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CHARLEEN H. CHAE THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN

ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO

361.676.8366 :: charleenchae@hotmail.com :: 2513 Seton Ave. Unit 114, Austin, TX 78705


THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN

CHARLEEN H. CHAE ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO


RESUME

CONTACT EDUCATION

361.676.8366 :: charleenchae@hotmail.com :: 2513 Seton Ave. Unit 114, Austin, TX 78705 The University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture Bachelor of Architecture, May 2013 Cornell University Summer College: Architecture, 2007

EXPERIENCE

present :: ISSUE 007 student publication :: student graphic designer Yearly student-run publication that produces a 200-page book on selected student projects from both fall and spring semesters summer 2010 :: Corgan Associates, Inc. - Dallas, TX :: architecture intern (aviation studio) [40 hours/week, 10 weeks] Love Field Terminal Complex Shell Building and Public Area Interiors: construction documents Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport Delta Skyclub: schematic design and presentation documents for project proposal American Airlines Flight Academy MOC move to SOC: field verification, space planning Denver International Airport American Airlines Admiral’s Club: receptionist desk re-design, Sketchup modeling and rendering

SKILLS LANGUAGES ACTIVITIES HONORS AND DISTINCTIONS

AutoCAD, Rhinoceros, Sketchup, Photoshop, Indesign, Revit, Illustrator, laser cutter, CNC router English, Korean 2008-2010 :: AIAS, member 2009-2010 :: Undergraduate Architecture Student Council mentor program, mentor

spring 2010 :: Undergraduate Research Fellowship recipient for travel to Chicago and New York spring 2010 :: exhibited design work at AIA San Antonio fall 2009 :: chosen to represent Design 3 studio at “Good Food” public presentation fall 2008 :: drawings selected to represent student work at school’s NAAB review 2008-2012 :: Texas Exes’ Mary Ann “Sandy” Santleben Lunsford Memorial Scholarship 2008-present :: University Honors student 2008-present :: TEXAS Grant recipient 2008-present :: University Tuition Grant recipient 2008-present :: Federal Pell Grant recipient


VELODROME SERIES PART 1: RESEARCH_FORMATIONS/TRANSITIONS VELODROME SERIES PART 2: DESIGN/MANIUPLATION_TESSELLATING ACCESS VELODROME SERIES PART 3: RATIONALIZATION/REALIZATION_CIRCULATION/TESSELLATION GOOD FOOD: URBAN ORGANIC MARKET AND LEARNING CENTER CITE DU DESIGN: BUILDING SKIN STUDY APERTURE: DIFFUSION OF LIGHT

29 INTERNSHIP LOVE FIELD TERMINAL COMPLEX STEEL BUILDING AND PUBLIC AREA INTERIORS DELTA SKYCLUB PROPOSAL - ATLANTA HARSTFIELD-JACKSON INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT AMERICAN AIRLINES ADMIRAL’S CLUB - DENVER INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT AMERICAN AIRLINES FLIGHT ACADEMY - MOC MOVE TO SOC

39 SHORT PROJECTS CUBE PROJECTIONS INDOOR/OUTDOOR THEATERS ON TOWN LAKE SHOE DECONSTRUCTION SOUND EXTRUSION MATERIAL CONNECTIONS INTERACTIVE WALL CARDBOARD SEAT COLOR COLLAGE ARCHIVE TONE DRAWING

TABLE OF C0NTENTS

05 SELECTED PROJECTS


05

SELECTED PROJECTS


UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SELECTED PROJECTS

VELODROME SERIES

PART 1: RESEARCH FORMATIONS AND TRANSITIONS

An extensive and thorough study of all relationships across each of the seven track cycling races of the Olympic Games was conducted to begin to produce the beginnings of a theory through which to conduct the remaining parts 2 and 3 of this semester-long series centralized around the theme of the velodrome.

