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MAY 2012

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YTF GLOBAL YOUTUBE’S BEST ENTERTAINERS THE KNOW-HOW’S OF DIM SUM AND DRINKING TEA

POWERED BY AX3MULTIMEDIA.COM


CONTRIBUTORS Publisher: AX3 Multimedia Editor-in-Chief: Justin Lee Managing Editor: Evelyn Wong Writers: Yan Lui, Peter Tang, Bernie Yee, Benjamin Yong

Letters from the Directors: Once again, AX3 is proud to present to you the latest issue of CHARGED Magazine. As members of our multimedia collective all have occupied lives, this month was definitely a challenging month for all of us, and I would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge everyone’s efforts and hard work to make this issue happen. I assure you that even though we are busy with many other on-going projects with AX3, the quality and energy level of the magazine you are holding right now in your hands is certainly fully

Art Director: Shun Lee Assistant Art Director: Venus Fung Designers: Tiffany Ip, Peter Zhao, Nicholas Sim,

CHARGED. With the advancements of modern technology, many people overlook the value of the print medium, and I hope you will enjoy reading this issue as much as we did creating it. While AX3’s online webzine and social media channels are becoming exceptionally popular, there is also a cooperative goal for us to preserve this traditional print medium, and allow both our readers and clients to continue to enjoy the essence of this form of communication while it lasts. — Alan Ng

Photographers: Norman Tam, Jonathan Lee

The busy month of April passed by very quickly. Aside from our personal duties, such as exams and final

Production Host: Angela Chang, Matthew Tse

to the team! I would also like to thank Mink Couteaux from Largetosti Studio for the beautiful artwork of

projects, our team dedicated a lot of their time to again deliver another issue of CHARGED. Big thanks Jeremy Lin. So if you are ever interested in these pieces of art, definitely go check them out! Enjoy May’s issue!— Shun Lee

Sales & Distribution Manager: Irvin Ho Sales: Charmine Lau, Kenny Chow, Annie Chan, Stephanie Ngo, Kiki Pau

May, a time when the sun comes out more than the rainclouds and everyone starts to daydream about the warm summer days. With exams have finally finished, May is a time for us to catch up with friends – and most importantly, family. This issue reminds us of the importance of spending time with family, whether you’re having Sunday afternoon Dim Sum or meeting her parents for the first time. Our feature this month

Marketing Manager: Carolyn Shum

is YTF Global, a group of YouTube artists that consider themselves and their fans a part of their family. So be sure to take some time away from your busy life and spend some quality time with your loved ones this

Special Thanks: YTF, Mink Couteaux from Largetosti Studio (Jeremy Lin Artwork) Horseshoe Press Inc.

May. — Justin Lee

Opinions expressed in this magazine are not necessarily intended to reflect those of the publisher. AX3 Multimedia Inc. accepts no responsibility or liability for claims made for any product or service reported on or advertised in this issue. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information contained in this publication is accurate and complete on publication date. AX3 Multimedia Inc. reserves the right to limit liability for omissions and errors to a printed issue. Copyright © 2012 by AX3 Multimedia Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced in any form or by any means, whether electronic, mechanical or photographic without the permission of AX3 Multimedia Inc.

CHARGED MAGAZINE | MAY 2012


TABLE OF CONTENTS CHARGED MAGAZINE

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04 CHARGED EATS

The Know-How’s of Drinking Tea with your Family

07 CHARGED AWARENESS

Diversity Not on the Menu at the Food Bank

10 CHARGED INTERVIEW

Singular Plural Event Planning

13 CHARGED BEAUTY

Interview with Annie G. Chan

16 CHARGED FEATURE

YTF GLOBAL: A Family of YouTube’s Best Entertainers

22 CHARGED SPORTS

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Jeremy Lin: An Inspiration for All Asian Athletes

24 CHARGED SPORTS

Dragon Boat Racing: The Modern Ancient Sports

27 CHARGED ASKS

What’s the Best Mother’s Day Present You’ve Ever Given?

29 CHARGED DATING

Meeting the Asian Parents

31 DISTRIBUTION

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CHARGED EATS THE KNOW-HOW’S OF DRINKING TEA WITH YOUR FAMILY

THE KNOW-HOW’S OF DRINKING TEA WITH YOUR FAMILY Text: Carolyn Shum

Photo: Shun Lee

There are three things that come to mind when “Dim sum” (also known as “Yum cha” 飲茶) is mentioned: “Weekend fam jam”, “Fighting for the bill” & “Bizarre chicken legs”. Dim sum is a large part of growing up in a Chinese family and has even grown to become a weekly, if not daily routine for many of us. It is a great time for a family to get together and catch up. The tradition of this social get-together originated over a century ago in the Canton province of Southern China. Dim sum goers typically come together to enjoy small, bite-sized portions in steamer baskets or plates while relaxing with their preferred hot tea in a white ceramic pot. For those who may not be that familiar with this popular gastronomic experience yet, you might find the following essential! When you go to dim sum, you will spot on the table: A white ceramic teapot, a lazy susan (depending on table size and party size), small china cups, plates and chopsticks. Before you order food, you must first figure out what kind of tea you want. There is a wide variety, but the most popular ones are: “Pu’er”(Black Tea), “Tie guan yin” (Oolong), “Shou mei” (White tea) & “Hua cha” (Flower tea). Below are some more tips when you’re eating with your family:

