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CHARISMA’S BEST ®

NOVEMBER 2015

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Invest Wisely Steps to ensure a cost-effective education

Learn How to Avoid College Debt Dorm Room Survival Guide


Discover Your Purpose

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Change the World

Since our beginning in 1978, Christian leadership has influenced everything we do at Regent University. We equip award-winning, principled graduates with knowledge and faith — together — so that they can excel in their careers and live significant lives. You can too. Enjoy top-quality, affordable academics led by recognized scholars and industry experts eager to prepare you for your world-changing calling.

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Undergraduate

16

Graduate

Your story starts here With more than 70 academic programs to choose from, you’re sure to find a path that’s right for you at Southeastern University.

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Doctoral


CONTENTS

8

Cover Story

Investing Wisely in Your Future

Your higher education experience will impact the core of who you are. By Dr. Nancy Brainard

F eatures

22

C olumns & more

Avoiding School Debt

Commuter students may benefit from lower costs but have their own special challenges.

Prayer plays a key role for the Christian making higher education choices. | By Dr. Steve Greene

Although tuition prices are up, the cost of college may not be as high as you think. By Karen Chambless

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Living With Impact

Freedom from school debt means greater ability to advance kingdom interests. By Alex Chediak

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Getting Ahead in High School

High school students may miss out on value if they don’t consider dual enrollment. By Mindy L. Hughes

By Dr. Jim Fereira

24

The Journey That Matters

Trust God to lead you toward your unique role in His kingdom. By Dr. Sheri Phillips

26

Dorm Room Survival Guide

See our tips for getting packed and prepared for life in the small space of a college residence hall.

6 Welcome

7 Charisma’s Best Online

See what extras are available for students at charismasbest.com.

32 How We Chose

Learn how we selected schools to include in our directory. | By Steve Strang

33 Charisma’s Best Christian

Universities, Colleges and Schools Search through our listing of nearly 260 top Christian schools in North America for contact information, denominational affiliation and more.

By Sarah Cushing and Jessilyn Justice

Charisma’s Best, a Charisma Media publication. Copyright © 2015 Charisma Media. All rights reserved. Printed in USA. Editorial and Advertising offices: 600 Rinehart Road, Lake Mary, FL 32746, Tel: 407.333.0600, www.charismasbest.com.

PRINTED IN THE USA

TOC: MARK MOORE/ORU

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Choosing to Commute


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Welcome

DR. STEVE GREENE

How Do You Find the Right College?

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“Pray and earnestly listen to what God tells you. Don’t rule out any possibilities or tell God, ‘No.’”

ew decisions after high school are as important as choosing the right college. College can be one of the most intense seasons of growth and development in an individual’s life. Students are learning who they are, what they want to do with the rest of their lives and how—or even if—they want to serve God. Finding the right environment for this process is one of life’s biggest decisions. Students need to find a campus where they feel comfortable. They need programs that offer exceptional training in their future profession. They need faculty who can create excitement about learning. It’s no surprise that the selection of the ideal college causes many students—and their parents—to wobble a bit. This is where Charisma’s Best Christian Universities, Colleges & Schools can help students looking for the most suitable college or university for them—students like you. In these 50-plus pages, we’ve assembled several features that may help you relax and make your decision in peace. Our guest writers will walk with you through common issues such as student loans, high school transcript preparation and even dorm room packing lists. In the back of this magazine, you can find a full listing of top-notch Christian schools. Our team has scoured college websites, compiled the most useful, oft-hidden information— phone numbers, email addresses, denominational affiliation—and presented it in a neat, easy-to-digest format. While we want to prepare you as much as possible, you already have the most powerful tool of life: prayer. Without prayer, we make decisions in the dark. No decision is ever truly informed without the counsel of God. Many seemingly impossible decisions have been made easy by simply consulting the

Holy Spirit and seeking guidance. “If any of you lacks wisdom, let him ask it of God, who gives to all men liberally and without criticism, and it will be given to him” (James 1:5). One of my former students experienced God’s leading in choosing a school. Amanda Barbosa thought she wanted to attend Oral Roberts University (ORU) because that’s where her parents studied. Later she entertained scholarships from a number of universities. “With a slightly better understanding of what I wanted in the collegiate experience,” she says, “I decided I wanted to play Division 1 soccer; to get a degree in business because, well, business is a part of everything; to attend a smaller university known for fostering strong community; and to be immersed in a community that would support me in my pursuit to know God.” Choosing to accept an athletic scholarship offer from ORU, she experienced “amazing relationships, invaluable learning and, most importantly, knowledge of God’s heart.” No doubt, prayer was part of Amanda’s journey. It’s critical to pray and earnestly listen to what God tells you about your education. Don’t rule out any possibilities or tell God, “No.” Often, when I feel what Paul calls “the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding” (Phil. 4:7), I know in my spirit where God is leading me. Other times, we must knock on many different doors and trust God to open the one He wants us to walk through. It is our hope that this publication will empower students to look objectively at their options, prayerfully consider them and choose a school that will help them both professionally and spiritually. As a former professor and dean, I’ve seen the strong impact that a Christian education can have on students. And I pray along with you for clarity in your decision.

DR. STEVE GREENE is Charisma Media Group’s publisher and executive vice president. He has served as dean of the College of Business and dean of Distance Learning and was a marketing professor at Oral Roberts University in Tulsa, Oklahoma. 6

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SEAN ROBERTS

Parents and students should pray together about their choices


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| VALUE

INVESTING Wisely in Your Future Consider why attaining a degree may be well worth your time, effort and money

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and money it will require? It certainly can be. For me, it was worth the investment, so much so that I have made it my vocation to help others pursue higher education for themselves. Higher education is a vehicle that changes the trajectory of our lives and propels us forward. While many voices have begun to question the value of attaining a college degree, potential students should consider the practical reasons to make the investment in their future and subsequent returns. According to the Pew Research Center, college-educated individuals between the ages of 25 and 32 earn approximately $17,500 more per year than adults who have attained a high school diploma. This equals a wage disparity of approximately 62 percent. The same study indicated that unemployment among 25- to 32-year-olds

with college degrees was 3.8 percent versus 12.2 percent for those with a high school diploma. Further, 9 in 10 college graduates ages 25-32 say their degree has already paid off or they expect it to pay off in the future. Even among students who have taken out loans to support their higher education goals, 9 in 10 believe their sacrifice was worth it or will be worth it in the future as they consider their lifetime earning potential. High school students asking the question of whether pursuing a college degree is worth the investment also should consider that without the degree, career paths will be limited. Data collected by Ruffalo Noel Levitz indicates that by 2020, two-thirds of all jobs in the United States will require a postsecondary education. Two-thirds! As teenagers and young adults, we may not know what we want to do with our c h ar ism asb est . com

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ttaining a college degree is about more than earning a credential. It’s about shaping our lives in both tangible and intangible ways. Unlike a product we purchase and then consume, education is a product in which we invest, and it impacts the core of who we are. We make short-term investments regularly in the places we live, the clothes we wear and the technology we use. Higher education is an investment that pays both short- and long-term dividends. We exercise as a means of taking care of the body God gave us. As Christians, we should carefully consider the pursuit of higher education for similar reasons, as preparation for the call of God on our lives. Is submitting to the process of earning a degree worth the time, effort

BY DR. NANCY BRAINARD


lives, and that’s understood, but simple math reveals that more opportunities exist if we continue to pursue education versus taking the position that we can do without it. Finally, what about the intangible benefits? College and university campuses are places in which long-lasting relationships and professional networks are established. My mother was right when she told me the friends I made in college were the ones I’d know for the rest of my life. College campuses are places in which ideas are generated, thoughts are expanded, presuppositions are challenged, dreams are born and strategic collaborations are made. The college years represent a powerful time in the life of a student.

“Higher education is a

vehicle that changes the trajectory of our lives and propels us forward.”

© ISTOCKPHOTO/MICHAELJUNG

Selecting the Best School

College selection can be a daunting process for students and families. Once a student expresses interest in going to any school whatsoever, the barrage of mail and email can feel overwhelming, and a type of decision paralysis can set in the mind of the potential university student. To avoid this paralysis, students should identify early in the search process what’s important to them in selecting a college or university. Students should create a list of the top 10 (or six or 11) items they value and which they want to find at the campus they’ll call home for a few years. These items may include the degree programs, extracurricular activities and the quality and characteristics of student life. While the location of a school is important, students should be open to schools located outside their city, state or even nation. The student who restricts his search to schools that are nearby may eliminate one from consideration that would be a great fit before even having an opportunity to learn about the school and what may be possible there. After researching schools that fit the student’s priorities, he should visit if at all possible, either in person or virtually. This is an opportunity to talk with students and professors to get cha ri s masbe st.co m

a realistic idea of what life would be like at the school, should he choose to attend. A campus visit is also a great opportunity to learn about the school’s graduates and what they are doing with the degrees they earned at the college or university. Although there is no substitute for walking the campus, many schools offer online-visit platforms that can give students a feel for the atmosphere at the school.

A Cost-Effective Education

Students will learn it’s important to be smart about the ways in which they manage their college education.

For instance, while in high school, they might consider options to get a jump-start on general-education degree requirements through advanced placement and/or dualenrollment programs. Such programs allow the student to take college courses while still enrolled in high school. For some, these are a wonderful tool to begin building their college transcripts. Second, students can utilize online career assessments to help them clarify their strengths and ultimate career goals. While students don’t need to have settled on a major by the day they arrive 2 01 5 | C H A RI S M A ’S B E ST

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as many classes as possible, all of which pertain to their degree plan. Students who do this will get the most for their tuition dollars. It is often the case that through a combination of maximizing enrollment in the fall and spring terms and taking advantage of mini terms, online courses or summer offerings, students can complete their degree in fewer than the standard four years.

A Well-Paying Job

To increase the chances of securing a well-paying job immediately upon graduation, it is imperative that students work to develop their skills academically, socially and professionally. Approaching each of their courses with the right disposition and diligence, they will have a better opportunity to maintain a good grade point average (GPA). Employers seek graduates who are both knowledgeable and confident, so students need to take the time while in college to gain a deep understanding of their chosen profession. Also, students should get to know some professionals in their chosen field.

This can be done through mentoring programs, job shadowing, internships or joining a professional organization. These will allow the student to gain hands-on experience and can lead to valuable professional contacts, which may be instrumental in finding a job after graduation. As students are strengthened personally and sharpened professionally through the process of obtaining a college degree, they will gain more than vital knowledge and an important credential or diploma. Ultimately, the student is a product of his college experience. Every class attended, every assignment completed and every relationship forged will add value to his future endeavors and pursuits. The student who chooses wisely will, no doubt, enjoy the journey! 3 DR. NANCY BRAINARDserves as vice president of enrollment management at Oral Roberts University in Tulsa, Oklahoma, where she enjoys counseling prospective students about what God is calling them to do and how a college education can help them get there. c h ar ism asb est . com

LIGHTSTOCK

on campus as a student, with planning, they can avoid taking classes that cost time and money and do not ultimately benefit their degree. Third, students can take opportunities to earn income through financial aid, part-time jobs and other experiences while applying for scholarships early and often. Even high school freshmen and sophomores should consider their extracurricular activities as they relate to scholarships for which they can apply later in high school. Having worked with hundreds of students through the years, I’ve seen that their hard work, creativity and perseverance do pay off! Fourth, when enrolling full time in college, students can work with a campus adviser to make sure they can see a clear path to graduation. These professionals know the academic and marketplace landscape and can be valued partners in making the most of every semester of study and hands-on experience. Fifth, students can take advantage of plans that offer fixed pricing for a range of credit hours per term by enrolling in


“Don’t assume that you can’t afford to go to college! Obtaining a college degree can be within your reach.”—Marian Dill

Avoiding School Debt The cost of college may not be as high as students believe

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ore students are headed to college than ever before, but the price of an undergraduate education has also risen. Today many assume tens of thousands of dollars of debt will be necessary for a university education, but it doesn’t have to be so. If a student believes he is called to go to college, but the financial burden seems overwhelming, there are ways to avoid the shadow of education debt.

Find the Best Value

Here are some tips to help students avoid significant school debt: 1) Work hard in high school for a better chance at merit scholarships. This is probably the most obvious strategy, and one that all students have heard endlessly. However, the benefits far outweigh the effort when it comes to taking advanced-placement (AP) or dual enrollment classes and studying to make the best grades possible. Colleges often offer scholarships that are based solely on the student’s test scores and/or grade point average. 12

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Students can easily apply for these scholarships because of their straightforward requirements. 2) Search for scholarships that are not just merit based. Google heartily! Ask around to learn about scholarships. The student should check with his local church or denomination as well as community and school organizations. High school guidance counselors are also a fantastic resource that are largely ignored by most students, but a significant part of a school counselor’s job is to help students with post-high school plans. Counselors will know about scholarships that students will never find on their own. Every year billions of dollars in scholarships become available—and, sadly, millions go unrewarded. Students may be surprised about what they qualify for, as so many different types of scholarships are available. 3) Shop around for the best value in colleges— and it’s not always the cheapest. Every upstanding college will have a website in addition to numerous phone numbers students can call for specific information. c h ar ism asb est . com

LIGHTSTOCK

BY KAREN CHAMBLESS


| DEBT

and federal aid and scholarships are factored into the calculation. 5) See if the college actually takes initiative to help students and alumni. Students should avoid schools that operate for profit. They should also be cautious of schools that work high-cost college experiences like study-abroad trips into their tuition rates. Students also may want to research ways that the university gives back to its community as well as to the school’s alumni. And if a college with higher fees offers significant networking opportunities that could help alumni get a job right after graduation, it could be worth the extra expense to maximize the possibility of an income. But of course, there is no guarantee of landing a job after school.

