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CHARISMA’S BEST ®

MAY 2014

‘How theology saved my life’ What to do when God calls

8 essentials

to look for in a grad school

A Higher Degree

The Spirit-empowered student’s guide to advancing your education

charismasbest.com


CALLED TO SERVE. EQUIPPED TO LEAD. No matter your profession, God calls you to excellence. At Northwest University in Kirkland, Washington, our graduate degrees will help to distinguish you from the rest. You will become a person who is well taught—the one others turn to for answers. That unusual individual who is humble enough to serve, yet confident enough to lead. At NU, we teach with excellence for those who seek excellence. And we do so for the everlasting glory of God.

GRADUATE DEGREES OFFERED AT NU:

• M.B.A. (also online) • Master of Education • Master in Teaching • M.A. in Counseling Psychology • M.A. in International Community Development (also online) • Psy.D. in Counseling Psychology • Master in Ministry (also online) • M.A. in Theology & Culture • M.A. in Missional Leadership • M.A. in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

northwestu.edu 425.822.8266


CONTENTS

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Charisma’s Best Graduate Schools and Seminaries Search through listings for over 200 of the nation’s top Christian programs

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12

Why training Christian leaders through advanced education is crucial to America’s future

After years in a cult, my healing has come from the unlikeliest of places

Are You Equipped to Face the Tide?

By Steve Strang

Charisma’s Best Online

Highlighting the extras available at charismasbest.com

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Am I Really Called?

How to recognize when God calls you to ministry—and how to respond when He does By Leroy R. Bartel

LIGHTSTOCK

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COVER: © ISTOCKPHOTO/GLOBALSTOCK

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How Theology Saved My Life By Kimberly Lyle-Ippolito

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Why Seminaries Are More Valuable Than Ever

Think seminaries have become irrelevant amid our cultural changes? Think again. By Ben Witherington

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8 Tips for Finding the Right Graduate School

How to narrow your choices to find the absolute best fit for you By Eric D. Patterson

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How to Stay Spiritually Sharp While Advancing Your Degree Tips to keep your heart aflame as you pursue God wholly By Thomson Mathew

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Live and in Person: Does It Matter Anymore?

19 pros and cons of distance learning By Sarah Wittcop

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A Wisdom-Based Formula for Success

Why advancing your education isn’t just about traditional ROI By Bob Rodgers

CHARISMA’S BEST GRADUATE SCHOOLS, a Charisma Media publication. Copyright © 2014 Charisma Media. All rights reserved. Printed in USA. Editorial and Advertising offices: 600 Rinehart Road, Lake Mary, FL 32746, Tel: 407.333.0600, www.charismasbest.com. PRINTED IN THE USA

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Welcome

BY STEVE STRANG

Are You Equipped to Face the Tide?

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Perhaps nowhere is the onslaught of anti-Christian thought more evident than in the academic world.

y father was a Bible college professor, which meant I spent most of my early life surrounded by the world of Christian higher education. Though I ended up pursuing a different career path from my father and never went to graduate school like he did (journalists don’t typically earn advanced degrees), his arena undoubtedly left a mark on me. I know the value of advanced education and currently serve on the board of a university. Within the church, advancing your education can often be key. Church leaders generally get advanced degrees, so I know that this kind of preparation is very important, especially in a digital era in which much of the learning can be done remotely. Today, it’s easier than ever for a pastor or ministry leader to straddle the line between academic preparation and realworld experience—and for many, this happens simultaneously as they lead their church while also getting a seminary degree! I’ve met many of these leaders in recent years as Charisma Media partnered with Dr. Mark Rutland and the National Institute of Christian Leadership (NICL), an intensive cohort that’s so high level it can be included in the curriculum for getting an advanced seminary degree. In fact, a high percentage of the students who go through NICL eventually go on to earn an advanced degree. Last year we published the first edition of Charisma’s Best Graduate Schools and Seminaries on the heels of releasing our guide for potential undergraduate students, Charisma’s Best Christian Universities, Colleges and Schools. We continue to receive great feedback from readers and schools alike regarding the Charisma’s Best line, and we’re excited to offer another issue this year to help older students who are contemplating returning to school.

I believe that God desires for every believer to be as equipped as possible to face the increasing tide of anti-Christian thought today. Perhaps nowhere is that onslaught more evident than in the academic world, which is why being prepared—whether via seminary, graduate school or another outlet—is so crucial. The apostle Paul said we should “always be ready to give a defense to everyone who asks you a reason for the hope that is in you,” and often that comes through an advanced education (1 Pet. 3:15). So whether you know God has called you to seminary or you’ve only begun to think about returning to school and getting a degree, I encourage you to use Charisma’s Best Graduate Schools and Seminaries to guide you through the challenging process of finding which school or program best fits your needs. We’ve organized the list by states and included interesting articles that cover the wide gamut of topics associated with advancing your education. To go deeper in your search and find out more information, visit charismasbest.com, which features complete listings of each school plus expert advice on everything from financing your education to scholarship opportunities to online education programs. As the American culture grows increasingly godless, the church has an opportunity like never before to truly be “the light of the world” and “a city that is set on a hill” (Matt. 5:14). But to shine brightly as a church, we also need leaders who are specifically called to equip fellow believers to stem the tide. For many of these leaders, their training ground will come first in the classroom. I pray Charisma’s Best can serve a part in preparing this generation of leaders—which may include you—for such a time as this.

STEVE STRANGis the founder and publisher of Charisma. Follow him on Twitter at @sstrang or Facebook (stephenestrang). 6

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SEAN ROBERTS

Why training Christian leaders through advanced education is crucial to America’s future


CHARISMA’S BEST OnIine ®

Need more information on Christian schools? Visit CHARISMASBEST.COM. Find tips for avoiding mountains of school debt

Discover the pros and cons of both liveand onlineclassroom learning

Get the tools needed to select the best school or program for you

VISIT OUR WEBSITE TO ACCESS

SCHOLARSHIP

MONEY

Questions to Search a ask before database of advancing 200+ Christian your advancededucation education programs

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Watch videos from select Christian schools

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LIGHTSTOCK


| MINISTRY & EDUCATION

Am I Really Called? How to recognize when God calls you to ministry—and how to respond when He does BY LEROY R. BARTEL

T

here are some calls a person can afford to ignore, e-mails that are simply “spam” and text messages that are just idle conversation—even a nuisance. But when God calls, it’s an entirely different matter. He will not be easily put off. In fact, ignoring His call comes at great risk. His summons to service is of utmost importance—a high honor, a holy vocation. Not only is it worthy of our deepest dedication and maximum effort in response, it also warrants the most diligent preparation and excellent performance. If you’ve heard God’s call, what should you do? That’s the question many students wrestle with as they further their education—whether through graduate studies or at a seminary. It’s critical for those involved in ministry within the church or marketplace to have a sense of divine calling to their task and ministry. To understand this calling more, let’s take a look at how Scripture distinguishes between two different types of callings.

The General Call

The general call, issued through the agency of the Holy Spirit, provides a backdrop against which to understand and appreciate a specific call. It is because of the Spirit’s general call that we understand who we are in Christ and the Lord’s ultimate claim on our lives (1 Cor. 1:2631). The general call accents God’s continuing purposes for us, regardless of the particular area cha ri s masbe st.co m

of service to which we are specifically assigned. The general call, first of all, is a call to salvation and eternal life (1 Thess. 2:12; 2 Thess. 2:13-14), a call from darkness to light (1 Pet. 2:9). We are called in a special sense to be the Lord’s—to belong to Him, to be His sons and daughters (Rom. 1:6-7; 9:22-26; 1 Cor. 1:2). A general call is given to discipleship (Mark 8:34-38) and participation in the rich blessings of God’s kingdom (Matt. 22:1-14). Believers are called into the fellowship of His Son (1 Cor. 1:9), to His purpose (Rom. 8:28-30), to holiness (1 Thess. 4:7), to peace (Col. 3:15), to freedom (Gal. 5:13), to participation in Christ’s glory and excellence (2 Pet. 1:3) and to respond in a Christlike way to persecution, suffering and trials (1 Pet. 2:21). Ultimately we are called to heaven (1 Pet. 5:10; Heb. 3:1; Eph. 1:18; Phil. 3:14). What a marvelous calling! It is little wonder that Paul urges us to “walk worthy of our calling” (Eph. 4:1-3; 1 Thess. 2:12, NKJV).

The Specific Call

Scripture not only reveals a general calling, however; it also teaches a specific calling. Paul believed he was called specifically to be an apostle (Rom. 1:1, 1 Cor. 1:1). He even believed that God, in His foreknowledge, established His will for him before his birth (Gal. 1:15-16). Those who are involved in ministry within the church or the marketplace, for that matter, need to feel that what they’re doing is something they have been specifically gifted and 2 01 4 | C H A RI S M A ’S B EST

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called to do. There needs to be a sense of mission and vision—a sense of accountability to God. The Holy Spirit is intimately involved in extending God’s call. When Paul and Barnabas responded to the specific call of God at Antioch, the Holy Spirit articulated it. Acts 13:2 puts it like this: “The Holy Spirit said, ‘Set apart for me Barnabas and Saul for the work to which I have called them’ ” (NIV). Verse 4 confirms the Spirit’s involvement in the call by saying they were “sent on their way by the Holy Spirit.”

How Do You Know If You’ve Been Called?

God’s calling can come to us as uniquely as the different ways people hear His voice. So what are some ways to know He’s actually calling you? Consider the following: 1) Be aware that God calls in a variety of ways. Sometimes the call is extraordinary and miraculous. At other times it may simply be a growing, unavoidable nudge about what a person should do. Both of these can be the authentic call of God. 2) God will often speak to and through others to confirm your call. What a wonderful affirming experience confirmations are, but it should be noted that confirmations are not calls; only God can call an individual. 3) God’s call usually starts where you are. The Lord often uses your current situation 10

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as the basis of your calling, particularly if you’re already serving Him in a specific area (1 Cor. 7:17-24). God leads us sovereignly, providentially, progressively and supernaturally from that point onward. 4) God equips you with gifts that lend themselves to success in the ministry to which you are called. The principle is clear and absolute: Those God calls to a particular ministry, He also gifts to do it effectively. In his book, Your Spiritual Gifts Can Help Your Church Grow, C. Peter Wagner observes, “It is helpful to recognize that a person’s ‘call’ and his or her spiritual gifts are very closely associated. God does not give gifts (that) He does not ‘call’ the recipient to use, nor does He call someone to do something for Him without equipping that person with the necessary gift or gifts to do it.”

What is a spiritual gift? Wagner defines it as a “special attribute given by the Holy Spirit to every member of the Body of Christ according to God’s grace for use within the context of the Body.” This doesn’t mean the “giftedness” a person has been granted is fully developed. There is a need for additional education, training and development to utilize the God-given gift to its full potential.

Called or Anointed?

If you asked a group of Spirit-filled Christians what is important for effective ministry within the church or marketplace, somewhere high on the list would

5 Most Frequently Asked Questions

1) How can I know it’s actually God calling me and not someone else’s idea or suggestion? Sadly, I’ve had conversations with a number of individuals who, after struggling in pastoral ministry of some kind, drew the conclusion that they allowed their home church, a parent or overbearing mentor be the source of their supposed “call.” In each case the result was frustration or failure. When assessing the genuineness of a call, it’s critical to do some personal, c h ar ism asb est . com

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There is a need for additional education, training and development to utilize the God-given gift to its full potential.

be “the anointing.” This term, used a great deal in Pentecostal/charismatic churches, has rich significance but is often misunderstood. Priests and kings in the Old Testament were set apart by anointing for their special tasks (Ex. 28:41; 29:7-9; 1 Sam. 9:15-16; 10:1; 16:1-3, 11-13). Jesus applied the term to Himself in the synagogue in Nazareth when He quoted Isaiah 61:1-2. The anointing was a metaphor used to describe the presence of the Spirit that resulted in a special setting apart and equipping with power for ministry (Acts 10:38). Thus, Jesus of Nazareth became known as “the Messiah” (the Hebrew term) or “the Christ” (the Greek term), both of which mean “God’s anointed one.” This imagery has rich significance for believers today. God anoints believers, setting them apart and equipping them by the Holy Spirit for special tasks. In this sense, it is correct to think of a person who has responded to God’s call for involvement in a particular ministry as needing “the anointing.” The anointing, however, is not a feeling that comes and goes; rather, it is an abiding reality in the person’s life. At times those involved in a ministry may be more aware of God’s presence working through them, but that doesn’t negate the fact of His presence and power at other times, even when it appears much less dramatic. First John 2:27 says, “The anointing which you have received from Him abides in you” (NKJV). So allow this old professor to answer a few questions he’s heard over the years about a divine call based upon his experience.


prayerful searching of your heart while also surrounding yourself with godly, Spirit-led counsel. No one can issue a divine call but God! And when He calls He gifts the person He calls, causes circumstances to work together for good, provides deep heart satisfaction in Christian service and honors the efforts with spiritual fruit. 2) Can’t the Lord just lead me every day? Do I need to have a special sense of calling? The Lord can be expected to lead our lives every day. Proverbs 3:5-6 needs to become our mantra: “Trust in the Lord with all your heart, and do not lean on your own understanding. In all your ways acknowledge him, and he will make straight your paths” (ESV).

church and its history, and consistent with Scripture—within the context of nothing more than vocational choice, consideration of a benefit package and opportunity for professional advancement.