RACE COMPARISONS (left) This is a cropped version of the layering of the laps in each race. The races shown here are (from bottom) the Madison, Team Pursuit, Olympic Sprint, and Points races. The different colors indicate different racers of a team or different opponents, and the start and stop of each curved line shows the part that each racer plays in the race. OPPONENT 1 / TEAM: RIDER 1

OPPONENT 2

TEAM: RIDER 3

SPRINT LAP

TEAM: RIDER 2

PACED LAP

TEAM: RIDER 4

ENDURANCE LAP

TEAM: 4 RIDERS TOGETHER TEAM: 3 RIDERS TOGETHER

TEAM: 2 RIDERS TOGETHER

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UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SELECTED PROJECTS PACELINES & ECHELONS

(above) These formations are more commonly used in road cycling or when training in a pack. Wind direction determines their shape so that rotating positions will conserve the energy of the entire group.

PRESENCE IN THE SPRINTER’S LANE (next page - right) Moving upwards and out of the sprinter’s lane is a common strategy used for varying purposes. Lines disappear as riders move upwards, and reappear as they return. Three races are shown: Individual Sprint, Individual Pursuit, and Keirin

RACE RELATIONSHIPS

(next page - left) Seven relationships from each race are shown in plan and then overlayed to illustrate the varying degrees of intimacy between team members or opponents. Races shown: Olympic Sprint, Team Pursuit, Keirin

OPPONENT 1 /TEAM 1: RIDER 1 TEAM 1: RIDER 2 TEAM 1: RIDER 3 TEAM 1: RIDER 4 OPPONENT 2 / TEAM 2: RIDER 1 TEAM 2: RIDER 2 TEAM 2: RIDER 3 TEAM 2: RIDER 4 THIRD OR MORE OPPONENTS PACER (KEIRIN ONLY) *KEY APPLIES TO ‘PRESENCE IN SPRINTER’S LANE’ AND ‘RACE RELATIONSHIPS’

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UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SELECTED PROJECTS


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UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SELECTED PROJECTS


UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SELECTED PROJECTS

PART 2: DESIGN AND MANIPULATION TESSELLATING ACCESS

ELLATING SS

Straight-line relationships are formed between site factors to predict directional behavior of inhabitants of the site. Each line represents the shortest path from one factor to another. The information is then used to determine how program should be placed to provide easy and rational access to different areas of the site. Different colors represent SHIPS ARE FORMED BETWEENentry SITEofFACTORS access towards program, TO andPREDICT the red lines and dots on the plans of each program F INHABITANTS OF THE SITE. EACH LINE REPRESENTS insertion represent the points of entry and THE circulation between them. As program continues E FACTOR TOto ANOTHER. THE INFORMATION IS THEN USED TO more complex so that easy access is change circulation throughout the site, it becomes SHOULD BE guaranteed PLACED TOin PROVIDE EASY AND RATIONAL a number of ways throughout the entire velodrome complex.

EAS OF THE SITE.

INFLUENCING SITE FACTORS E FACTORS: BOTANICAL GARDENS

STREET

STREET

ROGRAM

NS

PROGRAM/SITE CENTER TRAIL

10

TRAIL

BRIDGE RIVER

1. EXISTING SITE

E

PARKING

The site factors represent points from which people enter and interact with the site. They are used in each step of program insertion. The order of these steps are: 1. existing site 2. +velodrome 3. +parking 4. +seating 5. +lockers, healthcare, offices, multipurpose, entrance 6. +health club, cafe 7. +bike shop, mechanical Shown here are the steps that incorporated the most change.


5. +LOCKERS, OFFICES, HEALTHCARE, MULTIPURPOSE, & ENTRANCE

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SELECTED PROJECTS

3. +PARKING

7. +BIKE SHOP & MECHANICAL

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1

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SELECTED PROJECTS

CHANGES MADE FROM THE FIRST PROGRAM INSERTION TO THEPHASE LAST. CHANGES ARE MAPPED IN THREE DIMENSIONS TO CREATE A LAYERED FINAL PRODUCT. NEWLY CREATED ENTRY POINTS AND THOSE THAT HAVE BEEN MOVED ARE IDENTIFIED

PHASE

THE PROGRESSION OF THE EFFECTS OF PROGRAM INSERTION ON CIRCULATION ARE COMPARED

PHASE

1

PHASE 1

IDENTIFIED OFFICES, MULTIPURPOSE, PHASE ENTRY PHASE +SEATING +PARKING +VELODROME

2

2

PHASE

DIFFERENCES IN VERTICAL HEIGHT AT POINTS ARE NEWLY ENTRY CREATED ENTRY ONLY WHERE POINTS HIGHLIGHTED AND THOSE THAT POINTS HAVEARE MOVED. HAVE BEEN MOVED

PHASE 4 PHASE PHASE 2 2

IDENTIFIED

5

PHASE COMBI CHANG

PHASE 53 PHASE PHASE 3

WHERE THE NEW POINTS ORIGINATED FROM AND WHAT DIRECTION THEY MOVED IN ARE REPRESENTED IN LINES

PHASE 4 AND 5 ARE COMBINED TO COMPARE CHANGE VS. STATIC.