TIP #1

TIP #4

Try to pour tea with both hands to the elderly and seniors first, then to others before yourself

Refrain from tapping the table loudly with your chopsticks or pointing them at someone else

TIP #2

TIP #5

Tap two fingers on the table lightly to gesture gratitude for the person pouring tea for you

Ask the waiter in the beginning for two pots: One with tea and another with plain hot water

TIP #3

(good to dilute or refill the pot with tea and for those who may not want to drink tea)

Open the lid of the ceramic teapot to signal to the waiter that more hot water is needed

CHARGED MAGAZINE | MAY 2012


CHARGED EATS THE KNOW-HOW’S OF DRINKING TEA WITH YOUR FAMILY

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Many may have already heard of “BBQ pork bun” or “Siu mai” but there is probably a lot more that you have not heard of! Check out these five hand-picked dim sum dishes below and try it the next time you go “Yum cha”!

Steamed Rice Rolls Stuffed w/ Chinese Donut This is the marriage of the best of both worlds. Usually topped with some green onions, and dried shredded pork, this dish is complete with sweet “Hoi sin” sauce and sesame sauce.

Steamed Pork Dumplings This is a very authentic dish made with the same delicious “skin” as “Har Gow” (Shrimp Dumplings)! It is usually stuffed with pork and various veggies, and is sometimes deep fried.

Deep Fried Dumplings w/ Minced Pork, Shrimp and Leek Do not mistaken these as the steamed pork dumplings. Its deep fried skin, made with glutinous rice flour, is very chewy, giving it a mochi-like texture. The savoury of the fillings balances the flavours just right.

Steamed Buns w/ Golden Custard Eating this is almost like a race against time. The second you bite into the hot steaming bun, the salty egg yolk filling immediately starts oozing out. It can get messy, but hey, no one’s stopping you from licking the yummy custard off your plate!

Durian Puff Pastry This one’s for the adventurers. Known as the King of Fruits, and notoriously for its pungent scent, this dish will definitely leave an unforgettable impression on your taste buds.

All too often, we forget or neglect the importance of spending quality time with our parents and family. I personally have had the experience to find numerous excuses on the weekends to sleep-in or hang out with friends instead. But deep inside I know that my parents would love to have company, especially from their young ones. Next time you have a weekend to spare (no excuses!), take them out to a local dim sum joint! Impress your family with these must-knows & popular dishes!

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CHARGED AWARENESS DIVERSITY NOT ON THE MENU AT THE FOOD BANK

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DIVERSITY NOT ON THE MENU AT

THE FOOD BANK Text: Benjamin Yong

Volunteers outside the front of the Richmond Food Bank Society Cedarbridge office in Richmond.

There is no doubt that the Lower Mainland is a multicultural region that is only becoming more diverse with every passing day. People from all corners of the globe can be seen walking the streets, shopping in stores and eating in restaurants — but one place that that this diversity is still not seen is at the food bank. Margaret Hewlett is the executive director of the Richmond Food Bank Society, a support organization that distributes food twice a week in two local locations to those that need it. She says about 1,500 people, made up of 525 households, walk through the doors every week to receive things like canned fish, pasta and rice, and cereal. Of that 1,500, however, only about 25 per cent are Asian, mostly made up of immigrants — surprising when you consider that Chinese people alone make up 45 per cent of the total population of Richmond according to Statistics Canada. “I think a lot of it is fear (that stops them from using our services). Fear that people are going to start pointing at them and saying ‘why are you bringing your problems into our country?’” says Hewlett. In a culture where “face” is paramount, some immigrants believe asking for help could be seen as a sign of weakness and that they’ve somehow failed in their responsibilities. “Particularly if they have sponsored their families to come into the country,” she says. Other factors include misconceptions on what the food bank really does, and whom they are affiliated with. “Some are worried that it’s part of the government, and that they could get reported because they aren’t doing well in the country,” says Hewlett. “We have no connection

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CHARGED AWARENESS DIVERSITY NOT ON THE MENU AT THE FOOD BANK

at all to the government. No funding, no grants, nothing.” The Asian clients that do visit the food bank usually discover the organization via settlement service groups like S.U.C.C.E.S.S or Swift, schools, the health department or the hospital. Once they arrive, language barriers can provide an additional challenge. “We do our best, we have a multicultural volunteer core. We also have some folks that are accessible by telephone so we might call and say ‘would you please explain to so and so,’ or ‘can you please talk to so and so and ask what they are trying to say to us,’ so we do have that option,” she says. An “alarming” number of the clients in recent years have been seniors, up to 80-years-old. The median is middle-aged folks, many who have just arrived in Canada and are struggling with what she called a “transition time” before finding steady work and a permanent place to live. The younger faces often seen on distribution days belong to volunteers that live in the community, many of which are high school students that sign up on the website or are referred to by other agencies like Volunteer Richmond. Anyone living in the city with a need is eligible to receive food, provided they have some form of identification and proof that they live in the area. “We do have a registration process (for accountability and) for equity purposes. We want to serve people who live in Richmond, people who live in other communities can go to the food bank in that community,” says Hewlett. “Immigrants typically will bring some immigration papers, otherwise quite often it will be CareCards. “ The Food Bank distributes food four times a week: in East Richmond (11571 Daniels Rd. on Tuesdays 1 to 2 p.m.) and in Central Richmond (100-5800 Cedarbridge Way on Wednesdays and Thursdays from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and Thursday evenings from 6 to 7 p.m.). For more information or to volunteer, visit the Food Bank Society’s website at www.richmondfoodbank.org.