I believe the apostle Paul had the right idea on this one: “If I preach the gospel, that gives me no ground for boasting. For necessity is laid upon me. Woe to me if I do not preach the gospel! For if I do this of my own will, I have a reward, but not of my own will, I am still entrusted with a stewardship” (1 Cor. 9:16-17, ESV). 4) Is it OK to do something else vocationally to financially support my ministry habit? Bivocational ministry has

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What was spent in training and preparation is not wasted time—it is wisely invested time. That being said, however, individuals serving in ministry needs to have a conviction that what they are giving their lives to is in response to a divine call. That conviction will sustain a person through difficult times and reinforce mission-focused and vision-driven effort. Every effective person involved in ministry in the Scriptures operated from the foundation of a divine call. If we are to be effective, it can be no different for us! We need the Lord’s daily leadership and a clear sense of calling. 3) Can’t I just decide what I want to do with my life? Can’t I just decide, for example, to make the ministry my vocation? This question frightens me because I believe it is arrogant. It presupposes a level of personal independence that is alien to authentic discipleship. It also places ministry—which is divinely called, part of the cha ri s masbe st.co m

a rich history in church ministry. Apostle Paul helped support his “ministry habit” with tent-making (Acts 18:1-4). I had an uncle who, in the early years of Pentecostal ministry, never failed to support his gospel efforts in planting many churches with outside employment. My uncle would have agreed with Paul when he discussed this issue. Paul said, “[We] endure all things lest we hinder the gospel of Christ” (1 Cor. 9:12, NKJV).

I have a former student who has devoted his future to the honorable challenge of assisting struggling, small churches back to vibrancy and health by engaging in bivocational ministry. Many of the congregations that dot the countryside and fill our cities began by dedicated servants of the Lord who, with a pioneer spirit, supported their

“ministry habit” with “tent-making.” If we are to succeed in planting churches among unreached pockets of people in our world today, we will need young men and women who are willing to do whatever is necessary to extend the boundaries of the kingdom of God. 5) If I’m really called by God, why do I need any training or education? Won’t He provide everything I need? Shouldn’t I just obey? This last question has plagued the church for centuries. Sadly, it has often resulted in ministry that is passionate but ill-conceived, sincere but shoddy, aggressive but unnecessarily alienating to others. It is an approach that flies in the very face of Scripture. Moses, who sensed a divine purpose for his life, spent years of personal preparation in the wilderness. Joshua was mentored and trained by Moses before assuming leadership of Israel. Samuel’s years with Eli in the temple prepared him to be a prophetic voice and influence between the time of the judges and monarchy. David’s time with the sheep helped him prepare him to “shepherd God’s people, Israel.” It can be argued that even Daniel’s training in the pagan universities of Babylon was used by God. Paul spent time learning with Barnabas and in Arabia in preparation. The 12 apostles learned ministry from listening to the teaching of Jesus and observing Him in action. What was spent in training and preparation is not wasted time—it is wisely invested time. Taking the time and effort to pursue a degree at a university, graduate school or seminary is not wasted. It is really sharpening your “spiritual sword” and preparing yourself for the harvest. If God is calling you, are you willing to answer and do what He calls you to do, regardless of the cost, preparation or where He leads you? May the words of the old apostle become part of our spiritual DNA: “I do not account my life of any value nor as precious to myself, if only I may finish my course and the ministry that I have received from the Lord Jesus” (Acts 20:24, ESV). 3  n ordained minister, LEROY BARTEL, D.Min., A currently serves as dean for the College of Bible and Church Ministries at Southwestern Assemblies of God University in Waxahachie, Texas. 2 01 4 | C H A RI S M A ’S B EST

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| THEOLOGY

After 21 years in a fundamentalist cult, Kimberly Lyle-Ippolito was left broken, confused and uncertain about God and Christianity. Her healing has come from the unlikeliest of places.

How Theology Saved My Life

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BY KIMBERLY LYLE-IPPOLITO

y husband didn’t mean to shake my entire world, but he did. With one simple statement. “I think God is more interested in how we treat each other than in the purity of our theology,” he said casually during a conversation. He thought he was stating the obvious, but I was shocked. His words—along with several other incidents in recent years—made me realize there were significant problems with my belief system. I needed to reexamine what I believed and why I believed it. For 21 years I had been taught that the purity of your doctrine— believing the right thing—was the most important part of the Christian life. Without having right doctrine, you could not hope to be saved or please God. Consequently, I lived in fear. What if I did not have this or that particular doctrine correct? What if there were books of the Bible we did not have that contained crucial information about how to be saved? Was I really “right with God?” Sometimes you don’t know how far off you are from truth until something—even a simple comment like my husband’s—sends a ripple into the fault line of your paradigm. Let me explain.

Just Believe What You’re Told

I was saved when I was 10 years old. I loved God and had a strong desire to serve Him. While attending a commuter college I met and married an older man who had already graduated from a Bible college. He seemed to know so much about God and the Bible that I essentially took what he said as truth. It never occurred to me that he was part of an extreme, fundamentalist splinter group named for his Bible college’s founder. This group mixed fundamentalism, patriotism, racism, legalism and anti-intellectualism into a venomous mix labeled “Bibleco n t in u e d » believing Christianity.” 12

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LIGHTSTOCK


Master of

PASTORAL LEADERSHIP

It wasn’t until after my divorce that I realized this was a cult. That sounds unbelievable, especially since I wasn’t ignorant—I have a Ph.D. in genetics. But when you’re in the middle of it, the paradigm of a cultish culture doesn’t seem all that abnormal. It was almost as if I were schizophrenic. At work in the lab, I used my critical-thinking skills and solved complex problems. At home and at church, I tried to do and believe what I was told—because that was essential to being “right with God,” and I wanted to be “right with God” more than anything

Kimberly Lyle-Ippolito

Questioning does not mean that your faith is weak.

“I’m excited about starting this program because I see a plateau in my leadership skills. I know there’s more. I believe this will challenge me to go to a new level spiritually, academically and personally.” —Greg Preston Fall 2014 MPL participant Executive Pastor, Eastside Community Church, Gahanna, Ohio

An in-service, hybrid degree for busy pastors that allows participants to finish a master’s degree in two years without having to relocate

else. Though at times I tried to ask a few questions, I was always met with a quote from 1 Samuel 15:23—“For rebellion is as the sin of witchcraft.” Now there’s a verse that will stop you from asking questions! I learned quickly that you should just believe without asking questions—because that’s how this group defined faith in God. After 21 years and three children, that marriage ended in divorce, leaving me hurt and confused. I believed divorce was wrong and that if you loved the Lord, you would never get divorced. That was only one of the lies I had been fed that left me broken and bewildered. With three school-aged children to take care of, I felt I could no longer work in the medical research field. I needed to spend more time at home, so I looked for a teaching position at a Christian college that would allow me to stay home during the summers. I prayed that the Lord would still use me, and He answered my prayers. I accepted an associate professor position in the biology department of a college associated with the Church of God—Anderson University, in Anderson, Ind. My three children and I moved to a state where I knew no one, and to a university associated with a church movement I had never heard of.

New Life, New Beliefs

www.agts.edu/link/mtmpl14

At Anderson University (AU), I soon began to absorb the atmosphere of freedom and inquiry prevalent on 14

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campus. After two years of teaching, I married a fellow biology professor at the university. Because I still believed many of the lies I’d been taught, I had a difficult time differentiating between what I had been told the Bible said and what the Bible actually said. Because of how busy I was, I knew it would be difficult to systematically examine all of my beliefs and correct the lies, so I decided it was best to enroll in the School of Theology at AU and pursue a master’s degree in theological studies. This would fulfill both my professional and personal goals. AU is committed to the integration of faith and science, and theological studies would help me to gain the background and understanding I needed to teach my subject in a more holistic fashion. It would also allow me to read and study the Bible with proper guidance and training so I could re-examine my beliefs. So in 2008 I began taking seminary classes. It’s been a long, ongoing journey; I’m only able to take one class a semester, and sometimes not even that. I still have classes to complete for my degree, but what God has done in my life has been remarkable. It’s impossible to cover all the areas He’s brought healing through my classes at AU School of Theology, but here are at three major truths I’ve learned that have continually set me free. 1) It’s OK to ask questions. The first class I took, Theology of Worship, was with Dr. MaryAnn Hawkins. Because c h ar ism asb est . com


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the class was so small—there were only four of us—no question was off limits. Hawkins actually encouraged us to ask hard questions—questions that did not have clear answers. We spent time in the Scriptures. We read what different faith groups believed. And we visited and worshipped with different congregations running the gamut of Protestantism and Catholicism. This class taught me that it was not wrong to ask questions. What a gift! Questioning does not mean that your faith is weak. Plus, I learned that different people of genuine faith can hold different interpretations of particular biblical passages. 2) Seek the whole counsel of Scripture. The School of Theology has also taught me about the nature of the Bible. In my Constructive Theology I class, I was introduced to John Wesley and the Wesleyan quadrilateral—Scripture, tradition, reason and experience. I wrote in one of my papers: “Whereas Scripture, as God’s revelation to us, carries the most authority in matters of faith, it must be interpreted. Wellmeaning, presumably Spirit-led Christians differ in their interpretations of Scripture. This is where church tradition, human reason and personal experience can be brought to bear.” It’s dangerous to interpret Scripture in a vacuum. Indeed, in Greek class I learned about the legitimate challenges in translating Greek texts into English. Much of my previous experience with the Bible had involved proof-texting— taking verses out of context to teach a particular doctrine. I learned to seek out the whole counsel of Scripture. For example, in the parable of the great banquet, the New International Version says, “Then the master told his servant, ‘Go out to the roads and country lanes and compel them to come in, so that my house will be full’ ” (Luke 14:23). In the light of the entire counsel of Scripture, the use of the verb compel in this one verse does not grant Christians license to convert others by force. Because the Bible is God’s revelation to us and it carries authority, it is necessary to interpret it properly. 3) Examine your view of God. Another assignment in my Constructive Theology class was to answer 16

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this question: “How significant is the doctrine of the Trinity in your present ministry context?” My answer at the time was raw, honest and revealing: “I absorbed (whether or not I was actually taught) binitarianism,” I wrote. “God the Father was ‘the bad cop’ and Jesus Christ the Son was ‘the good cop.’ The Father was scary. He was somewhere ‘up there’ waiting to catch me doing something wrong and zap me. The Son died for me and loved me and welcomed little children.” The professor, Dr. Greg Robertson, responded by writing a simple yet heartsearing question across my paper: “What do you believe about God the Father?” That was a tough one. In the days that followed, I met with this professor and together we examined what I’d been taught and why it had led to a false view of God. If God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit are one, then how could God the Father be this terrifying figure who couldn’t wait to send me to hell, yet at the same time send His only Son to die on the cross to save me? In another class, Biblical Foundations of Mission, we studied the missio dei and traced this idea of God seeking relationship and reconciliation with humankind through the Old Testament and the New Testament. To see the theme of God’s love woven throughout Scripture was an antidote to my suffocating fear of God’s wrath. I knew Jesus loved me, but now I knew that God the Father loved me too. Though I didn’t let go of all of the fear immediately, and it sometimes resurfaces at odd moments, it is life-giving to truly believe that God loves you. God cared enough to rescue me from a cult and to bring me to a place where I could serve Him in truth. I am grateful to the faculty of the AU School of Theology for investing so much time and energy in me—and not just in me, but in the numerous other students who cross their paths. Attending seminary has been, for me, a truly life-changing experience. 3 KIMBERLY G. LYLE-IPPOLITO, Ph.D., is a professor of Biology at Anderson University in Anderson, Ind., where she teaches genetics, molecular biology, biochemistry, microbiology, immunology and virology. c h ar ism asb est . com


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TRANSFORMING POTENTIAL INTO EXPONENTIAL Fuller Seminary not only inspires students to discover God’s distinct calling on their lives. Programs like our newly redesigned Master of Divinity give them the tools to respond to the changing needs of the church and world. Fuller empowers students to radically be the presence of Christ in any vocation or context—for life. Fuller offers 20 degree programs—with Spanish, Korean, and online options—through 3 schools, 8 campuses, and 15 centers and institutes. Learn more at exponential-difference.org/charisma

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| SEMINARIES

Why Seminaries Are More Valuable Than Ever

Some argue that seminaries have become irrelevant and unnecessary in light of our culture’s changes. Here’s why those people are dead wrong.

I

n an age of increasing biblical illiteracy, it seems strange to even ask the question, “Why do seminaries matter?” They matter for many reasons, but especially because in an increasingly post-Christian culture, more understanding of Scripture is required—not less—for effective evangelism, preaching and teaching. I often hear preachers say, “I’m no expert in the Bible,” yet they preach from the Word every week. If they aren’t the experts in the Bible for their congregation, then who is? To be an expert in any subject requires being trained under those who are already experts in that field. This is all the more the case with Bible teaching because every English translation of the Bible is already an interpretation of the original language texts. An expert goes back to the original source documents and reads them for Ben Witherington himself. Fortunately, every believer can allow the Holy Spirit to provide insight to and illuminate the Word. Yet how much more would be revealed if we gave the Holy Spirit more to work with? This is why I encourage believers to go to seminary and get properly trained for ministry. One of the problems we face in the church today is a dearth of good leadership—which is a result of people not being trained. Many seminaries now offer vital seminars and courses to shore up the gaps for training leaders, who in the throes of ministry have discovered the ground is shifting under their feet and they are inadequately prepared to deal with such seismic changes in their cultural settings. When a culture becomes less Christian, you don’t need less training to understand and deal with it; you need more. It is ironic that while many believe seminary education is less and less relevant to our current milieu, there is in fact an even greater need for in-depth education and leadership training by experts in the field. And while some pundits are proclaiming the demise of seminaries, major denominations

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in the Wesleyan and Pentecostal traditions are increasingly recognizing the need for better-trained and more well-educated leaders, whereas in the past they had not required seminary training for ordination. Too many pastors today take an “If you can’t beat them, join them” approach to the increasingly non-Christian culture. This results in the dumbing down or watering down of the gospel, the stripping of worship services and sanctuaries of specifically Christian symbols and ideas (to make unbelieving visitors feel more “comfortable”) and the desperate attempt— bordering on pandering—to relate to people where they are rather than challenging them about where they ought to be.   The truth is, we need to boil up the people, not water down the gospel. We need to tease their minds into active thought, but for that to happen pastors must have enough intellectual training, spiritual juice, and homiletical and apologetical skill to show the continual relevance of the gospel to any and all cultural settings. After all, the New Testament was written by people who lived in and effectively addressed a much more non-Christian culture than ours. And they did not take the tact of oversimplifying the gospel, putting the cookies on the bottom shelf or preaching to the lowest common denominator to reach the lost.    Beyond the desperate need for true leaders and greater biblical understanding, there is a further major reason for going to seminary. At seminary, being spiritually formed in the context of a learning community where knowledge and vital piety are both part of everyday life and indeed of the worship experience itself. In a world of increasingly broken people—indeed, broken Christians—spiritual formation in a community of help, healing and learning is essential for any sort of ministry.   Finally, there is the issue of modeling. It has been said that you become what you admire. Mentoring requires close and personal contact with master teachers and ministers. The 12 disciples didn’t merely hear Jesus once in a while; they traveled with Him, imitated Him, were commissioned by Him and learned to love like Him. This all happened through close, personal contact with the master Teacher. Seminary offers the same intimate setting for modeling—one that’s just as valuable today as ever. 3 DR. BEN WITHERINGTONis an American New Testament scholar, professor of New Testament Interpretation for Doctoral Studies at Asbury Theological Seminary in Wilmore, Ky., and an ordained pastor in the United Methodist Church. c h a r i s ma s be st. com

VISIONS PHOTOGRAPHY

BY BEN WITHERINGTON


| SELECTING A SCHOOL

8 TIPS for Finding

the Right Graduate School Hundreds of graduate schools could help you further your education. Here’s how to narrow your choices to find the absolute best fit for you. BY ERIC D. PATTERSON

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t’s a given that earning a baccalaureate degree can help you throughout life—from providing greater opportunities to higher earning potential. A Pew Research Center study released in February further revealed the power of the bachelor’s degree: College graduates ages 25 to 32 make 50 percent more money than those with only two years of college or a high school diploma. And the unemployment rate for college grads (3.8 percent) is a fraction of that for those with a high school diploma (12.2 percent).

