Issuu on Google+

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO CHARLENE LIAW


CONTENTS CURRICULUM VITAE URBAN GREEN _ York ECO _ York DESIGN + COMMUNITY _ Leeds Herd Farm Activity Centre Masterplan + Campsite Proposal RURAL LANDSCAPE DESIGN _ The Lake District Torver Common Visitor’s Centre LANDSCAPE DESK STUDY + CHARACTER ASSESMENT Otley, Leeds WRITTEN WORK Critical Study

Venice, 2013


CURRICULUM VITAE CHARLENE CHRISTOPHER LIAW

Landscape Architect charlene.cliaw@gmail.com +447783225608 http://charleneliaw.wix.com/charleneclandscape

I see myself as a chameleon; adaptable to change and open to new experiences, blending into unfamiliar surroundings in a natural and sensitive way. My cultural upbringing in the East and growing up in a developing country has inspired me to work around improving and creating people oriented places. It has also led to my interest in landscape architecture’s potential in wildlife and environmental conservation. I enjoy the process of conceptual exploration, engaging with communities and I aspire to thrive in the working environment, weaving together my interests and skills.

STUDY BACKGROUND

2011 - CURRENT Leeds Metropolitan University BA(Hons) Landscape Architecture 2010 - 2011 Institut Sinaran, Malaysia A-Levels Business Studies Economics Law

SKILLS AND PROGRAMS Adobe Photoshop Adobe InDesign SketchUp AutoCAD Teamwork Sketching

PERSONAL INTERESTS Writing Reading novels Travel

OTHER NOTABLES

March 2014 - CURRENT Asset Skills Student Ambassador Bursary for a group project involving community engagement with an activity centre based in Leeds


URBAN GREEN ECO _ York

“It calls back a time when there were flowers all over the Earth, and there were valleys, and there were plains of tall green grass that you could lie down in - you could go to sleep in... and there were blue skies, and there was fresh air... and there were things growing all over the place.� Silent Running (1972)


EXISTING SITE

INITIAL RESPONSE

The city of York is made up of many layers of history. The site, situated in the historical core of the city, is surrounded by carparks and unproductive spaces. This has greatly undervalued the image of the city.

Historical core

Context

Due to geographical reasons, the site is at risk of flooding. Could this be a threat or an interest?

Carpark domination unproductive use

Forgotten River Foss

Potential riverfront regeneration

Flooding threat or interest?

There is a potential to bring people closer to their rivers and to give the people of York a reason to be proud of their city inviting visitors into the city to celebrate its rich cultural heritage in a 21st century setting.

Lack of interest

Flood risk

Flood warning area Pedestrian Intensity High Moderate Low Pedestrian Zone

Flood alert area Area affected by pedestrian route


CONCEPT The brief was to design a New City Civic Park for the historical city of York. An ecological approach was taken in this project highlighting landscape architecture’s role in mitigating climate change through resilient design. Inspired by the Tansy Beetle which can only be found by the River Ouse in York. It is dependant on the Tansy plant for food and cannot fly, making it difficult for it to look for their only source of food, the Tansy plant. The concept of the design embraces the resistance of living organisms in the midst of change.

PHYSICAL MODEL exploration Model exploration using home made dough, experimenting with undulations and flooding areas.

climate change

extinction

NATURE TAKES CONTROL

resistance

SCHEMATICS Proposed undulations

Proposed pedestrian circulation

Floodable area


ECO _ York. Towards A Resilient York EYE OF YORK/PICCADILLY ST. REGENERATION

EDUCATIONAL GREENHOUSE

FLOODABLE SQUARE RIVERFRONT REGENERATION SHARED SPACE, DECREASING CAR TRAFFIC


ZOOMED IN DETAIL +10.3 +9.7 +9.1

+8.5

+8.5 (existing)

+8.08 +7.66 +7.24

+9.0

KEY

+6.5 +7.0 +7.5

+8.0 +8.5

Proposed greenhouse

Existing Foss barrier

Accessible waterfront steps

Shrubs

Floodable water square

Proposed planting beds

Steps

Grass mound

Terraced area to allow for flooding

Grass lawns

River Ouse

Proposed PRUNUS avium

Existing trees Resin bonded recycled aggregate Yorkstone seating Accessible ramp


OPEN SQUARE A multifuntional space where people can meet and socialise. The space is a climate resilient space that transforms into a water square during times of flooding.

