well as a workshop to continue the development of the Elliptigo product. With visual connections in mind, the design for Elliptigo’s world headquarters began to take form. Using reclaimed hardwood flooring as visual dividers, ambiguous spaces take shape and create distinct locations for the employees and their customers. This allowed for the employees to continue working uninterrupted on their day to day tasks, while still allowing the employees to be aware of the events on the sales floor.

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UNFLESHED: AN ENVELOPE STUDY melbourne australia This project sought to re-design an existing faรงade through visual interpretation of an assigned jazz piece. After the jazz piece was analyzed, an infographic was created to represent the graphically collected information, which was then interpreted into an architectural re-design of an existing built-project.

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The project started out by creating a visual map of the song Bird’s Lament by Moondog. From there, the resulting diagram was integrated into the façade of the CH2 building in Melbourne, Australia. Using the existing mechanical shading device’s visual rhythm, a pattern of color was

created, adding paint to the inside of the wood members and changing their dimensions from all 2 x 4 lumber to a combination of 2 x 4, 2 x 8, and 2 x 10 lumber. Through this addition, the façade is able to provide constant visual change throughout the day as the louvers track the sun.

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SERPENTINE PAVILION london united kingdom

An annual event put on by the Serpentine Gallery, located in London England, the Serpentine Pavilion is designed each year by an architect who does not have any built works within the U.K. Each pavilion remains up for the summer months to be used by the public. During a twenty-four hour design charrette, two architecture students from the University of Idaho were asked to design a Serpentine Pavilion with an emphasis on sustainable design under the tutelage of an assigned London architecture firm. This pavilion’s design revolved around the five senses and how to actively engage them within an architectural environment. Various ideas were implemented, including an herbal green wall, which allowed for aroma and additions to prepared foods, a corrugated plastic roof and uneven creaky floors built from wood pallets for sound, and an infographic gabion wall to represent London’s waste production for sight.

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BOISE FIRE STATION #5 boise idaho

This studio project was for the Concrete Masonry Association Design competition. Students were given a fire station program for Boise, ID and asked to use CMU as the primary building material. The ultimate goal of the project was to heighten the use of the material beyond generic CMU construction. The design was a finalist in the competition. The Design Strategy for the fire station was to skew the visual and physical weight of CMU by creating what appeared to be floating CMU planes which also acted as shading devices. By doing this, CMU, a heavy material, appeared light and streamlined; this allowed for a unique use while still providing a highly functional fire station for the city.

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VERTICAL COMMUNITY chicago illinois

This studio project aimed to design a mid-rise residential tower for the downtown Chicago area with a focus on structure and human interaction. The program included both residential and commercial entities within the design while also encouraging social interaction amongst the tower users and inhabitants.

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RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL

RESIDENTIAL

STANDARD RESIDENTIAL PARTI

COMMERCIAL

PROPOSED RESIDENTIAL PARTI

The Vertical Community project was an attempt to re-imagine how a tower functions and its connection to a community. By manipulating the standard horizontal orientation of our urban street, it becomes both safe for the residents and prosperous for business.

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VERTICAL COMMUNITY chicago illinois

The concept behind the residential tower was to create a vertical urban street, allowing for residential and commercial entities to co-exist within one building. This would lead to increased accessibility and community viability for both building and neighborhood residents. A key design strategy for the design was a four story ramp which connects the commercial spaces to the streets below, highlighting the circulation of the user.

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Digital model of medium-sized living unit with views towards downtown Chicago.

detail of the steel structured exterior envelope.

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CENTER FOR ALTERNATIVE TECHNOLOGY FREEDOM BY DESIGN digital imaging SKETCHES

ADDITIONAL WORK/SKILLS


CENTER FOR ALTERNATIVE TECHNOLOGY

wales united kingdom

During a weeklong course at the Center for Alternative Technology, in Wales, students from the University of Idaho and the Center for Alternative Technology performed experiments on thermal mass. We started out by building test cells that would enable us to maintain a consistent environment for the experiments to take place, and then moved into testing various thermal mass scenarios. These included studying how different materials performed as a thermal mass, how different orientations and proximity would affect the performance of thermal mass, and also the importance of surface area versus volume to thermal mass success.

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FREEDOM BY DESIGN moscow idaho

Freedom by Design is a national architecture student club that performs design-build projects for people in need. For this project we designed a deck for Success by Six, a local daycare center which had accessibility and safety problems. The overall objective of the project was to create a safe haven for the daycare children to play in while also adding a ramp to provide wheelchair access.

