Issuu on Google+

CORPUS CHRISTI COLLEGE

Senior Curriculum Handbook Seniors of 2011


Senior Handbook 2010 - 2011

Contents MISSION STATEMENT ...................................................................................................................................... 2  SELECTING SENIOR SUBJECTS ...................................................................................................................... 3  QUEENSLAND CERTIFICATE OF EDUCATION (qce) .................................................................................. 6  THE QUEENSLAND CORE SKILLS (QCS) TEST ........................................................................................... 7  RANK – TERTIARY ENTRY FOR STUDENTS WITHOUT OPs .................................................................... 9  PREREQUISITES FOR YEAR 11 ................................................................................................................... 13  SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDED JUNIOR STUDIES ................................................................................. 14  LIFE SKILLS IN THE SENIOR SCHOOL........................................................................................................ 16  STUDY OF RELIGION...................................................................................................................................... 18  ENGLISH ............................................................................................................................................................ 20  ENGLISH EXTENSION (LITERATURE) ........................................................................................................ 23  ENGLISH FOR ESL LEARNERS ..................................................................................................................... 25  ENGLISH COMMUNICATION ........................................................................................................................ 27  MUSIC ................................................................................................................................................................ 28  VISUAL ART ..................................................................................................................................................... 31  FILM, TELEVISION AND NEW MEDIA ........................................................................................................ 33  DRAMA .............................................................................................................................................................. 35  GEOGRAPHY .................................................................................................................................................... 37  MODERN HISTORY ......................................................................................................................................... 40  ANCIENT HISTORY ......................................................................................................................................... 43  PHYSICAL EDUCATION ................................................................................................................................. 46  ACCOUNTING .................................................................................................................................................. 49  CERTIFICATE III IN BUSINESS ..................................................................................................................... 51  INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY (ICT) ........................................................... 52  JAPANESE ......................................................................................................................................................... 54  HOME ECONOMICS ......................................................................................................................................... 56  MATHEMATICS ................................................................................................................................................ 59  MATHEMATICS A ............................................................................................................................................ 60  MATHEMATICS B ............................................................................................................................................ 61  MATHEMATICS C ............................................................................................................................................ 62  BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE ................................................................................................................................... 63  CHEMISTRY ...................................................................................................................................................... 65  PHYSICS ............................................................................................................................................................ 67  HOSPITALITY ................................................................................................................................................... 71  PREVOCATIONAL MATHEMATICS ............................................................................................................. 74  CHINESE ............................................................................................................................................................ 75 

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

Corpus Christi College MISSION STATEMENT Guiding Motto – My Faith Is My Light Corpus Christi College is founded on the traditions of Mary MacKillop and the Sisters of St Joseph. The College is centred on Mary MacKillop’s belief in: the dignity of each person equality of opportunity and great trust in God

• • •

It responds to the call of the Catholic Church to continue the mission of Jesus through its education focus.

The College undertakes to provide:

education in the Catholic faith

Each individual will be encouraged to develop a love of God and through this give joyful witness to the goodness of the Creator and creation and to work for the common good in the world.

• a holistc education that is diverse and flexible The College will be responsive to the educational needs of students and be innovative in implementing them. A diverse and flexible curriculum will challenge and extend the students in their life journey. The teaching staff will empower students to achieve their potential and will work consistently in providing educational opportunities for all students. Each student will be encouraged to attain realistic educational goals

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

a caring community

Corpus Christi College will create an atmosphere in which self-esteem is fostered and self-motivation encouraged. Equality of opportunity for all, justice, respect and tolerance will be fostered between school, home and the wider community. The shared wisdom model of decision-making will encompass the whole College community.

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

2


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

SELECTING SENIOR SUBJECTS Subjects in Year 11 & 12 are generally studied over 4 semesters and the levels of achievement recorded on the Senior Statement are based on student performance during the two years. Subjects are of two kinds: Authority subjects and Authority-registered subjects. AUTHORITY SUBJECTS are those for which the College’s work programs are accredited by the Queensland Studies Authority and are based on QSA syllabuses. These subjects count towards an Overall Position (OP). AUTHORITY-REGISTERED SUBJECTS are those other than Authority subjects, for which the Authority has accredited the College’s study plan. These subjects do not count towards an Overall Position (OP) but do count towards a rank for tertiary entrance. SENIOR PATHWAY OPTIONS The process of subject selection for Year 10 students enables them to access a number of pathway options leading to entry to a range of tertiary studies or employment on completing Year 12. PATHWAYS

Traineeship/Apprenticeship AQTF Certificate I-IV

Rank (for Tertiary entrance) 20 semester units

OP (Overall Position) 20 semester units

TAFE Private Training Organisation Employment

University TAFE Private Training Organisation Employment

University TAFE Private Training Organisation Employment

University

University

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

3


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

SUBJECT SELECTION OPTIONS 1. Students may select a course which leads to an OP and direct entrance to University or Diploma level study. OP Eligible Students •

MUST sit for the Queensland Core Skills (QCS) Test

MUST select 6 Subjects for Year 11– at least 5 Authority subjects

MUST select 3 core subjects: * Study of Religion * English * One of the Mathematics subjects

SHOULD consider a level of Mathematics appropriate to their ability and future career pathway, in the light of the recommendations made by the Maths Department.

