Issuu on Google+

charity seyer portfolio 2012


table of contents


pg 4

observatory

pg 10

studio durham & harris stowe university

pg 16

jefferson lake

pg 22

history of streets

pg 26

made in the shade: re-fabricating florida’s modern architecture - part 1

pg 34

made in the shade: re-fabricating florida’s modern architecture - part 2

pg 40

digital cartographies foundation

pg 48

tango milonga dance academy

pg 56

transitional discovery: an exploration of autism therapy

pg 64

atlanta history center competition model

pg 68

2012 hok design annual book

pg 72

2011 sustainable year end report

pg 76

hok.com website

pg 80

sketches


01 studio 2008 | observatory location: forest park, st. louis, missouri size: 5,000 ft2 total live/work = 1,200 ft2 constructed public space = 3,800 ft2 program: live/work space for researcher/artist community/public space


concept Through the use of light and reflection during both day and night, the observatory and art installations provide spaces in which one can personally interact with the urban context and landscape surrounding the site. Artists such as James Turrell, Olafur Eliasson, Dan Graham, and James Carpenter were not only inspiration for this project but hypothetical researchers that would temporarily live and experiment within the observatory. Their stay would be on a monthly basis and the work of the artist’s would reflect their interpretation of St. Louis during that time. The artwork, standing as temporary exhibitions placed in or around the lake, would consistently provide visitors of Forest Park new and exciting experiences. It is not only a place for the artists to observe the effects of their artwork on the existing surroundings, but a place for the public to observe the work being done and after completed, act as participants in the experiment. Due to the mirrored surface, the building is meant to blend into the landscape by day, reflecting the seasonal changes and people that inhabit it, as well as reflect the city lights and blending into the urban context by night.


forest park site plan

observatory

planetarium

trees

bowl lake site plan

water

bowl lake site section

reflections


os os

pit al

hh wis

pit al

os

hh

rne

s je

wis

new reflections created by observatory

sc

rne ba

nte r r nte

ce

sc

ien

ce

sc

ien

ce

ce

nte

sc

r

ien

ce

ce

planetarium

nte

ien

ce

ce

planetarium

r

sc

s je

ien

ba

ce

planetarium

wis

ce

nte

r

planetarium

hh

ba rne

s je

ba rne

s je

planetarium

pit al

wis

hh

os

pit al

ba rne

s je

wis

hh

os pit

al

existing reflections off bowl lake

barnes jewish hospital

planetarium

science center

trees

ground level floor plan observatory

7


om inside the site looking out

w to

pede

vie

strian sidew al

k

-64 tate 40 inters

views from outside

cen te

r bri dge

st we

th

ou

scie

we st

h nort

w to

nce

w to vie

vie

w

vie

s to

vie w to st ea

view to south

view to

to

ish

ho

t

vie

w to

r

ba

pede

clayton ro

ad

view to nor

th

walk

clay

n side

ton

stria

site photos matrix

section

vie

view to wes

w

je

road

view

s ne

l

ita

sp

east

east

w to

east

west


exterior walking path at night

reflections during the day

observatory

9


02 building systems 2009 studio durham & harris stowe university location: st. louis, missouri team: charity seyer laura zediker finuf


concept The challenge of these two projects was to take existing buildings, dissect them through drawings and models, and form a comprehensive understanding of the differences between light timber and steel construction. Studio Durham provided information on light timber construction and was to be hand drawn. Harris Stowe University was an example of steel construction and was drawn in AutoCAD. Both projects provided challenges in understanding the structural aspects of each system and the differences between the two building envelopes.