But what about graduate school? Is there a decided difference between earning a bachelor’s and earning a master’s or doctorate? The evidence here is a bit murkier, with arguments for (i.e., more training, professional credentials, academic status) and against (i.e., lost time in the workforce, massive loans). Because “graduate school” can mean anything from seminary to law school to medical school to research-oriented doctorates in the hard sciences, it’s difficult to suggest a one-size-fits-all answer about whether an individual should attend graduate school. If you’re already considering 20

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advancing your degree, however, then these tips on what to look for in a graduate school can help you even more on your journey.

Tip #1: Examine yourself first.

Before you start evaluating schools and programs, start with a hard look in the mirror and ask yourself the following questions: Why do I want to go to graduate school? Am I an undergraduate who needs the additional professional credentialing to pursue my chosen vocation (e.g., med school, master’s in education)? Am I an undergraduate who wants to be on a research track, such

as in the sciences? Am I am professional who wants to increase my earning power and opportunities for management in my career field (e.g., Master of Business Administration or Master of Public Administration)? Am I looking to change careers and need additional schooling? Each of these questions has a subtext: Are you moving away from something or toward something? Sometimes people think graduate school is an escape from something—challenging job market, new career direction, etc. This usually isn’t a recipe for success. However, those who are moving toward something— a research focus, career transition or c h ar ism asb est . com


management opportunity—are more likely to count the costs (financial and other) of graduate study. So why pursue graduate school? What do you want to get out of it?

© I S TO C K P H OTO / V I S UA L S PA C E

Tip #2: Count the cost.

Speaking of costs, what are you actually willing to invest? Later we’ll add to our consideration the real cost of a graduate education, but before you start calculating the dollars and cents, it’s worth considering more generally if you have the personal resources necessary for this investment. Money—whether cold, hard cash, loans or scholarship— is a part of the equation. But so is time—time to take classes, time to be cha ri s masbe st.co m

out of the workforce, time away from family and external commitments, and time to devote your primary energies toward writing, reading and research. There were many times during my doctorate when I excused myself from a dinner with friends to return to the apartment and study or write while my wife continued on to the theater or a party without me. Our income was cut nearly in half when I went back to graduate school, and it was a dramatic change in lifestyle, especially when my wife became pregnant. How much time away from loved ones can you handle? Are you truly willing to endure sacrificing luxuries and changing your lifestyle for a season?

Tip #3: Only consider programs with high entrance standards.

I recently had a staff member telephone a growing online university to see what their entry procedures were like. The recruiter for that university waived academic tests (in this case, the GRE), waived the application fee and even waived the need for an official transcript. They did the simple online application—with no need for any letters of recommendation—over the phone and the student was provisionally admitted on the spot. It was easy— too easy. Do you want to sit in a classroom or participate in an online course with a bunch of individuals with no academic qualifications 2 01 4 | C H A RI S M A ’S B E S T

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faculty you see on the website actually teach the courses you’ll be taking? Are the headliners actually on campus, or are they constantly globe-trotting? If you are a non-traditional student taking courses in the evening, on weekends or via the Internet, will you be stuck with poorly paid adjunct instructors or grad students teaching your seminar? Or will you still receive instruction from the traditional faculty? You can get a sense of this by looking at faculty web pages and seeing what courses they taught over the past few semesters, as well as by viewing unofficial student evaluations of faculty at various websites. What you want is the top faculty at the school to teach the courses that you will take, whether on campus or online.

education programs have scholars and veteran teachers. In my own school (government/political science) we have seasoned practitioners (i.e., a former U.S. attorney general, a former member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, a former diplomat), as well as doctorate-wielding scholar-teachers. The reason that such a mix is important is simple. You need both academic depth as well as professional breadth in order to translate graduate school into employment opportunity. You need to know the latest in the discipline and trends in the workplace. Such a mix prepares you intellectually while also making it likely that you can find an internship, additional grants and scholarships, superior references and perhaps a job offer before you even finish the degree.

Much of your early interaction with a graduate school will be with staff members: recruiters, enrollment managers, student services personnel, graduate advisors and assistants, and the like. You might expect me to suggest that they should treat you sycophantically, as if you were a retail customer and they were working on commission. No! In fact, if they sound more like a used-car salesman than an academic institution, you ought to think twice. If their focus is on making you feel special, like the star of your own little universe, then you should recognize that they are not peddling a graduate education. They are just trying to take your money. A high quality staff will be professional, businesslike, knowledgeable and focus on the features and benefits of the program. They will spend time talking to you about your fit in the program, pre-qualifying your background and experiences, and trying to make it easier for both the university and the prospective student to make a wise decision. Of course, if they do not return your calls or emails in a reasonable manner, then you likely do not want to go there.

Tip #5: Find out how involved faculty are with students.

Tip #7: Take into account what type of classmates you’ll have.

It isn’t hard to make an initial distinction between high- and low-quality programs. whatsoever? Imagine how much remedial work the instructors (usually not tenured professors with doctorates) have to do with such students? It is not hard to make an initial distinction between high- and lowquality programs. High-quality programs have some measure of exclusivity, even if it is just rejecting the bottom quartile of applicants based on low GPAs and low test (GRE, GMAT, LSAT) scores. High quality programs have staff and faculty considering the fit of individual students and their likelihood of success; they do not simply see prospective students as cash in the coffer.

Tip #4: Look for a faculty mix of scholars and practitioners.

Regardless of the type of graduate school, you will need to learn from top-notch academics as well as seasoned veterans. Quality medical schools have research doctors as well as physicians who can heal. Quality law schools have theorists and trial lawyers. Quality 22

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There are other questions to ask about faculty. Does the famous, well-published

You will spend the next two to six years in a cohort of individuals going c h ar ism asb est . com

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Tip #6: Consider how the staff treats you.


through graduate school simultaneously. Who do you want to associate with? Do you want to be in a class of people who couldn’t get into any other program? Do you want to “earn” a degree from an institution with a tarnished academic reputation? Do you want to share your instructional time with individuals who are poorly prepared for class discussion, who have a sense of entitlement, or other vagaries? Of course, there are extremes to this that you should be aware of. At the most elite end of the spectrum are the fullyfunded doctoral programs at top-10 universities accepting only traditional students with immaculate GPAs and test scores, and in these environments it’s possible that some of your classmates will be outstanding researchers but lack social skills. In these cases, “iron will sharpen iron” and you’ll be forced to compete, regardless of whether you leave with friends. The same is true of some professional programs such as an excellent law or medical school. Understand, however, that there are simply too many graduate programs out there accepting poorly qualified students, and these people become a drag on the course. You should see what kind of qualifications your classmates have. Another way to get at this issue is to learn about the school to see if you will “fit” in terms of worldview. There’s a big difference, for example, in the worldview among students who go to a school that is a member of the Coalition of Christian Colleges and Universities compared to those who attend Brigham Young University. Make sure you’re at least aware of this before committing.

© ISTOCKPHOTO/MONKEYBUSINESSIMAGES

Tip #8: Focus on your program’s content, not on whether it’s the cheapest or fastest available.

It is a mistake to start your graduate school search by looking for the cheapest program. “Cheap” is usually not tuition rate, but rather number of credit hours. Unfortunately, mature students who are returning to school often make the mistake of thinking that the quickest degree will be the least expensive and will get them to back into the market the fastest. This is erroneous thinking and has caused thousands of Americans to rack cha ri s masbe st.co m

You want top faculty at the school teaching your courses, whether on campus or online. up massive debts in the past two decades for degrees that the marketplace clearly believes to be substandard. Focus instead on the content of the program. What classes must you take? Is there a core curriculum taught by senior faculty members? Is the school or department known for a particular emphasis, tradition or approach? Do the courses look “normal” (e.g., the same as at competitor schools), or do they have esotericsounding titles? Is there flexibility in the way that electives are offered? Are internships expected? Are there bridges to job placement? Use your common sense. An archaeology program without fieldwork makes no sense. A political science program that doesn’t offer internship opportunities does not pass the smell test. A medical studies program of any kind that doesn’t have an experiential component is likely not credible. In short, if it seems too good (too quick, too cheap) to be good, it probably is. You should be looking for rigor, hard work and excellent preparation, not the lowest common denominator. I can’t help you answer the question of whether you should go to graduate school. But if you are interested in

personal growth, learning more or making a career transition, then perhaps grad school of some sort is for you. Moreover, there are some disciplines— physics, oceanography, engineering, etc.—in which you can almost become boxed out of the field without a graduate degree. Graduate school isn’t for everyone, and it’s certainly not a solution for many of the dilemmas in one’s personal life. It is, however, an excellent way to advance your career and provide you with more opportunities. So if you’re still stuck at the basic question of whether you should go to graduate school, stop asking that question and go through the eight steps listed above. Perhaps taking a careful look at the schools and programs out there, as well as a careful evaluation of the costs and benefits, will help you make your final decision. 3 ERIC PATTERSON, Ph.D., is dean of the Robertson School of Government at Regent University and research fellow at Georgetown University’s Berkley Center for Religion, Peace and World Affairs. He is an expert on foreign policy and international affairs, the author or editor of 10 books, and has spent time at the U.S. Department of State and as an officer in the Air National Guard. 2 01 4 | C H A RI S M A ’S B E S T

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| FAITH & EDUCATION

How to Stay Spiritually Sharp While Advancing Your Degree Higher education doesn’t have to be about just acquiring head knowledge. Here are some tips to keep your heart aflame as you pursue God with body, soul and spirit. BY THOMSON MATHEW

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housands of students choose to pursue graduate degrees each year. In fact, the United States National Center for Education Statistics reported that the number of master’s degrees awarded between the academic years 2000-01 and 2010-11 increased by 54 percent, and doctoral degrees by 37 percent. I’ve spent most of my adult life mentoring students from around the globe. These students are smart, motivated and hardworking, but many have come to me with questions about how to choose the correct graduate program and how to maintain their spiritual health during higher studies. When choosing a graduate program, whether in business, education or theology, it is imperative to do research. You want to understand the culture of the institution and teaching methods used by the faculty. Thomson Mathew Do professors merely lecture or are they willing to mentor students? Do current students believe they are graduating with a respected degree? If you’re seeking a degree specifically in theology, considering the program’s culture is crucial. It’s vital to know the theological beliefs of the institution as well as the faculty. Did you know there are theological schools that do not require professors to believe in God? Many students do not realize how profoundly the theological culture surrounding them can impact their thinking. Make sure you choose a culture that informs your mind and edifies your spirit. Once you have chosen a graduate school, make sure you have a passion for your vocation. Students seeking a theology degree need to have a passion for ministry. It is important to clarify that ministry is not solely based on head knowledge or preaching skills. Ministry is about transforming lives, starting with your own. This transformation brings passion to our lives and allows us to be both knowledgeable and empowered. I have seen many students experience a spiritual attack or 24

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an intense dry season upon entering graduate school. Many begin to question the call God has place on their life, while stress and busyness disrupt their time with God. This is one of the realities that inspired Oral Roberts to establish ORU. He would often quote Bishop J.O. Patterson by saying, “ORU is a place where you can get your learnin’ but keep your burnin’.” So how can you keep this unique blend of knowledge and spirit in perspective during your graduate studies? How can you avoid succumbing to spiritual lethargy? Here are four basic tips to keep in mind. 1) Have a plan to keep an active spiritual lifestyle. Make spending time with God a priority. Whether you wake up early, stay up late or use your time between classes, this is your chance to meditate on the Word of God and set aside the cares and worries of the day. 2) Welcome the Holy Spirit into your life and allow Him to speak to you. The comforting presence of the Holy Spirit will calm you down during stressful times, such as when dealing with deadlines and exams. 3) Get involved with a community of faith. Look for friends and spiritual mentors who can help you flourish. These may include new friends or someone who lives in your hometown. If you leave home to attend graduate school, be prepared to communicate via Skype, FaceTime or other digital means. A good church can give you spiritual friends and a network of supporters. Healthy churches nourish your spirit and can help to sustain you during difficult times. A church can also give you opportunities to meet role models and mentors. Despite your busy schedule, there are many ways in which you can stay plugged in to a local church. Consider volunteering at events, making a short-term commitment to teach children, attending small groups or helping with worship. 4) Take care of your body. This may seem like an odd tip for avoiding spiritual dryness, but our physical well-being is directly connected with our spiritual health. Your body is the temple of the Holy Spirit (1 Cor. 6:19). Even a person on a student budget must be mindful of the importance of proper diet and exercise. Your relationship with God is the most important aspect of your life. Through the flurry of thoughts and obligations that are ever-present while advancing your education, continue to draw near to Him and He will draw near to you (James 4:8). 3 DR. THOMSON K. MATHEWis a third-generation minister. He has served at Oral Roberts University for over 25 years as a professor of Pastoral Care and dean for the ORU College of Theology and Ministry. c h a r i s ma s be st. com


BY

SA RA H

W I T TCO P

Liveand in Person: Does it Matter Anymore? 19 pros and cons of distance learning

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one are the days when college students packed their textbooks in milk crates and moved across the country simply to earn a college degree. Today colleges and universities are providing students with more options than ever to earn their degree without ever leaving the comfort of their own home or favorite coffee shop. The popularity of distance learning has grown significantly over the past few years and is now considered the norm among established brick-and-mortar schools. Most distance learning students are now even invited to participate in their school’s official graduation ceremony and receive the same diploma that on-campus students receive. These online programs have greatly improved since their early beginnings of mail correspondence and lectures on VHS tapes, but as you begin considering this nontraditional learning format, there are some pros and cons to consider before deciding what the best choice is for you and your educational goals.