CHARGED MAGAZINE | MAY 2012

(Top) Mona, a volunteer at the Richmond Food Bank Society, helps sort out bread on distribution night at the Cedarbridge location. (Bottom) Johanna: Richmond Food Bank volunteer Johanna holds up some fresh apples and carrots, some muchneeded nutritious food donations.


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CHARGED INTERVIEW SINGULAR PLURAL EVENT PLANNING

I N T ERV I EW W I T H SON N Y WONG

Text: Shun Lee Anyone that has ever planned a birthday party would know how one small mistake could potentially turn the entire function into a nightmare-come-true. That’s why there are event planning companies we can count on for the “best party ever!”—whether it’s a social gathering or a formal corporate event. Singular Plural, based in Vancouver, boasts a large portfolio of planning events of different sizes and types. We sit down with Sonny Wong, one of the founders of Singular Plural, to learn about the story behind the company.

CHARGED MAGAZINE | MAY 2012

Can you introduce Singular Plural to our readers?

What are some of the events that Singular Plural plans?

Singular Plural is a full-service event planning company that provides complete planning, consulting, and supervision for both corporate and social events. We provide our clients with memorable events that are both creatively and uniquely based on their individual tastes and preferences. We strive to meet our clients’ ultimate goal of hosting an unforgettable event by incorporating the most appropriate themes, design layouts and décor through our expertise.

Our service covers both corporate and social events. Corporate events include fundraisers, receptions, conventions, trade shows, and concerts. Social events include parties, weddings, tours, bar/bat mitzvahs or any other celebrations. These are definitely not the only events we plan though, as we are always open in utilizing our service to fit the type of events our clients have in mind.


CHARGED INTERVIEW SINGULAR PLURAL EVENT PLANNING

Can you tell us how Singular Plural started? Singular Plural Event Planning was discovered by myself, and my friends Candy Wang and Jasmine Huang. We felt that Vancouver needed some more entertainment, as well as a method of expanding our current networks of friends. We believe Singular Plural Event Planning is the bridge connecting individuals to people who possess similar qualities and interests from different fields. Singular Plural Event Planning is redefining the means of social networking from “strictly-business” to chic luxurious experience. What has been the most memorable experience since starting Singular Plural? Before organizing each and every individual event, our team contributes a lot of ideas for the function. Due to the fact that our team is made up of four unique individuals, we often challenge each other with our own point of views, which in turn create memorable experiences for all

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of us. However at the end of each event, we always come to agreement that although it was a challenging project, we appreciate each other’s efforts and can celebrate a successful job well done. What is the company’s future plans? The road ahead for SP is geared towards planning public events. In particular, grand openings, company launches and wedding planning.

If you wish to help your company or organization plan an upcoming event, Singular Plural offers free consultations. So don’t hesitate to call them at (778) 885-5951 or contact them through email at Info@SingularPlural.ca Visit Singular Plural at: http://www.singularplural.ca/

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CHARGED BEAUTY ANNIE G. CHAN: PROFESSIONAL MAKEUP ARTIST

Why did you start a career in the makeup industry?

MAKEUP & AIRBRUSH MAKEUP PROFESSIONAL Text: Evelyn Wong To build a strong portfolio in any professional industry is not easy. For Annie G. Chan, this is no different. Through passion and dedication to makeup and styling, Annie G. has gone through a lot in becoming one of the most prominent figures in Hong Kong’s makeup industry. Her portfolio of artists and entertainers include G.E.M. (鄧紫棋), Fala Chen (陳法拉), Annie Liu (劉心悠) and many more. She has also been the official makeup artist and brand spokesperson for beauty powerhouses such as Bobbi Brown, Nars, Shu Uemura, Yves Saint Laurent and many more. We had the chance to interview Annie G for this issue of CHARGED to learn more about her profession.

Before entering this industry, I was actually in advertising. As to why I chose to enter makeup, it was purely coincidental. In advertising, you have to work out problems by communicating with others, but in makeup you can resolve them with your own two hands. This gives me a great sense of satisfaction from the challenges I can overcome. What has been your most interesting make-up experience? The most interesting experience was following G.E.M on tour in Vancouver and Toronto in December 2011. At the time, G.E.M. caught the flu, so we were worried about her vocals for the concert. We brought with us all sorts of medicine to Canada and were actually trying them all out backstage to see which was the most effective! Another memorable experience was working at mastermind JAPAN’s fashion show.. It was amazing working with people from all over the world and to produce to a show that suits the tastes of different cultures.