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SUPPLEMENTARY GRAPHIC DESIGN Movie poster (1 hour): This project was for my digital tools class to create a movie poster. The movie plot and overall design were to be inspired by an event found through a current event newspaper article search. Design requirements stated that the overall poster must be completed with only the clip mask and the text tools within Adobe Photoshop. Earth Day poster (3 hours): This project was designed for a local Earth Day fair and an assignment for Digital Tools. An annual local competition and the winner would have their poster used as advertisement for that year’s Earth Day fair. For this particular project, we were only allowed to use clip masking, text, and vector based shapes.

ballroom

lake

small tea house grand canal

orangerie small canal

hedges

water terrace

island

flower garden

lake

reflective pool

large fountain

allee

chateau

covered walkway

grotto

residence

parterre

poplar rows pavillion

elev. 20ft

elev. 0ft

elev. 20ft

elev. 40ft

Album Cover (1 hour): This was a design from a digital tools class which involved designing an album cover for a musical artist. Photoshop was used to produce the album cover designed for the musician Elliott Smith, and was inspired by his song “Between the Bars.”

earthday poster

scale: 1” = 50’

island river

grand fountain

fren rench

Splice garden (20 hours): This was a design for a Landscape history class which involved another group member and I designing a splice garden (part traditional French garden style and part traditional Japanese garden). The project goal was to splice together these two contrasting design styles to form one coherent garden design. Auto-CAD was used for the line detail work and Illustrator for board layout and graphics.

movie poster

statue walk peninsula

colonnade bosque

splice garden

large tea house

larc 389

scale: 1” = 20’

Coreen Be Becia ecia ec ecia c Charle C Ch h s Va Va Van an nA Ausd Ausde Ausdel Aus usd dell d


album cover

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SKETCHES Rome, Italy [Summer 2011]: Sketch of building near Vatican City, 20 min., Pen. London, England [Summer 2011]: Sketch of Peter Zumthor’s Serpentine Pavillion, 15 min., Pen. London, England [Summer 2011]: Sketch of Richard Rogers Chiswick Park, 5 min., pen

rome sketch

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serpentine pavilion


chiswick park sketch

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Micro to Macro: Unification through Scales portland community art center

THESIS

PROJECT


MICRO TO MACRO: unification through scales

The Thesis Art Installation was a culmination of information that had been collected throughout the semester from an essay series about modernity and its relationship to Time, Space, and Form & Content as well as information about our individual thesis topics. This information was synthesized into an art installation that began to show our initial positions/concepts of our Architectural Thesis Project. Research has revealed that music has the ability to synchronize its listeners. This is evident when attending a concert: as the music begins, perceptions of the individual as unique tend to lessen, while all attendees begin to merge together to form the interacting “crowd,� synchronized as one through the sounds. My installation sought to represent this ability through the use of music superimposed upon graphic statistical data of the community of East Portland. To highlight this concept, the installation depicts varying layers of synchronization taking place within the musical process through five frames holding translucent diagrammatical maps; these show a scale of layers from the notes on the sheet music to audience listening together. A final map is depicted on the gallery wall, with a single spot of light shining through the frames upon it, representing East Portland’s relationship to the city of Portland as a whole.

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PORTLAND COMMUNITY ART CENTER portland oregon This thesis project emphasized the social sustainability of a community in need through the implementation of a community art center where the individuals may gather and enjoy the visual and performance arts. This program was chosen because of the budgetary cuts to our public schools art programs, which in some cases leads to courses being cut. This becomes a concern because of the research that has been done and subsequent findings linking cognitive benefits with involvement in art programs. The project was designed with the idea of a beacon: something that the community can take pride in, therefore allowing for a sense of ownership which often leads to safer environments. With this in mind, the site was chosen based on local maps of crime rates, levels of vandalism, proximity to schools, access to public transportation, overall walk-ability, and density. These criterions were created to identify a location that represented an area that was in need, while still allowing full access to all of the community.

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PORTLAND COMMUNITY ART CENTER portland oregon Connections, both physical and visual, were the main design strategy for the community center. This was accomplished through both the exterior of the building with vertical fins allowing visual relationships inside, and also the spatial layout of the interior. By allowing these connections, the community center became capable of engaging the community even if you were not directly involved with the activities taking place. This becomes important for a community center because it can start to engage the entire community, not only the active users.

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CAR

CAR

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Site

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CA

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Public access was key for the success of the community center. This diagram depicts the vehicular as well as pedestrian traffic around the site.

Walkability and public access played a key role in the selection of site for the community center. This map shows the walkability for the proposed site in Northern Portland.

With the community center trying to reach as many people in need as possible, crime rates were looked at in order to have the biggest impact. This map shows the crime rates for the proposed site and surrounding area.

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PORTLAND COMMUNITY ART CENTER portland oregon With the desire to attain an engaging interior space to display art works and allow for impromptu performances to take place, the performance hall became a main design feature that starts to break down the large central area to create these spaces. By allowing the performance hall to be augmented in ways to create spaces within spaces, the design was able to create smaller nooks throughout while also inspiring the users and their art.

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PORTLAND COMMUNITY ART CENTER portland oregon

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wall detail

roof detail

fin shading device

steel truss

perforated aluminum vertical shading device

steel i-beam column

perforated aluminum shading device

steel i-beam column glazing

hopper window

tension cable

concrete flooring shading device support arm steel decking steel support steel i-beam column

perforated aluminum vertical shading device

hopper window concrete slab on grade sand

operable shading device mechanism

gravel drainage pipe

foundation detail

The goal behind these details was to create a building that appeared to effortlessly carry itself. For this reason, the columns were placed two feet behind the exterior building envelope in order to hide them when viewing the exterior of the building. This led to problems limiting the thermal break of the building envelope because of mechanical vertical shading devices. The solution to this problem was to attach a support arm for the shading devices directly to the concrete floor slab with an insulated bracket that helps limit thermal transfer.

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Charles Van Ausdell Email: cvanausdell@hotmail.com Phone: (503)545-6608


Architecture Portfolio