Pros of Distance Learning

»»Convenience—As a distance-learning student, you have the freedom to set your own schedule and study in the environment you choose. As long as you have a computer and an Internet connection, you can complete course assignments. This flexibility is especially fitting for students who travel frequently or need to plan homework around their busy schedules. »»Affordability—Generally speaking, online colleges and universities offer lower course rates

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c h ar ism asb est . com


LIGHTSTOCK

| ONLINE EDUCATION


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we naturally excel at over others. As a distance-learning student, you have the flexibility to absorb the course material at a speed you are comfortable with. Plus, if you feel like you didn’t fully grasp the lesson information, you can simply repeat the lesson until you feel comfortable moving on. In the traditional classroom, if you don’t successfully understand the lesson you must rely on your note-taking skills and the opportunity to consult with your professor. »»Avoiding the classroom—For some students, attending a regular class and sitting through a lecture isn’t enjoyable. Studying in an online classroom allows you to skip the hours spent in a lecture hall, commuting to campus and fighting for a parking space—and yet still earn your degree. Plus, you don’t have to worry about sleeping in and missing your class. »»No relocation required—In addition to the daily convenience of distance education, students who opt to earn a degree online aren’t forced to pack their bags and move to a new area. This learning format is especially beneficial to adult students who have an establish job or a family and simply have no desire to move.

Cons of Distance Learning

»»Lack of a personal relationship with professors/instructors—Unlike in the traditional classroom, students studying online will most likely not have the opportunity to naturally form a relationship with their professors. In my experience, only a few professors in my online classes were personable and willing to connect with me c h ar ism asb est . com

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than traditional brick-and-mortar schools, plus you won’t be paying the overhead cost of room and board or campus fees. When researching distance-learning programs, take time to compare prices and ask about available scholarships and financial aid. »»Customize your education— Throughout my college career I have had the experience of studying in a traditional classroom, as well as at a distance. There were aspects of each learning format that I enjoyed and appreciated, but I have to admit that distance education was my favorite of the two learning options. I felt like distance education allowed me to customize my learning experience to suit my learning style. I need to be able not only hear information, but also truly absorb it, and that wasn’t always possible for me in the traditional classroom. In my distance-learning courses, I could return to a lesson and cover topics that I missed when initially receiving the information. Take advantage of the flexibility of distance education and don’t be afraid to customize your learning experience if you determine that this is the format that works for you. »»Work at your pace—We all learn at different speeds and have subjects that

»»A variety of degree program options— These days, distance education provides students with access to a variety of degree program options. From the associate to the doctoral level, you can explore a wide range of educational topics and program levels to shape your professional goals. »»Accredited degree—The accreditation of a college or university is very important when considering a school. Fortunately, most distance education programs are now accredited and offer students the same quality education they would receive through an on-campus program. The Department of Education provides an online list of accredited higher education institutions (ope.ed.gov/accreditation/). Be sure to verify that the school you’re considering is accredited. »»Transfer credits—Distance education is a great option for students who plan to attend a traditional university in the future but aren’t ready to enroll immediately following their high school graduation. Courses taken online through an accredited distance education program can be transferred into most colleges and degree programs. Just be sure to verify that the course you’re taking will transfer into your long-term school as the course you are trying to complete and not as an elective course. »»Real world skills—I was extremely satisfied with the quality of education I received through my graduate distance education program, but I was also pleased with the improvement in my ability to communicate effectively online and via email. Through my distance education courses I was forced to communicate my thoughts in a clear and concise manner. These are skills I use every day in the workplace and are highly valued by employers. Effective communication is just one of the real world skills that students naturally gain through learning in a nontraditional classroom.


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you put into the course. This fact requires a great deal of self-discipline on the part of the student. You’ll have access to many of the same materials and resources that traditional students enjoy, but you don’t have a professor or classmates reminding you of deadlines or driving you to complete your assignments. Make sure you have the self-discipline to not only complete your courses, but to actually learn the course material your degree will represent. »»Possible limited support—All schools are not created equally. It’s important to consider the support services that are available to you as a distance-learning student. The distance-learning program I was enrolled in provided me with access to technology support with extended service hours and tutoring services that were available 24/7. Be sure to ask about the support services available to distance education students before you enroll. »»Time requirements—Many people believe the myth that earning their degree online will be easier than studying on campus and won’t require as much of their time. That’s simply not true. You will have to commit the same amount of time to your studies and completing assignments as you would as a student on a traditional college campus. For example, if you’re enrolled in a three-credit, eight-week distance education course, you can expect to spend anywhere from 10 to15 hours a week, depending on the course difficulty and the assignments due that week. Before

you enroll, make sure you have the time to be successful in your courses. »»Difficulty staying focused and motivated—As with any educational program, distance education students must stay motivated. However, these nontraditional students are not surrounded by classmates and professors to keep them motivated and hold them accountable. If you are a distance education student, it’s important to establish relationships with your classmates virtually. While earning my MBA online, I was in a class where I formed close relationships with classmates who were assigned to a group project with me. We were able to encourage each other through emails and online forums, and even offered study tips and advice on our individual projects. »»College experience—Naturally, distance education students forgo the traditional college experience of late-night pizza in the dorm and homecoming football games. If you’re looking for more from your college experience than a degree, distance education is probably not the route you should consider. However, many traditional colleges are now offering online courses and provide their distance-learning students with the same benefits that their on-campus students enjoy.

If you feel unsure about whether online courses are the best option for you, many universities are now offering free, open online courses (often called “massive open online courses”) that will allow you to experience distance education without risk. A quick Internet search will provide you with a list of available courses from credible colleges and universities on a variety of subjects. No matter what, if you have set your sights on a college degree, don’t let your fears and uncertainties stop you. Earning your degree will require hard work and dedication, but if you clearly outline your goal and the path to reach it, you can be successful. 3 SARAH WITTCOPearned her MBA online through Liberty University and has continued her education by enrolling in Liberty’s online Educational Specialist degree program. For more information on Liberty University, visit liberty.edu/champions. c h ar ism asb est . com

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as a student; most professors will simply answer your questions and won’t get to know you personally. Because my undergraduate days were spent in a traditional classroom, I missed experiencing those student-professor relationships that didn’t form as an online graduate student. When considering graduate programs, this is not something I felt would affect my graduate studies in a negative way; however, you must consider whether this is a deal breaker for you. »»Cost of technology—Most people have a home computer or laptop, but the cost of technology is something to consider when weighing your education options. Having access to a computer and a consistent Internet connection is important to your overall success as an online student and could certainly spare you a great deal of stress. Depending upon the degree program you choose to pursue, you may be required to purchase software or memberships to online portals to complete your coursework. »»Lack of social interaction—Some students really enjoy interacting with people and naturally learn better from these interactions. If you’re like this, distance learning may not be the right choice for you. A few of your course projects may require you to work alongside your classmates, but the majority of your coursework will be completed independently. In my experience there was always at least one classmate in each of my online courses who wanted to connect with fellow classmates. If you desire to connect with your classmates, don’t be afraid to reach out and let them know you are in search of a study buddy. »»Life happens—We all know that what can go wrong often will go wrong. Life doesn’t stop just because you are a student. Some distance education students may find themselves unable to balance their course requirements amid life’s challenges. As a distance-learning student, you must be able to recognize when you are in over your head and be willing make the necessary adjustments in your life, even if that means withdrawing from a class. Fortunately, most online schools offer options to students who find themselves in situations beyond their control and unable to complete their courses. »»Self-discipline is required—When it comes to distance education, you get what


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| FURTHERING YOUR EDUCATION

A Wisdom-Based Formula for Success

Why advancing your education isn’t just about traditional ROI BY BOB RODGERS

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eople change jobs and shift career paths more today than ever before. From my vantage point as a university president, I see this continuing to trend upward, and though it opens exciting new doors, I’m concerned that people take these steps wisely. There are many good reasons people redirect their livelihoods: the shifting job market, major life changes, feeling stuck in a treadmill existence and stretching to reach their full potential. Some chart a new course because they hear God’s voice calling them to follow His will for their lives. Whatever the reason, the decision to embark on a new journey is a bold and courageous move that takes discernment and wisdom. Often the first step in a new direction leads people to investigate and consider the benefits of graduate school. Students of higher learning know the long-term benefits, but the hot debate about the return on Bob Rodgers investment (ROI) of graduate school in mainstream media today can often skew the picture. As traditional ROI logic goes, one should simply calculate whether the value invested (time and money) is commensurate with the long-term return, extended earnings and fulfillment. While this is certainly an important variable to consider, a decision of this magnitude should not rely solely on a monetary calculation. I propose a more comprehensive, wisdom-based formula that involves four key elements. It goes beyond the traditional money-in, money-out thinking and equally factors in the Spirit’s discernment, unique skills and support you need to answer God’s call for your life. Assessment

Do you really need to go to graduate school? If a degree of higher learning is necessary for you to have critical knowledge and skills, then the next decision is where to go. Consider prayerfully who you are, how you learn and what institution 32

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best fits your circumstance personally and financially. Then dive deeper into calling, formation and stewardship. Calling

What are you called to do? What is the Holy Spirit’s inner prompting saying to you about what you should lean into as a new career? Frederick Buechner said, “The place God calls you to is the place where your deep gladness and the world’s deep hunger meet.” Is there a deep gladness that arises in you when you think about your new adventure, or is it simply an idea rooted in monetary gain or relief from a bad situation? This is an important distinction. Seek the counsel of friends, family and spiritual mentors so you can make a sound decision. If the discernment does lead you to a career that requires graduate studies, the second consideration is formation. Formation

Educationally, does the university you’re considering encourage and enable you to grow holistically and in faith? Look carefully into this and ask lots of questions. Don’t be shy. Take time to ensure that your education will not only enable you with the knowledge and skills you need to succeed, but also will help grow and form you into the whole person you want and need to be. Stewardship

This means responsible planning and management of your time, energy and resources as you prepare for the very different rhythm of graduate work. Don’t take on more than you can handle, because you want to reach the end of your journey healthy, happy and thriving—not broken, weary and laden with worry and debt. In the end, all of these factors must work together to generate a formula for success. Think of graduate school as a trip requiring a plan and itinerary. You can take this trip at your own pace, in your own time and set your own personal goals. Everyone’s definition of success is different, so you determine what your own personal ROI needs to be. A wisdom-based ROI is as much about the kingdom as it is about you. If you put the time in to grasp your God-given calling and find an educational community that believes in the whole you and utilizes good stewardship of your resources, your investment will reap far more than money. It will be a harvest of life for the kingdom. 3 BOB RODGERS is the president of Richmont Graduate University in Atlanta. c h a r i s ma s be st. com


Graduate Programs | Designed to fit your schedule.

A graduate education at SEU offers you the flexibility to balance school with commitments at home and at work. Choose from campus-based and online options in areas such as business, human services, ministry, education, and counseling. Our campus-based programs meet during weekday evenings and enable professionals to earn degrees without missing work. Our online programs allow you to study during hours that are best for you. We’ve made it convenient — you make it yours!

Graduate Programs

Doctor of Education

MA in Human Services MS in Professional Counseling MS in School Counseling MS in Marriage & Family Therapy MA in Ministerial Leadership Executive MA in Ministerial Leadership MA in Theological Studies Master of Business Administration Accelerated MBA Master of Forensic Accounting MEd in Educational Leadership MEd in Elementary Education MEd in Arts & Academic Interdisciplinary Education MEd in ESE MEd in Reading Education MEd in TESOL

Our first doctoral program will launch in summer 2014 with the following concentrations: Curriculum & Instruction Educational Leadership in K–12 Schools* Educational Leadership in Christian Schools* Organizational Leadership Contact Dr. Patty LeBlanc, the program’s coordinator, at pbleblanc@seu.edu for program and application details. *

These concentrations are SEU-approved and currently under final development. The SACS prospectus for this concentration will be submitted for approval in 2015 – well in advance of the 2016 concentration course dates.