Invest in the Future

Students should ask for fee breakdowns. (If the school doesn’t give these, the student should be suspicious!) How does the tuition rate per credit hour compare to the rate at similar schools? Is it worth paying $500 per semester to work out if the school gym only has one treadmill? These and many other questions are worth asking. 4) Calculate the net price of a school. By law, every college in the United States is required to post a netprice calculator on its website. Students will most likely need federal tax forms, academic records and possibly bank statements and property information to calculate this price. Using a net-price calculator is a good way to get a ballpark figure for how much school will cost after institutional cha ri s masbe st.co m

Students who invest in their education must know that they are worth the investment. Of course, they also must understand what they’re getting into in terms of costs and how their finances will impact their future. Because many students do not understand the impact of their financial choices, the importance of doing one’s homework before applying for financial aid or loans cannot be stressed enough. Lee University’s Director of Financial Aid Marian Dill reminds students that several sources are available for funding, including federal (fafsa.ed.gov and studentaid.gov), state, institutional and private. Loans must be repaid, but grants are funds that do not have to be paid back. If the student plans to become a teacher, he must take note that the federal TEACH (Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher education) grant sometimes converts to a loan, and when that occurs, it must be paid back. Scholarships do not have to be repaid, but students should read the specific criteria for each scholarship. Students should also take advantage of work programs. Federal loans can be subsidized (where the government is responsible for the interest while the student is enrolled

at least half time) or unsubsidized. Students also can seek loans from private lenders (though these are not the best option), and parents can apply for assistance through the Federal PLUS loan program, although borrowers must meet the credit-worthiness criteria to receive these loans. Students must know their school’s requirements for aid. At most institutions, a student must be enrolled for a certain number of credits per semester to receive any aid. Students must reapply for financial aid each year by submitting the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Upon leaving school, loan recipients must assume repayment responsibility. “Don’t assume that you can’t afford to go to college!” Dill said. “Obtaining a college degree can be within your reach. I encourage all families to explore the various financial aid options available and chase after the dreams and desires of your heart.” Best-selling author and speaker Jon Acuff offers a challenge that applies to students and their quest for the information they need to make education-related decisions. “You could give up so much easier in the 1990s by just saying, ‘I don’t know how to do that.’ Until the Internet murdered that phrase,” Acuff writes on his blog. “You can no longer ever say, ‘I don’t know how to do that,’ because you have the means to figure it out. You know how to learn anything you feel called to do. You just have to do it.” If the high school graduate feels compelled to go to college, he shouldn’t let finances get in the way. Through hard work, research and understanding of how money is borrowed and spent, the student aspiring to a college education can join the millions answering God’s call through their time at university. 3 KAREN CHAMBLESSis a senior writing intern for the public relations office at Lee University in Cleveland, Tennessee. She will graduate in May 2016 with an English major and a business minor. 2 01 5 | C H A RI S M A ’S B EST

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| FUTURE

LIVING

With Impact

Unburdened by debt, the college graduate can more easily advance God’s agenda BY ALEX CHEDIAK

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est-selling author, speaker and professor Alex Chediak is passionate about students thriving in college and in their early adult years. But Chediak knows one significant factor can hold college graduates back from experiencing all that God has for them in their lives and careers. In his new Zondervan book, Beating the College Debt Trap, he addresses this critical factor—debt—that waylays so many students from the path God has chosen for them. We offer the following excerpt from the book’s potentially lifealtering conclusion titled “Be Free 14

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From Student Debt so You Can Live With Impact”:

Free to Choose Work You Love

Tragically, too many teachers, social workers, pastors and others in lowerpaying jobs today are struggling with student debt throughout their 20s, 30s and even beyond. And many of you, afraid of such a future, are, for financial reasons, opting out of the work God made you to do. That’s the wrong response. These are noble lines of work, important in our communities and honoring to God, that simply don’t pay as well as other jobs. The right response is for future teachers, social workers, pastors and others like them

to spend and borrow less for college by employing the principles in this book. Freedom from student debt means freedom to choose the work you love without the pressure to come up with an extra several hundred dollars every month for the next decade or more.

Peace of Mind

Many college graduates lack peace of mind because they don’t know how they’re going to make their student debt payments. Their anxiety leads to sleeping problems, poor eating habits and all kinds of relational dysfunction. It’s one thing if your debt payments are small relative to a stable source of income. But when your debt load is high and you’re c h ar ism asb est . com


© ISTOCKPHOTO/DEAN MITCHELL; AQUIR; KOSTENKODESIGN

“Avoiding debt in the first place means not having to pay Uncle Sam and Sallie Mae interest. It means having more money to advance God’s interests.”

unemployed or underemployed, it’s as if there’s a black cloud constantly hanging over your head. Freedom from student debt promotes peace of mind because it means there are fewer bills to pay and no debt collectors chasing you.

Preparation for Marriage

Having debt doesn’t disqualify you from marriage. What matters is if you’re moving in the direction of living within your means and paying off your debt. But arguments about money are a frequent trigger for divorce. While financial problems can arise after marriage, bringing student debt into marriage is especially messy because it’s individual debt—his cha ri s masbe st.co m

debt or her debt, not your debt. If Tyler brings in $15,000 of debt, and Brianna brings in $35,000, it’s easy for Tyler to become resentful or suspicious toward his bride. Theoretically, Tyler and Brianna both know “they” have $50,000 in debt, but it’s not always easy to remember that fact when Brianna wants a $900 sofa and Tyler wants a $900 flat-screen TV. Freedom from student debt means bringing a clean financial slate into your marriage—an excellent gift to your future bride or groom.

The Ultimate Benefit

To understand the ultimate benefit of beating the college debt trap,

let’s examine one of the most bizarre parables Jesus ever told. We find it in chapter 16 of Luke’s gospel. It’s a story known as “the parable of the shrewd manager.” Mr. Shrewd Manager, let’s call him Zach, works for a rich man, whom we’ll call Ryan. Ryan finds out that Zach is wasting money—Ryan’s money. Naturally, he’s troubled. So he calls him in. “Hey, Zach, I understand you’ve been irresponsible with my money.” Zach doesn’t even try defending himself. He knows it’s over. Ryan gives him until the end of the day to clean out his office and hit the road. Zach comes up with a brilliant plan. Ryan is a banker; lots of people owe him money. Until 5 p.m., Zach still 2 01 5 | C H A RI S M A ’S B EST

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smarter in the ways of the world than Christians are in the ways of God. People like Zach do a great job of using money to advance their agenda. Shouldn’t we be as resourceful about using money to advance God’s agenda? Everything we have is on loan from God: “The earth is the Lord’s and everything in it” (Ps. 24:1, NLT). When we get out of debt, we honor God because we’re displaying integrity by paying back what we owe (Rom. 13:7-8). Avoiding debt in the first place means not having to pay Uncle Sam and Sallie Mae interest. It means having more money to advance God’s interests. Though I’ve warned you about the traps to avoid, fundamentally this book’s message is one of hope. Getting a college degree in something you enjoy and do well in is entirely possible. You don’t need to believe the hype that college is too expensive. You just need to understand how the system works and then be willing to apply yourself and live within your means. Beating the college debt trap lays

the foundation for honoring God with money for a lifetime. It’s not about getting rich so you can sit on a beach in the Bahamas and order cocktails. Wealth isn’t the goal; freedom to serve God is. Those who don’t have to send monthly checks to Sallie Mae have the freedom to put their efforts and earnings to work around the globe relieving suffering, lifting people out of extreme poverty and sharing the saving message of Jesus Christ— making friends who will join them for eternity (Luke 16:9). 3 Taken from Beating the College Debt Trap by Alex Chediak. Copyright © 2015 by Juan Alexander Chediak. Used by permission of Zondervan. www.zondervan.com. All rights reserved. ALEX CHEDIAKis an author, speaker and professor of engineering and physics at California Baptist University in Riverside, California. Along with Beating the College Debt Trap, he has also written Thriving at College and Preparing Your Teens for College. c h ar ism asb est . com

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has the authority to sign paperwork on Ryan’s behalf. So Zach calls a bunch of the people who owe Ryan money. He offers each of them an immediate 20 to 50 percent discount on their debt if they quickly sign the paperwork. Sure enough, they come flocking in. And at 5 p.m., Zach heads for the door with a slew of new friends ready to scratch his back the way he just scratched theirs. Devious, isn’t it? Zach was supposed to take care of Ryan’s interests. It’s hard to imagine it was in Ryan’s best interest to forfeit what scholars estimate would have been a year and a half ’s worth of wages (Luke 16:4-7). But what’s so bizarre is that the master praises Zach as he’s heading home. Then Jesus seems to tell his disciples to go and do likewise (verse 9). What in the world? Jesus isn’t praising Zach’s sneaky trick. He’s telling us to imitate Zach in using money strategically to prepare for the future. We’re told, “For the people of this world are more shrewd in dealing with their own kind than are the people of the light” (verse 8). People of this world are often


| PLANNING

Getting Ahead During High School Dual enrollment offers value and advancement for forward-thinking students BY MINDY L. HUGHES

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ohnessa Richard graduated in May from Tidewater Community College (TCC) in southeastern Virginia with an associate of science and general studies degree. In June, Richard joined her high school classmates at graduation ceremonies, where she received her high school diploma. The 17-year-old began taking classes at TCC when she was 14, while attending high school. She was the first student to earn dual degrees while enrolled in a partnership between the community college and the Portsmouth, Virginia, public school division. She was also TCC’s youngest graduate in the class of 2015. Now, Richard is enrolled at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia, where she’s a student in the Honors College, on a path toward studying to be a neurologist. Richard’s educational journey may not be the norm, but for more college-bound teens and their families, dual enrollment programs are growing in popularity and proving advantageous for several reasons.

Be Part of a Growing Trend

Dual enrollment programs enable high school students to enroll in college classes, earning both high school and college credits at the same time. Although the details of these programs vary from state to state and from college to college, participation continues to grow as students and parents learn more about this option. In Virginia, a 2012 law requires community colleges and school boards to develop agreements encouraging dual enrollment. Other states have similar agreements. Most of TCC’s dual enrollment students come from public high schools, where they pay a reduced credit-hour fee. Homeschool students and private high school students pay TCC’s prevailing tuition rate. TCC provides an insightful example of the growing interest and attention for dual enrollment. During the 2014-15 academic year, TCC enrolled about 1,300 high school and homeschool students—a 20 percent increase compared with the previous year. The community college’s president has put a renewed emphasis on dual enrollment and set an ambitious goal of 3,000 students for the fall 2015 semester. 18

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With the Federal Reserve reporting outstanding student debt of about $1.3 trillion, one of the prime advantages of dual enrollment is a significant cost savings in financing a college education. Some colleges offer discounted tuition to dual enrollment students, which results in those students entering college with a head start, both financially and academically. “I would highly recommend it as a way to get ahead in school and save a good amount of money,” says Mary Beth Miles, a business management major at Regent University in Virginia Beach, Virginia. “Because of dual enrollment, I will be graduating college in three years instead of four, and it has a made a difference in how I approach life.” Regent’s dual enrollment program, known as Early College, debuted several years ago. While Early College enrollment numbers comprise less than 2 percent of Regent’s undergraduate student population, staff and faculty members who work with Early College students speak highly of the program. “Dual enrollment is not utilized as often as it could be,” says Molly Smith, Regent’s director of undergraduate admissions. “It’s really a great option for many families.” In Regent’s experience, the retention rate for Early College students is also very good. Smith said some professors have shared that the dual enrollment students in their classes are the most prepared students. Early College students tend to be more motivated and are eager to be in class, which means they generally perform well. “Here at Regent, we find that homeschool students most often utilize dual enrollment, and these students are often more academically advanced,” Smith says. Besides the academic credentials of their students, homeschool families also tend to be more financially savvy about college costs. “We have seen that homeschool students in our dual enrollment program tend to take out less money in student loans when they enter college full time,” says Liz Dougherty, Regent’s executive director of advising.

Be Informed of the Limitations

However, Smith cautions that dual enrollment could have an impact on a student’s ability to qualify for certain c h ar ism asb est . com


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scholarships after they graduate from high school and enroll full time in college. Financial aid cannot be applied to dual enrollment course tuition. Also, students entering college with significant college credit may not be considered freshmen and may not be eligible for some scholarships. It’s important for families to understand how a college will categorize students with dual enrollment credits; an incoming freshman may qualify for different financial aid than a transfer student. The typical dual enrollment student will take general education college classes while in high school. Most students take a maximum of two or three courses per semester. “My parents strongly advised me to get a head start on college and thought dual enrollment would be my best option,” Miles says. “They helped me choose the college and the courses cha ri s masbe st.co m

based on what I wanted to major in. I took 28 credits, almost an entire year of school during my junior and senior year of high school—English 101 and 102, College Algebra, Intro to Music, Earth Science, New Testament and Old Testament, Intro to Philosophy, Western Civilization 1, U.S. History 1 and others. I pretty much exhausted Regent’s Early College list of approved classes.” Besides general education courses, the opportunity to enroll in more advanced classes is another benefit of dual enrollment. Particularly for homeschool students, dual enrollment classes can supplement the high school courses that parents and homeschool co-ops can teach effectively. Most dual enrollment students are high school juniors or seniors. Entrance requirements to dual enrollment programs vary among institutions. At Regent, Early College applicants must

have a “B” average and submit high school transcripts for review. SAT scores are not required for admission to Early College, but Smith encourages parents and students to check specific dual enrollment requirements for colleges they are considering. As in Richard’s experience with TCC, some students may take dual enrollment classes through a local community college in preparation for enrolling in a four-year institution after high school graduation. In those cases, Smith advises parents and students to contact their top two or three colleges and ask how many credits they will accept from dual enrollment.