PHASE

PHASE

3

3 5

RELATION TO THEM. PHASE 7 IS A COMPILATION OF THE PREVIOUS PHASES PHASE 4 AND 5 ARE TO COMPARE COMBINED TO AND COMPARECONTRAST THE CHANGE EFFECTS VS. STATIC. OF EACH STUDY COMBINED

PH

6

SURFACES ARE CREATED BY THE LINES FROM PHASE 5 SO THAT THE PATHS OF CHANGING LINES CAN BE OBSERVED IN RELATION TO THEM. PHASE 7 IS A COMPILATION OF THE PREVIOUS PHASES PHASE 4 AND 5 ARE TO COMPARE CONTRAST THE COMBINED AND TO COMPARE CHANGE VS. STATIC. COMBINED EFFECTS OF EACH STUDY

PHASE7 7

WHERE THE NEW POINTS ORIGINATED FROM AND WHAT DIRECTION THEY MOVED IN ARE REPRESENTED IN LINES

PH

SOME POINTS REMAIN WHERE THE NEW POINTS STATIC FOR UP TO THREE ORIGINATED FROM AND WHAT INSERTIONS DIRECTION THEY MOVED IN ARE REPRESENTED IN LINES

Points of entry defined by evaluation of site and placement of program have been connected to create a continuous network of circulation between each piece of program. These points evolve as additional program is added to the site. The following eight phases are a progression of studies compare SURFACES ARE that CREATED BY THE LINES FROMtoPHASE 5 SOChanges THAT THE the ENTRY changes made from the first program insertion the last. arePATHS OF NEWLY CREATED POINTS ANDmapped THOSE THAT SOME POINTS REMAIN CHANGING LINES CAN BE OBSERVED IN WHERE THE NEW POINTS in three dimensions to create a layered final product. HAVE BEEN MOVED ARE STATIC FORAND UP TO THREE ORIGINATED FROM WHAT RELATION TOTHEY THEM. PHASE 7 IS A IDENTIFIED INSERTIONS DIRECTION MOVED IN PHASE 1 - the progression of the effects of program on circulation COMPILATION OF THE PREVIOUS PHASES AREinsertion REPRESENTED IN LINES PHASE PHASE are compared TO COMPARE AND CONTRAST THE PHASE PHASE 2 - newly created entry points and those that have been moved COMBINED EFFECTS OF EACHare STUDY identified PHASE 3 - where the new points originated from and what direction they moved in are represented in lines PHASE 4 - differences in vertical height at entry points are highlighted only where points have moved PHASE 5 - some points remain static for up to three insertions PHASE 6 - phase 4 and 5 are combined to compare change vs. static PHASE 7 - surfaces are created by the lines from phase 5 so that the paths of changing lines can be observed in relation to them SURFACES ARE changed CREATED BY THE LINES PHASE 8 - a clear distinction between what has changed or hasn’t FROM SO THAT is determined. The gray is what stayed the same, and thePHASE blue is 5what has THE PATHS OF PHASE changed CHANGING LINES CAN BE OBSERVED IN

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INSER

SOME POINTS REMAIN STATIC FOR UP TO THREE INSERTIONS

PART 3: RATIONALIZATON/REALIZATION CIRCULATION AND TESSELLATION

2

4

PHASE

6

PHASE CHARLEEN H. CHAE - DESIGN V - SHORTALL

7


IDENTIFIED OFFICES, MULTIPURPOSE, PHASE ENTRY PHASE +SEATING +PARKING +VELODROME

DIFFERENCES IN VERTICAL HEIGHT AT ENTRY POINTS NEWLY CREATED ENTRY ARE HIGHLIGHTED ONLY WHERE POINTS AND THOSE THAT POINTS HAVE HAVE BEEN MOVED AREMOVED.

