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THE TECH

By Brian Gallagher

Brian has had a variety of engineering and management roles designing human machine interfaces (HMIs) in the biotech and automotive industries. Most recently, he is the cofounder of Andromeda Interfaces, which develops HMIs for many different industries.

How can we successfully translate the data into a form that technicians and engineers can use to diagnose or test battery packs easily?

W

ith the adoption of lithium-ion battery technology in electric vehicles, the role of battery management systems (BMS) has become vital measuring and reporting critical real-time information about the operation of the battery pack. An EV’s pack is comprised of many individual cells working together in groups. The primary responsibility of the BMS is to maintain the same state of charge (SOC) among all the cells by performing energy management. It is essentially the “brain” of the pack, and data is continually being monitored, processed and stored to prevent damage to the cells. The amount of cell data being provided by the BMS is comprehensive, and becomes quite a challenge to troubleshoot in the event that an issue arises. The question is: How can we successfully translate the data into a form that technicians and engineers can use to diagnose or test battery packs easily? Critical BMS cell data The single most important function of a BMS is cell protection. Lithium-ion cells possess characteristics that make it necessary to monitor them. If the cells are overcharged, they can be damaged and cause overheating. If the cells are discharged below a certain

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CHARGED Electric Vehicles Magazine - Iss 11 DEC 2013  

CHARGED Electric Vehicles Magazine - Iss 11 DEC 2013