RECEIVE Queensland Certificate of Education (if they qualify), Senior Statement and Tertiary Entrance Statement

2. Students may select a course with vocational outcomes, which leads to a rank and further study at University/TAFE or with a private provider. Rank Eligible Students •

MUST sit for the Queensland Core Skills (QCS) Test to receive a rank

MUST select 6 subjects for Year 11 – at least 5 authority-registered subjects

MUST include 3 core subjects: * Study of Religion * English * One of the Mathematics subjects

SHOULD consider a level of Mathematics appropriate to their ability and future career pathway, in the light of the recommendations made by the Maths Department.

CAN select their other subjects from either Authority subjects or Authority-registered subjects

RECEIVE Queensland Certificate of Education (if they qualify), Senior Statement and AQTF Certificates according to subject choice

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

4


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

3. Students with a particular interest in a vocational area may be offered a school based traineeship or apprenticeship during Year 11 or Year 12. Under this program, students combine work, senior studies and on-the-job training. School based trainees/apprentices •

CAN sit for the Queensland Core Skills (QCS) Test

CAN reduce their subject load to accommodate their work and off-the-job training

MUST study the 3 core subjects of: * Religion and Ethics or Study of Religion * English or English Communication * Mathematics

SHOULD consider a level of Mathematics appropriate to their ability and future career pathway, in the light of the recommendations made by the Maths Department.

RECEIVE a Senior Statement and completed (or in the case of Apprenticeship partially completed) AQTF Certificates related to the vocational area of education and training.

Subject Results There are five possible Levels of Achievement for both Authority and Authority-registered subjects: Very High Achievement High Achievement Sound Achievement Limited Achievement Very Limited Achievement Some university courses require students to have studied particular subjects at the Senior level, and to have been awarded a certain level of achievement in those subjects. To find out what these prerequisites are, refer to the Summary of Selection Criteria for entry to Universities in the Tertiary Prerequisites 2010 booklet, published by QTAC and distributed to all Year 10 students.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

5


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

QUEENSLAND CERTIFICATE OF EDUCATION (QCE) The QCE is a broad based school qualification awarded to young people who have achieved a significant amount of learning to a set standard and have met certain literacy and numeracy requirements. Students from Year 10 are working towards the QCE which replaces the Senior Certificate. To be eligible for a QCE, a student: ‰ must complete between 12 and 20 credits from core courses of study; ‰ may include up to 8 credits from a combination of core, preparatory, enrichment or advanced courses; ‰ must meet the literacy and numeracy requirement. For most students, the QCE will be awarded at the end of the year they complete Year 12. In the event that a student has not met the QCE requirements upon completion of Year 12, their Learning Account will remain open and they will be awarded a QCE in July or December of the year in which they meet the QCE requirements. Each student is registered with the QSA and has a secure online Learning Account which is created in the year that they turn 16 or when they are in Year 10 – whichever occurs first. Learning Accounts record all learning achievements, including those that contribute towards the QCE. The learning accounts remain open until a student has received a QCE and are able to be accessed by the student at any time. Once a Learning Account is opened, learning providers will be able to bank the student’s achievements in their individual Learning Account. The Senior Statement is an official record of all the learning achievements in a Learning Account and complements the QCE. It details what learning was attempted, the standard achieved and, where and when the learning took place. The QSA will issue the Senior Statement to students who: ‰ have met the requirements for a QCE; ‰ are attending a school and have banked at least one achievement in their Learning Account, and are enrolled in at a school until the prescribed date at the end of Year 12; ‰ have completed a pattern of study which makes them OP eligible. OP eligible students will also receive a Tertiary Entrance Statement which reports on Overall Position (OP) and Field Positions (FPs).