PHASE 4 PHASE 2 PHASE 4

IDENTIFIED

SOME POINTS REMAIN WHERE THE NEW POINTS STATIC FOR UP TO THREE ORIGINATED FROM AND WHAT INSERTIONS DIRECTION THEY MOVED IN ARE REPRESENTED IN LINES

PHASE PHASE 3

5

SURFACES ARE CREATED BY THE LINES PHASE FROM PHASE 5 SO THAT THE 8PATHS OF CHANGING LINES CAN BE OBSERVED IN RELATION TO THEM. PHASE 7 IS A COMPILATION OF THE PREVIOUS PHASES PHASE 4 AND 5 ARE TO COMPARE AND CONTRAST THE COMBINED TO COMPARE CHANGE VS. STATIC. COMBINED EFFECTS OF EACH STUDY

2

4

INSERTIONS

PHASE

SOME POINTS REMAIN WHERE THE NEW POINTS STATIC FOR UP TO THREE ORIGINATED FROM AND WHAT INSERTIONS DIRECTION THEY MOVED IN ARE REPRESENTED IN LINES

PHASE 4 AND 5 ARE COMBINED TO COMPARE CHANGE VS. STATIC.

PHASE 5 PHASE 3 PHASE 5

PHASE 6 PHASE 6

SURFACES ARE CREATED BY THE LINES FROM PHASE 5 SO THAT THE PATHS OF CHANGING LINES CAN BE OBSERVED IN RELATION TO THEM. PHASE 7 IS A COMPILATION OF THE PREVIOUS PHASES PHASE 4 AND 5 ARE TO COMPARE CONTRAST THE COMBINED AND TO COMPARE CHANGE VS. STATIC. COMBINED EFFECTS OF EACH STUDY

PHASE

5 UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SELECTED PROJECTS

1

PHASE THE LAST. CHANGES ARE MAPPED DUCT.

6

PHASE

7 CHARLEEN H. CHAE - DESIGN V - SHORTALL

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GOOD FOOD

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URBAN ORGANIC MARKET AND LEARNING CENTER

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SELECTED PROJECTS


UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SELECTED PROJECTS

Located in east Austin at the corner of 5th and San Marcos, this small plot of land has great potential for taking after its neighbor, Progress Café, by helping to upgrade the surrounding community’s choice in food. By incorporating a learning center, commercial program, community activities, and a self-sufficient growing system, the goal of “Good Food” was to educate the community of the world’s changing views on how food should be prepared and to promote the betterment of the underdeveloped surrounding neighborhood. People can participate in a number of activities including community gardening, classes on growing, health & eating, and healthy option cooking classes. The development of this site meets the goals of the East Cesar Chavez Neighborhood District.

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UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SELECTED PROJECTS

2 3

Longitudinal section 4 5 6

1

8 4 3 7

Second floor plan

5

9


9

Section cut

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8

11

12

13 14

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First floor plan

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1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

Offices Loading dock Circulation core Restrooms Student lobby Teaching garden Classrooms Deli Market Teaching kitchen Cafe kitchen Cafe Garden storage Community gardens Drainage Commercial gardens Farmer’s market deck

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SELECTED PROJECTS

4

7

10

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UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SELECTED PROJECTS 18

WEST CORNER OF SITE DELI MARKET, UPPER OFFICES, AND CENTRAL CORE


EAST CORNER OF SITE

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SELECTED PROJECTS

TEACHING GARDENS AND CLASSROOMS

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UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SELECTED PROJECTS

CITE DU DESIGN LIN ARCHITECTS - BUILDING SKIN STUDY

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The Platine is one of the projects of the Cite du Design, and its unique building skin encases exhibition spaces, an auditorium, a greenhouse and a library. Structure consists of repeating steel space trusses, removing the need for columns. The concept of the building skin is that of a filter. An equilateral triangle module of different materials is seemingly placed at random intervals throughout the skin. The actual purpose of each triangle is dictated by the need for light by different programmatic elements. Some even contain photovoltaics, and others regulate air circulation or temperature as needed.