Lakeland, Florida | 800.500.8760 |

SEU.edu

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HOW WE CHOSE

CHARISMA’S BEST

or many years, Charisma has served not only the Pentecostal/charismatic community, but also the wider evangelical community. Our magazine has consistently reflected that broader scope while remaining true to the interests of our core audience of Spirit-filled believers. Yet over the years the two communities have increasingly overlapped, and today it’s common for churches to have such a blend that any charismatic or non-charismatic ties are virtually indistinguishable. This trend has, for the most part, applied to the Christian collegiate arena as well. Many institutions that were traditionally opposed to the fundamental tenets of Pentecostal/charismatic theology are now more open to things of the Spirit, and their student bodies reflect this shift as well. When we first created Charisma’s Best Christian Universities, Colleges and Schools, we celebrated this by highlighting these schools alongside traditionally Pentecostal/ charismatic undergraduate schools. We’ve continued this approach with Charisma’s Best Graduate Schools and Seminaries as we created another comprehensive list for potential students to use in their search for the best advanced-degree program that fits them. We again worked closely with many of the schools represented here, forming a “blue-ribbon committee” with multiple representatives from them who helped 34

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us shape the product to best serve potential students. As a result, Charisma’s Best Graduate Schools and Seminaries isn’t just an advertising vehicle; it’s our attempt to serve this community with a guide that is informative, authoritative and helps prospective students make a wise decision—including looking at schools and advanced-degree programs they may not have known existed. We began with the final list of more than 260 schools compiled in our original college guide. Of those, we removed any that did not offer master’s or doctorate degrees, leaving us with the current 206 schools. Though the basic listings are free, many colleges paid for an enhanced listing and display advertising so they could tell their story in their own way. And staying true to the vision for this guide, we’ve highlighted with a Holy Spirit dove those schools—regardless of denominational affiliation—that support or are open to Pentecostal/charismatic theology. These are the ones we call “Charisma’s Best.” Though we’ve done due diligence, we can’t vouch for every school. We believe our information is correct and that the schools we’re endorsing merit this; however, we want this to be interactive, so if

we’ve made a mistake, please contact us so that we can make changes in the future. Likewise, if we haven’t included a school that should be listed, send us contact information for that school so that we can research it more and make a qualified decision. More than anything, we hope this listing serves as an invaluable guide during the key process of selecting a school for advancing your education. —Steve Strang, Publisher c h ar ism asb est . com

© ITSOCKPHOTO/RICHLEGG

CHARISMA’S BEST CHRISTIAN COLLEGES


CHARISMA’S BEST GRADUATE SCHOOLS AND SEMINARIES

A L A BAMA Amridge University Montgomery, AL Phone: (334) 387-7000 Website: amridgeuniversity.edu Email: admissions​​ @amridgeuniversity.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nondenominational Beeson Divinity School Birmingham, AL Phone: (800) 888-8266 Website: beesondivinity.com Email: bdsinfo@samford.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Interdenominational Bethany Bible College Dothan, AL Phone: (334) 793-3189 Website: bethanybc.edu Email: cwarden@bethanybc.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Baptist Heritage Christian University Florence, AL Phone: (800) 367-3565 Website: hcu.edu Email: jcollins@hcu.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nondenominational Selma University Selma, AL Phone: (334) 872-2533 Website: selmauniversity.org Email: selmau.admissions​ @bellsouth.net Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nondenominational

ALASKA Alaska Pacific University Anchorage, AK Phone: (800) 252-7528 Website: alaskapacific.edu Email: admissions @alaskapacific.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Methodist

A R I ZONA Gateway International Bible Institute Phoenix, AZ cha ri s masbe st.co m

Phone: (602) 993-5353 Website: gibionline.org Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Interdenominational Grand Canyon University Phoenix, AZ Phone: (800) 800-9776 Website: gcu.edu Email: apply.gcu@gcu.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Nondenominational Phoenix Seminary Phoenix, AZ Phone: (888) 443-1020 Website: ps.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Interdenominational

ARKANSAS Freedom Bible College and Seminary Rogers, AR Phone: (800) 494-7497 Website: freedombiblecollege.org Email: admissions​ @freedombiblecollege.org Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Interdenominational

CA LIFO R N I A A.W. Tozer Theological Seminary Redding, CA Phone: (530) 226-4571 Website: tozer.simpsonu.edu Email: efrydel@simpsonu.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Christian and Missionary Alliance Azusa Pacific University Azusa, CA Phone: (800) 825-5278 Website: apu.edu Email: admissions@apu.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Interdenominational

Bethesada Christian University Anaheim, CA Phone: (714) 517-1945 Website: buc.edu Email: admission@buc.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Pentecostal Biola University LaMirada, CA Phone: (562) 903-6000 Website: biola.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nondenominational California Baptist University Riverside, CA Phone: (877) 228-8866 Website: calbaptist.edu Email: admissions@ calbaptist.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: California Southern Baptist Convention California Lutheran University Thousand Oaks, CA Phone: (877) 258-3678 Website: callutheran.edu Email: clugrad@callutheran.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Lutheran Concordia University Irvine Irvine, CA Phone: (949) 214-3010 Website: cui.edu Email: gradadmissions@cui.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod Fuller Theological Seminary Pasadena, CA Phone: (800) 238-5537 Website: fuller.edu Email: admissions@fuller.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Interdenominational Life Pacific University San Dimas, CA Phone: (909) 599-5433 Website: lifepacific.edu Email: admissions @lifepacific.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: International Church of the Foursquare Gospel

New College Berkeley Berkeley, CA Phone: (510) 841-9386 Website: newcollegeberkeley.org Email: newcollege@aol.com Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Interdenominational Pacific Baptist College Pamona, CA Phone: (877) 622-2921 Website: pacificbaptist.edu Email: pacificbaptistcollege @gmail.com Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Baptist Patten University Oakland, CA Phone: (877) 427-8836 Website: patten.edu Email: admissions@patten.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Interdenominational Simpson University Redding, CA Phone: (530) 226-4606 Website: simpsonu.edu Email: admissions @simpsonu.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Christian and Missionary Alliance Southern California Seminary El Cajon, CA Phone: (888) 389-7244 Website: socalsem.edu Email: thpittman@socalsem.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nondenominational Talbot School of Theology La Mirada, CA Phone: (562) 903-6000 Website: talbot.edu Email: graduate. admissions@biola.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Nondenominational The Master’s Seminary Sun Valley, CA Phone: (800) 225-5867 Website: tms.edu Email: cdixon@tms.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Nondenominational Vanguard University Costa Mesa, CA Phone: (714) 556-3610 Website: vanguard.edu 2 01 4 | C H A RI S M A ’S B E ST

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CHARISMA’S BEST GRADUATE SCHOOLS AND SEMINARIES Email: gradadmissions @vanguard.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Assemblies of God Vision University Pasadena, CA Phone: (626) 791-1200 Website: visionu.net Email: visionuniversityusa @yahoo.com Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Nondenominational World Mission University Los Angeles, CA Phone: (213) 388-1000 Website: wmu.edu Email: admissions@wmu.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Nondenominational

C O LO R A D O Colorado Christian University Longwood, CO Phone: (303) 963-3311 Website: ccu.edu Email: agsadmission@ccu.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Interdenominational Denver Seminary Littleton, CO Phone: (303) 761-2482 Website: denverseminary.edu Email: info@denverseminary.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Nondenominational

D IS T R I CT O F CA NADA Canada Christian College Toronto, ON, CAN Phone: (416) 391-5000 Website: canadachristiancollege.com Email: jennifer ​ @canadachristiancollege.com Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Nondenominational Horizon College and Seminary Saskatoon, SK, CAN Phone: (877) 374-6655 Website: horizon.edu Email: admissions@horizon.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Pentecostal Assemblies of Canada Providence Theological Seminary Otterburne, MB, CAN Phone: (800) 668-7768 Website: providenceseminary.ca Email: info@prov.ca Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Interdenominational Trinity Western University British Columbia, CAN Phone: (604) 888-7511 Website: twu.ca Email: admissions@twu.ca Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Evangelical 36

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C O LU M B I A

American University Washington, DC Phone: (202) 885-6000 Website: american.edu Email: admissions @american.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: United Methodist Apostolic Christian College Washington, DC Phone: (202) 544-6940 Website: apostolicchristiancollege.com Email: registrar ​ @apostolicchristiancollege.com Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Evangelical Wesley Theological Seminary Washington, DC Phone: (202) 885-8600 Website: wesleyseminary.edu Email: contact @wesleyseminary.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: United Methodist Church

FLO R I DA Bethune-Cookman University Daytona Beach, FL Phone: (800) 448-0228 Website: bethune.cookman.edu

Email: admissions @cookman.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Methodist Capital Bible Seminary and Graduate School Boca Raton, FL Phone: (866) 275-8720 Website: bible.edu Email: graduate@lbc.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nondenominational Clearwater Christian College Clearwater, FL Phone: (800) 348-4463 Website: clearwater.edu Email: admissions @clearwater.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nondenominational Evangelical Bible College and Seminary Greenacres, FL Phone: (561) 965-0363 Website: ebcministries.org Email: dpdonally@cs.com Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Interdenominational Faith Theological Seminary and Christian College Tampa, FL Phone: (813) 886-8492 Website: ftscc.org Email: foct@tampabay.rr.com Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Nondenominational Heritage University and Seminary Kissimmee, FL Phone: (407) 348-6200 Website: heritageseminary.com Email: admissions​ @heritageseminary.com Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Interdenominational International Seminary Plymouth, FL Phone: (407) 886-3619 Website: internationalseminary.com Email: info @internationalseminary.com Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Interdenominational

Life Christian University Lutz, FL Phone: (813) 909-9720 Website: lcus.edu Email: administration@lcus.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Nondenominational Logos Christian University Jacksonville, FL Phone: (904) 398-3700 Website: logos.edu Email: lcc.registrar@logos.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Nondenominational Palm Beach Atlantic University West Palm Beach, FL Phone: (888) 468-6722 Website: pba.edu Email: admit@pba.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nondenominational Southeastern University Lakeland, FL Phone: (800) 500-8760 Website: seu.edu Email: admission@seu.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Assemblies of God Vision Christian Bible College and Seminary Clermont, FL Phone: (352) 557-4814 Website: vcbcs.org Email: vcbcs777@gmail.com Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Nondenominational Warner University Lake Wales, FL Phone: (800) 309-9563 Website: warner.edu Email: admissions@warner.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Church of God Zoe University Jacksonville, FL Phone: (904) 743-6166 Website: zoeuniversity.org Email: zoe@zoeuniversity.org Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Nondenominational

c h ar ism asb est . com


CHARISMA’S BEST GRADUATE SCHOOLS AND SEMINARIES

G E O RGIA Beulah Heights University Atlanta, GA Phone: (404) 627-2681 Website: beulah.org Email: admissionsinfo @beulah.org Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Interdenominational Covenant College Lookout Mountain, GA Phone: (706) 820-2398 Website: covenant.edu Email: admissions @covenant.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Presbyterian Church in America New Hope Bible Institute Warner Robins, GA Phone: (478) 953-7898 Website: nhbi.org Email: info@nhbi.org

Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Nondenominational Richmont Graduate University Atlanta, GA Phone: (404) 233-3949 Website: richmont.edu Email: admissions @richmont.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nondenominational

I LLI N O IS Dayspring Bible College Mundelein, IL Phone: (224) 677-7800 Website: dbc.edu Email: info@dbc.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Baptist

FULLER THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

135 N Oakland Avenue Pasadena, CA 91182 800-A-FULLER fuller.edu

Fuller Theological Seminary offers master’s and doctoral level education in theology, psychology and intercultural studies. Fuller is an innovative multidenominational seminary committed to the highest standard in academic excellence, thoughtful

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Greenville College Greenville, IL Phone: (618) 664-7100 Website: greenville.edu Email: admissions @greenville.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Free Methodist Church

Lincoln Christian University and Seminary Lincoln, IL Phone: (217) 732-3168 Website: lincolnchristian.edu Email: info@lincolnchristian.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Church of Christ

Jerusalem University College Rockford, IL Phone: (800) 891-9408 Website: juc.edu Email: admissions@juc.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Interdenominational

Moody Theological Seminary Chicago, IL Phone: (800) 356-6639 Website: moody.edu Email: admissions@moody.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nondenominational

Judson University Elgin, IL Phone: (800) 879-6376 Website: judsonu.edu Email: admissions@judsonu.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: American Baptist

Admissions email: admissions@fuller.edu Twitter name: @fullerseminary Facebook page: facebook.com/fullerseminary Accreditation: Visit fuller.edu/about/ institutional_reports_and_ documents/accreditation/ for list of accreditations Application deadline (fall): 5/16 Admission requirements: Master level programs: bachelor’s, 2.7 GPA; Doctoral level programs: master’s; visit fuller.edu/

Olivet Nazarene University Bourbonnais, IL Phone: (815) 939-5011 Website: olivet.edu Email: admissions@olivet.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Church of the Nazarene

Admissions/ for full list of requirements Student body: 2,650; 62% male, 38% female; 30% full-time, 70% part-time; 70 countries represented Resident status: 2,245 residential; 731 enrolled online Most popular degrees: Visit fuller.edu/academics/ for full list of degrees offered No. online courses: 60 Financial aid: Visit fuller.edu/sfs/ for more information on financial aid

evangelicalism, missional and community diversity, creative engagement with the church and culture, and spiritual formation of men and women for the manifold ministry of Christ and His church.