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What’s the biggest challenge in this industry? The biggest challenge is to be able to push your physical limits. This industry can get hectic and physically demanding. This one time, I woke up with my neck completely stiff. I was rushed to the hospital for some injections for painkilling in order to get back to work. There was another time when I had scheduled several back-to-back jobs on the same day. That experience made me literally throw up. In general, it is the bustle of the job that inhibits you from getting adequate rest to reenergize your body and function properly. Where do you draw your inspirations from? I draw my inspirations from my fine arts background and from trends all around the world, as well as from art pieces, architecture and cultural influences from my travels. Who is your favorite artist you have worked with? I don’t have any preferences; I’m very familiar with many of the artists that I had worked with. It’s a blessing that we’ve always been MAY 2012

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CHARGED BEAUTY ANNIE G. CHAN: PROFESSIONAL MAKEUP ARTIST

close-knitted like a family because they trust me. I also tend to become friends with brides that I’ve worked with. As long as there is a certain connection and chemistry, there will be appreciation and a sense of fulfillment. Besides makeup, what else do you enjoy doing? If I am actually able to get a day off work, the first thing I do is visit the sauna to cleanse my body of toxins. Then I get a massage. I don’t have too many pastimes, except maybe Facebook games. I also enjoy reading philosophical books and watching National Geographic on TV. What advice would you give to those aspiring to become makeup artists? The most important thing is to have passion and persistence. The makeup industry is by no means an “easy way out”, but rather it depends on the level of satisfaction you can give your clients. Their positive experience with you is what you should find joy and motivation in. You can consider yourself a sort of painter and your client’s face as your canvas that gets showcased to everyone. What gets you CHARGED in life? What gets me CHARGED is the people around me. No matter the age or personality, everyone has a different strength. I get my energy and motivation from the positive attitudes of others.

TIPS AND TECHNIQUES FROM ANNIE G CHAN What is currently the hottest makeup trend in Asia? What is popular right now is the porcelain doll look. As for the eyes, lighter colours will make them stand out more. You may also want to use bright colours like shocking orange and neon pink for eyes and lips. What are the hottest 3 eye shadow colors for summer 2012? • Light peachy orange which is very suitable for Asian skin colour • Purple eyeline can help make your eyes appear bigger and brighten them up • Metallic colours like gold, silver and bronze What’s the biggest difference when putting on make up for an Asian and a non Asian (Caucasian etc.)? The biggest difference between Asians and Caucasians are the facial features. Caucasian features are a lot more prominent, so you have to pay extra attention to where the light hits. On the other hand, Asians tend to have fairer skin. What are some useful tips for people with very oily faces? Any tips for those with sensitive skin? Oily skin: If acne is the cause of the facial oil, then alcohol-based, or oil-absorbing products could be used. If the oil is caused by over-dryness, then more moisturizing products should be used, rather than oil-absorbing ones. Sensitive Skin: People with sensitive skin should use organic and 100%-natural products

CHARGED MAGAZINE | MAY 2012

Do you have any makeup/skincare tips for men? I’ve noticed that the biggest problem about men, with regards to skincare, is that they do not have a routine. You should first use a cleanser (with microbeads for scrubbing), a toner, then finish off with moisturizer. If you can follow these three steps, then you can have healthy looking skin even when you are 60 years old! If your make up kit can only have 3 things, what would those 3 items be? • 2-way cake: So I can improve the look of the skin by evening out the skin tone • Mascara: Even without eyeshadow or eyeline, eyes can appear brighter with just the use of mascara • Deep plum brown lipstick: Lip colour should always be slightly darker even without makeup on the rest of your face

Annie G’s Workshops here in Vancouver: • 15 hours certificated professional makeup course (basic level)

• 15 hours certificated professional bridal makeup course

• 3 hours Basic Makeup & Styling course • 3 hours Japanese & Korean Style Makeup course • 3 hours Mom & Daughter Interactive Makeup course (Available from May 26 to May 31. )

Course information: www.AnnieGChanMakeup.ca To apply, please call Stage One Academy at 604.244.2999


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CHARGED FEATURE YTF GLOBAL: A FAMILY OF YOUTUBE’S BEST ENTERTAINERS

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CHARGED FEATURE YTF GLOBAL: A FAMILY OF YOUTUBE’S BEST ENTERTAINERS

YTF GLOBAL : A FAMILY OF YOUTUBE’S BEST ENTERTAINERS TEXT: JUSTIN LEE & PETER ZHAO PHOTOS: NORMAN TAM

``

Yesterday is in the past. Today you have a choice. Forever is up to you.

``

YTF Global is a family of YouTube’s greatest talents, aiming to entertain and empower fans all over the world. The goal of this movement is to encourage fans to achieve happiness and success by making their own choices. When the group kicked off their 2012 tour in Vancouver back in March, we caught up with a few of them to learn about how YTF started, what a typical day is like, their inspirations, and crazy fan stories. WHO’S THE MASTERMIND BEHIND YTF? DTRIX: It was actually three of us, at lunch one day. It was Chester, Ryan and myself, we would just secret tweet. “Alright bro, see you later. #YTF”. The more we did that, we kind of snuck YTF in our videos, and people started catching on, wondering what is this YTF thing was. We fell in love with it, and since we already hang out all the time, we just brought along the friends we

CHARGED MAGAZINE | MAY 2012

were hanging out with at the time to the group. All of a sudden we all started doing it, hiding YTF in our videos, using #YTF, and wearing the jackets everywhere. YTF is about talents and meeting people, but it has everything to do with the way we believe and think; that’s what we are trying to get across, to spread through touring. It’s not necessary just “this is YTF, and these are our talents”, it’s about how we got it, who we are, and that’s what you can be a part of too.” WHAT’S A TYPICAL DAY IN THE LIFE OF A YTF MEMBER? DTRIX: Actually our lives are pretty similar: Andrew usually stays in the night over, sleeping in Ryan’s bed.

I wake up, look at Ryan, and we are wearing the same thing. Andrew has his pants off with some really nice underwear, but we are literally all homies. Andrew might do the dishes, but we might go to Panera Breads or Daphne’s. Night rolls through, either we are recording, making YouTube videos, or we are just hanging out. Andrew will sing, and we will just hang out and dance around.