sectional model


hand drawn section and elevation studio durham & harris stowe university

13


sectional model


section and elevation drawing studio durham & harris stowe university

15


03 site planning 2009 | jefferson lake location: forest park, st. louis, missouri size: 55,000 ft2 program: educational exhibitions rain gardens bioswales bioretention basins team: charity seyer shelby ponce jimmy o’loughlin jared marcantoni jodene shwer burcu kamci


concept Due to the many missed opportunities on the site, the goal of the project was to hone in on those possibilities and create an experiential journey, one that was not so much about the actual path taken, but what you are exposed to along the way. Not only was the South side of the lake more neglected by pedestrians, but wildlife and landscape as well. Therefore, we chose this particular space as a challenge in doing just the opposite. The street directly South of the site provided a way of directing pedestrians coming by vehicle to a more hidden parking area off site, in which they would then pass under the road to access the lake. The underground tunnel not only served as a way of connection between parking and the site, but it provided a space for education on what was to come. The interactive walls inform visitors of wildlife, vegetation, and ecosystems that they will find upon exiting the tunnel. Within the site, our focus was on restoring the landscape and ecosystems, attracting wildlife such as birds and fish back to the area. We focused on three types of landscape intervention: bioswales, rain gardens, and bioretention basins. The bioswales towards the Northeast end of the project help maintain an already existing drainage ditch, as well as provide an ecosystem for plants and wildlife to thrive in. The rain gardens not only added aesthetic beauty to the project but kept the existing road’s dirty runoff water from coming in contact with the lake. The bioretention basin was an educational way of physically showing visitors the process in which water is cleaned naturally through stages before draining into the lake. Goals for restoring wildlife activity are achieved through restoring wetland areas with a focus on aquatic plants for fish, and adding pier posts for birds. With every intervention, the end goal of the project was to peak visitors interest and hope they would then take the next steps themselves in better understanding the way infrastructure, landscape, and wildlife can be more unified, and in return create a more fulfilling experience for all.


diagram: missed opportunities

conceptual collage: activity + education

conceptual collage: activity + education


open-water (aquatic bed)

deep marsh (emergent)

shallow marsh (emergent)

wet meadow

scrub / shrub wetland

water depth 3’-7’

water depth 18”-3’

white water lily

soft-stem bulrush

yellow water lily pond weeds

hard-stem bulrush

wild celery

pickerelweed

hydric soil characteristics

burreed northern arrowhead

blue flag iris

pickerelweed

blue vervain

common three square

joe-pye weed

soft-stem bulrush

cattails

sweetflag woolgrass

upland buffer

hydric soil characteristics

water depth 0”-6” water depth 6”-18”

forested wetland

hydric soil characteristics silky dogwood red-osier dogwood highbush blueberry northern arrow-wood

sweet pepperbush spicebush swamp white oak

non-hydric soils white pine eastern hemlock shadblow

red maple

serviceberry

green ash

sweet fern

black ash

gray birch

black gum

gray dogwood

diagram: recreating a wetland edge

jefferson lake

19


bioswales

rain gardens stone sand potting soil gravel

bioretention educational basins

view of jefferson lake upon exiting educational tunnel


site plan

terrace jefferson lake

21


04 urban books 2009 | history of streets location: st. louis, missouri


concept Inspired by the book City Streets, I began to uncover the history of St. Louis through the many different types of road construction during 1897. During this time, the streets of St. Louis differed not only in materiality but also character, creating an eclectic mixture. Today, many layers of asphalt have managed to cover up much of this story. This book was a chance to expose those layers and reveal what once defined St. Louis streets. The book consists of five fold-out booklets contained within a decorated slipcase (19 x 13 x 4 cm) with a cutaway cover and spine. The spine pocket holds a pull-out tab with explanatory text.


history of streets

25


05 studio 2010 made in the shade: re-fabricating florida’s modern architecture part 1 | canopy location: umbrella house designed by paul rudolph sarasota, florida size: 4,500 ft2 program: new canopy for umbrella house team: charity seyer jumi song sara johnson