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charisma’s best Graduate Schools and Seminaries Urbana Theological Seminary Champaign, IL Phone: (217) 365-9005 Website: urbanaseminary.org Email: office@urbanaseminary.org Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nondenominational Wheaton College Wheaton, IL Phone: (630) 752-5000 Website: wheaton.edu Email: gradadm@wheaton.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Nondenominational

Trinity College of the Bible Theological Seminary Newburgh, IN Phone: (800) 457-5510 Website: trinitysem.edu Email: admissions@trinitysem.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Interdenominational Valparaiso University Valparaiso, IN Phone: (800) 821-7685 Website: valpo.edu Email: graduate.school@valpo.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Lutheran

Indiana Anderson University Anderson, IN Phone: (765) 641-4080 Website: anderson.edu Email: info@anderson.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Church of God Capital Bible Seminary and Graduate School Indianapolis, IN Phone: (717) 560-8282 Website: bible.edu Email: graduate@lbc.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nondenominational Grace Theological Seminary Winona Lake, IN Phone: (800) 544-7223 Website: gts.grace.edu Email: enroll@grace.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nondenominational Huntington University Huntington, IN Phone: (800) 642-6493 Website: huntington.edu Email: admissions@huntington.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: United Bretheren in Christ Indiana Wesleyan University Marion, IN Phone: (866) 498-4968 Website: indwes.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Wesleyan Wesley Seminary Marion, IN Phone: (877) 673-0009 Website: seminary.indwes.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Wesleyan

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Iowa Dordt College Sioux Center, IA Phone: (800) 343-6738 Website: dordt.edu Email: admissions@dordt.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Christian Reformed Kingsway University and Theological Seminary Norwalk, IA Phone: (515) 288-2852 Website: kingsway.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Nondenominational University of Dubuque Thelogical Seminary Dubuque, IA Phone: (800) 369-8387 Website: udts.dbq.edu Email: udtsadms@dbq.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Presbyertian

K a n sa s Friends University Wichita, KS Phone: (316) 295-5300 Website: friends.edu Email: learn@friends.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nondenominational MidAmerica Nazarene University Olathe, KS Phone: (913) 971-3380 Website: mnu.edu Email: admissions@mnu.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nazarene c h ar ism asb est . com


CHARISMA’S BEST GRADUATE SCHOOLS AND SEMINARIES Southwestern College Winfield, KS Phone: (800) 846-1543 Website: sckans.edu Email: scadmit@sckans.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: United Methodist

K E NTUC KY Asbury University Wilmore, KY Phone: (800) 888-1818 Website: asbury.edu Email: admission@asbury.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Interdenominational Asbury Theological Seminary Wilmore, KY Phone: (859) 858-3581 Email: admissions.office​ @asburyseminary.edu

Website: asburyseminary.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Interdenominational Campbellsville University Campbellsville, KY Phone: (270) 789-5220 Website: campbellsville.edu Email: admission @campbellsville.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Baptist Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary Louisville, KY Phone: (502) 992-9371 Website: lpts.edu Email: cvharper@lpts.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Presbyterian Mid-Continent University Mayfield, KY Phone: (270) 247-8521 Website: midcontinent.edu

SOUTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY

1000 Longfellow Blvd. Lakeland, FL 33801 (800) 500-8760 SEU.edu

Southeastern University offers more than 50 undergraduate and 14 graduate degree programs, giving students the opportunity to prepare for a lifetime of service in almost any field. Our beautiful campus is located in Lakeland, Fla., within 45 minutes of Tampa and the Disney area of Orlando. Home to more than 3,000 students, SEU prepares you for careers in fields such as education, business, ministry, counseling and human services.

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Email: admissions @midcontinent.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Baptist Southern Baptist Theological Seminary Louisville, KY Phone: (800) 626-5525 Website: sbts.edu Email: admissions@sbtu.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Southern Baptist Union College Barbourville, KY Phone: (800) 489-8646 Website: unionky.edu Email: enroll@unionky.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: United Methodist University of the Cumberlands Williamsburg, KY Phone: (606) 539-4444 Website: ucumberlands.edu

Admissions email: admission@seu.edu Admissions website: seu.edu/apply Twitter name: @seuniversity Facebook page: facebook.com/seuniversity Affiliation: Assemblies of God Accreditation: Visit seu.edu/about/ accreditation/ for full list of accreditations Application deadline (fall): Rolling application process Admission requirements: Master level programs: bachelor’s; Doctoral level programs: master’s, 3.0 GPA Student body: 351; 36% male, 64% female; 46% full-time, 54% part-time;

Email: shelleigh.moses​ @ucumberlands.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Southern Baptist

LOU ISIAN A Evangel Christian University of America Monroe, LA Phone: (800) 346-4014 Website: ecua.edu Email: admin@ecua.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Nondenominational Team Impact Christian University Baton Rouge, LA Phone: (225) 292-1171 Website: tiuniversity.com Email: dean@tiuniversity.com Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Nondenominational

26 states represented, 10 countries represented Resident status: 107 residential; 244 enrolled online Most popular degrees: Visit seu.edu/academics/ programs/ for full list of degrees offered No. online courses: 46 Student/teacher ratio: 19:1 Academic staff with terminal degree: 100% Average class size: 14 Expenses: Tuition/ Fees: $17,820-31,500; Books/Supplies: $1,200; visit seu.edu/admission/ financial-aid4/tuition-and -fees/ for more information on expenses Financial aid: (800) 500-8760

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CHARISMA’S BEST GRADUATE SCHOOLS AND SEMINARIES

M A RYL AND Capital Bible Seminary and Graduate School Greenbelt, MD Phone: (717) 560-8282 Website: bible.edu Email: graduate@lbc.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Nondenominational

Website: gordon.edu Email: admissions@gordon.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nondenominational Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary South Hamilton, MA Phone: (800) 428-7329 Website: gordonconwell.edu Email: admrep@gcts.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Nondenominational

M A SSAC HUS ETTS Eastern Nazarene College Quincy, MA Phone: (617) 745-3711 Website: enc.edu Email: info@enc.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nazarene Gordon College Wenham, MA Phone: (866) 464-6736

M I CH I GA N Calvin Theological Seminary Grand Rapids, MI Phone: (800) 388-6034 Website: calvinseminary.edu Email: admissions @calvinseminary.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate

VANGUARD UNIVERSITY

55 Fair Drive, Costa Mesa, CA 92626 • (714) 556-3610

Description: Vanguard University is a private, Christian university of liberal arts and professional studies equipping students for a Spirit-empowered life of Christ-centered leadership and service. Ranked one of the top 10 colleges in the west by The U.S. News & World Report since 2010, Vanguard University was also named by The Princeton Review as a 2014 “Best in the West” College. Additionally, Vanguard is named in the 2012-13 Christian Colleges of Distinction 40

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and made the Forbes list of best universities. Vanguard University is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC). Website: vanguard.edu Twitter Name: @VanguardU Facebook page: facebook.com/ vanguarduniversity Affiliation: Assemblies of God Graduate Student body: 91; 55% male, 45% female; 55% full-time, 45% part -time; 4 states represented, 1 country represented Resident status: 81 residential; 10 enrolled online No. online courses: 1 degree program, 14 courses Student/teacher ratio: 9:1 Academic staff with terminal degree: 95% Average class size: 12

Affiliation: Interdenominational

Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nondenominational

Concordia University Ann Arbor Ann Arbor, MI Phone: (734) 995-7322 Website: cuaa.edu Email: admission@cuaa.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod

Spring Arbor University Spring Arbor, MI Phone: (800) 968-0011 Website: arbor.edu Email: admissions@arbor.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Free Methodist Church

Cornerstone University Grand Rapids, MI Phone: (616) 222-1426 Website: cornerstone.edu Email: admissions @cornerstone.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nondenominational Grand Rapids Theological Seminary Grand Rapids, MI Phone: (800) 697-1133 Website: grts.cornerstone.edu Email: seminary @cornerstone.edu

M IN N E SOTA Acts International Bible College Blaine, MN Phone: (763) 755-4800 Website: actscollege.org Email: mail@actscollege.org Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Interdenominational

KINGSWAY UNIVERSITY AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

9120 SW 9th Street Norwalk, IA 50211 • (515) 288-2852

Descrition: Our purpose is to nourish your Christian faith. We have associates to doctorate level degrees in 7 different biblical programs. Admissions email: ku@kingsway.edu Admissions website: kingsway.edu/page/ online-application/ Facebook page: facebook.com/ kingswayuniversity Affiliation: Nondenominational Accreditation: Visit iabcs.org for full list of accreditations Application deadline (fall):

8/31 Admission requirements: Master level programs: bachelor’s, 3.0 GPA; Doctoral level programs: master’s, 3.0 GPA, ordination Student body: 500; 40% male, 60% female; 40% full-time, 60% part-time; 10 states represented, 15 countries represented Most popular degrees: Theological and Ministerial Studies, Pastoral Counseling, Pastoral Studies,Christian Studies, Religion/Religious Studies No. online courses: 160 Student/teacher ratio: 20:1 Academic staff with terminal degree: 80% Average class size: 20 Expenses: Tuition/Fees: $840; Books/Supplies: $400 c h ar ism asb est . com


CHARISMA’S BEST GRADUATE SCHOOLS AND SEMINARIES Bethel Seminary St. Paul, MN Phone: (651) 638-6288 Website: seminary.bethel.edu Email: bsem-admit@bethel.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Coverage Worldwide (former Baptist General Conference) Concordia University, St. Paul St. Paul, MN Phone: (800) 333-4705 Website: csp.edu Email: admission@csp.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod Crown College St. Bonifacius, MN Phone: (952) 446-4100 Website: crown.edu/graduate Email: info@crown.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Christian and Missionary Alliance

University of Northwestern — St. Paul St. Paul, MN Phone: (651) 631-5200 Website: unwsp.edu Email: gceadmissions @unwsp.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nondenominational

M I SS I SS I P P I Belhaven University Jackson, MS Phone: (601) 968-5988 Website: belhaven.edu Email: jackson@belhaven.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Presbyterian Blue Mountain College Blue Mountain, MS Phone: (800) 235-0136 Website: bmc.edu Email: admission@bmc.edu

ASBURY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

204 N. Lexington Avenue Wilmore, KY 40390 (859) 858-3581 asburyseminary.edu

Asbury Theological Seminary is a multidenominational, evangelical seminary serving nearly 100 different denominations. Rooted in the Wesleyan tradition, we have a strong emphasis on the Bible, spiritual formation and discipleship.

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Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Baptist Mississippi College Clinton, MS Phone: (601) 925-3800 Website: mc.edu Email: enrollment -services@mc.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Mississippi Baptist Convention

M ISSOU RI Assemblies of God Theological Seminary Springfield, MO Phone: (866) 773-2226 Website: agts.edu Email: info@agts.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Assemblies of God

Admissions email: admissions.office@ asburyseminary.edu Admissions website: asburyseminary.edu Twitter name: @AsburySeminary Facebook page: facebook. com/AsburySeminary Affiliation: Multi-denominational Accreditation: SACS, ATS Application deadline (fall): 8/15 Admission requirements: Master level programs: bachelor’s; Doctoral level programs: master’s, 3.0 GPA; visit asburyseminary.edu/ admissions/apply/ for full list of requirements Student body: 1,389; 65% male, 35% female; 45% full-time, 55% part-time; 42 states represented, 39 countries represented Resident status: 891 residential; 498 enrolled online

Biblical Life College and Seminary Marshfield, MO Phone: (417) 859-0881 Website: biblical-life.com Email: biblicallife@centurytel.net Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Interdenominational Calvary Theological Seminary Kansas City, MO Phone: (800) 326-3960 Website: calvary.edu/seminary Email: seminary@calvary.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nondenominational Carver Baptist Bible College, Institute and Theological Seminary Kansas City, MO Phone: (816) 333-1577 Website: carverbible collegekc.org Email: admissions​ @carverbiblecollegekc.org

Most popular degrees: Theological and Ministerial Studies, Pastoral Counseling, Marriage and Family Therapy/Counseling; visit asburyseminary.edu/ academics/degrees/ for full list of degrees offered No. online courses: 64 Student/teacher ratio: 10:1 Academic staff with terminal degree: 92.1% Average class size: 16 Expenses: Tuition/ Fees: $1,308; Books/ Supplies: $1,008; Room/ Board $4,120; visit asburyseminary.edu/ admissions/funding -your-seminary-education/ tuition-fees/ for more information on expenses Financial aid: (859) 858-2319; visit asburyseminary.edu/ admissions/ funding-your-seminaryeducation/financial-aid/ faqs/ for more information on financial aid 2 01 4 | C H A RI S M A ’S B EST

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CHARISMA’S BEST GRADUATE SCHOOLS AND SEMINARIES Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Baptist Global University Springfield, MO Phone: (417) 862-9533 Website: globaluniversity.edu Email: gradenroll @globaluniversity.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Assemblies of God Nazarene Theological Seminary Kansas City, MO Phone: (800) 831-3011 Website: nts.edu May 2014 Email: enroll@nts.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate ORU Affiliation: Nazarene

Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Interdenominational Southwest Baptist University Bolivar, MO Phone: (417) 328-5281 Website: sbuniv.edu Email: admissions@sbuniv.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctoral Affiliation: Baptist Evangel University Springfield, MO Phone: (417) 865-2815 Website: evangel.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Assemblies of God

CHARISMA Seminary Guide Proof Date: 4-10-14 M O N TA N A Lindenwood Proof #4 —University Proofed by Editorial St. Charles, MO Phone: (636) 949-4949 Website: lindenwood.edu Email: admissions @lindenwood.edu

Rocky Mountain College Billings, MT Phone: (800) 877-6259 Website: rocky.edu

ORAL ROBERTS UNIVERSITY

7777 S. Lewis Avenue Tulsa, OK 74171 (918) 495-6618 oru.edu

ORU SEMINARY—A GLOBAL PLACE FOR WORLDCLASS TRAINING IN MINISTRY. Since its inception, the Graduate School of Theology and Ministry has provided sound academic, theological and biblical education with a distinctive charismatic dimension. We offer a variety of ATS-accredited master's and doctoral degree programs in distance and residential formats.

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Email: admissions@rocky.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Interdenominational

N E B RASK A Concordia University, Nebraska Seward, NE Phone: (800) 535-5494 Website: cune.edu Email: admiss@cune.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod

N E W J E RSE Y Drew University Madison, NJ Phone: (973) 408-3739 Website: drew.edu Email: cadm@drew.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Methodist

N E W YORK

advertising proof

Houghton College Houghton, NY Please view this proof carefully, paying close Phone: (800) 777-2556 Grace University attention to spelling. Website: houghton.edu Omaha, NE Email:toadmission Phone: (402)approval 449-2831 or corrections Email the ad traffic @houghton.edu Website: graceuniversity.edu coordinator: erica.heitz@charismamedia.com. Degrees Offered: Master’s Email: admissions Note: After approving thisAffiliation: proof (orThe the reproof, @graceuniversity.edu if necessary), Charisma Media will not be held Wesleyan Church Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: responsible for any misspellings/errors undetected Interdenominational by the advertiser and/or Acct. Exec.