CHARGED FEATURE YTF GLOBAL: A FAMILY OF YOUTUBE’S BEST ENTERTAINERS

Literally, that’s what we do every day. We are very lucky to be just able to dance, and enjoy each other’s presence and grow, and work on our gifts with each other. RYAN: For me, basically if I’m not filming or editing, I’m writing. I try to write every single day, that’s pretty much all that I do: Write all day. Sometimes I can write a video in a few hours, and sometimes it takes all week, it depends if I have inspiration or not. JRA: I like to sleep, and I like to eat; but then when I get a creative process, it’s basically a couple hours of me playing guitar, vibing, writing lyrics, and stuff. I’m always doing something. I don’t sleep at night.”

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RYAN: I’m roommates with Dtrix. People see him online, and on stage, and it’s like the same thing anywhere. So it’s like living with a hyperactive person. Andrew stays at our place half the time too, so it’s like living with him as well. Everybody is very animated—it keeps your energy up.

She just kept hugging me and wouldn’t let me go for at least five minutes straight. I didn’t know what to do either; I didn’t how to just tell her “Okay, stop,” so it was really awkward.

ANY CRAZY FAN STORIES?

DTRIX: The future of YTF is we will always be friends no matter what. It’s kind of like the next generation: it depends on who steps forward for the next people on YouTube. YTF is just trying to spread our knowledge around the world.

ANDREW: Yeah, there are a lot, but like since we are weird, we just go with it. DTRIX: There might be weird Facebook messages, but that’s about it, nothing really crazy. RYAN: I was at this mall, and this girl was a great fan, and this was the only time that it got weird.

THE FUTURE OF YTF, WHAT’S YOUR PLAN NOW AFTER THIS?

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CHARGED FEATURE YTF GLOBAL: A FAMILY OF YOUTUBE’S BEST ENTERTAINERS

WHO INSPIRES YOU? WHAT ARTISTS DO YOU LOOK UP TO? DTRIX: For me, I’m a dancer, so I just look up to my homies. The live music for me is just crazy. I’ve been able to dance and freestyle like live music, so it’s always Andrew and JR that always sing, or Chester and Victor when they play. But anytime, music in general just inspires me.” JRA: I grab from a lot from different artists, but I guess as far as work ethics goes, I literally have to say my YTF members. These guys work like no other; they don’t play, it’s no games. Even though it looks funny, it’s not funny… to them. We work pretty hard, you can’t sit down and not do anything when you are with these guys. Everything else is just inspired by life, heartbreak. WHAT GETS YOU CHARGED? JRA: It’s literally waking up, and realizing that I’m not in Alaska, not going to school, but I’m doing the things I love—it boggles my mind. Whenever I get down or anything, I think about that to get my spirits up. RYAN: As much as we are doing work, at least we love doing it, that’s the best motivation. It’s just having fun with what we do.

CHARGED MAGAZINE | MAY 2012

JRA: And I’m friends with Ryan, so I always wake up and go “OMG I’m friends with Ryan, YES! Blow my MIND!” ANDREW: All the support online that we get. All of the fans I see when I do live shows, that’s what gets me. It lets me know that I’m doing a good job, and that the fans listen to your music when they are down. I’m helping them to get through something, inspiring them. That’s what gets me amped up doing what I do. DTRIX: They say we inspire them; but it also goes the opposite way as well. For me, I stopped dancing for a year; whenever we are not performing or on tour, I never really dance. About a month ago, I was in Nova Scotia teaching a class, and the kids got me re-inspired again. So for me, it would definitely be when I go around the city and see kids dancing, I know I have to get back on my game. It sounds really cliché, but really it’s our fans. If we have no fans, we have nobody to dance for. FOLLOW YTF GLOBAL: www.ytfglobal.com www.twitter.com/ytfglobal Facebook: YTF Global


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CHARGED SPORTS JEREMYLIN: AN INSPRATION FOR ALL ASIAN ATHLETES

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rowing up as an Asian boy, I was taught to always finish homework first, and then practice basketball— it’s part of the culture. We aren’t supposed be good at sports. “Just play it as a hobby, don’t spend too much time on it. You have to get into university, and get a job. Don’t dream about becoming a professional athlete,” my mom told me as I was getting ready to go to practice at 5:00AM. I never blamed her, because that’s the way she was raised up as well; we are supposed to be good at math, and rather bookish.

Jeremy Lin: an inspiration for all Asian athletes

It was my senior year as a high-school student. Even though I had good grades, I never really cared about it; I was too immersed in basketball. However, I felt the fact that regardless of how hard, and how much time I practiced, I was never going to be as good as Danny Zigich (Our captain who was bigger and faster than me). I bet even Thomas Wang (co-captain, even bigger, buffer, and faster than Danny) also felt a stigma attached to Asian basketball players regardless of how good he was.