6

CITE DU DESIGN:

7

2

1

N III - ULRICH DANGEL TA: JAKE GEORGE

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SELECTED PROJECTS

1

THE PLATINE

+ CHARLEEN CHAE

ST. ETIENNE, FRANCE LIN ARCHITECTS

3

6

1 CONSTRUCTION III - ULRICH DANGEL TA: JAKE GEORGE

DREW FINKE + CHARLEEN CHAE

3

1 1

1

OPAQUE MODULE: 6 MM ALUMINUM SHEET, ANODIZED 50 MM MINERAL WOOL 0.75 MM SHEET STEEL, GALVANIZED 50 MM MINERAL WOOL FELT, WHITE 1.5 MM ALUMINUM SHEET, PERFORATED TRANSPARENT MODULE (FACADE): 6 MM SOLAR CONTROL FLOAT GLASS + 16 MM CAVITY + 6 MM CLEAR FLOAT GLASS FRAME AT FACADE: 120 MM EQUILATERAL TRIANGLE OF 80/40MM STEEL RHS 180/60 MM STEEL RHS ENTRY BRIDGE: 140 MM REINFORCED CONCRETE IN STEEL FRAME PHOTOVOLTAIC PANEL VENTILATION PANEL

2 PARTIAL ELEVATION, SCALE 1 : 20

2

ED 2

ZED 3

RATED E): LASS + LOAT OF

N STEEL

ANGLES AND ECTIONAL INLTAIC TRIANIONS COULD

4 5 6 7

*DETAIL SECTION ONLY DEPICTS ALUMINUM SHEET TRIANGLES AND GLASS TRIANGLES BECAUSE OF LACK OF PUBLISHED SECTIONAL INFORMATION CONCERNING THE AIR VENT AND PHOTOVOLTAIC TRIANGLES. ALSO, DETAILED INFORMATION ABOUT THE MULLIONS COULD NOT BE FOUND.

Partial elevation 2 interior PARTIAL ELEVATION, SCALE 1 : 20

3 4

1 opaque module:

5

3

4

2

DETAIL SECTION*, SCALE 1 : 10

3

5

4 5 6 7

6mm aluminum sheet, anodized 50mm mineral wool 3 0.75mm sheet steel, galvanized 50mm mineral wool felt, white 1.5 aluminum sheet, perforated transparent module (facade): 6mm solar control float glass + 16mm PARTIAL PLAN, SCALE 1 : 20 cavity + 6mm clear float glass frame at facade: 120 mm equilateral triangle of 80/40mm steel rhs 180/60mm steel rhs entry bridge: 140mm reinforced concrete in steel frame photovoltaic panel ventilation panel

4

1

exterior

2

interior

exterior 3

[section model on next page] Detail SECTION section *, SCALE 1 : 10 DETAIL

PARTIAL PLAN, SCALE 1 : 20

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UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SELECTED PROJECTS


UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SELECTED PROJECTS SECTION MODEL, 20” x 8” x 8” at scale 2” = 1’-0” The model is a portion of the detail section drawn with reference to construction photos, images from Detail magazine, and use of construction logic. Materials: museum board, aluminum paper, clear removable tape, acetate sheets

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UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SELECTED PROJECTS

APERTURE DIFFUSION OF LIGHT

Over a hundred modules, consisting of seven isoceles triangles each, are separated into two sizes and held in place by two adjoining layers of plexiglass each. Light first enters the box through the larger modules, travels through a void in between the two “sandwiches” of modules, and then filters through the mass of smaller modules. Because of the angled nature of each module, the light becomes further and further diffused as it travels through the aperture, creating attractive patterns on the inside of the aperture’s box no matter the orientation of the box or light source.

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UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SELECTED PROJECTS


UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SELECTED PROJECTS TOP: view of aperture through the side of the smaller modules MIDDLE: view of aperture through the side of the larger modules BOTTOM: closeup of light diffusion

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UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: FEATURE PROJECTS


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INTERNSHIP


CORGAN ASSOCIATES, INC. :: DALLAS, TX :: ARCHITECTURE INTERN

LOVE FIELD TERMINAL COMPLEX STEEL BUILDING AND PUBLIC AREA INTERIORS A three-week period of the internship was focused on finishing construction documents for submission. The most time was spent on drawing concourse elevations, mock-up drawings, vestibule plans, and correcting red-lines. The images shown display the level of skill attained in AutoCAD from this project.