Be Aware of the Advantages

Smith also advises students to consider both on-campus and online options for dual enrollment. “Besides financial and academic 2 01 5 | C H A RI S M A ’S B EST

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people who may believe differently. That can be hard for some young people.” Although the environment at a Christian college such as Regent may alleviate some of these concerns, parents and students need to be ready for the maturity of content and discussion in a college class. “Remember, these are classes designed for adult learners,” Dougherty explains. “For example, in a psych class, students may be studying mature themes such as sexual identity. They need to understand the expectation of an adult atmosphere in a college class setting.” All aspects considered, dual enrollment programs offer significant advantages. Reflecting on her own experience, Miles offers this practical advice to students considering dual enrollment:

“I was also working part time while finishing high school and taking college classes, so I mostly struggled with time management, never in a serious way, but sometimes the midweek deadlines for posts were difficult between work and church activities and previous commitments,” she says. “Time management is your best friend. Learning how to stay focused for two or three hours at a time is hard, but so worth it later.” 3 MINDY L. HUGHES, APR,is a nationally accredited, award-winning public relations counselor based in Virginia Beach, Virginia. Since 2000, she has been successfully serving clients in higher education, government, health care, transportation and nonprofit organizations, including Regent University. c h ar ism asb est . com

LIGHTSTOCK

advantages, dual enrollment classes are a good way for students to investigate a college, to experience how professors teach and find out how much student support is available,” she explained. Miles confirmed the value of taking that approach. “I enjoyed learning what college classes were like from the comfort of my home without other people around,” she says. “As an introvert, learning how college classes are without being in a classroom setting was wonderful for me because I did them all online.” Taking classes online may be a new experience for some high school students. Choosing that option means the student also should take advantage of a college’s online orientation programs and stay connected to the professor and classmates throughout the semester. “Dual enrollment can help with acclimation to college, and for some students, it also can be a way for them explore their interests and help choose a major,” Dougherty says. Because dual enrollment programs focus on general education classes, students who earn those credits also may have more time during college to take more elective courses, add a minor or join studyabroad opportunities. Not every college-bound high school student may be a candidate for dual enrollment, and their families must understand the differences between high school and college classes. “Parents should be sure their teens are ready for college-level work,” Dougherty says. “Students are not always prepared for the different learning environment of a college class. In high school, students have more time and interaction with teachers. They may not be ready for more self-directed learning and the demands of a faster-paced college course. It requires a lot of discipline.” Besides academic readiness, a teen’s emotional, psychological and spiritual maturity are also essential factors for consideration. “Parents should accurately assess the maturity of the student,” Smith advises. “Students and parents need to remember that they’ll be with older students— adult learners, career changers and


| COMMUTE

Choosing to Commute Discover the pros and cons of this cost-effective option

tudents who want a full college experience, not simply an education, may hesitate to choose to commute, but there are benefits in doing so. Deciding to commute or live in a college residence hall is one of the more important, and sometimes difficult, decisions students must make as they plan to enter college. A number of factors may impact this decision, including the cost of education, students’ desire to keep strong connections to their home, friends or faith community, and their need to retain a job they already have to help pay for college expenses. While it may be tempting to make the choice based on these factors alone, the benefits of living in a residence hall and the value that on-campus life offers should be weighed in order to arrive at a decision that will lead to the most rewarding college experience. However, students attending college a distance from home may have little choice about whether they live on campus. Many colleges, especially those that are primarily residential in their approach, require their students live on campus, at least during their freshman and sophomore years. But for students whose college choice provides them with the option to commute or live in residence halls, here are 22

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some considerations that may help to weigh the benefits and drawbacks of this choice:

Perks and Peers

Each student differs in his personal experience of commuting or living in a residence hall. One Anderson University student was pleased with her decision to commute. “Being a commuter most definitely has its perks,” she says. Having “quiet study space,” as another commuter noted, and the ongoing presence and support of family members toward educational endeavors adds to the commuter student’s college experience. Yet another student said he “stayed home mostly for financial reasons,” but added that the ability to “enjoy homecooked meals and not needing to share laundry facilities” was a benefit that came out of his commuting experience. Considerable research demonstrates living in campus residence halls has a significant and mostly positive effect on the student experience. Becoming a part of the college community is essential to getting the most out of the student’s higher-education experience. c h ar ism asb est . com

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BY DR. JIM FEREIRA


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Rutgers University Professor Gregory S. Blimling shows in his book Student Learning in College Residence Halls that participating in the social aspects of college life has a significant impact on students’ academic success and on their overall satisfaction and enjoyment of college. Living on campus provides a number of opportunities to students who live in residence halls that are less readily available to students who commute. One benefit of living on campus is the ability to connect readily with other students. A recent commuter student says the most difficult aspect of her commuter year was “the lack of community” she was able to develop with her peers. While there are often many housing options for students—residence hall, on- or off-campus apartment, with other students as roommates or not—being in close proximity with their fellow students offers a significant benefit. Students who have this interaction in daily life tend to develop vital connections with other students more quickly than those who commute. These relationships are critical to students’ academic success and overall satisfaction with college. Living on campus also supports making connections with members of the faculty and staff. Students who live on campus are more likely to make vital connections beyond the classroom with faculty and staff whose offices are often in close proximity to the student’s living accommodations. Developing accessible connections with faculty and staff members may help students navigate the difficult points and places in their college life. Blimling’s research suggests that students who have these important connections are often more satisfied with their college experience, exhibit stronger academic performance and are more likely to graduate from the college or university they choose to attend. Because students living in college residences don’t leave campus after classes, they also can more readily attend campus sports events, student activities, clubs and organizations’ meetings, participate in intramural games and eat in college dining halls—all activities that draw students into community. One commuter commented that one of the cha ri s masbe st.co m

more difficult aspects of commuting was finding ways to be a part of college life after classes. “Most of the student body lives on campus, so social interactions are more spontaneous,” he says. Finding connecting opportunities challenged this student because he commuted. Students who are able to develop strong connections with peers, faculty and staff members and who are able to get involved in campus life are more likely to enjoy their college experience. They are also more likely to do well

academically, more likely to graduate and more likely to graduate on time.

Intentionality and Involvement

For a number of reasons, it isn’t practical or possible for all students to live in residence halls. The cost, students’ desire or need to remain close to home and other factors may lead students to choose to commute. Students who have commuted in the past may have differing points of view on whether the experience was their best option. Past commuters agree that there are a few things a student can do to maximize the commuting experience: »»Don’t just go to classes! It’s easy to attend classes, then get in your car and go home. Commuter students must not view their classes as a job to which they go, do their work and then punch out when the workday is done. Commuters must develop their own campus life. Eating meals in college dining halls, studying in the library, spending time with friends in residence halls–in general, participating in college life as if college is your life will add to the commuter student’s college experience.

»»Be intentional about building relationships. The commuter student needs to make an effort to talk to his classmates and get to know them outside of class. They might exchange contact information and organize study groups with other students. It’s helpful to visit with professors at their office, perhaps inviting them to coffee. They could meet with staff members in student development, student activities and campus ministries. Commuter students can build strong connections with peers through involvement with academic endeavors and campus organizations. They could spend time in the residence halls and at the campus union and participate in late-night activities. Simply being on campus, even when not in class, will help the commuting student build the relationships and connections that lead to a feeling of membership in the community and, ultimately, will strengthen the factors that lead to college success. »»Get involved in the community. A recent commuter says “to make the commuter experience the very best possible, especially for the first-year commuter, you need to get involved!” Joining college clubs and organizations, taking part in intramural sports teams or attending athletics events are helpful ways to become a part of the college community. Commuters might consider taking on certain leadership roles. They could return to campus at night for student activities. These are the elements that draw students into the community. Clearly the student’s choice regarding where he will live during college, especially in the first years, may be one of his most important decisions—one that will have a significant impact on the overall college experience. For those who choose to commute for their college experience, these suggestions may help make their commuter experience the best possible choice. 3 JIM FEREIRA serves as vice president for student development at Anderson University in Anderson, South Carolina. He holds a Ph.D. in higher education from the University of Minnesota and has 31 years of experience in student development and residence life roles. 2 01 5 | C H A RI S M A ’S B EST

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| PURPOSE

The Journey That Matters

Following Christ’s leading toward your unique role in His kingdom

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pic. Empowering. Life-changing. You have just had the most intense personal spiritual encounter ever, perhaps at a youth camp, and you want your parents, your friends and the world to know that you are 100 percent totally committed to following Jesus, no matter what. If you’ve had that kind of experience, you know what I’m talking about. The powerful altar call. The impassioned prayers. The faith walk through a night-filled sky. The call of God to live with abandon and follow Him. The peace-filled yes. You are ready. But where do I go from here? Who am I really? What is God calling me to? These big questions cry out for big answers. College is starting, and you anticipate the years ahead with excitement, hoping to find answers. You get to be on your own, take the classes you want, chart your own path. This path is exclusively yours, and walking it well makes all the difference. Knowing about the college journey will help you navigate this path toward living the life God is calling you to live. Take the high road. If we only use education as a means to an end, to live a good life or get a good job, then perhaps we miss the whole “God calling” point. In the Gospels, Jesus’ counsel to the disciples after His resurrection was to be living proof that God exists. So, as Christians, our journey becomes less about a good life and more about a worthy life. When our outlook is to be living proof that God exists, our destination changes. We begin to see that our intellect, skills, passions, relationships—all of it—are designed to honor Him. 24

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Explore the route. The business of learning is serious stuff. No matter how much you pray, if you don’t study, you skip class or you spend the majority of your time gaming, dating, shopping, working out (or any other excess or procrastination), you set yourself up for failure. For some, exploration takes them down paths of destruction, but for those who plan well, they map the journey of a lifetime. Practical matters like setting up a semester assignment calendar, study and work schedule and accessing campus support services are essential to forging new milestones. Engage in the journey. Learning at the college level is, at its best, an active partnership. What you put into it deeply impacts what you get out of it. A Christian college, in particular, is a place where students have space and support to wrestle with big questions about their faith, purpose and calling. Academic reading and listening to lectures are just the road maps—passive learning. But the experiential—stopping, camping out and researching ideas, beliefs and knowledge, the give-and-take with professors, study groups and others—brings meaning to the student’s journey. Recent research from Gallup and Purdue University shows that students who felt support from professors and mentors were more likely to pursue their dreams, be more engaged at work and thrive in life. This support is a “career- and life-trajectory game changer.” Travel with fellow explorers. Learning doesn’t just happen in the classroom, so pay attention to the relationships c h ar ism asb est . com

LIGHTSTOCK

BY DR. SHERI PHILLIPS


you build with others. Every step you take either moves you closer to or further away from God. Building community with people of faith, challenging and supporting each other, going on mission trips, serving others through volunteering, being involved in a local church, getting out of your comfort zone, caring about others—you will be amazed at how the journey unfolds. Walk deeply on your spiritual journey. During the college years, your beliefs will likely be tested, and these times can feel like huge detours. On your spiritual journey, you may begin to question your faith as you try to reconcile meaning out of all the inconsistencies you see around you. With support, these challenges can lead you to an integrative faith that connects who you are with your purpose in this world. For some, this testing can be so earth-shattering that they abandon their faith. Others never even begin to question, preferring the security of beliefs told to them. However, those students who move toward integration gain a deeper understanding of God, a tested faith that will guide their lives. Know that one path leads to yet another. The path is rarely straight and often has many twists and turns. It will change you. Higher education changes the way you think, believe and act. We live our lives fulfilling our purpose in the unique way that we can, in the way that no one else ever has or ever will be able to do in the same manner. If we listen, Christ whispers that our purpose is to be who we are uniquely created to be—shortcomings and all—and to live it all under His love. As a journeyman trusting God to shape your life’s path, college, done well, is a gateway to a life you may not imagine on this day. God does call. It is up to us to answer. This world needs your skills and gifts, but more importantly, there are people desperate to know Christ. Your life, and those you touch, will never be the same. This is no spectator sport, so let’s get some skin in the game. 3 DR. SHERI PHILLIPSis vice president for student development at Evangel University in Springfield, Missouri. cha ri s masbe st.co m