Artwork by: Mink Couteaux www.largetosti.com CHARGED MAGAZINE | MAY 2012


CHARGED SPORTS JEREMYLIN: AN INSPRATION FOR ALL ASIAN ATHLETES

As an Asian basketball player, we really didn’t have any basketball players we could relate to. You would say there was Yao Ming, but he is a giant. Now we do. Jeremy Lin scored more points than anyone else in NBA history in their first four starts—a total of 109 points. This was way more than Derek Rose, LeBron James, Kobe Bryant, or Michael Jordan. In these four games, he had recorded breathtaking highlights, a win over Kobe Bryant in which he scored 38 points, and produced one of the greatest underdog sports stories of all time. Now he is the starting point guard, with Baron Davis, and Mike Bibby backing him up. Jeremy Lin scored more points than anyone else in NBA history in their first four starts—a total of 109 points. This was way more than Derek Rose, LeBron James, Kobe Bryant, or Michael Jordan. In these four games, he had recorded breathtaking highlights, a win over Kobe Bryant in which he scored 38 points, and produced one of the greatest underdog sports story of all time. Now he is the starting point guard, with Baron Davis, and Mike Bibby backing him up. In May 2002, Mike Bibby and the Sacramento Kings were in the Western Conference finals with my favorite team and player, Kobe and the Lakers. They were the heavy underdogs. Coming into game 5, I wasn’t wearing a Kobe jersey like I always did on game day. I was sporting a vintage Mike Bibby jersey from the Vancouver Grizzlies, because as the underdog, the Kings turned the tides on the series as they took down game 4, and now with 9 seconds left, Bibby just hit a game-winning threepointer to put the Kings up 3-2 in the series. Now, Mike Bibby is giving Jeremy Lin garbage time rest. Sounds crazy right? I know. I have been following Lin for years, even when he led Harvard to close games against NCAA powerhouses Connecticut and Boston College. That year, he also led Harvard to their best season in school history. I remember reading the first article about him in SLAM magazine. I remember having that sliver of hope to see an Asian

American just like myself make it to the NBA. Now, Jeremy Lin has broken through, he even has other NBA players like Metta World Peace (Ron Artest) running around the arena shouting “Linsanity, Linsanity, Linsanity!!!” Kobe Bryant praised him by saying “Players playing that well don’t usually come out of nowhere. It seems like they come out of nowhere, but if you can go back and take a look, his skill level was probably there from the beginning. It probably just went unnoticed.” Even my mom started comparing my game to Jeremy Lin’s game. “Peter, you need to build up lower body strength, look at how Jeremy explodes off the dribble!” I can’t stop watching Jeremy Lin highlights on YouTube. I’ve watched Jeremy’s cross over and dunk on John Wall countless of times. Maybe it’s because of the stereotypes like “Who says Asians can’t drive?” that I’ve been trying to understand why I love watching his highlights: is it because of his infectious style of play, or how fired up his teammates get whenever he does something spectacular? Is it the joy of witnessing basketball at its highest of highs, or is it because how much I dream that it was me? To me, Linsanity was never about hitting the game-winning shot against the Raptors, or selling out arenas and merchandise, or having countless articles and videos made over night—because that will all end. It is about that and-one lay up he made against the Raptors before the finishing shot. It is about getting back up time after time after he’s been knocked down. It is about the iron will determination and faith he always has.

“Players playing that well don’t usually come out of nowhere. It seems like they come out of nowhere, but if you go back and take a look, his skill level was probably there from the beginning. It probably just went unnoticed.” Kobe. Forget about basketball,” he can say “I will go to university, and play professional basketball...... just like Jeremy Lin.” The last thing this article is missing is the puns, and the thank yous. Jeremy Lin, thank you for being a leader, thank you for breaking stereotypes, and thank you for being a LINSPIRATION.

It’s now May; Jeremy Lin’s winning streak ended 2 months ago, and he has missed six weeks of action due to a torn meniscus in his left knee. People are starting to have doubts. I’m actually glad that I didn’t draft him in my fantasy league, mostly because of his assist to turn-over ratio. But I know Jeremy will come back strong, because he has never given up, never lost confidence and faith. I am ecstatic that he’s making a huge impact on the game, and how he has become an inspiration to millions. Because next time a young Asian kid gets told “You have to go to university, and get a real job.

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Text Peter Zhao Design Peter Zhao Art Mink Couteaux www.largetosti.com

MAY 2012

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CHARGED SPORTS DRAGON BOAT RACING: THE MODERN ANCIENT SPORT

DRAGON BOAT RACING THE MODERN ANCIENT SPORT TEXT: PETER TANG

PHOTO: PETER ZHAO

Vancouver offers a wide variety of sports that provide a good workout and a good social aspect, but how many of them place you in the middle of Vancouver’s picturesque False Creek with a team of 19 other people racing up and down in a long boat? The Dragon Boat festival is known throughout the world as an Asian culturaltradition that originated in the Guangdong province of China. It first started as an ancient folk ritual between contending villagers. However over the years it hasspread throughout the world, making it a fun, competitive sport on a global scale. Vancouver’s Dragon Boat scene has been around for a while now, with the first festival being held in 1989 to showcase the city’s proud cultural diversity. It was at first a very difficult sport to adapt to for a Western society where no Canadian understood what to do, but it has since grown into a large recreational activity for many Vancouverites and has even created a community surrounding the sport.

