Page 1

T I M E S

N E W

R O M A N


T I M E S N E W R O M A N b a s t a r d f o n t


INTRO


Times NewThe Roman made it’s comissioned debut in Britains newspaper Times. It was after Stanley Morison wrote articleascriticizing the typography of TheanTimes dated .


Y O U R

D A D D Y ?


While we know when Times New Roman first appeared, who fathered the font has become a bit of a mystery as of late. At least three different individuals are said to be its creator or have contributed to its creation, and there are at least two different stories as to how Times New Roman came to exist. STORY I After criticizing the typography employed by The Times in 1931, Stanley Morison commissioned artist Victor Lardent of the English branch of Monotype to revise an older font by the name of Plantin. The revision became known as Times New Roman and first made The Times newspaper on the third day of October in 1932.


According to M i k e P a r k e r, a worldwide expert on type, William Starling Burgess is the true father of Times New Roman. Burgess was born of a wealthy Boston family in 1878, and made a life for himself as a naval and aeronautical designer. He built yachts for the America’s Cup and aircraft for the Wright Bros. Before all this however, Parker believes, Burgess dabbled shortly in typography. In his posession, Parker has a brass pattern plate bearing the familiar form of a large capital Times New Roman B. The technology used to create this plate, Parker says, was S T O R Y I I no longer in use after 1915. Ge rald Giampa, a Canadian Master Printer, provided this plate in 1990 to Parker after purchasing the remnants of the Lanston Monotype company. Delving in to the company’s archives, Giampa claimed to have come upon documents that refer to a typeface Number 54 - the font Parker contends we now know as Times New Roman.


B U R N E D ,

B O M B E D ,

F L O O D E D

Such has been the fate of most all evidence that might give us a clue as to who really is responsible for the creation of Times New Roman. In 1918, a fire tore through Burgess’ shipyard, destroying any evidence of his activities during the time in which Parker says he designed the original concept for the font. A bomb blast in 1941 near Monotype Corporation’s London offices destroyed much of the evidence of Morisons activities during the redesign of The Times typeface. The Lanston Monotype archives in Giampa’s posession were all that remained. His home was flooded in 2000, and a hundred years worth of printing history was lost forever. A second Lanston Monotype archive resides at The Smithsonian Institute in Washington, DC, but due to asbestos and lead contamination, it has been placed off limits.


ANATOMY


7

9

5

3

MILK

13

strawberry 15

11

4

2

12 16 1

6

o 10

1. x-height

2. cap height

3. baseline

4. stem

5. bowl

6. serif

7. descender

8. ligature

9. finial

10. terminal

11. spine

12. ascender

13. uppercase

14. small capital

15. counter

16. lowercase


a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z

LOWER CASE


ABCDEFGHIJKLM NOPQRSTUVWXYZ

UPPER CASE


END


C H A P S

TIMES NEW ROMAN  

Typography Project @ UCDenver

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