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

6


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

THE QUEENSLAND CORE SKILLS (QCS) TEST All students in Year 12 who are studying five or more Authority subjects and who wish to receive an OP must take the QCS Test. Students not eligible for an OP are advised to sit for the QCS Test. Students who would like a tertiary rank must sit the test also. The QCS Test consists of four papers: Writing Task Two Multiple Choice Short Response Results from these four papers are combined to give each student one of five grades from A (highest) to E (lowest). This grade will be recorded on the Senior Certificate and it will be one of the measures used to calculate either the OP (if eligible) or the rank for tertiary entrance (for those not taking twenty semester units of Authority subjects). The items chosen in the four papers of the QCS Test will examine the skills found in the 49 Common Curriculum Elements (CCEs) which have been identified in the Queensland Senior Curriculum. Descriptions of these are in the College Student Diary and on the College website. Overall Position The Overall Position (OP) is calculated by taking a measure of student’s performance in the equivalent of her best five Authority subjects in Years 11 and 12. Students must study at least three Authority subjects for the complete two years, and the remainder can be made up of other Authority subjects. All Authority subjects count equally when calculating the OP and each student’s results will be compared with other students by means of the QCS Test. An OP is reported as one of twenty-five bands numbered from 1 (highest) to 25 (lowest). Field Positions Field Positions (FPs) are calculated by combining results in related subjects. As the fields measure different qualities, subjects are weighted in individual fields according to the skills they will measure. Positions in fields for which students are eligible are reported in ten bands numbered from 1 (highest) to 10 (lowest).

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

7


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

TABLE OF WEIGHTS FOR FIELDS - YEAR 12 IN 2011 Subject  Field A  Field B  Field C  Field D  English   5  3  1  NA  English Extension (Literature)   5  3  1  NA  English for ESL Learners (trial)   5  4  1  NA  Japanese   1  5  1  NA  Ancient History   5  4  2  NA  Modern History   5  4  2  NA  Geography   5  5  4  2  Mathematics A   1  2  5  5  Mathematics B   1  2  5  5  Mathematics C   1  2  5  5  Chemistry   4  3  5  5  Physics   4  3  5  5  Biology   4  3  5  3  Science21 (pilot)   3  3  5  3  Accounting   3  3  5  4  Physical Education   4  3  3  2  Home Economics   3  3  3  2  Hospitality Studies   3  3  3  1  Visual Art   3  2  2  NA  Study of Religion   5  4  2  NA  Drama   4  3  2  NA  Film, Television and New Media   4  3  2  NA  Music   3  2  2  2  Music Extension   3  2  2  2 

Field E  4  3  3  4  2  2  3  1  1  1  3  3  3  3  2  5  4  4  5  3  5  5  5  5 

This is the most current information which The Queensland Studies Authority (QSA) provided to schools in July 2009. The weights for fields for all subjects may change in future years. FIELD DESCRIPTIONS FIELD A FIELD B FIELD C FIELD D FIELD E

Extended written expression involving complex analysis and synthesis of ideas. Short written communication involving reading comprehension and expression in English or a foreign language. Basic numeracy involving simple calculations and graphical and tabular interpretation. Solving complex problems involving mathematical symbols and abstractions. Substantial practical performance involving physical or creative arts or expressive skills.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

8


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

RANK – TERTIARY ENTRY FOR STUDENTS WITHOUT OPS Students who do not qualify for an Overall Position (OP) can still gain entry to courses offered by TAFE Qld and most universities. Students not eligible for an OP will be allocated a QTAC selection score, called a ‘rank’, based on their results recorded on the Senior Certificate and their results in the Queensland Core Skills (QCS) Test. It is important that students who elect the non-OP pathway understand: • to gain entry to courses they must satisfy specified prerequisites. Prerequisites may be subject requirements or folio/audition requirements for creative and performing arts courses. • it is difficult and sometimes impossible to obtain the extremely high ranks necessary to enter some competitive courses at tertiary institutions. Most non-OP students who are successful in their applications gain entry to TAFE diploma and advanced diploma courses and diploma courses at universities. A very small number gain direct entry to university degree courses. What is a rank? Ranks are worked out from tables developed by QTAC in consultation with other higher education authorities. Ranks are based on a scale from 99 (highest) to 1 (lowest).

How are ranks determined for non-OP students? To determine a rank, QTAC uses the achievement levels reported on the Senior Statement for Authority, Authority-registered and approved Vocational Education and Training subjects and modules. The best 20 semester’s unit of study and results from QCS test are used for calculation.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

9


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

10


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011`

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

12


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

PREREQUISITES FOR YEAR 11 Students need to check the QTAC Pre-requisites book to ascertain any pre-requiste subjects they need to undertake for university entrance. Further information to help in the choice of subjects is available in the Careers Centre in TAFE and University Handbooks and on the computer programmes OZ JAC and Career Builder available on the College computer network.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

13


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

SENIOR STUDIES SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDED JUNIOR STUDIES SUBJECTS Accounting

YR 10 STUDIES Achievement of at least a C standard in Year 10 Preparation Mathematics A or B is required.

Ancient History

A study of Yr 10 History is an advantage.

Biology

C in Yr 10 Introduction to Senior Science, C in Yr 10 English

Certificate III in Business Chemistry

No prerequisites A high standard in Yr 10Science and Yr 10Maths is required. Enrolment in senior Maths B is required. C in Yr 10 English required.

Drama

Yr 10Drama is recommended. Yr 10English is required.