CHARGED MAGAZINE | MAY 2012


CHARGED SPORTS DRAGON BOAT RACING: THE MODERN ANCIENT SPORT

The Starbucks Waverunner are one of the many teams based in Vancouver that have taken up their oars to engage competitively in the sport. Having been around for several years, the team is composed of individuals from a variety of cultures and ages. The Waverunners has competed in numerous competitions, not just locally but also abroad in Hong Kong. They compete annually in the Rio Tinto Alcan Dragon Boat festival, an open competition for Dragon Boat enthusiasts around the globe, and have previously placed top in the 2nd division. Experienced paddlers of the team, Bonny Mah and Caerleon Bridgman, both agree that the sense of camaraderie amongst the team is a big incentive that has helped drive them to compete. The bond that ties the team together can definitely be sensed when watching the Waverunners in action, as well as the fun, familylike atmosphere generated. The intensity and passion for the sport that each member possesses can be seen up close when all 20 members of the team work together and paddle in unison to carry the boat swiftly across the water. Dragon boating in Vancouver certainly offers a lot in terms of breathtaking views of the city from the water that you would never be able to find on dry land. “I love being on water, Vancouver’s so beautiful” Bridgman remarks. “We’re paddling on False Creek and you get to see the skyline and enjoy the beauty of it.” The traditional sport isn’t to be taken lightly, as there is a heavy physical aspect to it. “It’s a lot harder than people think, there’s definitely a lot more of your body used in it and it provides a really good workout” says Bridgman. That isn’t to say it’s a sport only for the young and fit: Mah explains how dragon boating differentiates itself from other sports because of the physicality.

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“It’s a sport you can do

with your limitations and it’s a great sport to be outside. You don’t really need coordination; as long as you’re alive you can do this. You can have bad knees, bad legs but you can still do this.” Dragon boating is a prime example of the Asian cultural heritage that Vancouver is keeping alive today, through the many enthusiasts who unite together to celebrate the Chinese tradition and stay fit. When asked what gets them CHARGED in regards to Dragon boating, Mah and Bridgman answered, “having that great feeling when you hit that moneyspot” and also that “great rate, timing and communication with the adrenalin rush when you’re out on the water!”

GET INVOLVED If you want to get involved with a traditional sport in Vancouver that derives itself from the roots of Asian culture, you can visit http:// www.dragonboatbc.ca/ formore information. If you’d like to see teams like the Starbucks Waverunners race at a competitive level, you can check out the Rio Tinto Alcan Dragon Boat Festival happening on June 15th to 17th, located at Concord Place, Creekside Community Centre near False Creek.

MAY 2012

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CHARGED MAGAZINE


CHARGED ASKS BEST MOTHER’S DAY PRESENT GIVEN

WHAT’S THE BEST MOTHER’S DAY GIFT YOU’VE EVER GIVEN?

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The most important woman in our lives will always be the one that gave birth to us—our mothers. They’re the ones that carried us in their wombs for nine torturous months, clothed and fed us, taught us how to love, and most importantly, they’re the ones that always put us above themselves. TEXT: BERNIE YEE

Every second Sunday of May, we honour our mothers. And curious as to what others have done to make their mothers happy, we’ve gathered some responses! • A big fat kiss followed by an equally as large hug and an “I Love You”. It’s simple and cheesy, but nothing beats it! • Just be there for your mother! Every day can be a Mother’s Day! • A bouquet of roses folded by me! • I just try to be a good boy by doing whatever pleases her! • My mom’s a huge hockey fan, so I bought her playoff tickets one year. She was ecstatic! • Ever since I was little, I would make her a card with a letter inside every year. I still do it! • A few years ago, I sent her to the spa so she could be the one that got taken care of for once! • My mom got stressed really bad one year, so I paid for her cruise trip with friends so she could unwind! • I taught her how to use the computer! Trust me, teaching a technologically inept woman requires A LOT of love! • Every year, I just pay close attention to what wants, and then I surprise her with it!

MAY 2012

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CHARGED MAGAZINE


JANG CHEUN G LEE CHU LAW CORPORAT ION

鄭張李朱律師事務所


CHARGED DATING MEETING THE ASIAN PARENTS

Text: Yan Lui

Illustrations: Nicholas Sim

She’s perfect - cute, Asian, smart and funny too. She’s the one. Two semesters, 50 phone calls, 10 sleepless nights and $760 dollars later, she’s finally noticed you, but now there’s another hurdle: her parents. Meeting the parents is the critical stage in a couple’s love life that can decide whether the couple has a chance at a happy ending or is doomed to become star-crossed lovers. But impressing the parents at the first meeting can be tricky, especially when they’re Asian parents who are super-Asian. Below is a quick “banana’s” guide to meeting the parents.

Memorize these handy phrases and use them as conversation starters: “I hear that Harvard is a great place for personal development.” “If I had a million dollars, I should like to give 99% of that to my parents.” “I think everyone should have a grandchild.”

Refuse everything three times – This is the polite way to respond to a gift or an offer of food or drink. Even when you say “no,” they will probably offer it again, and perhaps force you to accept. It’s okay to accept after being brutally forced; that way, it doesn’t appear greedy. Speak the parents’ mother tongue – Instant brownie points. At least impress them with a “thank you” or “that was delicious” in their native language. Say hi to Grandma – But don’t just say hi – that’s rude. Say, “Hi, Grandma.” Wear glasses – Most Asian children wear glasses, because they study a lot, which ruined their eyesight from a young age. You want to appear to have done the same. Button your shirt all the way up – You’ll look like an accountant from the 70’s. It doesn’t matter. An accountant from any era is fantastic. Spit bones out on the table – Fitting in. Know the Asian village of your forefathers – For some reason, they always ask about this. Say you’re not smart – Humility is a Confucian virtue. Learn to show your intelligence and capableness while denying it in your words.