RIVERFRONT REGENERATION Bringing people closer to their rivers. The green areas as a whole helps provide a space for people to run, cycle and walk in a biophilic setting.


PROPOSED GREENHOUSE To educate people of the importance of nature conservation, as they sweep their way through the wonder and strangeness of variety of species from different parts of the world. Like the Sheffield Winter Gardens, a modern take of botanical gardens, giving the site a point of interest in the city.


Normal Situation SECTION A - AA During normal situations the square is a social hub where people can meet and gather. It is also a multifunctional space for various people oriented activities such events, live music, and festivals.

Celebration of Flood SECTION A - AA To solve the problem of flooding, the open square transforms into a water square when flood occurs on an average of 15 days per year. This makes it a climate resilient and dynamic setting and attract children and families to come out to play.

CROSS SECTIONS


CONSTRUCTION DETAILS An ecological approach in choice of materials. using recycled content and cut and fill system. Fluid forms of the design make use of fluid materials to prevent material wastage and save cost. Locally sourced material such as Yorkstone is also used on the waterfront steps. All dimensions in mm


PLANTING SPECIFICATION

Planting table

Attracting wildlife and encouraging movement through the site with the use of waves of planting borders. The desire lines of the planting inside and outside of the propose greenhouse are a continuous fluid flow of movement.

Symbol

Latin Name

Common Name

Height M)

Spread (M) Pot size

Quantity Bed1

Quantity Bed2

Planting Notes

Maintenance Notes

A

ACHILLEA millefolium

Yarrow

0.5

0.5

0.5L

0

13

Divide evenly in Apr

Cut back after first flowering to encourage secondary flush in late summer. Revive old clumps by lifting, splitting, and replanting in spring

Cg

CAMPANULA glomerata

Clustered bellflower

0.5

1

2L

17

0

Divide evenly in Mar-Apr

Cut back after flowring to prevent self-seeding and encourage second flush of flowers.

PERENNIALS

Cs

CENTAUREA scabiosa

Greater knapweed

1

0.5

1L

12

23

Propagate by seed

No pruning required

Dc 1

DAUCUS carota

Wild carrot

0.6

0.08

1L

26

157

Plant Mar-Jul

No pruning required

Gv

GALIUM verum

Lady’s bedstraw

0.5

0.5

1L

18

0

Propagate by seed or division

No pruning required

Gs

GERANIUM sanguineum

Bloody cranesbill

0.5

0.5

2L

21

0

Plant seeds Mar-May, Divide Mar-May

Remove flowered stems and old leaves to encourage the production of fresh flowers and leaves

Sg

SOLIDAGO ‘Goldenmosa’

Goldenrod ‘Goldenmosa’

1

0.5

1L

13

0

Divide plants in Mar-May

Remove flowered stems to prevent self seeding

So 1

SANGUISORBA officinalis

Great burnet

1.5

0.5

2L

29

0

Raised from seed in spring/ autumn. Divide clumps in sprint/autumn

No pruning required

Divide plants in Sept-Nov

Cut back after flowering to maintain shape or leave seedheads over winter

So 2

STACHYS officinalis

Betony

1

0.5

2L

0

16

Ss

SEDUM spectabile

Ice plant

0.5

0.5

2L

0

27

No pruning required

T

TANACETUM vulgare

Common tansy

0.9

0.45

0.7L

0

39

Divide in Mar-May

Remove flowered stems to prevent self seeding

V

VERBENA bonariensis

Purple top

2.5

0.5

2L

22

16

Plant seeds Mar-Apr

My be damaged in winter frost. This may be avoided by leaving dead stalks until spring, when new growth is evident before cutting back. Protective mulch should be added around them in autumn with leaf mould or compost.

L

SHRUBS LAVANDULA angostifolia

Lavender

1

0.6

1.2L

0

8

Plant in spring

Cut in Apr-Jul. Remove dry flower stalks in late summer. Cut back shoots in early spring by approximately 2.5cm, avoiding cutting into old wood.