concept The first part of the project was focused on the partial destruction of Paul Rudolph’s 1954 Umbrella House by re-inventing its canopy. We were to design and prototype a replacement canopy that responded to various site conditions such as landscape, program, solar mitigation, and regional identity. Because Paul Rudolph’s original canopy was treated in a very uniform way with only a change in regularity directly above the pool, climatic analysis in Ecotect was the first step taken in designing a new canopy. Our canopy needed to be flexible enough to allow for direct sunlight and air flow in some areas, but deflect it in others to reduce solar heat gain. Along with climatic analysis, our group worked to develop a prototype that was structural and would allow for flexibility. Paper models were initially built using three techniques: folding, laminating, and expanding. We concluded that a combination of folding and expanding was most beneficial because it gave us more structural stability and variability with the individual unit. In our final prototype, the more porous the unit is from above, the wider it becomes on its side. The opposite is true when the unit is almost closed from the top, allowing no light or air to pass through and becoming very narrow on its side. Both physical and computer models aided in experiments with irregularity, transitions, and edge control. As we jumped scales, materiality, structure, and details became more apparent. The final canopy was to be built with steel structure and CNC milled white aluminum composite panels which would wrap around concealing the structure within. Tension cables would be attached from each unit to provide more structural stability. A full scale mock-up portion was built of the most extreme situation within the canopy to test these decisions. Throughout the functional and methodical development of the project, we always continued to think conceptually about the canopy. We approached the columns as not only structural necessity, but a way of defining more intimate spaces through a forest of columns, and more public spaces with the columns spread out, a concept Paul Rudolph used on his initial canopy as well. This organizational method helped create micro climates and different programmatic and spatial qualities throughout. We wanted the canopy, also like the original, to appear lightweight and delicate, making the transition from ground to column, column to canopy very crucial. Most importantly, the goal was to create a canopy that was an extension of the owners domestic habitat.


rectilinear canopy that shades the entire site expect for the space directly above the pool columns that are in line with the structural framework of the house

an even treatment of shade structure thoughout the length of the canopy - no variety the house itself is designed off of a 32� increment scheme

the canopy hovers over the house & is delicately anchored to the ground - lightweight feeling

diagram: umbrella house with initial canopy

northwest elevation

diagram: unit development

diagram: digital process

southwest elevation

northeast elevation

southeast elevation


canopy that maintains general rectilinear area of original canopy

triangulation of planes determined by structural framework of the house

variations in canopy are in response to climatic conditions

variations in height & width of canopy determined by 32� increments

1.5x .5x

.5x x .5x

X = 32�

diagram: umbrella house with proposed canopy

northwest elevation

southwest elevation

northeast elevation

5% porous

southeast elevation

20% porous 35% porous 50% porous 65% porous 80% porous 95% porous 100% porous

diagram: porosity of canopy

made in the shade: re-fabricating florida’s modern architecture - part 1

29


columns

diagram: assembly process

columns + beams (truss design)

columns + beams + tension cables


west elevation

plan

made in the shade: re-fabricating florida’s modern architecture - part 1

31


view from interior

proposed canopy over pool

northwest elevation


detail of joint

full scale model

full scale model

made in the shade: re-fabricating florida’s modern architecture - part 1

33


06 studio 2010 made in the shade: re-fabricating florida’s modern architecture part 2 | house location: hammock site sarasota, florida size: 1,555 ft2 program: use the canopy system designed in the first part as a starting point and way of informing the design of a new house team: charity seyer jumi song sara johnson


concept In the second part of the studio we were to use the previous canopy study as a starting point to design a new modern domestic scenario on a vacant site in Sarasota, Florida. Our group was given the hammock site, an area with dense trees and extensive bird wildlife. We began by not only questioning the role our canopy could play in this landscape but also by challenging existing conventional ways of living and how one inhabits their home. By building vertically with the landscape, the inhabitant experiences the environment at three very different and unique stages: ground level, most dense level of trees, and the top of the tree canopy. Organization of program was led by this idea, as well as the use of the canopy as a skin. Overlapping program rather than stacking gave way to more verticality and forces circulation to pass through spaces and engage rather than in a confined area. The first level of focus is the ground plane where one enters the house. Rather than immediately approaching the front door, we wanted to create an opportunity for observation and transition before entering. By lifting the house off the ground it not only appears to touch the landscape more delicately, but manages to free up what we felt like was the first important panoramic view for the inhabitant to observe. A series of stairs interrupted by a landing with seating provides a space for reflection and is where the sensation of the tall trees and dense hammock overhead is really experienced. As one enter’s the house and continues upstairs they approach the living room and kitchen. At this height within the landscape, the inhabitant becomes surrounded by the most dense area of trees. Due to the thick foliage, large windows, and double height space inside, the trees outside the house are what begin to define and enclose the spaces within, rather than the physical barrier itself. Also, at this level, exterior walkways and platforms allow the inhabitant to experience the interstitial space between the house and the skin that the canopy creates. After continuing upstairs, the inhabitant reaches the highest level, the top of the tree canopy, serving as the final destination point. Not only is this level unique because one is rarely exposed to it, but it also serves as a new ground plane and the culmination of the project. All three of these unique spaces within the landscape are what drove the design, as well as contributed to our questioning and response to Modern Architecture in Florida and beyond.