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CORGAN ASSOCIATES, INC. :: DALLAS, TX :: ARCHITECTURE INTERN


CORGAN ASSOCIATES, INC. :: DALLAS, TX :: ARCHITECTURE INTERN

DELTA SKYCLUB PROPOSAL ATLANTA HARTSFIELD-JACKSON INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT A small team from the Aviation studio undertook a design charette to complete a proposal for the design of a Delta skyclub in Terminal E of the Atlanta Hartsfied-Jackson International Airport. Following the guidelines set by the Lipincott Design Intent Package, Delta’s set palette for each skyclub, a proposal was developed in a week that included a layout in the existing fabric, ceiling articulation options for each of Delta’s seven “programs”, and material choices.

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CORGAN ASSOCIATES, INC. :: DALLAS, TX :: ARCHITECTURE INTERN Passenger flow diagram

PASSENGER FLOW DIAGRAM

Enter

Greet

Play

Recharge

Refresh

Relax

Work

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CORGAN ASSOCIATES, INC. :: DALLAS, TX :: ARCHITECTURE INTERN

AMERICAN AIRLINES ADMIRAL’S CLUB DENVER INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT The American Airlines Admiral’s Club at the Denver International Airport undergoes routine renovations under contract with Corgan. After changes were made to the construction documents, the task of updating the Sketchup model was undertaken by myself. Re-designing the receptionist desk was an additional task which I developed on my own, creating presentation documents of proposals to show at client meetings.

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Magazine rack and lounges

CORGAN ASSOCIATES, INC. :: DALLAS, TX :: ARCHITECTURE INTERN

View towards entrance from interior

Reception desk from entry

Oblique plan of Admiral’s Club

Lounges and path to bar

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CORGAN ASSOCIATES, INC. :: DALLAS, TX :: ARCHITECTURE INTERN

floor vent electric floor box electric ‘tombstone’ light switch outlet thermostat

AMERICAN AIRLINES FLIGHT ACADEMY SPACE PLANNING AND FIELD VERIFICATION The American Airlines headquarters and flight academy in Dallas had recently revealed plans of bringing in a unit of workers from Mesquite, TX. In order to provide adequate space, a team from Corgan’s Aviation interiors conducted an intensive field verification of both existing buildings and then produced space planning solutions to accomodate the needs of the incoming workers. I partcipated in the field verification and drawings process, focusing mainly on electrical and mechanical components.

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CORGAN ASSOCIATES, INC. :: DALLAS, TX :: ARCHITECTURE INTERN


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SHORT PROJECTS


UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SHORT PROJECTCS

CUBE PROJECTIONS DIGITAL SOFTWARE EXERCISES A volume was inserted into a 9” x 9” x 9” cube composed of twenty-seven sub-cubes and then subtracted from the cube to leave a void. The sub-cubes were exploded and pieced together in Rhino and AutoCAD to prepare files for the laser cutter. Each exploded sub-cube was folded with paper and then assembled into the original design. Lastly, a projection of the void was designed through use of extension lines to attach to the finished cube.The main purpose of this semester-long project was to teach skills in AutoCAD, Rhino, InDesign, and Revit.

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UT SOA VC3 VC3

No | | Assignment No Assignment

A04

SOA FallBeaman 2009 . SmithBeaman . Smith . Anderson . McDaris . Nolan FallUT2009 . Anderson . McDaris . Nolan

2 A102

A04

VC3

Assignment No |

UT SOA Fall 2009

Beaman . Smith . Anderson . McDaris . Nolan

A04

2 A102 2 1 A102

A102

1 A102

1 A102

1

Name |

Notes |

Section 2 1/2" = 1'-0"

Name |

1

H. Chae Charleen H.Charleen Chae Notes |

Sections.

Sections.