Faithful Freshmen: A guide to staying close to God in college Every 18-year-old going off to college wonders what the next four years will bring. As freshmen, you look forward with excitement, hope and curiosity to the changes that lie ahead. If you grew up in a religious household or practice a certain religion, a fear of losing touch with your faith (or your parents’ fear of this) can contribute to feelings of anxiety. If you follow a few simple steps, however, and remain committed to the goal of staying faithful, your journey will be much easier. 1) Find supportive friends. Finding at least one or two close friends who share your values, even if most of your friends don’t, is the key to success. Going to church on Sundays or to regular religious worship is much easier when you have company. Being able to discuss and share your faith with others is key to your success. There is a reason we have faith communities—to support one another. I’m sure there were times during my college years when a roommate’s gentle reminder about Mass on Sunday morning kept me going. None of us is perfect, and none of us is constantly unwavering in our faith. It takes good influences in our lives to keep us going. Occasionally I would joke with two of my good friends that they pressured me to do the right thing, and I am so grateful they did. Not every college friend, of course, should be exactly like you or share your same religion. That’s not what college—or life—should be at all. But a few close believers just like you can make a surprising difference. 2) Have confidence and humility. One reason college students lose their faith and stop going to church (apart from just laziness) is wanting to be like everyone else. Especially in the first few months of school, the majority of freshmen just want friends. They don’t really care who they are. Having confidence is critical. As St. Francis de Sales said, “Be who you are and be that well.” The desire to blend in and sleep in on Sundays will be appealing, but having the strength and confidence to stand up for your beliefs and practice them is important to maintaining your faith. “Be who you are and be that well.” Remaining faithful throughout your life also requires the humility to recognize this is only possible with God’s help. This is perhaps one of the hardest aspects of keeping our faith: trusting God completely. It goes against our human nature and desire for complete control. However, if we can move past that desire and trust God with our lives and our future, He will not let us down. 3) Create a prayer routine. If you are about to leave for college, or have a son or daughter who is, prayer is one sure way to remain close to God. Just like exercising or planning ahead in your studies or your work, making prayer part of your routine will keep God at the center of your life. My mother always told me, “If you just pick three times a day to pray, it will become like brushing your teeth.” Of course, she was right. Working in those little prayers throughout the day may seem like a small and unnecessary addition to an already busy schedule. But remembering to pray should not be left to just one hour on Sunday. Adding in daily prayer will give you strength when keeping your faith isn’t so easy. 4) Know it’s all up to you now. One of the most thrilling aspects of college is the freedom that comes along with it. Keeping your own schedule, living on your own for the first time, going to get pizza at 1 a.m., eating dessert before dinner—all of these new and different experiences are exciting. However, keeping your faith is truly up to you. If you want to remain loyal to your faith in college, it cannot be something you just expect to happen. You have to work at it. Your parents won’t wake you on Sundays. You’ll need to be accountable for your actions and choices. Finding like-minded friends, remaining confident in your own good decisions and adding prayer to your routine will all help in this journey, but you need to be persistent. This is a decision. You have four years to grow, live and learn as well as make your mark on a new community. Who will you become, and how will you express your faith? It’s up to you.—Elisa Cipollone This article was originally posted in the online publication lifezette.com at lifezette.com/ faithzette/the-faithful-freshman/. 2 01 5 | C H A RI S M A ’S B E S T

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| DORM ROOM SURVIVAL GUIDE

Packing Essentials

BY SARAH CUSHING

How to make your new space feel more like home

1) Room Furnishings

Make your room comfortable as a place to study and hang out with friends. »»Desk lamp and bulb »»Alarm clock/radio »»Wastebasket 26

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»»Clothes hangers »»Wall decorations (posters, white boards, photographs) »»Floor rug

2) Laundry and Cleaning Supplies

Keeping your belongings clean can help you focus and relax in your room. »»Laundry bag or basket »»Laundry detergent, dryer sheets and stain remover »»Quarters for washers and dryers »»Clothes drying rack »»Iron and mini ironing board »»Non-abrasive cleaning supplies »»Dish soap »»Paper towels

3) Clothing and Accessories

If you live in a state with a steady climate year round, you may need to prepare for all four seasons depending on where your college is located. »»Rain boots »»Everyday footwear and dress shoes »»Shower shoes (flip-flops) »»Swimsuit »»Sweatshirts »»Light and heavy jackets, and a raincoat

»»Belts »»Hat, gloves and scarf »»A set of business-casual clothes »»A set of formal clothes for special events »»Exercise and sports clothing »»Pajamas and a robe

4) Groceries

Sometimes you just need a snack or quick meal in your room instead of going to the cafeteria. Here are a few suggestions for easily stored and prepared foods and useful kitchen supplies: »»Coffee, tea and hot chocolate »»Water bottles »»Oatmeal packets »»Cold cereal »»Trail mix »»Granola and protein bars »»Macaroni and cheese »»Plates, cups and silverware »»Mugs »»Travel mugs »»Electric hot water pot

5) Bed and Bath

Check your bed and bathroom setup so you can pack specifically for your needs. c h ar ism asb est . com

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acking for college can be a long stressful process. Although looking around your room at home and deciding what to bring, what to buy and what to leave can seem overwhelming, the key is to take the big move one step at a time. To help you make decisions along the way, we have provided a detailed list of essential items incoming college students need. The list is broken down into 10 categories to simplify the packing experience. Each college or university may give students a specific list of items they are permitted to bring as well as items not allowed. Also, certain colleges will provide furniture such as a bed, desk, chair and dresser or closet. Pay particular attention to the furniture and storage sizes to avoid overpacking your dorm room.


»»Bed sheets (Be sure to take note of the mattress size.) »»Comforter »»Mattress pad »»Blanket »»Pillows »»Towels »»Shower caddy

6) Personal Items

Taking care of yourself marks the beginning of a successful college experience. »»Shampoo, conditioner and body wash »»Deodorant »»Toothbrush and toothpaste »»Sanitary supplies »»Hair products »»Facial products »»Medical insurance information

7) Electronics

As you know, electronic devices are useful for coursework and entertainment. »»Printer, printer paper and ink »»Extension cord/power strip (UL approved)

»»Medical insurance information »»Sunglasses and umbrella »»Sewing kit »»Flashlight

»»Laptop and charger »»Hard drive and flash drive »»Headphones »»Speakers

8) Classroom Supplies

10) Optional Items

Going back to school would not be the same without stocking up on basic classroom supplies to ensure you begin college on the right note. »»Notebooks, note cards »»Folders »»Writing utensils (pencils and erasers, pens, markers, highlighters, permanent marker) »»Mini stapler and staples »»Tape »»Ruler »»Post-it notes »»Planners »»Calculator »»Textbooks

Finally, these are extra items you might want or need: »»Fan »»Microwave »»Small refrigerator (keeping in mind any size requirements) »»Bicycle Use this list to effectively pack dorm room and college-life essentials. There is no need to stress about the packing process if you are following a detailed list to remind you of any items you may need. Remember to double-check your college’s guidelines for what you can bring—or not—and do not be afraid to ask your admissions counselor for the top items every student takes to college. 3

9) Miscellaneous

These are items you will need in certain situations: »»Backpack »»Suitcase »»Personal ID

Eating Well

SARAH CUSHINGworks in the Office of Marketing at the University of Valley Forge in Phoenixville, Pennsylvania.

BY JESSILYN JUSTICE

Keep down takeout costs with these mix-and-match microwave meals

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orms are not exactly hotbeds of culinary expertise. Thankfully, the technology of the ’80s brought us the microwave, in other words, your one-stop shop on the way to living a semi-healthy lifestyle. The best kitchen invention ever can give you more than TV meals if you put in a halfhearted effort. The key to culinary variety is to keep microwavable-ready staples handy in both your fridge and freezer, such as pre-packaged, pre-cooked chicken; rice; eggs; cheese; and your choice of veggies. Lacking a cutting board and some knives? No worries. Grocery stores have

cha ri s masbe st.co m

sliced and diced a variety of produce for your cooking needs. Here’s how you can eat three meals a day using something that probably will sit under your bed:

blueberries are my favorites), grab a spoon and indulge on the way to your obnoxiously early class.

Breakfast burrito

Instant oatmeal

You’ll need: 1-2 eggs, water, diced onions, diced tomatoes and shredded cheese.

Instructions: You’ve made it this far in your education, so surely you’re literate. Follow the directions on the packet (or just add 2/3 cups of water/milk and heat in the microwave for 60-80 seconds); add fruit (Bananas, strawberries and

Instructions: Mix the eggs with 1/4 cup of water, add veggies and beat with a fork. Heat for 60-120 seconds, depending on your microwave’s power. When finished, dump the eggs in a tortilla, add shredded cheese, and congratulate yourself for being more pragmatic than going to Mickey D’s. co n t inu ed »

Breakfast

You’ll need: packets of oatmeal of your choice, fruit and water or milk.

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| DORM ROOM SURVIVAL GUIDE

a barbecue on your bed. Hot dogs are optional.

Vegetarian cheese-and-spinachstuffed ravioli You’ll need: pre-packaged ravioli (or tortellini), a sauce of sorts (alfredo vs. marinara), mushrooms, tofu crumbles and diced veggies.

Ham, egg and cheese croissant

Ultimate mac and cheese

Instructions: Much like the burrito, beat eggs in with the water. Microwave for 60-120 seconds. Layer the ham and cheese on the croissant.

Instructions: Pop those noodles into enough water to cover them and microwave for 2-3 (or 3-4) minutes until they’re boiling. Drain any extra water. Add heaps of shredded cheese and mix. Microwave 15-30 seconds or until cheese is melted to your heart’s desire. Microwave the precooked shrimp or chicken according to package instructions. Add it all together and pretend you’re on the East Coast, indulging in a seafood delicacy.

Lunch/Dinner

Chicken tacos

You’ll need: pre-cooked chicken, lettuce, shredded cheese, diced veggies and tortillas. Instructions: Heat the chicken in the microwave according to the package instructions. When finished, roll it up with the cheese, lettuce, veggies and maybe some salsa if you’re feeling fancy.

Vegetable stir fry

You’ll need: fresh broccoli florets, snap peas, shredded carrots, green beans, ready-rice and teriyaki sauce. Instructions: Wrap your veggies in a wet paper towel. Microwave them for 2-3 minutes until the desired squishiness is achieved. Microwave the rice according to package instructions. Mix it all up with desired amount of teriyaki. Snap a photo and Instagram it to show your mother you are not completely malnourished. 28

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You’ll need: noodles (ramen or otherwise), shredded cheese, pre-cooked shrimp or chicken and water.

JESSILYN JUSTICEis the assistant news editor for Charisma. Born into a pastor’s family in Alabama, she attended Lee University and the Washington Journalism Center.

Burgers and a baked potato

You’ll need: pre-cooked burgers, potato, buns, condiments galore, olive oil, salt and pepper. Instructions: Start with the potato. Stab it all over with a fork or knife and then rub olive oil, salt and pepper into the skin. Pop it in the microwave (No aluminum! I cannot emphasize this enough or you will lose your precious cooker) for 6-7 minutes. When it’s done cooking, slice and dice, and add the condiments you want, such as butter, cheese or sour cream. Now follow the instructions for the burger, add the fixin’s, and you’ve got

© ISTOCKPHOTO/JUANMONINO; ANDRESR

You’ll need: croissant, cheese slices, ham (or turkey, for the healthier among us), water and 1-2 eggs.

Instructions: Add enough water to cover the pasta and microwave for 4-5 minutes. Add more time if the pasta is still hard. Drain the excess water. In a separate bowl, mix your sauce, mushrooms, crumbles and veggies. Heat for 3-4 minutes or until you’re satisfied with the consistency. Once everything is to your liking, combine bowls and pretend you’re in Italy while gazing out the window. 3

c h ar ism asb est . com


TOP TIER

RANKING Recognized by U.S. NEWS AND WORLD REPORT TOP 100

SOCIAL MEDIA COLLEGES BACK TO BACK YEARS by studentadvisor.com

BEST IN THE WEST by Princeton Review

RETURN ON INVESTMENT

OKLAHOMA’S TOP COLLEGES FOR by AffordableCollegesOnline.org TOP 5

HEALTHIEST COLLEGES IN THE UNITED STATES from data collected by College Prowler

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HOW WE CHOSE

CHARISMA’S BEST charisma’s best christian colleges

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or many years, Charisma has served not only the Pentecostal/ charismatic community, but also the wider evangelical community. We know the two communities overlap, yet when we created Charisma’s Best Christian Universities, Colleges & Schools, we were primarily aiming to serve the Pentecostal/charismatic institutions of higher learning because they have few other avenues to reach potential students. We believe sending young people to a Christian institution of higher learning is vital today, partly because as the American culture becomes more and more ungodly, we need strong Christian leaders—which is what these institutions produce. We also know that secular schools can often challenge a student’s faith to the extent that some students fall away from their Christian faith. This motivates parents and grandparents to get their college-bound students in Christian schools where their faith is developed rather than destroyed. Because of this, Charisma’s Best Christian Universities, Colleges & Schools is more than just an advertising vehicle; it’s our attempt to serve this community with a guide that is informative, authoritative and helpful to parents, grandparents and students in making a wise decision—including looking at 32

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colleges they may not know exist. Nearly 260 Christian colleges and universities are included in this issue’s school listing. Though the listings are free, many colleges paid for an enhanced listing or bought display advertising so they could tell their story

in their own way. To help you focus on which schools are either Pentecostal/ charismatic or are open to Pentecostal/ charismatic theology, we added an icon that is a Holy Spirit dove next to these schools. These are the ones we call “Charisma’s Best.” We also eliminated any colleges we knew were anti-Pentecostal. In fact, a couple of schools we contacted even asked us to take them off our lists, which we did. However, many Protestant and evangelical colleges with solid reputations are open to Pentecostal/ charismatic students. Though we’ve done due diligence, we can’t vouch for every school. We believe our information is correct and that the schools we’re endorsing merit this; however, we want this to be interactive, so if we’ve made a mistake, please contact us so we can make changes in the future. Likewise, if we haven’t included a university, college or Bible school that should be listed, please send us contact information for that school so we can research it more and make a qualified decision. More than anything, we hope this listing serves as an invaluable guide to students and families during the key process of selecting a school that will significantly impact the student’s future.—Steve Strang, founder/CEO c h ar ism asb est . com

COURTESY OF REGENT UNIVERSITY

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CHARISMA’S BEST CHRISTIAN COLLEGES

ALABAMA Amridge University Montgomery Phone: 888-790-8080 or 334-387-3877 Website: amridgeuniversity.edu Email: admissions @amridgeuniversity.edu Affiliation: Churches of Christ Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Bethany Divinity College & Seminary Dothan Phone: 334-793-3189 Website: bethanybc.edu Email: gen-info@bethanybc.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Concordia College Selma Phone: 334-874-5700 Website: www.ccal.edu Email: admissions@ccal.edu Affiliation: Lutheran (Missouri Synod) Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor Heritage Christian University Florence Phone: 800-367-3565 Website: hcu.edu Email: hcu@hcu.edu Affiliation: Churches of Christ Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master Huntsville Bible College Huntsville Phone: 256-469-7536 Website: hbc1.edu Email: admin@hbc1.edu Affiliation: Interdenominational Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master Judson College Marion Phone: 800-447-9472 Website: judson.edu Email: admissions@judson.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Bachelor cha ri s masbe st.co m