ground level floor plan

second level floor plan

ka

ak

my

a

akk

my

canopy walkway and tower park entrance

72

site plan

view from path

sta

te

park rd

upper myakka lake

river

third level floor plan


fourth level floor plan

fifth level floor plan

sixth level floor plan

section made in the shade: re-fabricating florida’s modern architecture - part 2

37


top of tree canopy

north

north

east

south

east

program

circulation

north

east

west

south

south

west

structure

skin

west 54’ [bedroom2] 46’ [platform] 40’ [office] 30’ [platform] 27’ [kitchen] 23’ [living room] 15’ [bedroom1] 8’ [platform]

diagram: organization of program based on site analysis


exterior walkway at 30 feet

exterior platform at 54 feet

section made in the shade: re-fabricating florida’s modern architecture - part 2

39


07

summer studio 2010 | digital cartographies foundation location: barcelona, spain size: 1.350 m2 (approx. 14,500 ft2) program: lobby/entrance cafe/bar exhibition and educational area public archives private research area conference/lecture room administration services


concept Due to the objectiveness of the site the concept of Figure + Background was an idea of beginning to blur the edges, making the interpretation of the site and its purpose more subjective. With this conceptual idea I began to analyze the immediate site as well as the larger context within the city by mapping out building/courtyard as figure/background, and considering each of their properties and relationship to the city. The grain of the city began to directly relate to the building in the sense that the two “legs” touching the ground formed the inverse of a courtyard. Therefore, what is typically the building on the ground plane was instead hung from the two “legs” becoming a suspended courtyard. The suspended built environment starts to play with the idea that instead of courtyard vs. building, it becomes courtyard + building, exterior + interior, open + closed, etc rather than being two separate entities where one forms the other.

building.................................vs................................courtyard solid................................................................................void vertical movement.....................................horizontal movement private..........................................................................public interior.........................................................................exterior closed...........................................................................open protected (from elements)...............unprotected (from elements) volume..........................................................................plane


site plan

concept models

concept collage


concept collage

concept model digital cartographies foundation

43


ground level floor plan

outdoor roof access


third level floor plan

sixth level floor plan

second level floor plan

fifth level floor plan

lower level floor plan

fourth level floor plan

section digital cartographies foundation

45


exterior roof terrace

sectional perspective

view to sea


view from museum

digital cartographies foundation

47


08 studio 2010 | tango milonga dance academy location: buenos aires, argentina size: 2.500 m2 (approx. 27,000 ft2) program: lobby/entrance milonga/multipurpose cafe/bar bookstore administration large studios x2 small studios x3 seminar rooms x2 services


concept Upon initially starting this project I was intrigued by the rawness of tango and how it can take place anywhere, whether it be inside or outside. I was interested in the street culture of Buenos Aires and the new urban condition that the tango creates in an exterior setting such as the one that occurs every Sunday on the corner of Plaza Dorrego. As I looked more closely at understanding the way people interact with an unexpected interruption such as this, the concept gradually became more about bringing this form of “street-life” into the building. By weaving the exterior activity with the interior spaces, the street and sidewalk become a threedimensional event within. Not only did this concept lead me to a sectional method for organizing the program and circulation, but it also began to address an issue more specifically related to the urban fabric of Buenos Aires. Due to narrow passageways, these areas become congested with the combination of pedestrian and vehicular traffic. The only open area in which pedestrians can gather without this complication is in small parks and plazas throughout the city. However, those spaces tend to be destination points rather than unexpected interruptions such as my concept expresses. Therefore, on an urban scale, the project is attempting to capture the ‘other spaces’, an idea the Smithson’s of Team 10 introduced in the 1950s, that are found in everyday situations that give Buenos Aires its strong cultural identity. Many if not most of the activities that are open to the public take place in the street: markets, antique fairs, open air ballets, street vendors, tango dancing, etc, therefore making the ‘street’ one of the most important ‘other spaces’ to focus on. A street is more than just a street in Buenos Aires...the city is defined within them. Finding a balance between the tightly woven urban fabric of the city as well as allowing for exterior space to give back to the public is something my design is trying to mediate. The exterior ideas and goals are also reflected within the interior where more private studios always flow into more public spaces such as the cafe and bookstore. The circulation or ‘interior street’ remains fairly consistent from floor to floor, therefore putting focus on select punches in the interior walls that allow one moving through the more public spaces to momentarily interact with what’s going on inside the private double-height studios.