7

17

Divide in early summer

Cut back old stems to the ground in early spring before growth resumes

Dc 2

GRASSES DESCHAMPSIA cespitosa

Tufted hair grass

1.5

1

2L

F

FESTUCA ovina

Sheep’s fescue

0.3

0.2

2L

71

58

Divide Mar-May

Clip plants right to the ground after flowering has finished

St

STIPA tenuissima

Mexican feather grass

1

0.5

2L

39

46

Divide in spring or by division in spring

Cut back leaves when they die off in late autumn.


DESIGN + COMMUNITY Herd Farm Activity Centre

“A critical aspect of the present-day crisis in education is that children are becoming separated from daily experience of the natural world, especially in larger cities.� -Robin C. Moore and Herb H. Wong (2007)


THE SITE Natural beauty and setting

Potential outdoor education

Herd Farm Activity Centre 20 m in

m

ut

10

es

in ut es

Leeds City Centre

Historical value

Herd Farm is a 16 acre site surrounded by woodland and rolling grassland set within a countryside setting. It is located 4 miles North of Leeds and is situated close to Eccup Reservoir, sharing the boundary with Harewood Estate. The centre itself is a Grade II Listed former working farm. In 1999, it was converted into a DDA Compliant outdoor education centre, offering activity days and 42 accessible bed residential experience targeted at young people from Leeds aged 10-19. The Farm is owned and operated by the Leeds City Council.

Accessibility issues


BRIEF “To design a unique and bespoke experience by creating an accessible campsite, allowing visitors of all abilities to immerse themselves within the natural landscape. In addition, our aim is to eventually develop the general cohesion of the site and introduce new, exciting and educational experiences to Herd Farm.”

COMMUNITY CONSULTATION We were given the opportunity to engage with different users of different abilities at Herd Farm Activity Centre mainly for young people of Leeds. We consulted a few groups and this helped inform the design stages, from consultation, individual design process, all the way through to group decision making in terms of design and output for an external exhibition.

OUTCOMES • Emergency Vehicular Access • Sensory Features (Lighting/ Water) • Outdoor Eating • Campfire • Parents Retreat • Livestock • Sense of Play (Folly) • Night Time Activities • Something for Everyone!


INDIVIDUAL DESIGN concept drawings

The design is driven by the idea of paracosm - a reality made up by children complete with its own geography, history and language. The theme embraces the idea that young children need to free range and to explore their inner imaginarium.


INDIVIDUAL PROPOSAL CURIOSITY LEADS TO ADVENTURE


BOG AREA

CATTERPILLAR AND SCULPTURE BOARDWALK

SECRET DOOR ADVENTURE


GROUP RESOLUTION Oscar The Owl

Herd Farm Vision

Campsite Proposal

The scheme of the masterplan aims to unify the site by blurring boundaries between the restrictions that currently exist. The proposed interventions embrace the natural beauty of the site, offering an educational, engaging, and memorable experience for young people of Leeds, bringing them closer to natural environments.

Oscar The Owl drawn by Luc Guralp Stargazing Visual drawn by Joe McCallion

The tale of Oscar The Owl, the driving force of the design. The story inspires young children to be adventurous and open to exploration.

Overall Masterplan drawn by Kristian Reay

Luna Lodge aims to strip back the distractions of modern life through the use of a subtle material palette allowing the user to engage with the surrounding natural beauty. The design has drawn influence from the Tale of Oscar The Owl which portrays the importance of ambition, curiosity and determination, The interventions within and surrounding Luna Lodge provide a safe platform for self exploration for children.


EXHIBITION DISPLAY + OPENING NIGHT “When I saw the finished article, I was immensely impressed with the vision, energy and designs in response to our discussions and aims of developing such a Project... I have found the students nothing less than thoroughly professional and polite and first class ambassadors for the university.� - Tony Edwards. Current manager of Herd Farm Activity Centre


RURAL LANDSCAPE DESIGN Torver Common

“In all things of nature there is something of the marvelous.” - Aristotle


THE SITE


GROUP TORVER MASTERPLAN COMMON VISITOR CENTRE The Vision:

MASTERPLAN

3.