Samford University Birmingham Phone: 800-888-7218 Website: samford.edu Email: admission@samford.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Certificate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Selma University Selma Phone: 334-872-2533 Website: selmauniversity.edu Email: info@selmauniversity.edu  Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master Southeastern Bible College Birmingham Phone: 205-970-9200 Website: sebc.edu Email: info@sebc.edu Affiliation: Evangelical Degrees: Associate, Bachelor

ALASKA Alaska Bible College Palmer Phone: 800-478-7884 Website: akbible.edu Email: info@akbible.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor Alaska Christian College Soldotna Phone: 877-222-7211 or 907-260-7422 Website: alaskacc.edu Email: mail@alaskacc.edu Affiliation: Evangelical Degrees: Certificate, Associate Alaska Pacific University Anchorage Phone: 800-252-7528 Website: alaskapacific.edu Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Methodist Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

A R I ZO N A American Indian College of the Assemblies of God Phoenix Phone: 602-944-3335 Website: aicag.edu Email: info@aicag.edu Affiliation: Assemblies of God Degrees: Associate, Bachelor

Freedom Bible College and Seminary Siloam Springs Phone: 479-373-6420 Website: freedombiblecollege.org Email: info@freedom.edu Affiliation: Interdenominational Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

Arizona Christian University Phoenix Phone: 800-247-2697 Website: arizonachristian.edu Email: info@arizonachristian.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Bachelor

Ouachita Baptist University Arkadelphia Phone: 870-245-5000 Website: obu.edu Email: registrar@obu.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Bachelor

Gateway International Bible Institute Peoria Phone: 623-486-5000 Website: gibionline.org Email: contact@gibionline.org Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Grand Canyon University Phoenix Phone: 800-800-9776 Website: gcu.edu Email: studentlife@gcu.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

ARKANSAS Central Baptist College Conway Phone: 501-329-6872 Website: cbc.edu Email: info@cbc.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Associate, Bachelor Ecclesia College Springdale Phone: 479-248-7236 Website: ecollege.edu Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Interdenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor

CALIFORNIA Azusa Pacific University Azusa Phone: 626-969-3434 Website: apu.edu Email: admissions@apu.edu Affiliation: Interdenominational Degrees: Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Bethesda University Anaheim Phone: 714-517-1945 Website: buc.edu Email: admissions@buc.edu Affiliation: Pentecostal Degrees: Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Biola University La Mirada Phone: 562-903-6000 Website: biola.edu Email: admissions@biola.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Bachelor, Master, Doctorate California Baptist University Riverside Phone: 866-767-6228 Website: calbaptist.edu Email: admissions @calbaptist.edu Affiliation: Southern Baptist Degrees: Certificate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate 2 01 5 | C H A RI S M A ’S B EST

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CHARISMA’S BEST CHRISTIAN COLLEGES California Christian College Fresno Phone: 559-251-4215 Website: calchristiancollege.edu Email: admissions @calchristiancollege.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor California Lutheran University Thousand Oaks Phone: 805-493-3135 Website: clunet.edu Email: admissions @callutheran.edu Affiliation: Lutheran (ELCA) Degrees: Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Canyon Hills Bible College Bakersfield Phone: 661-871-1150 Website: canyonhillsbiblecollege.org Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Assemblies of God Degrees: Certificate, Associate Concordia University Irvine Phone: 800-229-1200 Website: cui.edu Email: admissions@cui.edu Affiliation: Lutheran (Missouri Synod) Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Cottonwood Leadership College Los Alamitos Phone: 562-308-2460 Website: cottonwoodcollege.org Email: clcinfo @cottonwoodcollege.org Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Certificate, Associate Harvest Bible University Los Angeles Phone: 213-384-8747 Website: harvest.edu Email: info@harvest.edu Affiliation: Interdenominational Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate 34

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Life Pacific University San Dimas Phone: 877-886–5433 Website: lifepacific.edu Email: admissions @lifepacific.edu Affiliation: International Church of the Foursquare Gospel Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master Pacific Baptist College La Verne Phone: 877-622-2921 or 909-593-0123 Website: pacificbaptist.edu Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master Patten University Oakland Phone: 888-550-3250 Website: patten.edu Email: admissions@patten.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master Providence Christian College Pasadena Phone: 866-323-0233 Website: providencecc.edu Email: admin@providencecc.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Bachelor San Diego Christian College Santee Phone: 800-676-2242 or 619-201-8700 Website: sdcc.edu Email: admissions@sdcc.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Bachelor School of Bible Theology Seminary and University San Jacinto Phone: 951-654-7700 Website: sbtsu.org Email: office@sbtsu.org Affiliation: Pentecostal Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

Simpson University Redding Phone: 530-224-5600 Website: simpsonu.edu Email: admissions @simpsonu.edu Affiliation: Christian and Missionary Alliance Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master

Degrees: Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

Southwestern College Chula Vista Phone: 619-421-6700 Website: swccd.edu Email: admissions@swccd.edu Affiliation: Methodist Degrees: Certificate, Bachelor

World Mission University Los Angeles Phone: 213-388-1000 Website: wmu.edu Email: wmuinfo@wmu.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

SUM Bible College and Theological Seminary Oakland Phone: 888-567-6174 or 510-567-6174 Website: sum.edu Email: contact@sum.edu Affiliation: Assemblies of God Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master Vanguard University Costa Mesa Phone: 800-722-6279 Website: vanguard.edu Email: admissions @vanguard.edu Affiliation: Assemblies of God Degrees: Bachelor, Master Vision International University Ramona Phone: 800-984-7466 or 760-789-4700 Website: vision.edu Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Interdenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Vision University Pasadena Phone: 626-791-1200 Website: visionu.net Email: visionuniversityusa @yahoo.com Affiliation: Interdenominational

William Jessup University Rocklin Phone: 916-577-2200 Website: jessup.edu Email: info@jessup.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Bachelor, Master

CO LO R A D O Charis Bible College Woodland Park Phone: 719-635-6029 Website: charisbiblecollege.org Email: info@charisbiblecollege.org Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master Colorado Christian University Lakewood Phone: 800-443-2484 or 303-963-3000 Website: ccu.edu Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Interdenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master

DISTRICT OF CO LU M B I A American University Washington, D.C. Phone: 202-885-1000 Website: american.edu Email: admissions @american.edu Affiliation: United Methodist Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

c h ar ism asb est . com


CHARISMA’S BEST CHRISTIAN COLLEGES Apostolic Christian College Washington, D.C. (Temporary address: Capital Height, MD) Phone: 202-542-0500 Website: apostolicchristiancollege.com Email: registrar @apostolicchristiancollege.com Affiliation: Evangelical Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

F LO R I DA Baptist College of Florida Graceville Phone: 800-328-2660 or 850-263-3261 Website: baptistcollege.edu Email: admissions @baptistcollege.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master

Bethune-Cookman University Daytona Beach Phone: 386-481-2000 Website: bethune.cookman.edu Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Methodist Degrees: Bachelor, Master Clearwater Christian College Clearwater Phone: 727-726-1153 Website: clearwater.edu Email: admissions @clearwater.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master Evangelical Bible College and Seminary Greenacres Phone: 561-965-0363  Website: ebcministries.org Email: dpdonnally@cs.com Affiliation: Evangelical

CHARIS BIBLE COLLEGE

800 Gospel Truth Way Woodland Park, CO 80863 (719) 635-6029 www.charisbiblecollege.org

Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Faith Theological Seminary and Christian College Tampa Phone: 813-886-8492   Website: ftscc.org Email: ftscc@tampabay.rr.com Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Global Impact Bible College and Seminary Bradenton Phone: 941-792-3200 Website: gibcs.com Email: info@gibcs.com Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Grace and Truth Christian University Tampa

Founded: 1994 Degrees offered: certificate, associate, bachelor’s, master’s Undergraduate student body: 6,028; 46% male, 54% female; 2% Asian, 8% black, 3% Hispanic, 85% white, 2% other descent; 8% international, 36% from in-state Students who live on campus: 0% Online enrollment: 2,100 Freshmen retention: 80% Graduation rate: 94% Most popular majors: Bible/Biblical Studies, General

Phone: 813-903-8822 Website: graceandtruthempowered.org Email: gtcu @graceandtruthempowered.org Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Certificate Heritage University and Seminary Kissimmee Phone: 407-348-6200 Website: heritageseminary.com Email: admissions @heritageseminary.com Affiliation: Interdenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate inCharacter School of Ministry Marianna Phone: 850-372-2551 Website: getincharacter.org Email: info@getincharacter.org

Academic staff (FT): 35 Student/teacher ratio: 30:1 Average class size: Ranges from 10 to 275 depending on campus location and class year No. campus ministries: 17 Expenses: Advance Tuition: $3,553; Fees w/Elec Books: $375; Fees w/Hard Copy Books: $475; visit charisbiblecollege.org for more information on expenses or call (719) 635-6029 Admissions email: info@charisbiblecollege.org

Charis Bible College is equipping the saints for the work of the ministry, training disciples to go out and share the gospel with the rest of the world in the way God has uniquely called each individual to do it.

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CHARISMA’S BEST CHRISTIAN COLLEGES Affiliation: Assemblies of God Degrees: Associate, Bachelor Johnson University Florida Kissimmee Phone: 407-847-8966 Website: johnsonu.edu /Florida/Home.aspx Email: johnsonufl@johnsonu.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor

Trinity College of Florida Trinity Phone: 727-376-6911 Website: trinitycollege.edu Email: admissions @trinitycollege.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor University of the Supernatural Ministry

Life Christian University Lutz Phone: 813-909-9720 Website: lcus.edu Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

Miami Phone: 305-398-7969 Website: university .kingjesusministry.org Email: university @kingjesusministry.org Affiliation: Charismatic Degrees: Associate, Bachelor

Logos Christian University Jacksonville Phone: 800-776-0127 Website: logos.edu Email: info@logos.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

Warner University Lake Wales Phone: 800-309-9563 Website: warner.edu Email: admissions@warner.edu Affiliation: Church of God (Anderson, IN) Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master

Palm Beach Atlantic University West Palm Beach Phone: 561-803-2100 Website: pba.edu Email: grad@pba.edu Affiliation: Interdenominational Degrees: Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

Zion Christian University Clearwater Phone: 727-791-4846 Website: zion.edu Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Pentecostal Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master

River Bible Institute Tampa Phone: 813-971-9999, ext. 233 Website: riverbibleinstitute.com Email: rbi@revival.com Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor

Zoe University Jacksonville Phone: 904-743-6166 Website: zoeuniversity.org Email: zoe@zoeuniversity.org Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

Southeastern University Lakeland Phone: 800-500-8760 Website: seu.edu Email: admission@seu.edu Affiliation: Assemblies of God Degrees: Certificate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

GEORGIA

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Beulah Heights University Atlanta Phone: 404-627-2681 Website: beulah.org Email: admissionsinfo @beulah.org Affiliation: Nondenominational

Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Brewton-Parker College Mount Vernon Phone: 912-583-2241 Website: bpc.edu Email: admissions@bpc.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Bachelor Covenant College Lookout Mountain Phone: 706-820-1560 Website: covenant.edu Email: info@covenant.edu Affiliation: Reformed Degrees: Bachelor, Master Emmanuel College Franklin Springs Phone: 800-860-8800 Website: ec.edu Email: admissions@ec.edu Affiliation: Pentecostal Degrees: Associate, Bachelor New Hope Bible Institute Warner Robins Phone: 478-953-7898 Website: nhbi.org Email: info@nhbi.org Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

Website: uofnkona.edu Email: info@uofnkona.edu Affiliation: Interdenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master

ILLINOIS Christian Life College Mount Prospect Phone: 847-259-1840 Website: christianlifecollege.edu Email: rstevens @christianlifecollege.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational (Spirit-filled) Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor Dayspring Bible College Mundelein Phone: 224-677-7800 Website: dbc.edu Email: info@dbc.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Certificate Greenville College Greenville Phone: 618-664-2800 Website: greenville.edu Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Free Methodist Degrees: Bachelor, Master

Toccoa Falls College Toccoa Falls Phone: 706-886-6831 Website: tfc.edu Email: admissions@tfc.edu Affiliation: The Christian and Missionary Alliance Degrees: Associate, Bachelor

Judson University Elgin Phone: 847-628-2500 Website: judsonu.edu Email: admissions@judsonu.edu Affiliation: Evangelical Degrees: Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

Truett-McConnell College Cleveland Phone: 706-865-2134 Website: truett.edu Email: admissions@truett.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master

North Park University Chicago Phone: 800-888-6728 Website: northpark.edu Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Evangelical Covenant Church Degrees: Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

H AWA I I University of the Nations Kona Kailua-Kona Phone: 808-326-4400, ext. 0

Olivet Nazarene University Bourbonnais Phone: 815-939-5011 Website: olivet.edu c h ar ism asb est . com


CHARISMA’S BEST CHRISTIAN COLLEGES Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Church of the Nazarene Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Trinity Christian College Palos Heights Phone: 866-874-6463 Website: trnty.edu Email: admissions@trnty.edu Affiliation: Reformed Degrees: Bachelor Wheaton College Wheaton Phone: 630-752-5000 Website: wheaton.edu Email: admissions @wheaton.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Certificate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

INDIANA Anderson University Anderson Phone: 800-428-6414 Website: anderson.edu Email: info@anderson.edu Affiliation: Church of God (Anderson, IN) Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Huntington University Huntington Phone: 800-642-6493 Website: huntington.edu Email: admissions @huntington.edu Affiliation: United Brethren in Christ Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Trinity College of the Bible Theological Seminary Newburgh

SOUTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY

1000 Longfellow Boulevard Lakeland, FL 33801 (800) 500-8760 SEU.edu

Southeastern University offers more than 60 undergraduate and 16 graduate programs, including our Doctor of Education degree. With over 4,500 students, SEU prepares its graduates for a lifetime of servant leadership in career fields such as nursing, communication, teaching, business, ministry and more. Our beautiful, modern campus is situated in Lakeland, Florida, just 45 minutes from Tampa and the Disney area of Orlando.