tango in the street, plaza dorrego

circulation surrounding perimeter | central program

view from down the street

plaza dorrego, san telmo (weekday) plaza plaza dorrego, dorrego, sansan telmo telmo [weekday] [weekday]

central circulation | program surrounding perimeter

plaza dorrego, san telmo (sunday) plaza plaza dorrego, dorrego, san telmo [sunday] [sunday]

circulation intersecting program | program intersecting circulation


unrolled west and south elevations

site plan

SMALL STUDIO

LARGE STUDIO LOCKER ROOMS ADMIN

LARGE STUDIO

MILONGA san telmo market plan of circulation between public streets & more private buildings: how sanchanges telmo plan movement duemarket to an unexpected interruption such as tango in the streets of circulation between

public streets & more private buildings - how movement changes due to an unexpected interruption such as tango in the streets

SMALL STUDIO CAFE/BOOKS SMALL STUDIO LOBBY

translating previous circulation in plan to inform sectional idea: initial translating diagrammatic section ofprevious circulation between public &in private spaces circulation plan to

inform sectional idea - initial diagrammatic section of circulation between public & private spaces

LARGE STUDIO LARGE STUDIO

MILONGA

ADMIN LOCKERS SEMINAR LOCKERS SEMINAR BOOKSTORE

SMALL STUDIO SMALL STUDIO SMALL STUDIO CAFE/BAR/LOBBY

new diagrammatic section of circulation between spaces: public & private more new diagrammatic intertwined, therefore more effectively setting up situations for unexpected interruptions section of circulation

between spaces - public & private more intertwined, therefore more effectively setting up situations for unexpected interruptions

tango milonga dance academy

51


milonga

third level floor plan

sixth level floor plan

second level floor plan

fifth level floor plan

ground level floor plan

fourth level floor plan


large studio

+ 22.38

+ 19.38

+ 16.38

+ 13.38

+ 10.38

+ 7.38

+ 4.40

+ 0.00 - 0.93

section tango milonga dance academy

53


section


+ 22.38

+ 19.38

+ 16.38

+ 13.38

+ 10.38

+ 7.38

+ 4.40

+ 0.00 - 0.40 - 0.93

tango milonga dance academy

55


09

degree project 2011 transitional discovery: an exploration of autism therapy location: st. louis, missouri size: total site = 230,000 ft2 building = 62,000 ft2 public green space = 123,000 ft2 program: lobby administration

-information desk, admistrative offices, nurse’s office, staff room, copy room

speech therapy vocational (sorting) skills therapy fine motor skills therapy social skills (group) therapy occupational therapy art therapy music therapy horse therapy -stalls, tack room, feed room, shop, multipurpose/storage

calming (dark) rooms observation rooms computer lab interactive kitchen lunch room toy room library nap room services