Proposed land uses and activities Proposed Visitor’s Centre Chosen due to its location in a woodland setting and its relatively flat landform which has a biggest variety of species.

- To provide a functional, user friendly and safe place in a tranquil setting. - To preserve the natural woodland and native species of Great Britain. - Creating an aesthetically suitable visitor’s centre which the public can utilize as well as

Proposed Woodland Woodland surrounding the carpark to provide a natural visual barrier separating the carpark to the visitor’s centre allowing visitor’s to immerse themselves in a natural setting. Extending the existing woodland to create a more diverse and dramatic entrance to the higher points on site. On the west side, a proposed woodland acts as a natural fence to shield the existing commercial and residential areas of Torver.

immerse themselves in woodland history. - Enable people to have an experience of their own within the natural habitat. - Introducing a woodland walk through Torver Common which will include installations and sculptures reflecting parts of The Lake District history.

Car Park The car part is situated as shown due to the fact it is accessible from the nearby main road, and uses the existing access route currently provided. It is also partially surrounded by the existing woodland so will not be visible from the visitors centre and the east side of Coniston Water.

- The visitor’s centre will be the hub of Torver Common, attracting people to visit for not only the experience of the woodlands and views, but also to the facilities such as the cafe becoming a place of Zen of all ages.

Cafe and Outdoor Seating Providing a place for people to take a break from the cold or just to relax whilst in the woodland setting.

Concept Plans

Sculpture Park Scattered around the site, commissioned land artists will have the opportunity to exhibit their work adding interest to the various trails.

1.

Trails Providing a naturalistic experience for visitors and tourists who come into the site and allowing them to immerse themselves in nature without feeling like they will get lost. They are named after culturally relevant areas in the surrounding area of Torver Common. Playground A small, safe and enclosed zone located next to the onlooking cafe will be developed into a natural looking playground made from local materials to entertain children while their parents are occupied with the visitors. Learning Facilities Interactive activities that aim to inform visitors about components that make up the landscape around them by providing constant information around the site, both indoors and out. This will be achieved by placing informative plaques around the trails, along with having boards of information appealing to all ages inside the visitors centre. Shop Within the visitors centre there will be a shop to purchase a range of items, including postcards with the land art seen across the site. Visitors will also be given a chance to buy educational books about the landscape and habitats of The Lake District.

+Views overlooking the lake +Interesting topography and landform +Landscape variety and habitat. e.g: The tarns +Nearest to the community centre (garage and shops) and main road for proposed car park.

-Topographically challenging for disabled access. -Strong wind exposure -Not much woodland surrounding the area.

2.

Key: Proposed Visitors Centre Site Car Park Existing Tarns Campbell Circuit Waterside Walk

1:2500

Peter Rabbit Path Swallow & Amazon’s Strole Ruskin Ramble Main Entrance

+ Picturesque views of the lake + Flat land +Good soil/ground conditions +Easily accessible to main road -Furthest away from the Coniston woodland area

Vehicle Access A593 Viewpoints Playground

Gaby Lebetkin/ Lottie Wellesley/James Shore/ Charlene Liaw ED208 BA(Hons) Landscape Architecture


Individual Detailed Design


ESCAPISM PAVILION Balance between man and nature, complementing each other, not against each other. A juxtaposition of man made area and natural area, where people can escape to within the woodland setting.

CROSS SECTION


Existing

Proposed Pseudotsuga menziesii

Larix decidua

Canopy layer Quercus petraea Betula pendula Betula pubescens Alnus glutinosa

Understorey Luzula sylvatica Hyacinthoides non-scripta Shrub layer Corylus avelanna Juniperus communis

A

PROPOSED WOODLAND


OTLEY LANDSCAPE ASSESSMENT


Historical/Cultural

Ecological

Overall Value

Visual

4

3

2

3

3

2

4

2

2

2 4

3

4

2

4

4

2

3

3

2

3

Area

Naturalness

Diversity

Rarity

Total

Score

1

4

3

2

3

12

3

2

1

2

2

4

9

2

3

1

2

2

4

9

2

4

1

2

2

4

9

2

5

4

2

3

4

13

2

6

1

1

1

3

6

2

7

1

2

3

3

9

2

1=0-5

8

5

1

1

1

8

2

2 = 6 -10

9

5

4

5

5

19

4

3 = 11 - 15

10

2

3

4

5

14

3

4 = 16 - 20

Scale

4

4

4

Ref no.