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Phone: 800-457-5510 Website: trinitysem.edu Email: contact@trinitysem.edu Affiliation: Interdenominational Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Valparaiso University Valparaiso Phone: 219-464-5000 Website: valpo.edu Email: undergrad .admission@valpo.edu Affiliation: Lutheran Degrees: Certificate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

I OWA Central College Pella Phone: 877-462-3687 Website: central.edu Email: admissions@central.edu

Founded: 1935 Affiliation: Assemblies of God Degrees offered: certificate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctorate Freshmen admissions: SAT or ACT required Application deadline (fall): Rolling admissions process; apply today Undergraduate student body: 4,559; 44% male, 56% female; 1.5% Asian, 14% black, 17% Hispanic, 60% white, 7% other descent; 2.9% international, 69.7% from in-state Students who live on campus: 45% Online enrollment: 732 Freshmen retention: 68.4% Graduation rate: 39%

Affiliation: Reformed Degrees: Bachelor Deaf Missions Training Center Council Bluffs Phone: 712-322-5493 Website: deafmissions.com/ibtc Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Certificate Dordt College Sioux Center Phone: 800-343-6738 Website: dordt.edu Email: admissions@dordt.edu Affiliation: Reformed Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master Faith Baptist Bible College and Theological Seminary Ankeny Phone: 515-964-0601 Website: faith.edu

Academic staff (FT): 126 Student-teacher ratio: 19:1 Average class size: 19 No. campus ministries: 30 Expenses: Tuition/Fees: $21,840; Books/Supplies: $1,200; Room/Board: $9,148 Notable alumni: Caleb Kinchlow (Emmy Award winner); Kristen Ledlow (ESPN co-host for NBA Inside Stuff); Manwell Reyes (Group1Crew lead singer); Dee Gordon (MLB shortstop and second baseman); Chester Spellman (appointed by Governor Rick Scott as Chief Executive Officer of Volunteer Florida) Admissions email: admission@seu.edu

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CHARISMA’S BEST CHRISTIAN COLLEGES Email: admissions@faith.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master Kingsway University & Theological Seminary Norwalk Phone: 515-288-2852 Website: kingsway.edu Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

KANSAS Baker University Baldwin City Phone: 785-594-6451 Website: bakeru.edu Email: admission@bakeru.edu Affiliation: United Methodist Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Central Christian College McPherson Phone: 800-835-0078 Website: centralchristian.edu Email: admissions @centralchristian.edu Affiliation: Free Methodist Degrees: Associate, Bachelor Friends University Wichita Phone: 800-794-6945 Website: friends.edu Email: learn@friends.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master MidAmerica Nazarene University Olathe Phone: 913-971-3380 Website: mnu.edu Email: admissions@mnu.edu Affiliation: Nazarene Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Ottawa University Ottawa Phone: 855-774-7713 Website: ottawa.edu

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Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Bachelor, Master Southwestern College Winfield Phone: 800-846-1543 Website: sckans.edu Email: scadmit@sckans.edu Affiliation: United Methodist Degrees: Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

K E N T U C KY Asbury University Wilmore Phone: 800-888-1818 Website: asbury.edu Email: admissions@asbury.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master Boyce College Louisville Phone: 800-626-5525 Website: boycecollege.com Email: admissions@sbts.edu Affiliation: Southern Baptist Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor Campbellsville University Campbellsville Phone: 270-789-5220 Website: www.campbellsville.edu Email: admissions @campbellsville.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master Mid-Continent University Mayfield Phone: 270-247-8521 Website: midcontinent.edu Email: info@midcontinent.edu Affiliation: Southern Baptist Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master Union College Barbourville Phone: 800-489-8646 Website: unionky.edu Email: contact@unionky.edu

Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Bachelor, Master University of the Cumberlands Williamsburg Phone: 800-343-1609 or 606-539-4240 Website: ucumberlands.edu Email: admiss @ucumberlands.edu Affiliation: Southern Baptist Degrees: Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

LO U I S I A N A Evangel Christian University of America Monroe Phone: 855-796-7111 Website: ecua.edu Email: admin@ecua.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Team Impact Christian University Baton Rouge Phone: 225-292 1771 Website: tiuniversity.com Email: dean@tiuniversity.com Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

MAINE Faith School of Theology Charleston Phone: 207-285-3373 Website: faithschool.org Email: info@faithschool.org Affiliation: Pentecostal Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor

M A RYL A N D Maryland Bible College and Seminary Baltimore Phone: 800-528-2027 Website: mbcs.edu Email: info@mbcs.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Bachelor, Master

M A S S AC H U S E T T S Eastern Nazarene College Quincy Phone: 617-745-3000 Website: enc.edu Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Nazarene Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master Gordon College Wenham Phone: 978-927-2300 Website: gordon.edu Email: info@gordon.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Bachelor, Master

MICHIGAN Concordia University Ann Arbor Phone: 734-995-7300 Website: cuaa.edu Email: admissions@cuaa.edu Affiliation: Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master Cornerstone University Grand Rapids Phone: 616-949-5300 Website: cornerstone.edu Email: info@cornerstone.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master Grace Bible College Grand Rapids Phone: 616-538-2330 Website: gbcol.edu Email: graceadmissions @gbcol.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master Hope College Holland Phone: 616-395-7000 Website: hope.edu Email: admissions@hope.edu Affiliation: Reformed Degrees: Bachelor Kuyper College Grand Rapids c h ar ism asb est . com


CHARISMA’S BEST CHRISTIAN COLLEGES Phone: 616-222-3000 Website: kuyper.edu Email: admissions@kuyper.edu Affiliation: Reformed Degrees: Associate, Bachelor Spring Arbor University Spring Arbor Phone: 800-968-0011 Website: arbor.edu Email: admissions@arbor.edu Affiliation: Free Methodist Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master

M I N N E S OTA Acts International Bible College Blaine Phone: 763-755-4800, ext. 114 Website: actscollege.org Email: mail@actscollege.org Affiliation: International Church of the Foursquare Gospel Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master Bethel University St. Paul Phone: 651-638-6400 Website: bethel.edu Email: undergradadmissions@bethel.edu Affiliation: Converge Worldwide Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Concordia College Moorhead Phone: 800-699-9897 Website: cord.edu Email: admissions@cord.edu Affiliation: Lutheran-ELCA Degrees: Bachelor, Master Crossroads College Rochester Phone: 507-288-4563 Website: crossroadscollege.edu Email: admissions @crossroadscollege.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor Crown College St. Bonifacius 40

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Phone: 952-446-4100 Website: crown.edu Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: The Christian and Missionary Alliance Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master North Central University Minneapolis Phone: 800-289-6222 Website: northcentral.edu Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Assemblies of God Degrees: Associate, Bachelor Oak Hills Christian College Bemidji Phone: 888-751-8670 or 218-751-8670 Website: oakhills.edu Email: oakhills@oakhills.edu Affiliation: Interdenominational Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor Spirit Life Bible College & Seminary Brooklyn Center Phone: 763-560-7221 Website: slbc.slcgrace.com Email: biblecollege @slcgrace.com Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master

MISSISSIPPI Belhaven University Jackson Phone: 601-968-5940 Website: belhaven.edu Email: info@belhaven.edu Affiliation: Presbyterian Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master Blue Mountain College Blue Mountain Phone: 662-685-4771 Website: bmc.edu Email: admissions@bmc.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Bachelor, Master

Mississippi College Clinton Phone: 601-925-3000 Website: mc.edu Email: admissions@mc.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Certificate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Southeastern Baptist College Laurel Phone: 601-426-6346 Website: southeasternbaptist.edu Email: rkitchens @southeasternbaptist.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Associate, Bachelor Tougaloo College Tougaloo Phone: 601-977-7700 Website: tougaloo.edu Email: jjacobs@tougaloo.edu Affiliation: United Church of Christ Degrees: Bachelor

MISSOURI Biblical Life College and Seminary Marshfield Phone: 417-859-0881 Website: biblical-life.com Email: biblicallife@centurytel.net Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Carver Baptist Bible College, Institute & Theological Seminary Kansas City Phone: 816-333-1577 Website: carverbiblecollegekc.org Email: admissions @carverbiblecollegekc.org Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master College of the Ozarks Point Lookout Phone: 800-222-0525 Website: cofo.edu Email: Use online contact form.

Affiliation: Prebyterian Degrees: Bachelor Evangel University Springfield Phone: 800-382-6435 Website: evangel.edu Email: admissions@evangel.edu Affiliation: Assemblies of God Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Global University Springfield Phone: 800-443-1083 Website: globaluniversity.edu Email: info@globaluniversity.edu Affiliation: Assemblies of God Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate International House of Prayer University Grandview Phone: 816-763-0243 Website: ihopkc.org/ihopu Email: ihopu@ihopkc.org Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Certificate James River Leadership College Ozark Phone: 417-581-5433 Website: jrlc.com Email: jrlc@jamesriver.org Affiliation: Assemblies of God Degrees: Associate Lindenwood University St. Charles Phone: 636-949-4949 Website: lindenwood.edu Email: admissions @lindenwood.edu Affiliation: Presbyterian Degrees: Certificate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Southwest Baptist University Bolivar Phone: 417-328-5281 Website: sbuniv.edu Email: admissions@sbuniv.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Bachelor, Master, Doctorate St. Louis Christian College Florissant c h ar ism asb est . com


CHARISMA’S BEST CHRISTIAN COLLEGES Phone: 314-837-6777 Website: stlchristian.edu Email: admissions @stlchristian.edu Affiliation: Churches of Christ Degrees: Associate, Bachelor

M O N TA N A Rocky Mountain College Billings Phone: 800-877-6259 Website: rocky.edu Email: admissions@rocky.edu Affiliation: Interdenominational Degrees: Bachelor, Master

NEBRASKA Concordia University Seward Phone: 800-535-5494 Website: cune.edu

Email: admiss@cune.edu Affiliation: Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod Degrees: Bachelor, Master Grace University Omaha Phone: 402-449-2800 Website: graceuniversity.edu Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master Hastings College Hastings Phone: 800-532-7642 Website: hastings.edu Email: hcadmissions @hastings.edu Affiliation: Presbyterian Church (USA) Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master

EVANGEL UNIVERSITY

1111 N. Glenstone Ave Springfield, Missouri 65802 800-EVANGEL evangel.edu

Evangel University is a comprehensive Christian university committed to excellence in educating and equipping students to become Spirit-empowered servants of God who impact the Church and society globally.

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Nebraska Christian College Papillion Phone: 402-935-9400 Website: nechristian.edu Email: info@nechristian.edu Affiliation: Churches of Christ Degrees: Associate, Bachelor

NEW JERSEY Drew University Madison Phone: 973-408-3000 Website: drew.edu Email: cadm@drew.edu Affiliation: United Methodist Degrees: Certificate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Pillar College Newark Phone: 800-234-9305 Website: pillar.edu Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Pillar of

Founded: 1955 Affiliation: Assemblies of God Degrees offered: certificate, associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctorate Accreditation: visit evangel.edu /accreditation for full list of accreditations Freshmen admissions: visit evangel.edu /admissions for full list of requirements Acceptance rate: 64% Application deadline (fall): rolling admissions process Undergraduate student body: 1,486+; 44% male, 56% female; 2% Asian, 5% black, 5% Hispanic, 76% white, 12% other descent; 1% international, 44% from in-state Students who live on campus: 76% Freshmen retention: 75%

Fire International Degrees: Associate, Bachelor

N E W YO R K Concordia College Bronxville Phone: 914-337-9300 Website: concordia-ny.edu Email: admission @concordia-ny.edu Affiliation: LutheranMissouri Synod Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master Davis College Johnson City Phone: 877-949-3248 Website: davisny.edu Email: askdavis@davisny.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor

Graduation rate: 48% Most popular majors: Biblical Studies; Biology; Business Management; Education; Psychology; visit evangel.edu/programs for full list of degrees offered Academic staff (FT): 99 Student/teacher ratio: 14:1 Average class size: 25 No. campus ministries: 52 Expenses: Tuition/Fees: $28,898; Books/Supplies: $1,000; Room/Board: $7,582; visit evangel .edu/tuition for more information on expenses Financial aid: (417) 8652815; 97% undergrads with financial need; visit evangel.edu/fafsa for more information on financial aid Admissions email: admissions@evangel.edu

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CHARISMA’S BEST CHRISTIAN COLLEGES Houghton College Houghton Phone: 800-777-2556 Website: houghton.edu Email: admission @houghton.edu Affiliation: Wesleyan Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master Nyack College Nyack Phone: 845-358-1710 Website: nyack.edu Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: The Christian and Missionary Alliance Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Roberts Wesleyan College Rochester Phone: 585-594-6000 Website: www.roberts.edu Email: admissions@roberts.edu Affiliation: Free Methodist Degrees: Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

NORTH CAROLINA Brevard College Brevard Phone: 828-883-8292 Website: brevard.edu Email: admissions@brevard.edu Affiliation: United Methodist Degrees: Bachelor FIRE School of Ministry Concord Phone: 704-782-3555 Website: fire-school.org Email: info@fire-school.org Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor Gardner-Webb University Boiling Springs Phone: 800-253-6472 Website: gardner-webb.edu Email: admissions @gardner-webb.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Heritage Bible College Dunn 42