Admissions email: gradtheology@oru.edu Twitter name: @OralRobertsU Facebook page: facebook .com/OralRobertsUniversity Affiliation: Nondenominational Accreditation: ATS, NCA-HLC, AAU, NAICU; visit oru.edu/ accreditation for full list of accreditations Application deadline (fall): 7/1 Admission requirements: Master level programs: bachelor’s, 2.5 GPA; Doctoral level programs: master’s, 3.0 GPA, ministry experience Student body: 429; 47% male, 53% female; 70% full-time, 30% part-time; 50 states represented, 72 countries represented Resident status: 330 residential; 120 enrolled online Most popular degrees: Master of

Divinity; MA Christian Counseling [LMFT & LPC Concentrations]; MA Practical Theology; MA Missions; MA [Biblical Literature]; MA [Theological and Historical Studies]; DMIN; visit gradtheology.oru.edu/ programs for full list of degrees offered No. online courses: 13 Student/teacher ratio: 11:1 Academic staff with terminal degree: 100% Average class size: 11 Expenses: Tuition/Fees: $10,404; Books/Supplies: $1,848; Room/Board: $10,768; visit gradtheology .oru.edu/costofed for more information on expenses Financial aid: (918) 4957089; 50% receiving aid; average aid package $6,500; visit gradtheology .oru.edu/costofed for more information on financial aid

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CHARISMA’S BEST GRADUATE SCHOOLS AND SEMINARIES Nyack College Nyack, NY Phone: (800) 336-9225 Website: nyack.edu Email: admission@nyack.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Christian and Missionary Alliance Roberts Wesleyan College Rochester, NY Phone: (585) 594-6000 Website: roberts.edu Email: benedict_mattie @roberts.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Free Methodist Church

Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Interdenominational

Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Interdenominational

Gardner-Webb University Boiling Springs, NC Phone: (800) 253-6472 Website: gardner-webb.edu Email: admissions @gardner-webb.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Baptist

Montreat College Montreat, NC Phone: (800) 662-6968 Website: montreat.edu Email: admissions @montreat.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Presbyterian (U.S.A.)

N O RTH CAROL IN A

Impact University Clemmons, NC Phone: (336) 714-4048 Website: impactuniv.com Email: info@impactuniv.com Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nondenominational

Carolina Graduate University Greensboro, NC Phone: (336) 315-8660 Website: carolinagrad.edu Email: fscurry@carolinagrad.edu

Laurel University High Point, NC Phone: (336) 887-3000 Website: laureluniversity.edu Email: admissions @laureluniversity.edu

LEE UNIVERSITY

1120 North Ocoee Street Cleveland, TN 37311 (423) 614-8000 leegraduate.com Lee University is a Christ-centered university of about 5,000 students located in Cleveland, Tenn., in the southeast part of the state’s scenic Tennessee River Valley. Lee is emerging as a leader in higher education in the southeastern region and is continuously ranked in the “Top Tier” of Regional Universities in the South by U.S. News & World Report.

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Piedmont International University Winston-Salem, NC Phone: (800) 937-5097 Website: pbc.edu Email: admissions @piedmontu.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Baptist

Website: ses.edu Email: info@ses.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Baptist STC Bible College Thomasville, NC Phone: (336) 472-4109 Website: stcbiblecollege.com Email: admin @stcbiblecollege.com Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nondenominational Wingate University Wingate, NC Phone: (800) 755-5550 Website: wingate.edu Email: admit@wingate.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Baptist

Southern Evangelical Seminary Matthews, NC Phone: (800) 778-7884

Admissions email: admissions@ leeuniversity.edu Admissions website: leeuniversity.edu/ academics/graduate/ admissions/ Twitter name: @LeeU Facebook page: facebook. com/LeeUniversity Affiliation: Church of God Accreditation: SACS, NCATE, ACBSP, NASM, CAATE; visit leeuniversity .edu/about/accreditation .aspx for full list of accreditations Application deadline (fall): 9/2 Admission requirements: Master level programs: bachelor’s; visit leegraduate.com for full list of requirements Student body: 372; 40% male, 60% female; 45% full-time, 55% part-time; 29 states represented, 13 countries represented, 23 study abroad programs Most popular degrees:

Business Administration and Management, General; Ministry/ Lay Ministry; Teacher Education, Multiple Levels; Marriage and Family Therapy/ Counseling; Music Performance, General; visit leeuniversity.edu/ academics/graduate/ for full list of degrees offered No. online courses: 4 Student/teacher ratio: 8:1 Academic staff with terminal degree: 54% Average class size: 9 Expenses: Tuition/Fees: $550 per semester hour; Books/Supplies: $300-500 per semester; visit catalog. leeuniversity.edu/content .php?catoid=6&navoid=1007 for more information on expenses Financial aid: (423) 6148300; visit leeuniversity .edu/financial-aid/ for more information on financial aid 2 01 4 | C H A RI S M A ’S B EST

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CHARISMA’S BEST GRADUATE SCHOOLS AND SEMINARIES

OHIO Capital University Columbus, OH Phone: (866) 544-6175 Website: capital.edu Email: admissions@capital.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Lutheran Cedarville University Cedarville, OH Phone: (800) 233-2784 Website: cedarville.edu Email: admissions @cedarville.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Baptist Cincinnati Christian University Cincinnati, OH Phone: (800) 949-4228 Website: ccuniversity.edu Email: info@ccuniversity.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nondenominational

Franciscan University of Steubenville Steubenville, OH Phone: (740) 283-6226 Website: franciscan.edu Email: admissions @franciscan.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Roman Catholic Mount Vernon Nazarene University Mount Vernon, OH Phone: (866) 462-6868 Website: mvnu.edu Email: admissions@mvnu.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nazarene Tri-State Bible College South Point, OH Phone: (740) 377-2520 Website: tsbc.edu Email: info@tsbc.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Interdenominational

PENTECOSTAL THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

900 Walker Street NE Cleveland, TN 37311 (800) 228-9126 ptseminary.edu

PTS is a Wesleyan-Pentecostal graduate school preparing pastors and training ministerial leaders for global evangelization. The Seminary offers a residential campus in Cleveland, Tenn., online courses, and occasional “outreach” courses offered throughout the U.S. and various parts of the world. The Seminary presently offers six master’s level degrees in ministry, theology and counseling disciplines, as well as a Doctor of Ministry program. 44

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OKLAHOM A

Affiliation: Nondenominational

Oklahoma Baptist University Shawnee, OK Phone: (405) 878-2023 Website: okbu.edu Email: admissions@okbu.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Southern Baptist Convention

Wisdom University Tulsa, OK Phone: (918) 712-7122 Website: wisdomuniversityonline.org Email: registrar @wisdomuniversity.org Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Nondenominational

Oklahoma Wesleyan University Bartlesville, OK Phone: (866) 222-8226 Website: okwu.edu Email: admissions@okwu.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: The Wesleyan Church Oral Roberts University Tulsa, OK Phone: (918) 495-6161 Website: oru.edu Email: gradtheology@oru.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate

Admissions email: admissions@ ptseminary.edu Admissions website: ptseminary.edu Twitter name: @pentecostalTS Facebook page: facebook.com/ptseminary Affiliation: Church of God Accreditation: SACS, ATS; visit ptseminary.net/about/ accrediation/ for full list of accreditations Application deadline (fall): 8/1 Admission requirements: Master level programs: bachelor’s, 2.5 GPA; Doctoral level programs: 2.5 GPA; visit ptseminary .net/admissions/ for full list of requirements Student body: 211; 71% male, 29% female; 32% full-time, 68% part-time; 24 states represented, 9 countries represented

ORE G ON Concordia University Portland, OR Phone: (503) 280-8501 Website: cu-portland.edu Email: admission @cu-portland.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod

Resident status: 130 residential; 81 enrolled online Most popular degrees: Visit ptseminary.net/ admissions/ for full list of degrees offered No. online courses: 27 Student/teacher ratio: 6:1 Academic staff with terminal degree: 97% Average class size: 14 Expenses: Tuition/Fees: $478/credit hour; Books/ Supplies: varies; Room/ Board: varies; visit ptseminary.net/admissions/ tuition-and-fees/ masters-program-fees/ for more information on expenses Financial aid: (423) 478-7704; visit finaid .ptseminary.edu for more information on financial aid

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CHARISMA’S BEST GRADUATE SCHOOLS AND SEMINARIES Corban University Salem, OR Phone: (800) 845-3005 Website: corban.edu Email: admissions@corban.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Baptist George Fox Evangelical Seminary Portland, OR Phone: (503) 554-6122 Website: seminary .georgefox.edu Email: sbartlett@georgefox.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Interdenominational Northwest Christian University Eugene, OR Phone: (541) 343-1641 Website: nwcu.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Evangelical

Warner Pacific College Portland, OR Phone: (503) 517-1020 Website: warnerpacific.edu Email: admissions @warnerpacific.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Church of God (Anderson, IN) Western Seminary Portland, OR Phone: (877) 517-1800 Website: westernseminary.edu Email: admiss @westernseminary.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Nondenominational Multnomah University Portland, OR Phone: (877) 251-6560 Website: multnomah.edu Email: admiss@multnomah.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Nondenominational

RICHMONT GRADUATE UNIVERSITY

1815 McCallie Ave. Chattanooga, TN 37404 (888) 267-4073 richmont.edu

Richmont Graduate University provides Christcentered education and research that advances God’s work of healing, restoration and transformation in the lives of individuals, churches and communities. Located in Atlanta, Ga., and Chattanooga, Tenn., students can pursue master’s degrees in: Professional Counseling, Marriage and Family Therapy, Ministry, and Psychological Studies.

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P E N N SY LVAN IA

Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nondenominational

Baptist Bible College and Seminary Clarks Summit, PA Phone: (800) 451-7664 Website: bbc.edu Email: admissions@bbc.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Baptist

Eastern University St. David’s, PA Phone: (800) 732-7669 Website: eastern.edu Email: gpsadm@eastern.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: American Baptist

Biblical Theological Seminary Hatfield, PA Phone: (800) 235-4021 Website: biblical.edu Email: admissions@biblical.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Reformed Presbyterian of North America

Geneva College Beaver Falls, PA Phone: (724) 847-6500 Website: geneva.edu Email: admission@geneva.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Reformed Presbyterian of North America

Capital Bible Seminary and Graduate School Philadelphia, PA Phone: (717) 560-8282 Website: bible.edu Email: graduate@lbc.edu

Admissions email: admissions@richmont.edu Admissions website: richmont.edu Twitter name: @richmontgradu Facebook page: facebook.com/ RichmontUniversity Accreditation: SACSCOC; visit richmont.edu/admissions/ applications/ for full list of accreditations Application deadline (fall): 5/1 Admission requirements: Master level programs: bachelor’s, 3.0 GPA; visit richmont.edu/ admissions/ for full list of requirements Student body: 300; 40% male, 60% female; 55% full time, 45% part time Resident status: 100

Lancaster Bible College Lancaster, PA Phone: (717) 569-7071 Website: lbc.edu Email: graduate@lbc.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Nondenominational

residential Most popular degrees: Ministry/Lay Ministry; Marriage and Family Therapy/Counseling; Psychology, General; visit richmont.edu/about/ for full list of degrees offered Student/teacher ratio: 15:1 Academic staff with terminal degree: 100% Average class size: 19 Expenses: Tuition/Fees: $41,000; Books/Supplies: $800; visit richmont.edu/ admissions/financialassistance/tuition-fees/ for more information on expenses Financial aid: (888) 9246122; visit richmont.edu/ admissions/ financial-assistance/ for more information on financial aid

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CHARISMA’S BEST GRADUATE SCHOOLS AND SEMINARIES Lebanon Valley College Annville, PA Phone: (717) 867-6181 Website: lvc.edu Email: admission@lvc.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Methodist Messiah College Grantham, PA Phone: (719) 619-6000 Website: messiah.edu Email: admiss@messiah.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Interdenominational Valley Forge Christian College Phoenixville, PA Phone: (800) 432-8322 Website: vfcc.edu Email: admissions@vfcc.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Assemblies of God

P U E RTO R I C O Evangelical Seminary of Puerto Rico Rio Piedras, PR Phone: (787) 763-6700 Website: se-pr.edu Email: registro@se-pr.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Interdenominational

S O U T H CA RO LI NA Anderson University Anderson, SC Phone: (800) 542-3594 Website: andersonuniversity.edu Email: admission​ @andersonuniversity.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: South Carolina Baptist Convention

SOUTHWESTERN ASSEMBLIES OF GOD UNIVERSITY

1200 Sycamore St. Waxahachie, TX 75165 (888) YES-SAGU sagu.edu

Southwestern Assemblies of God University is a private, Christian university located 30 minutes south of the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex in Waxahachie, Texas. The university was established in 1927 and now offers more than 70 associate, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees on campus or online. More information is available at sagu.edu or by calling 1-888-YES-SAGU. 46

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Cathedral Bible College Myrtle Beach, SC Phone: (843) 477-1448 Website: cathedralbiblecollege.com Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Nondenominational Charleston Southern Univeristy Charleston, SC Phone: (843) 863-7050 Website: csuniv.edu Email: enroll@csuniv.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Baptist Columbia International University Columbia, SC Phone: (800) 777-2227 Website: ciu.edu Email: yesgrad@ciu.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Nondenominational

Admissions email: graduateadmissions@ sagu.edu Admissions website: sagu.edu/apply Twitter name: @sagu Facebook page: facebook.com/SAGUFans Affiliation: Assemblies of God Accreditation: Visit sagu.edu/about-sagu/ accreditation for full list of accreditations Application deadline (fall): 7/15 Admission requirements: Master level programs: bachelor’s, 2.5 GPA; Doctoral level programs: master’s, 3.0 GPA, ministry experience Student body: 310; 51%

Erskine College Due West, SC Phone: (864) 379-8838 Website: erskine.edu Email: admissions@erskine.edu Degrees Offered: Masters’, Doctorate Affiliation: Reformed Presbyterian Erskine Theological Seminary Due West, SC Phone: (864) 379-8838 Website: seminary.erskine.edu Email: admissions@erskine.edu Degrees Offered: Masters’, Doctorate Affiliation: Reformed Presbyterian North Greenville University Tigerville, SC Phone: (864) 977-7001 Website: ngu.edu Email: admissions@ngu.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Southern Baptist

male, 49% female; 20% full-time, 80% part-time Resident status: 74 residential; 236 enrolled online No. online courses: 187 Student/teacher ratio: 15:1 Academic staff with terminal degree: 100% Average class size: 15 Expenses: Tuition/Fees: $10,080; Books/Supplies: $500; Other: $800; visit sagu.edu/admissions/ tuition-and-fees for more information on expenses Financial aid: (972) 8254730; 88% receiving aid; visit sagu.edu/financial-aid for more information on financial aid

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CHARISMA’S BEST GRADUATE SCHOOLS AND SEMINARIES Southern Wesleyan University Central, SC Phone: (864) 639-2453 Website: swu.edu Email: central@swu.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Evangelical Christian

SO U TH DAKOTA Sioux Falls Seminary Sioux Falls, SD Phone: (605) 336-6588 Website: sfseminary.edu Email: info@sfsemimary.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Baptist

T E N N E SS E E American Baptist College Nashville, TN Phone: (615) 256-1463 Website: abcnash.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Baptist Belmont University Nashville, TN Phone: (615) 460-6785 Website: belmont.edu Email: admissions@belmont.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Nondenominational Berea Bible Institute and Seminary Hixson, TN Phone: (423) 643-3100 Website: bereabibleseminary.com Email: berea@abbashouse.com Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Baptist

THE KING’S UNIVERSITY

2121 E. Southlake Blvd. Southlake, TX 76092 (817) 552-3700 tku.edu

TKU is a Spirit-filled evangelical university based in the DFW area. The university continues to expand its footprint with multiple locations worldwide to prepare men and women for effective leadership and Christlike service in the global community. Carrying on the vision of its founder, Dr. Jack Hayford, TKU uniquely equips students by integrating accredited higher education with dynamic ministry experience in the local church.