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Twitch your leg while sitting – In Asian movies, Hong Kong gangsters and otherwise bad people always do this. Address the parents by their first names – This is the fastest way to death... of your reputation. Have really cool, spiky hair – Asian parents refer to this as “bomb head.” Reckless, rebellious people who don’t study are known to sport this kind of hair. Have dyed hair – Mushroom cut is okay though. Lots of people who study hard have mushroom cuts. Have multiple piercings – Oh heaven forbid. Wear a toque or a thick scarf to hide them. Look at your date – Because if you look at each other, it probably means you sometimes hold hands, and if you hold hands it might mean you hug. And if you hug it might mean you kiss. And if you kiss it might mean you… are spreading germs. Not good. Wear a white rubber wristband – White is the Asian colour for funerals, so showing up at the family table and serving chicken to Aunty while wearing white on your wrist is not a good omen. In fact, avoid white clothing altogether. Don’t even wear white socks. Wear red socks. Red is a lucky color. Poke your chopsticks in the rice bowl vertically – Do you know how bad this looks? Asians give incense to the dead in urns filled with sand (looks like a rice bowl filled with rice) and insert the incense sticks in the urn vertically.

MAY 2012

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CHARGED MAGAZINE


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CHARGED MAGAZINE DISTIRBUTION

MAY2012 DISTRIBUTION LIST UBC STUDENT CLUBS 2329 West Mall, Vancouver, B.C.

SFU STUDENT CLUBS 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, B.C.

BURNABY

KR Media 2602-4500 Kingsway

DELTA

Assi Korean and Japanese Supermarket 5593 Kingsway

McGill Burnaby Public Library 4595 Albert Street

Ming Shing Restaurant 7158 120th Street

Bamboo Café 5103 Joyce Street

Metro Max 5912 Kingsway

Boransi Cafe 4035 North Road

MoonFlower Café 2610 – 4500 Kingsway

BubbleWorld 1-4300 Kingsway

Orange Corner 140-6200 McKay Avenue

Chonqing 4519 Kingsway

Pearl Drops 22 Willingdon Avenue

Crystal Mall Dental 1001-4500 Kingsway

Pittsburg 1687-4500 Kingsways

Curry King 5-4250 Kingsway

S&W Pepper House 1821-4500 Kingsway

Ice Baby BBT 1021-4500 Kingsway

Sunshine Café 1003 – 4500 Kingsway

Happy Molars 1-4361 Kindsway

Tea Plus 2122-4500 Kingsway

Jang Mo Jib 5075 Kingsway

The One Restaurant 5908 Kingsway

Japanese Waffle House 2210-4500 Kingsway

COQUITLAM

Joyce Hair Design 5156 Joyce Street

Bon Vivant Fashion Cafe Unit 1001, 1163 Pinetree Way

Kay Market 5169 Joyce Stree

Coquitlam College 516 Brookmere Avenue

CHARGED MAGAZINE | MAY 2012

RICHMOND Aberdeen Health Centre Unit 2180 – 4151 Hazelbridge Way Artistic Space Studio 140-4140 No. 3 Road Backstage Hair Studio 8010 Saba Road Blenz Coffee Suite 130-9040 Blundell Road Bone Sushi 1040 – 4540 No.3 Road Candyland Unit 3710 – 4151 Hazelbridge Way Cube Inc. Unit 3370 – 4151 Hazelbridge Way Gacha Gacha Hobbies & Toys Unit 3750 – 4151 Hazelbridge Way H-mart Unit 1780 – 4151 Hazelbridge Way K Fever 1018-8300 Capstan Way Mentor Hair Salon Suite 105-6211 No. 3 Road


CHARGED MAGAZINE DISTIRBUTION

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MINI Richmond 410-10700 Cambie Road

SURREY

H-Mart 590 Robson Street

Monzter 190-4151 Hazelbridge Way

Bubble88 10209 King George Hwy

Hon’s Wun-Tun House 1339 Robson Street

MQ Cosmetics Unit 3400 – 4151 Hazelbridge Way

VANCOUVER

Jang Mo Jib 1719 Robson Street

Bonchaz 426 W Hasting Street

Ma Dang Coul 847 Denman Street

Bubble World Tea House 1325 Robson Street

Milano Coffee & Gelato 849 Denman Street

Capstone 1429 Robson Street

Starbucks 433 Seymour Street

Chicco 1504 Robson Street

Sushi Mart 1668 Robson Street

Dajia Sushi 836 Denman Street

Take Five Café 701 West Georgia Street (Pacific Centre)

Donburiya 1329 Robson Street

Waves Coffee House 492 W Hastings Street

East Fusion 1021-88 West Pender Street

WE Coffee 1696 Robson Street

Footo Delights 820 Homer Street

Zabu Chicken 1635 Robson Street

Osaka Optical Unit 2450 – 4151 Hazelbridge Way Parker Place 4380 No 3 Road Saigon City Vietnamese Restaurant Suite 125-9040 Blundell Road The One Cafe 聚客亭 6091 No. 3 Road Waves #180-5951 No. 3 Road Whatever Café 1108 8328 Capstan Way Yavis Club Cheesecake Cafe 1231-8300 Capstan Way 尚品 1028-8300 Capstan Way

MAY 2012

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CHARGED MAGAZINE


CHARGED Magazine - Issue 05  

CHARGED is an Asian lifestyle magazine that strives to bring you the ultimate Asian pop culture experience. Content ranges from exclusive co...

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