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Phone: 910-892-3178 Website: heritagebiblecollege.edu Email: iprince @heritagebiblecollege.edu Affiliation: Pentecostal Free Will Baptist Degrees: Associate, Bachelor Impact University Clemmons Phone: 336-714-4048 Website: impactuniv.com Email: info@impactuniv.com Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Bachelor, Master Laurel University High Point Phone: 336-887-3000 Website: laureluniversity.edu Email: admissions @laureluniversity.edu Affiliation: Interdenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Montreat College Montreat Phone: 800-622-6968 Website: montreat.edu Email: admissions @montreat.edu Affiliation: Presbyterian Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master Peace College Raleigh Phone: 919-508-2000 Website: peace.edu Email: admissions@peace.edu Affiliation: Presbyterian Degrees: Bachelor Piedmont International University Winston-Salem Phone: 800-937-5097 Website: piedmontu.edu Email: admissions @piedmontu.edu  Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate STC Bible College Thomasville Phone: 336-472-4109

Website: stcbiblecollege.com Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master Wingate University Wingate Phone: 800-755-5550 Website: wingate.edu Email: admit@wingate.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

N O R T H DA KOTA Trinity Bible College Ellendale Phone: 800-523-1603 Website: trinitybiblecollege.edu Affiliation: Assemblies of God Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master

OHIO Allegheny Wesleyan College Salem Phone: 330-337-6403 Website: awc.edu Email: college@awc.edu Affiliation: Wesleyan Methodist Degrees: Bachelor Capital University Columbus Phone: 614-236-6011 Website: capital.edu Email: admission@capital.edu Affiliation: Lutheran-ELCA Degrees: Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Cedarville University Cedarville Phone: 800-233-2784 Website: cedarville.edu Email: admissions @cedarville.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Bachelor, Master Cincinnati Christian University Cincinnati Phone: 800-949-4228 Website: ccuniversity.edu

Email: info@ccuniversity.edu Affiliation: Churches of Christ Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master Franciscan University of Steubenville Steubenville Phone: 740-283-3771 Website: franciscan.edu Email: admissions @franciscan.edu Affiliation: Roman Catholic Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master God’s Bible School and College Cincinnati Phone: 513-721-7944 Website: gbs.edu Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master Mount Vernon Nazarene University Mount Vernon Phone: 866-462-6868 Website: gotomvnu.com Email: admissions@mvnu.edu Affiliation: Nazarene Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master Valor Christian College Columbus Phone: 800-940-9422 Website: valorcollege.com Email: info@valorcollege.com Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Certificate, Associate Tri-State Bible College South Point Phone: 740-377-2520 Website: tsbc.edu Email: mercer.tsbc@tsbc.org Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master

OKLAHOMA AFCM International Training Center Tulsa Phone: 918-392-0511 c h ar ism asb est . com


Website: afcmitc.com Email: office@afcmitc.com Affiliation: Pentecostal Degrees: Certificate Family of Faith College Shawnee Phone: 405-273-5331 Website: familyoffaithcollege.edu Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Certificate, Bachelor Oklahoma Baptist University Shawnee Phone: 405-275-2850 Website: okbu.edu Email: admissions@okbu.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Bachelor, Master Oklahoma Wesleyan University Bartlesville Phone: 918-335-6219

Website: okwu.edu Email: admissions@okwu.edu Affiliation: Wesleyan Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master Oral Roberts University Tulsa Phone: 800-678-8876 Website: oru.edu Email: admissions@oru.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Rhema Bible Training College Broken Arrow Phone: 918-258-1588, ext. 2260 Website: www.rbtc.org Email: rbtc@rhema.org Affiliation: Pentecostal Degrees: Certificate

ORAL ROBERTS UNIVERSITY

7777 S. Lewis Avenue Tulsa, OK 74171 (918) 495-6518 oru.edu

Make No Little Plans Here. This powerful challenge of ORU’s founder, Oral Roberts, is a core principle of the university bearing his name. Oral Roberts University is a world-renowned Christian university that focuses on building Spirit-empowered leaders to impact their world. Experience ORU for yourself. Get connected at campusvisits.oru.edu or oru.edu/admissions or call (800) 678-8876.

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Southern Nazarene University Bethany Phone: 405-789-6400 Website: snu.edu Email: kelliejohnson@snu.edu Affiliation: Nazarene Degrees: Bachelor, Master Wisdom University Tulsa Phone: 918-712-7122 Website: wisdomuniversityonline.org Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

OREGON Concordia University Portland Phone: 503-288-9371 Website: cu-portland.edu

Founded: 1963 Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees offered: certificate, associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctorate Accreditation: HLC, NCACS, CCNE, ABET, NCATE Freshmen admissions: SAT required: 940; ACT required: 20 Acceptance rate: 44% Application deadline(fall): Rolling admissions process Undergraduate student body: 3,054; 43% male, 57% female; 2% AsianAmerican, 16% AfricanAmerican, 8% Hispanic, 3% Native American, 47% White/Caucasian, 14% Two or more races or other descent; 5% International (85 nations represented), 44% from in-state (50 states represented) Students who live on campus: 72% Online enrollment: 302

Email: admission @cu-portland.edu Affiliation: LutheranMissouri Synod Degrees: Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Corban University Salem Phone: 800-845-3005 Website: corban.edu Email: info@corban.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate New Hope Christian College Eugene Phone: 800-322-2638 Website: newhope.edu Email: admissions @newhope.edu Affiliation: Interdenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor

Freshmen retention: 81% Graduation rate: 53% Most popular majors: Nursing; Ministry and Leadership; Business Administration; Engineering; Biology Academic staff (FT): 163 Student/teacher ratio: 16:1 Average class size: 19 No. campus ministries: 40 Expenses: Tuition/Fees: $24,792; Books/Supplies: $1,848; Room/Board: $10,348 Financial aid: 93% receive financial aid w/ average aid package of $22,741 Notable alumni: Matt Steele (Academy Award recipient for his work on the animated feature film Frozen); Clifton Taulbert (author of several national best-sellers); Rep. Michele Bachmann (first Republican woman elected to the U.S. House from Minnesota); Admissions email: admissions@oru.edu

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CHARISMA’S BEST CHRISTIAN COLLEGES Northwest Christian University Eugene Phone: 541-343-1641 Website: nwcu.edu Email: admissions@nwcu.edu Affiliation: Disciples of Christ Degrees: Bachelor, Master Warner Pacific College Portland Phone: 503-517-1020 Website: warnerpacific.edu Email: admissions @warnerpacific.edu Affiliation: Church of God (Anderson, IN) Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master

P E N N S YLVA N I A Baptist Bible College and Seminary Clarks Summit Phone: 570-586-2400

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Website: bbc.edu Email: admissions@bbc.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Eastern University St. Davids Phone: 610-341-5800 Website: eastern.edu Email: ugadm@eastern.edu Affiliation: American Baptist Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Geneva College Beaver Falls Phone: 855-979-5563 Website: geneva.edu Email: admissions@geneva.edu Affiliation: Reformed Presbyterian Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master

Grove City College Grove City Phone: 724-458-2000 Website: gcc.edu Email: admissions@gcc.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Bachelor Lancaster Bible College Lancaster Phone: 717-569-7071 Website: lbc.edu Email: admissions@lbc.edu  Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Lebanon Valley College Annville Phone: 866-582-4236 Website: lvc.edu Email: admission@lvc.edu Affiliation: United Methodist Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

Messiah College Mechanicsburg Phone: 717-766-2511 Website: messiah.edu Email: admiss@messiah.edu Affiliation: Interdenominational Degrees: Certificate, Bachelor, Master University of Valley Forge Phoenixville Phone: 800-432-8322 Website: valleyforge.edu Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Assemblies of God Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master

SOUTH CAROLINA Anderson University Anderson Phone: 800-542-3594 Website: andersonuniversity.edu

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Email: admission @andersonuniversity.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Charleston Southern University Charleston Phone: 843-863-7000 Website: csuniv.edu Email: enroll@csuniv.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Certificate, Bachelor, Master Columbia College Columbia Phone: 800-277-1301 Website: columbiasc.edu Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: United Methodist Degrees: Bachelor, Master

Columbia International University Columbia Phone: 800-777-2227 Website: ciu.edu Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Interdenominational Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Erskine College Due West Phone: 888-359-4358 Website: erskine.edu Email: admissions@erskine.edu Affiliation: Reformed Presbyterian Degrees: Bachelor North Greenville University Tigerville Phone: 864-977-7001 Website: ngu.edu Email: admissions@ngu.edu Affiliation: Baptist

LIBERTY UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF LAW

1971 University Boulevard Lynchburg, VA 24515 (434) 592-5300 liberty.edu/law/

Liberty University School of Law, founded in 2004 and located in Central Virginia, teaches law in the context of the Western legal tradition through a Christian worldview. Students are encouraged in their faith and desire to learn law as future attorneys, policy makers, judges, educators and world leaders. Legal skills are practiced in clinical and externship opportunities.

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Degrees: Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Southern Wesleyan University Central Phone: 877-644-5556 Website: swu.edu Email: admissions@swu.edu  Affiliation: Wesleyan Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master W.L. Bonner College Columbia Phone: 803-726-3503 Website: wlbc.edu Email: emcqueen@wlbc.edu Affiliation: Pentecostal Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor

S O U T H DA KOTA University of Sioux Falls Sioux Falls

Admissions email: LawAdmissions@ Liberty.edu Admissions website: law.liberty.edu/admissions Admission Phone: (434) 592-5300 Twitter Name: @LibertyLaw Facebook page: facebook .com/LULawSchool Accreditation: liberty.edu /law/aba-accredited-lawschool/ Application deadline (fall): 6/1 rolling admission; apply today Admission requirements: Doctrate level programs: master’s; bachelor’s; liberty.edu/law /requirements Student body: 173+; 59% male, 41% female; 100% full-time; 38 states represented, 10 countries

Phone: 800-888-1047 Website: usiouxfalls.edu Email: admissions @usiouxfalls.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Bachelor, Master

TENNESSEE American Baptist College Nashville Phone: 615-256-1463 Website: abcnash.edu Email: info@abcnash.com Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Associate, Bachelor Belmont University Nashville Phone: 615-460-6000 Website: belmont.edu Email: admissions@belmont.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

represented (based on entering class of 2015) Resident status: 174 Most popular degrees: Business Administration and Management, Criminal Justice, Law, Legal Assistant/Paralegal, Legal Studies, General, Pre-Law Studies; liberty .edu/law/dualdegree Student/teacher ratio: 11:1 Academic staff with terminal degree: 100% Average class size: 35 Expenses: $29,994 tuition, $1,568 fees, $1,800 books/ supplies; liberty.edu/law /tuition Financial aid: 100% receiving aid; average aid package is approximately 60% of tuition; liberty.edu /law/tuition

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CHARISMA’S BEST CHRISTIAN COLLEGES Berea Bible Institute & Seminary Hixson Phone: 423-643-3100 Website: bereabibleseminary.com Email: berea@abbashouse.com Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Bryan College Dayton Phone: 423-775-2041 Website: bryan.edu Email: info@bryan.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master Carson-Newman College Jefferson City Phone: 865-471-2000 Website: cn.edu Email: admitme@cn.edu Affiliation: Baptist

Degrees: Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Johnson University Tennessee Knoxville Phone: 800-827-2122 Website: johnsonu.edu /Tennessee/Home.aspx Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate King University Bristol Phone: 423-652-4861 Website: www.king.edu Email: admissions@king.edu Affiliation: Presbyterian Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Lee University Cleveland Phone: 800-533-9930

LEE UNIVERSITY

1120 North Ocoee Street Cleveland, TN 37311 (800) LEE-9930 leeuniversity.edu Lee University is a Christ-centered university of more than 5,000 students located in the southeast part of the state’s scenic Tennessee River Valley. Lee is emerging as a leader in higher education in the Southeastern region and is continuously ranked in the “Top Tier” of Regional Universities in the South by U.S. News & World Report.

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Website: leeuniversity.edu Email: info@leeuniversity.edu Affiliation: Church of God (Cleveland, TN) Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Mid-South Christian College Memphis Phone: 901-375-4400 Website: midsouthcc.org Email: info@midsouthcc.org Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor New Life Bible College Cleveland Phone: 423-479-7120 Website: newlifecollege.net Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor

Founded: 1918 Affiliation: Church of God Degrees offered: certificate, associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctorate Accreditation: SACS, NCATE, NASM, ACBSP, CEPR; visit leeuniversity.edu/about /accreditation.aspx for full list of accreditations Undergraduate student body: 5,041; 42% male, 58% female; 49% from in-state Students who live on campus: 41% Online enrollment: 780 Freshmen retention: 77% Graduation rate: 55% Most popular majors: Business, Communications, Pastoral Ministries, Music; visit catalog.leeuniversity .edu/content.php?catoid=7 &navoid=1637 for full list

Trevecca Nazarene University Nashville Phone: 615-248-1200 Website: trevecca.edu Email: admissions@trevecca.edu Affiliation: Nazarene Degrees: Associate, Certificate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Union University Jackson Phone: 731-668-1818 Website: uu.edu Email: admissions@uu.edu Affiliation: Southern Baptist Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

T E XA S All Nations School of Ministry Houston Phone: 281-821-2222, ext. 104 Website: allnations.cc

of degrees offered Academic staff (FT): 169 Student/teacher ratio: 17:1 Average class size: 20 No. campus ministries: 88+ Expenses: Tuition/Fees: $7,200; Books/Supplies: $500; Room/Board: $3,625; visit leeuniversity .edu/financial-aid/ for more information on expenses Financial aid: (800) 533-9930; 88% undergrads with financial need; visit leeuniversity.edu /financial-aid/general-info .aspx#Contact for more information on financial aid Notable alumni: Dr. Steve Strang (Founder of Charisma magazine); Kevin Brooks (Tennessee State Representative)

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Email: school@allnations.cc Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: N/A Arlington Baptist College Arlington Phone: 817-461-8741 Website: arlingtonbaptistcollege.edu Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Bachelor, Master Baptist University of the Americas San Antonio Phone: 210-924-4338 Website: bua.edu Email: mary.ranjel@bua.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Associate, Bachelor Baylor University Waco Phone: 800-229-5678 Website: baylor.edu

Email: admissions@baylor.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Calvary Cathedral International Bible College Fort Worth Phone: 817-332-1246 Website: calvarycathedral .org/bible-college-home/ Email: ccibc @calvarycathedral.org Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Certificate, Associate Christ for the Nations Institute Dallas Phone: 800-477-2364 Website: cfni.org Email: info@cfni.org Affiliation: Charismatic Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor

THE KING’S UNIVERSITY

2121 E. Southlake Blvd. Southlake, TX 76092 (817) 552-3700 TKU.edu

The King’s University is a Spirit-empowered evangelical university based in the DFW area. The university continues to expand its footprint with multiple locations worldwide to prepare men and women for effective leadership and Christlike service in the global community. Carrying on the vision of its founder, Dr. Jack Hayford, TKU uniquely equips students by integrating accredited higher education with dynamic ministry experience in the local church.