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Bryan College Dayton, TN Phone: (800) 277-9522 Website: bryan.edu Email: admissions@bryan.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nondenominational Carson-Newman College Jefferson City, TN Phone: (800) 678-9061 Website: cn.edu Email: gradenrollment@cn.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Baptist King College Bristol, TN Phone: (423) 652-4861 Website: king.edu Email: admissions@king.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Presbyterian Lee University Cleveland, TN Phone: (423) 614-8000 Website: leegraduate.edu

Admissions email: admissions@tku.edu Admissions website: gateway.kingsuniversity .edu/prospective-students/ undergraduate/apply Twitter name: @TKUGateway Facebook page: facebook.com/TKUGateway Affiliation: Nondenominational Application deadline (fall): 7/15 Admission requirements: Master level programs: bachelor’s, 2.0 GPA; Doctoral level programs: master’s, 3.0 GPA, ministry experience Student body: 615; 53% male, 47% female; 32% full-time, 68% part-time; 34 states represented, 10 countries represented Resident status: 443

Email: admissions@ leeuniversity.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Pentecostal Pentecostal Theological Seminary Cleveland, TN Phone: (800) 228-9126 Website: ptseminary.edu Email: admissions @ptseminary.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Pentecostal Richmont Graduate University Chattanooga, GA Phone: (423) 266-4574 Website: richmont.edu Email: admissions @richmont.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nondenominational

residential; 172 enrolled online Most popular degrees: Theological and Ministerial Studies, Theology/Theological Studies, Ministry/ Lay Ministry, Master of Divinity, Master of Messianic Jewish Studies No. online courses: 35 Student/teacher ratio: 11:1 Academic staff with terminal degree: 100% Average class size: 10 Expenses: Tuition/ Fees: $9,180; Books/ Supplies: $533; visit gateway.kingsuniversity .edu/prospective-students/ graduate/tuition-graduate -students for more information on expenses Financial aid: (817) 552-7339

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CHARISMA’S BEST GRADUATE SCHOOLS AND SEMINARIES Tennessee Temple University Chattanooga, TN Phone: (800) 553-4050 Website: tntemple.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Interdenominational

Baptist University of the Americas San Antonio, TX Phone: (210) 924-4338 Website: bua.edu Email: mary.ranjel@bua.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Baptist

Trevecca Nazarene University Nashville, TN Phone: (615) 248-1200 Website: trevecca.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Nazarene

Baylor University Waco, TX Phone: (800) 229-5678 Website: baylor.edu Email: admissions@baylor.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Baptist

T EX AS Arlington Baptist College Arlington, TX Phone: (817) 461-8741 Website: arlington baptistcollege.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Baptist

Christian Bible Institute and Seminary Spring, TX Phone: (888) 360-0004 Website: christianbibleinstitute.net Email: info @christianbibleinstitute.net Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Nondenominational

LIBERTY UNIVERSITY

1971 University Blvd. Lynchburg, VA 24515 (855) 466-9220 Liberty.edu

Liberty University, the world’s largest Christian university, offers more than 350 residential and online programs from the associate to the doctorate level and is settled on a 7,000-acre campus in Virginia.

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Criswell College Dallas, TX Phone: (214) 821-5433 Website: criswell.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Southern Baptist Convention Dallas Baptist University Dallas, TX Phone: (800) 460-1328 Website: dbu.edu Email: admiss@dbu.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Baptist Dallas Theological Seminary Dallas, TX Phone: (214) 887-5000 Website: dts.edu Email: admissions@dts.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Nondenominational

Admissions email: admissions@liberty.edu Admissions website: liberty.edu/Admissions Twitter name: @LibertyU Facebook page: facebook.com/ LibertyUniversity Accreditation: SACSCOC, ACBSP, ABET, AOA-COCA, ABA; visit Liberty.edu/ Accreditation for full list of accreditations Application deadline (fall): Rolling admissions process Admission requirements: Master level programs: bachelor’s; Doctoral level programs: master’s; visit Liberty.edu/Admissions for full list of requirements Student body: 42; 41% male, 59% female; 47% full-time, 53% part-time; 50 states represented, 126 countries represented Resident status: 13,000

George W. Truett Theological Seminary Waco, TX Phone: (254) 710-3755 Website: baylor.edu/truett Email: Truett_Admissions @baylor.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Baptist Hardin-Simmons University Abilene, TX Phone: (877) 464-7889 Website: hsutx.edu Email: enroll@hsutx.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Baptist Houston Baptist University Houston, TX Phone: (281) 649-3211 Website: hbu.edu Email: admissions@hbu.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Baptist

residential; 92,000 enrolled online Most popular degrees: Business Administration and Management, General; Education, General; Religion/ Religious Studies; Psychology, General; visit Liberty.edu/Admissions for full list of degrees offered No. online courses: 187 Student/teacher ratio: 19:1 Academic staff with terminal degree: 70% Average class size: 19 Expenses: Expenses vary by program; visit Liberty.edu/Tuition for information on expenses Financial aid: (888) 5835704; 85.2%% receiving aid; average aid package varies by program; visit Liberty.edu/FinancialAid for more information on financial aid

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CHARISMA’S BEST GRADUATE SCHOOLS AND SEMINARIES Howard Payne University Brownwood, TX Phone: (325) 649-8020 Website: hputx.edu Email: enroll@hputx.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Baptist

Phone: (888) 937-7348 Website: sagu.edu Email: graduateadmissions @sagu.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Assemblies of God

LeTourneau University Longview, TX Phone: (903) 233-4300 Website: letu.edu Email: admissions@letu.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Interdenominational

The King’s University Southlake, TX Phone: (817) 552-3700 Website: tku.edu Email: admissions@tku.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Nondenominational

Lubbock Christian University Lubbock, TX Phone: (800) 933-7601 Website: lcu.edu Email: graduatestudies@lcu.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Churches of Christ

Tyndale Theological Seminary and Biblical Institute Hurst, TX Phone: (800) 886-1415 Website: tyndale.edu Email: info@tyndale.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Interdenominational

Southwestern Assemblies of God University Waxahachie, TX

REGENT UNIVERSITY

1000 Regent University Drive Virginia Beach, Va. 23464 (800) 373-5504 regent.edu

Regent University is a fully accredited Christian university offering undergraduate and graduate degrees on campus and online. Named a Top 10 school in 2013 for online bachelor's programs (U.S. News & World Report), Regent unites rigorous academics and biblical faith. Students gain knowledge to excel and faith to live with purpose. The School of Divinity's diverse student body is committed to the rigorous study and application of theology, biblical interpretation, and the renewing work of the Holy Spirit. cha ri s masbe st.co m

Wayland Baptist University Plainview, TX Phone: (806) 291-3500 Website: wbu.edu Email: admityou@wbu.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Southern Baptist Convention West Coast Bible College and Seminary Waco, TX Phone: (800) 921-4561 Website: westcoastbible.org Email: info@westcoastbible.org Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Casa de Oleiro Ministries in Brazil

V IRGIN IA Capital Bible Seminary and Graduate School Springfield, VA Phone: (703) 752-1624

Admissions email: admissions@regent.edu Admissions website: regent.edu Accreditation: SACSCOC, ATS Application deadline (fall): 7/15 Admission requirements: Master level programs: bachelor’s, 2.75 GPA; Doctoral level programs: master’s, 3.0 GPA; visit regent.edu/qualifydivinity for full list of Divinity degree requirements Student body: 5,953; 40% male, 60% female. 42% full-time; 58% part-time; 50 states represented, 68 countries represented, 40 denominations represented, 11 study abroad programs Resident status: 1,261 residential; 3,415 enrolled online; 1,277 online and

Website: bible.edu Email: graduatecapital@lbc.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nondenominational Faith Landmarks Bible Institute Richmond, VA Phone: (804) 262-7104 Website: flbi.org Email: rgupton @faithlandmarks.org Affiliation: Nondenominational Liberty University Lynchburg, VA Phone: (855) 466-9220 Website: liberty.edu Email: admissions@liberty.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Southern Baptist Regent University Graduate School and School of Divinity Virginia Beach, VA Phone: (800) 373-5504 Website: regent.edu

on-campus Most popular degrees: Visit regent.edu/acad/ schdiv/academics for full list of degrees offered No. online courses: 271 Student/teacher ratio: 17:1 (Divinity), 18:1 (University) Academic staff with terminal degree: 95% Average class size: 18 Expenses: Divinity: Tuition/Fees: $555/ credit hour; Semester Fees: $400; Room/Board: $10,445/year average; visit regent.edu/admin/ finaid/1314_pages/costs_ grad1314.cfm for more information on expenses Financial aid: (757) 3524125; visit regent.edu/ admin/finaid for more information on financial aid

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CHARISMA’S BEST GRADUATE SCHOOLS AND SEMINARIES Email: admissions@regent.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Interdenominational

WA SHINGTON Columbia Evangelical Seminary Buckley, WA Phone: (360) 802-6437 Website: columbiaseminary.edu Email: info@columbiaseminary.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Interdenominational Corban University School of Ministry Tacoma, WA Phone: (253) 759-6104 Website: corban.edu Email: admissions@corban.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nondenominational

Covenant Bible Seminary Lakewood, WA Phone: (253) 472-4322 Website: covenantbibleseminary.org Email: cbseminary@qwestoffice.net Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Interdenominational Northwest University Kirkland, WA Phone: (425) 822-8266 Website: northwestu.edu Email: comgrad@northwestu.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Assemblies of God

5520 108th Ave. NE Kirkland, WA 98033 (425) 822-8266 northwestu.edu

Northwest University (NU) is a fully accredited institution that awards associate, baccalaureate, master’s and doctorate degrees. We are a private, Christian liberal arts university that has trained leaders since 1934. Recently, U.S. News and World Report listed us in their Best Colleges ranking both as a top school and a best value.

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Appalachian Bible College Mount Hope, WV Phone: (304) 877-6428 Website: abc.edu Email: admissions@abc.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s Affiliation: Nondenominational

Seattle Pacific University Graduate School and Seminary Seattle, WA Phone: (206) 281-2000 Website: spu.edu Email: gradadmissions@spu.edu Degrees Offered: Master’s, Doctorate Affiliation: Free Methodist Church

NORTHWEST UNIVERSITY

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Admissions email: comgrad@northwestu.edu Admissions website: northwestu.edu Twitter name: @northwestu Facebook page: facebook.com/northwestu Affiliation: Assemblies of God Accreditation: NWCCU, ACBSP; visit northwestu.edu/about/ accreditation/ for full list of accreditations Application deadline (fall): 6/1; rolling admissions process Admission requirements: Master level programs: bachelor’s, 3.0 GPA; visit northwestu.edu/ assets/documents/ graduate/12ministry_ procedures.pdf for full list of requirements Student body: 55; 84% male, 16% female; 15% full-time, 85% part-time; 7 states represented, 3 countries represented,

1 study abroad program Resident status: 42 residential; 13 enrolled online Most popular degrees: Theological and Ministerial Studies; Business Administration and Management, General; Ministry/ Lay Ministry; Teacher Education, Multiple Levels; Psychology, General; visit northwestu. edu/academics/ for full list of degrees offered No. online courses: 12 Student/teacher ratio: 3:1 Academic staff with terminal degree: 100% Average class size: 8 Expenses: Tuition/Fees: $26,000; Books/Supplies: $800; Room/Board: $3,000; visit northwestu .edu/ministry/cost for more information on expenses Financial aid: (425) 889.7791

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Contact us today to start your Master of Divinity, Doctor of Ministry, Ph.D., or your choice of 13 distinctive Master of Arts degrees, which can be pursued at our campuses in Wilmore, Kentucky and Orlando, Florida, or through our on-line program.

Call. 800.2ASBURY Click. asbury.to/degrees Visit. asbury.to/visit Learn more. asburyseminary.edu


You’ll Meet the World at Regent— and Sometimes in Just One Person Regent University professor Clifton Clarke is a living example of missions and world Christianity. The fascinating lecturer, author and distinguished missionary brings his multicultural background to the classroom as well as an instructive perspective on the mission field—including the one in your own backyard. Christian leaders being prepared by Christian leaders. That’s Regent’s strength. Discover how to make it yours.

MASTER’S & DOCTORAL ON CAMPUS | ONLINE 800.723.6162 REGENT.EDU/DIVINITY

Christian Leadership to Change the World

The School of Divinity is accredited by the Association of Theological Schools (ATS), with approval for a Comprehensive Distance Education Program. DIV130798

Dr. Clifton Clarke

Associate Professor of Global Missions & World Christianity

Charisma's Best Graduate Schools, Seminaries and Online Education 2014  

Charisma's Best Graduate Schools, Seminaries and Online Education is an exhaustive list of Christian advanced-education institutions organiz...

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