3

3

4

3

3

2

2 4

3

3

3

2

4

4 3

2

Ref no.

Sustainability

Age/ Maturity

Stability

Designated sites

Total

Score

Ref no.

Memories

Pattern

Sounds

Settlement

Enclosure

Total

Score

Ref no.

Ecological

Historical/ Cultural

Visual

Total

Score

1

4

4

5

5

18

4

1

5

2

1

1

1

10

2

1

3

4

2

9

3

2

3

5

3

2

13

3

2

2

3

4

4

2

15

3

2

2

3

3

8

2

3

5

5

5

2

17

4

3

2

3

5

4

3

17

4

3

2

4

4

10

4

4

4

5

5

3

17

4

4

2

3

4

4

2

17

4

4

2

4

4

10

4

5

5

5

4

3

17

4

5

3

4

4

1

1

13

3

5

2

4

3

9

3

6

5

5

5

5

20

4

6

5

4

5

4

2

20

4

6

2

4

4

10

4

7

3

3

3

4

13

3

1=0-5

7

4

3

2

2

4

15

3

1=0-5

7

2

3

3

8

3

1=0-3

8

4

3

3

5

15

3

2 = 6 -10

8

2

1

4

4

4

16

2

2 = 6 -10

8

2

3

2

7

3

2=4-6

9

4

4

5

5

18

4

3 = 11 - 15

9

5

3

2

1

5

16

4

3 = 11 - 15

9

4

4

4

12

4

3=7-9

10

3

3

2

5

13

3

4 = 16 - 20

10

5

2

1

1

1

10

2

4 = 16 - 20

10

3

3

2

8

3

4 = 10 - 12


CRITICAL STUDY


“A study of the factors which correlate to public life in urban environments” There are many major problems faced by inhabitants of the urban environment today and many of these problems have emerged after The World War II where many cities have decided to focus more on rebuilding their cities but neglected the need to build for the human senses. What are the possible factors that led to such negative consequences? Why is it important to look into these principles that make places relate to the human senses? Jan Gehl so eloquently spoke about how we definitely know more about good habitats for animals such as mountain gorillas, Siberian tigers, or panda bears yet there has been very little research put into the study of urban habitats for Homo sapiens (Gehl, 2011). This research paper is aimed at looking into the factors that encourage and deter walkability; what makes a place suitable for the human scale for creating public life and thus creating livable environments for people in cities.

Pedestrian travel is rarely single purpose: in going from one place to another, we stop to buy a newspaper or a bottle of milk; talk to a neighbour, colleague or friend; window shop; have a drink at a pavement café; or, more simply, enjoy a view or watch the ‘world go by’ (Jacobs 1961) famously highlighted that walking as a mechanism that turns roads into streets where social interaction and economic

exchange flourish.

Having said that, people usually enjoy going outside due to what is there. Why is it that it enriches the experience of the walk to go from one place to another and how does it make the journey worthwhile? If we take Copenhagen as an example, there are many old squares such as Gammeltrov, Nytorv, and Amagertorv where there is always on going social activity that encourages people to go outside. Such central social hubs give life to the place that people live in and create a friendly informal place that people can go to interact with one another. This can also be seen in Melbourne as a result of its urban regeneration where people were seen outside not only just walking, but also being part of the city. If there isn’t much of a reason to go to a place, people might be less likely to want to make an effort to go to a place. This can be observed in Brasilia, where every activity is organised and are mono functional. To sum up this chapter, there are many factors that hinder and intrigue people to be part of the city and to interact with the landscape around it and there are many suggested theories of how this could be true. Interestingly, the factors that have been discussed in this chapter creates a wider understanding of the way streets may be improved and that incorporating design based on human scale is a very important aspect in making sure public spaces work to bring life into a place.


Prague 2014


“I’m in love with cities I’ve never been to, and people I’ve never met..” - John Green

Bordeaux 2013


Charlene Liaw BA Landscape Architecture Portfolio