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Christian Bible Institute and Seminary Spring Phone: 888-360-0004 Website: christianbibleinstitute.net Email: info @christianbibleinstitute.net Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Certificate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Criswell College Dallas Phone: 800-899-0012 Website: criswell.edu Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master Dallas Baptist University Dallas Phone: 214-333-7100 Website: dbu.edu

Founded: 1997 Affiliation: Non-Denominational Degrees offered: certificate, associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctorate Accreditation: TRAC, ABHE, CHEA Freshmen admissions: SAT required: 1000; ACT required: 20; visit tku .edu /apply for full list of requirements Application deadline(fall): 12/14; Undergraduate student body: 546+; 48% male, 52% female; 3% Asian, 11% black, 14% Hispanic, 62% white, 10% other descent; 1% international, 47% from in-state Online enrollment: 80 Freshmen retention: 71% Most popular majors: Bachelor of General Christian Studies; Bachelor of Biblical and

Email: admiss@dbu.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate East Texas Baptist University Marshall Phone: 903-923-2000 Website: etbu.edu Email: admissions@etbu.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Bachelor Elevate Leadership Institute Frisco Phone: 214-387-9833 Website: elevateinterns.com Email: intern@elevatelife.com Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor FIRE Institute Fort Worth Phone: 417-862-2781, ext. 4041 Website: fireinstitute.com

Theological Studies; Bachelor of Biblical Counseling; visit tku.edu /academics for full list of degrees offered Academic staff (FT): 12 Student/teacher ratio: 5:1 Average class size: 11 No. campus ministries: 10 Expenses: Tuition/Fees: $398 per credit hour; Books/Supplies: $300; visit tku.edu/tuition-and -fees/ for more information on expenses Financial aid: (817) 552-7339; 50% undergrads with financial need; average aid package $11,000; visit tku.edu /financial-aid/ for more information on financial aid Admissions email: admissions@tku.edu

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CHARISMA’S BEST CHRISTIAN COLLEGES Email: fireinstitute@ag.org Affiliation: Assemblies of God Degrees: Certificate Hardin-Simmons University Abilene Phone: 325-670-1000 Website: hsutx.edu Email: visit@hsutx.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Houston Baptist University Houston Phone: 281-649-3000 Website: hbu.edu Email: registrar@hbu.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Bachelor, Master Howard Payne University Brownwood Phone: 325-649-8020 Website: hputx.edu

Email: enroll@hputx.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master Institute for Biblical Leadership Baird Phone: 325-269-9474 Website: iblcentral.net Email: admin@iblcentral.net Affiliation: Interdenominational Degrees: N/A The King’s University Southlake Phone: 817-552-3700 Website: tku.edu Email: admissions@tku.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate LeTourneau University Longview

SOUTHWESTERN ASSEMBLIES OF GOD UNIVERSITY

1200 Sycamore St. Waxahachie, TX 75165 (888) 937-7348 sagu.edu

Southwestern Assemblies of God University is a private, Christian university located 30 minutes south of the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex in Waxahachie, Texas. The university was established in 1927 and now offers more than 70 associate, bachelor’s or master’s degrees on campus or online. More information is available at sagu.edu or by calling (888) YES-SAGU.

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Phone: 800-759-8811 Website: letu.edu Email: admissions@letu.edu Affiliation: Interdenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master Messenger College Euless Phone: 817-554-5950 Website: messengercollege.edu Email: info @messengercollege.edu Affiliation: Pentecostal Church of God Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor Southwestern Assemblies of God University Waxahachie Phone: 888-937-7248 Website: sagu.edu

Founded: 1927 Affiliation: Assemblies of God Degrees offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctorate Accreditation: SACS Undergraduate student body: 1,702 Students who live on campus: 61% Online enrollment: 562 Freshmen retention: 61% Graduation rate: 47% Academic staff (FT): 74 Student/teacher ratio: 21:1 No. campus ministries: 20 Expenses: Tuition/Fees: $16,950; Room/Board: $5,990

Email: info@sagu.edu Affiliation: Assemblies of God Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate The Way Bible College Woodlands Phone: 281-419-0208 Website: waychurch .org/#/bible-college Email: info@waychurch.org Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Associate Wayland Baptist University Plainview Phone: 806-291-3500 Website: wbu.edu Email: admitme@wbu.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master West Coast Bible College and Seminary Waco

Financial aid: (972) 825-4730; 92% undergrads with financial need Notable alumni: John Hagee (founder and senior pastor of Cornerstone Church in San Antonio, Texas); Alton Garrison (Assistant Superintendent of the Assemblies of God); Michael Miller (Brigadier General, U.S. Air Force); Jonathan Woods (Senior Manager of Capital Markets, Walmart); Crystalyn Maloney (marketing creative designer, Disney); Trey Mitchell (accountant, Murphy Oil); Brandi Lewis (acrobatics coach, World Olympic Gymnasium Academy) Admissions email: admissions@sagu.edu

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Roanoke College Salem Phone: 540-375-2500 Website: roanoke.edu Email: admissions@roanoke.edu Affiliation: Lutheran Degrees: Bachelor

Website: abc.edu Email: abc@abc.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master

VIRGINIA

Liberty University Lynchburg Phone: 434-582-2000 Website: liberty.edu Email: admissions@liberty.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

Bluefield College Bluefield Phone: 276-326-4395 Website: bluefield.edu Email: admissions@bluefield.edu Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Bachelor, Master

Patrick Henry College Purcellville Phone: 540-338-1776 Website: phc.edu Email: info@phc.edu Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Bachelor

WA S H I N G TO N

Jackson Hole Bible College Jackson Phone: 307-739-8630 Website: jhbc.edu Email: jhbc.admin@gmail.com Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Certificate

Faith Landmarks Bible Institute Richmond Phone: 804-262-7104, ext. 111 Website: flbi.org Email: rgupton @faithlandmarks.org Affiliation: Pentecostal Degrees: Certificate

Regent University Virginia Beach Phone: 800-373-5504 Website: regent.edu Email: admissions@regent.edu Affiliation: Multidenominational Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

Phone: 800-921-4561 Website: westcoastbible.org Email: ​info@westcoastbible.org Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Bachelor, Master, Doctorate

LIBERTY UNIVERSITY

1971 University Blvd. Lynchburg, VA 24515 (855) 466-9220 Liberty.edu

Liberty University provides a world-class liberal arts education with a solid Christian foundation. Located on a campus of more than 7,000 acres in Lynchburg, Virginia, Liberty is comprised of 16 colleges and schools, offering hundreds of programs in undergraduate and graduate studies.

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Trinity Lutheran College Everett Phone: 800-843-5659 Website: tlc.edu Email: info@tlc.edu Affiliation: Lutheran Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor

WEST VIRGINIA Appalachian Bible College Mount Hope Phone: 304-877–6428

Founded: 1971 Affiliation: Private, nondenominational Christian liberal arts university Degrees offered: certificate, associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctorate Accreditation: SACSCOC, NCATE, CCNE, ABET, ABA, ACBSP, CACREP, FAA Freshmen admissions: SAT required: 1040; ACT required: 23 Application deadline (fall): 1/31; rolling admissions process Undergraduate student body: 14,500+; 48% male, 52% female; 2% Asian, 7% black, 5% Hispanic, 66% white, 20% other descent Students who live on campus: 60% Online enrollment: 95,000+ Freshmen retention: 80%

W YO M I N G

C A N A DA Briercrest College and Seminary Caronport, SK Phone: 306-756-3200 Website: briercrest.ca

Graduation rate: 50% Most popular majors: Business, Psychology, Religion, Education Academic staff (FT): 550 Student/Teacher ratio: 24:1 Average class size: 25 No. campus ministries: 9 Expenses: Tuition/Fees: $29,500 (resident); Books/ Supplies: varies; Room/ Board: $7,000 - $9,200 Financial aid: 95% undergrads with financial need; average aid package $16,895; visit Liberty.edu /FinancialAid for more information. Notable alumni: Shannon Bream, Rashad Jennings, Meredith Andrews, TobyMac, Samantha Ponder, Walt Aikens, Mike Brown Admissions email: admissions@liberty.edu

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CHARISMA’S BEST CHRISTIAN COLLEGES Email: info@briercrest.ca Affiliation: Nondenominational Degrees: Associate, Bachelor, Master Canada Christian College Toronto, ON Phone: 416-391-5000 Website: canadachristiancollege.com Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Evangelical Degrees: Certificate, Bachelor, Master, Doctorate Canadian Baptist Bible College Winkler, MB Phone: 204-325-8648 Website: canadianbaptistbiblecollege.com Email: cbbc@pvbc.ca Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Bachelor

Crandall University Moncton, NB Phone: 888-968-6228 or 506-858-8970 Website: crandallu.ca Email: admissions@crandallu.ca Affiliation: Baptist Degrees: Bachelor Eston College Eston, SK Phone: 888-440-3424 Website: estoncollege.ca Email: info@estoncollege.ca Affiliation: Pentecostal Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor Horizon College and Seminary Saskatoon, SK Phone: 877-374-6655 Website: horizon.edu Email: info@horizon.edu Affiliation:

REGENT UNIVERSITY

1000 Regent University Drive Virginia Beach, VA 23464 (800) 373-5504 regent.edu

Regent University prepares students with the knowledge to excel and the faith to live with purpose. Our 20,000 alumni are changing the world as accomplished professionals. Named a top-15 school nationally for online bachelor’s programs (U.S. News & World Report), Regent is among the most affordable undergraduate Christian colleges. Accredited, challenging programs are available online and on campus. New classes begin every eight weeks.

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Interdenominational Degrees: Certificate, Bachelor Redeemer University Ancaster, ON Phone: 877-779-0913 or 905-648-2131 Website: redeemer.ca Email: Use online contact form. Affiliation: Reformed Degrees: Bachelor Steinbach Bible College Steinbach, MB Phone: 204-326-6451 Website: sbcollege.ca Email: info@sbcollege.ca Affiliation: Anabaptist Degrees: Certificate, Associate, Bachelor Summit Pacific College Abbottsford, BC Phone: 800-976-8388 or 604-853-7491 Website: summitpacific.ca

Founded: 1978 Affiliation: Multidenominational Degrees offered: certificate, associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctorate Accreditation: visit regent.edu/academics /accreditation.cfm Undergraduate student body: 2,986+; 39% male, 61% female; 2% Asian, 21% black, 3% Hispanic, 55% white; 2% international, 50% from in-state Students who live on campus: 20% Online enrollment: 2,498 Freshmen retention: 78% Most popular majors: Theological Studies; Business, English, Psychology, Film/Video; visit regent.edu/academics /degrees.cfm Academic staff (FT): 187

Email: admissions @summitpacific.ca Affiliation: Pentecostal Assemblies of Canada Degrees: Bachelor Trinity Western University Langley, BC Phone: 604-888-7511 Website: twu.ca Email: admissions@twu.ca Affiliation: Interdenominational Degrees: Certificate, Bachelor, Master Tyndale University College and Seminary Toronto, ON Phone: 416-226-6380 Website: tyndale.ca Email: admissions@tyndale.ca Affiliation: Interdenominational Degrees: Certificate, Bachelor

Student/teacher ratio: 18:1 Average class size: 18 No. campus ministries: 40 Expenses: Tuition/Fees: $15,900; Books/Supplies: $1,000; visit regent.edu /admin/finaid/costs/ Financial aid: (757) 3524125; 88% undergrads with financial need; visit regent.edu/admin/finaid/ Notable alumni: Tony Hale (Emmy winner for Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series); William Ball (Academy Award winner for Visual Effects); Dr. Jay Sekulow (Chief Counsel for the American Center for Law and Justice); Scott Rigell (U.S. House of Representatives); Nicole Johnson (Miss America 1999) Admissions email: admissions@regent.edu

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WHERE

CHAMPIONS ARE MADE Training Champions for Christ since 1971

Built on a solid Christian foundation, Liberty University emphasizes the pursuit of knowledge in every discipline — from medicine, biology, and engineering to design, religion, law, and more. Liberty is a world-class liberal arts university with 16 schools and colleges, offering more than 500 programs from the certificate to the doctoral level. Inspiring students to define success by a higher standard, Liberty is developing tomorrow’s leaders — men and women of character whose impact will extend beyond their professions to change the world around them.

www.Liberty.edu/ www.Liberty.edu/Champions Lynchburg, Virginia


Charisma's Best Christian Universities, Colleges & Schools 2015