concept The concepts and goals of the project were a direct result in addressing the sensitivity of the clients, the issues of the site, and the importance of programmatic relationships. Many studies show that the earlier a child with autism receives treatment in the areas of struggle, the better they will be able to function in everyday situations, such as school. Therefore, the most important client are children ages two to pre-kindergarten. Special programs and spaces within the building are also aimed at helping the family, and most importantly the parents understand how to approach discipline, education, eating habits, etc differently. The site is not a typical area chosen for this type of research and development due to it’s noise and traffic, but it is close in proximity to the best universities and hospitals in St. Louis and near the metro stop for out-of-state visitors. The site is part of the future Chouteau Greenway of St. Louis, adding an urban design quality to the project and giving the opportunity for children with autism to engage with other children. This provides space for newer ideas such as horse therapy to be added to the program. Open lots surrounding the site also provide for future plans of a school and temporary housing for out-of-state families. Across the street the nearby Armory of St. Louis would be rehabilitated for a gymnasium. Although the program defined most of the interior and exterior spaces, the site is what began to inform the provocative building form during the conceptual stages. The site is surrounded by interstate 64-40 on the North, Grand Blvd on the East, and the large Armory building on the West, therefore making one feel as if they are in a canyon when standing on ground level. The formal idea became about creating a new ground plane, separating the public/service areas from the children, as well as creating an internal environment that would physically protect and acoustically treat much of the outside noise. As the project was further explored in both plan and section, the goal was to create densities of spaces, where the loud activities such as music and occupational therapy, were separated from the more quiet activities such as speech therapy and fine motor skills. Thick walls for acoustics and a “carving� technique was used to form the interior rooms as well as create a series of thresholds, another important aspect when working with children with autism. With the roof being the most public facade, the exterior walls and skylights aided in controlling views and sunlight, two very critical aspects for the development and success of children with autism. The exterior courtyards became a place where the child could step outside after successfully completing their lesson and provide a way for them to still feel connected to the outside world. All of the decisions made throughout the process were with a goal in mind that upon leaving the institution a child with autism will be able to function as independently and confidently as possible, reflecting in their own quality of life and the lives of others around them.


nap room

nurse’s office computer lab

exterior green space

horse rounding pen

moderate activities

loud high-stimulus activities

session room

calm space

fine motor skills

speech therapy

library administrative offices

toy room

social skills (group) interactive cooking employee parking

maintenance

horse trailers

public

trash trucks

service trucks

parent

composite

conference room

copy room

restrooms

administration

break room

art therapy

horse therapy

occupational therapy

music therapy

lunch room

child

quiet low-stimulus activities

70

Blv nd Gra d Blv nd Gra

tate

Inters

Ave

70

Forest Park

diagram: chouteau greenway proposal diagram: parks chouteau greenway proposal barnes jewish hospital

tate

Ave

Inters

Forest Park

d

diagram: programmatic organization

forest park community college parks harris stowe barnes jewishuniversity hospital washington university college forest park community

4

4 tate

rs

Inte

Kingshig

4

te 4

rsta

Inte

hwKin ay gs Blvhig d hway Blv

d

saint louis harris stoweuniversity university site washington university roadways saint louis university

diagram: chouteau greenway proposal

conceptual models

site plan

Inters

tate

Inters

tate

64-4

0

64-4

0

site

metrolink routes greenway roadways expansion route metrolink routes greenway expansion route


view from Grand Ave bridge

metal fin soil with plantings filter fabric reservoir layer with optional aggregate moisture retention/aeration layer insulation drainage/root barrier/protection course layer waterproofing membrane concrete metal decking spandrel drop ceiling glass

cast acrylic panel interior finish raised wood floor insulated metal panel metal studs concrete metal decking metal finish

detailed section transitional discovery: an exploration of autism therapy

59


+0’ to +16’ floor plan

section


private entry

process models

transitional discovery: an exploration of autism therapy

61


public green space & pathway

acrylic panels from street view

section


+0’ to +16’ floor plan

transitional discovery: an exploration of autism therapy

63


10

patterhn design | atlanta history center competition model model building team: charity seyer (lead) brett simon brendan wittstruck jonathan fridberg eric hoffman design team: eric hoffman tony patterson jonathan fridberg


concept This design competition called for a new exhibition wing along with a design solution for the existing facade. By proposing one addition now and one for the future, a balance of four sides is created and the area which is currently used for additional exhibition can be reclaimed as the Center space. The primary entrance is relocated from the north side to the west side of the building. The elongated path of arrival is formed through a series of stepped landscaped terraces, and provides for a much slower transition. In addressing the facade, new darker glazed brick facade acts as a shell to the existing buff brick and in some cases extends into the interior. All of the above design decisions were reflected in the model design. The 7 foot by 2 foot model was built sectionally. This allowed the viewer to see inside the building and really understand the new Center space that would function as the heart of the building. The elevation view on the opposite side shows the existing primary entrance that would be changed to the secondary entrance with a drop-off area in the new design solution. It is here that one can also see how the glossy finish of the new facade interacts with the matte finish of the existing facade. Lastly, the model shows the additional wing and the new entrance from the west side. It reflects the way the landscape has been altered to form the terraced pathway landscaped with orchard trees leading up to the museum.