Level 1 0' - 1 15/32"

Section 2 1/2" = 1'-0"

Level 1 0' - 1 15/32" 2

Date |

Date |

Section 3 1/2" = 1'-0"

Instructor |

12.09.2009 12.09.2009

2

Level 1 0' - 1 15/32"

Section 3 1/2" = 1'-0"

Instructor |

Anderson Anderson

Studio |

Level 1 0' - 1 15/32"

Level 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

2

Level 2 1/2" = 1'-0"

Studio |

Harpman Harpman

Name |

Page |

1

Page |

8 of 14

Charleen H. Chae

8 of 14

Notes |

Plans.

Date |

12.09.2009

Instructor |

Anderson

Studio |

Page |

Ha

7o


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UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SHORT PROJECTS


UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SHORT PROJECTS

INDOOR/OUTDOOR THEATERS ON TOWN LAKE A dramatic grassy slope separates the street from the edge of Lady Bird Lake. Seaholm Power Plant’s old water facility as well as a jogging trail occupy the small strip of land. To cure the site of desolation, a proposal for a theater that would function as an outdoor movie theater as well as a small one-house cinema was made to integrate more of Austin’s developing movie culture into the lakefront.

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UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SHORT PROJECTS Taking advantage of the water’s edge, the form of the building juts out onto the water to provide sweeping views of the lake to people in the downstairs lobby as well as those on the concessions deck.

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UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SHORT PROJECTS

Cross section

Elevation, lake side

Longitudinal section


UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SHORT PROJECTS

View of staircase and both stories

Lobby and entrance to indoor theater

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UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SHORT PROJECTS

SHOE DECONSTRUCTION Investigations of this woman’s casual sandal were conducted thoroughly and intensively by documentation through drawings and deconstruction of the shoe layer by layer. The most intriguing aspect of this shoe was that the woven upper was not molded by its seams, but by its ends, which were glued and held in place underneath the sole. Not only does the woven upper provide shape to the shoe, but it also adjusts to the foot shape of wearer, as the straps are not sewn to each other. The model shown demonstrates this quality.

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UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SHORT PROJECTS


UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SHORT PROJECTS

INTERACTIVE WALL This wall can be interpreted by users in any way they wish. Walk in between the strands, step over them, exit whenever you choose. The concept of this perforated access was inspired by the way in which a pattern of cut slits in vellum reacted when pushed and pulled. These studies (shown on the bottom right) were then translated into a more self-sufficient material to create the final built environment. 48


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UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SHORT PROJECTS


UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SHORT PROJECTS

SOUND EXTRUSION The way in which sound can be interpreted three-dimensionally was the study topic of this project. Observations of one-hour intervals were taken from the sixth-floor corridor off of the atrium at the McCombs School of Business. After studying and documenting the space, sounds that occurred both within and outside of the corridor were mapped in various ways, including the image above. Then, using these maps, a three-dimensional sound projection in the corridor was modeled based on user experience and the overlapping of different sounds.

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UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SHORT PROJECTS


UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SHORT PROJECTS

MATERIAL CONNECTIONS Several pairs of everyday objects were explored to determine a logical connection that best represented the true nature of the materials involved. In this pair, the wire gauze is pulled into its present form by the force that the string exerts on the folds when pulled taut. Above: different views of the final product

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UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SHORT PROJECTS


UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SHORT PROJECTS

ARCHIVE: A STUDIO AND PRIVATE EXHIBIT FOR A SCULPTOR Though an archive for sculptures, this building is a retreat as well as a studio for the client. The four lower floors contain a small studio containing the necessary equipment and several storage/display areas for finished sculptures or works in progress. The tall central staircase of steel and fritted glass provides a soft diffused light for the displays of sculptures. The observation deck at the very top of the tower serves as a place to sketch and calmly reflect on ideas or to relax and free one’s self from “sculptor’s block.” The concept of winding one’s way to the pinnacle of light and space is what spurred the form of this building.

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UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SHORT PROJECTS


UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SHORT PROJECTS

COLOR COLLAGE

Color blocks cut from magazines were cut to form convincing color-transition compositions.

TONE DRAWING

(right)

A cropped portion of a black and white photograph was re-produced using only graphite. 11” x 24” on stonehenge.

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UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN :: B.ARCH :: SHORT PROJECTS 56

CARDBOARD SEAT

A seat in which to comfortably recline and browse through books or catalogues was designed for the Materials Lab. The seat is made only of cardboard, without the use of glue, tape or other fasteners.



Charleen Chae _ architecture portfolio