view into gallery space

north elevation


series of terraces leading up to main entrance

new facade with old facade at drop-off

view from parking garage

section atlanta history center competition model

67


11 hok | 2012 hok design annual book team: valerie greer sarah oppenhuizen charity seyer derek prior john gilmore megan mcclure


concept The 2012 Design Annual is a representation of the best work circulating throughout the firm. The projects, both built work and competitions, reflect the diversity of HOK and show a range in type, scale and location. 120 projects were submitted from 15 office locations for the Annual and 50 were selected for the publication. Criteria for selection is innovation and design excellence. The HOK Board of Directors sponsors the creation of the Annual through the Design Board, as Design Directors are responsible for submitting their best work from the year. 1,800 copies were published through ORO Editions, and an e-book is in process.


opener spread with project description


hok logo detail on cover

labeling detail

plans spread

full bleed closer spread 2012 hok design annual book

71


12 hok | 2011 sustainable year end report team: mary ann lazarus susan baerwald charity seyer


concept With HOK’s commitment to incorporating measurable, sustainable outcomes into everything they do, the Sustainable Year End report provides a way of seeing these results from 2011 and setting new challenges to be accomplished firm wide for 2012. The report provides a breakdown of total LEED certified and registered projects by office as well as market type. In an effort to raise green performance on all projects, LEED Platinum work within the firm and examples of breakthrough sustainable thinking in 2011 are shown with supporting metrics. LEED credentials are measured throughout the firm as part of the People Roadmap Measure. The Sustainable Operations Plan holds each office accountable for operating more sustainably by providing a list of prerequisites to follow and additional examples for more energy efficient ways of working. The results of all offices are shown in the report and examples of new and innovative green operations ideas are featured.


Click on the measures for more detail

2011 Sustainable Report

DESIGN: Raise green performance on all projects

130 2 1 6

This is the 5th annual sustainable report and the 2nd using Sustainable Roadmap metrics. We made progress in all areas. The challenge in 2012 is to improve across all sectors, especially

Total certified projects, 30 new LEED certified, 44 new registered New LEED Platinum projects, including the largest single occupant office building in the world New Board mandate to drive energy performance across all new projects Exemplary breakthrough sustainable projects

PEOPLE: Bring leading edge knowledge to clients

in project energy optimization. Key findings:

63

• HOK Board reinforced our commitment to carbon neutrality by 2030 by adopting important energy performance requirements. • Total number of LEED certified projects was up 20% while new registered projects dropped 32%. • The percent of LEED accredited professionals

Percent LEED credentialed professionals firmwide

PRACTICES: Embody exemplary green operations

1 21

increased slightly despite a drop in total numbers. • 91% of HOK offices are on or above target in implementing sustainable operations.

New LEED-CI Platinum HOK office; 3 registered targeting Gold or Platinum Offices met the Sustainable Roadmap Operations goal

HOK’s Sustainable Commitment: Building on two decades of hands-on experience in sustainability, HOK is committed to incorporating measurable, sustainable outcomes into everything we do.

BacK tO cOver DESIGN: Raise Green Performance on All Projects

130 Total Certified Projects* 30 30

How does HOK compare? The graph below illustrates HOK certified projects vs. all LEED certified projects.

25 25

50%

20 20

40%

30%

20%

15 15

10%

CERTIFIED

HOK

10 10

55 00

97

19

98

19

99

19

00

20

01

20

02

20

03

20

04

20

1997-2010 HOK cERtifiEd pROjEcts Platinum

Gold

Silver

Certified

*Includes LEED, BREEAM and Green Mark projects

05

20

06

20

07

20

08

20

09

20

10

20

11

20

SILVER

USGBC

GOLD

PLATINUM


BacK tO cOver DESIGN: Raise Green Performance on All Projects

Two new projects certified LEED Platinum in 2011

Wellmark Blue Cross Blue Shield, Des Moines, Iowa

HOK Bryant Park, New York, NY

LEED NC Platinum | HOK Chicago

LEED CI Platinum | HOK New York

Wellmark is the world’s largest LEED Platinum

A showcase in integrating BIM and sustainablity in

single-user, owner-occupied corporate office building. An elliptical entry garden and pedestrian walkway area is carved deep into the building’s facade to allow maximum penetration of daylight into the core.

the design process, the New York office incorporates numerous advanced building technologies to optimize daylight and minimize energy costs with a predicted reduction of CO2 emissions by 55 tons annually.

BacK tO cOver PRACTICES: Embody Exemplary Green Operations

People Roadmap Operations Plan Roadmap Measure:Measure

2011 Innovative green operations ideas Most offices have incorporated local innovations to help drive their sustainability message. Here are two 2011 examples:

COMPOSTING - St. Louis Office

100% REPURPOSING - Hong Kong Office

At HOK’s urging, the Metropolitan Square building manager initiated a building-wide compost pilot program adopted by eight tenants and based on the model HOK St. Louis created for its own office. The HOK in-house compost campaign begun in Fall 2011 has already resulted in significant diversion from landfill. This is the first program of its kind in the city of St. Louis.

In its 2011 move, the Hong Kong office was able to repurpose all of its existing furniture to local organizations and schools. In the demolition of the new space, all glass, wood, wood doors, and boxlight fixtures were donated to local recycling and salvage organizations.

100% Recycled

1.05 tons

Building Wide

0% Landfill R , w ECY , an o o L I N G rs d b d, wo o d d o o s ox l i g h t fi x t u re

gla

HOK

al ls oc hoo c

REPURPOS IN rn ing fu iture t G ist ations o l ex rganiz & s o

8.10 tons

ss

AMOUNT OF WASTE DIVERTED TO COMPOST FROM OCTOBER 2011-PRESENT

2011 sustainable year end report

75


13 hok | hok.com website team: lori moran kelly bathe jeannette thompson sharon burton john gilmore megan mcclure charity seyer


concept The primary goals of the new hok.com website were to connect with existing and potential clients, promote HOK in a new and innovative way, and attract outside talent. The layout, transiitions, and navigation tools were highly discussed in an effort to improve upon the usability, usefulness and enjoyability of HOK’s on-line experience. Layouts for desktops, lap tops, ipad’s, and smart phone’s were all adapted in order to still maintain the same aesthetic, but transform to accommodate each form of technology. By featuring projects in multiple markets and regions, the new website displays HOK’s versatility as a global firm. Along with images, “blocks” containing metrics are used on all landing pages in an effort to provide hard evidence reflecting the performance of the designs to visitors. By adding a “People” section, the face of HOK is made public for the first time, displaying leaders of different disciplines throughout all locations. The new hok.com will continue to stay relevant through the website’s flexibility, news feed updates, and social networking connections. The Content Management System (CMS) used to develop the site was designed by TOKY Branding + Design.


united states landing page


people landing page hok.com website

79


14

the observer & the observed 2010 | sketches location: buenos aires, argentina la plata, argentina ouro preto, brazil brasilia, brazil rio de janeiro, brazil


concept This workshop was intended to put us in contact with the urban and architectural cultures in South America, and through discovery and critical observation bring us closer to understanding the ways of thinking and doing in this context. The relationship between the observer and the observed was meant to be intensified through graphic exploration, rather than pre-established historical or theoretical interpretation. The choice of case studies coincided with the array of buildings that were visited on field trips within Buenos Aires, Uruguay, Chile and Brazil. Buildings and practices that were observed all represented different scales, degrees of intervention and the construction of different landscapes.


church in ouro preto

camara legislative districto federal


brasilia cathedral

la plata cathedral

museu de arte moderna

museo xul solar

brasilia president’s offices

recoleta cemetery

casa curutchet

niteroi contemporary art museum sketches

83



Charity Seyer | 2012 Portfolio