English

Yr 10English is required.

Film, Television and New Media Geography

Level 5/6 in Yr 10English

Home Economics

A study of Yr 10Geography is an advantage. At least one food unit and one textile unit of Yr 10Home Economics is recommended

* Hospitality Practices

No prerequisites

* Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Mathematics A

No prerequisites

Achievement of at least a C standard in Preparation for Mathematics A.

Mathematics B

Achievement of at least a C standard in Preparation for Mathematics B.

Mathematics C

Achievement of at least a B standard in Preparation for mathematics C.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

14


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

Japanese

Four semester units in Yr 10Japanese is required.

Maths A

Year 10 Mathematics is required.

Maths B

Year 10 Preparation for Mathematics B is required.

Maths C

Year 10 Preparation for Mathematics B is required. Senior Maths B is also required.

Modern History

A study of Yr 10History is an advantage.

Music

Yr 10Music is recommended. Students should have the ability to either play an instrument or sing.

Physical Education

C in Yr 10 Physical Education, C in Yr 10 English

Physics

B in Introduction to Senior Science and Yr 10 Maths is required. Enrolment in Senior Maths B is required.

Study of Religion

English is recommended.

* Pre-Vocational Mathematics Visual Art

Yr 10Maths or Numeracy Course. Yr 10Visual Art and English are recommended.

* These are Authority-registered Subjects and do not contribute towards an OP. However, they are still used to calculate a Selection Rank which enables entry to TAFE and some University Courses.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

15


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

LIFE SKILLS IN THE SENIOR SCHOOL “Personal and Social Development Education is an essential curriculum component that aims to promote the growth and development of the human person as an individual in relationships and as part of a community.” PSDE Guidelines p.6 All students participate in the College’s Life Skills Program. The aim of this program is to empower students with the ability and knowledge to develop a better understanding of themselves at various stages of their life that will become evident through their physical, social, emotional, moral and spiritual development as they shape and enrich their changing world. The Vision is for students to develop into resilient young women who: o o o o o o

have a clear sense of self and a preferred future are capable of coping with challenge and change communicate effectively make Healthy choices and decisions engage in Positive Relationships with others contribute to the community

Outcomes

Contexts

Bullying Nutrition Safety Health Care Student Protection ƒ Career education

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

ƒ Drug Education ƒ Body Image ƒ Values Education ƒ Sexuality education ƒ Mental Health promotion

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Culture Religious and Spiritual development Effective learning Social and emotional well-being Socio-economic factors Physical development Positive relationship Complex global society

In Year 11 the students undertake study in the following topics: Semester 1:

Goal Setting, Time Management, Study Skills, Referencing, Stress Management, Decision Making & Assertiveness, Relationships – domestic violence/ STD’s, Drug Arms, Careers - Smart Casual

Semester 2:

Leadership – understanding styles / principles/ effectiveness / qualities/ decision making, Common Curriculum Elements, Queensland Core Skills Preparation

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

16


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

In Year 12 the students undertake study in the following topics: Semester 1:

Women’s Health – nutrition and exercise/eating disorders/PMS, Stress Management, Mental Health – depression / anxiety disorders/ substance abuse, QCS Preparations

Semester 2:

Women’s Health – Breast Cancer/Mammograms/Pap Smears/Cervical Cancer/ Teenage Pregnancy/Sexual Violence, QCS, Guest Speakers such as RACQ, Qld Fire’n’Rescue, Financial Coaching, etc.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

17


STUDY OF RELIGION 1.

INTRODUCTION

Australia today is a pluralist society in which a great variety of religious traditions exist side by side. Studying religion helps students become aware of others’ beliefs and further understand their own. These studies can also help students develop an understanding of the ways that particular cultural contexts have influenced, and continue to influence, the formation of an individual’s world view and beliefs. Such understandings can make valuable contributions to cross-cultural harmony and mutual enrichment. Study of Religion can help students become more effective global citizens by developing their knowledge, skills and values, and develop their understanding through critical inquiry, debate and reflection, and empathetic engagement with the standpoint of others. At this College we explore integrated curriculum initiatives, and to this end we have closely aligned subjects English and Study of Religion in content, skills and the critical inquiry method. Each subject enriches the other and it is our desired aim that student responses and ability to analyse, synthesise and evaluate at a high level will be enhanced, thus enabling them to reach their educational goals. AIMS Study of Religion may be viewed as a number of interrelated educational activities designed to help students understand: • • • • •

2.

the purpose, meaning and significance of religion in the lives of individuals and communities their own patterns of belief, their traditions, and the ways in which these contribute to shaping their lives and interpreting their experiences and appreciate the beliefs, attitudes and values of others while retaining one’s own beliefs and values that religions are dynamic and living, not static, with transformative power for their adherents the study of world religions and the phenomena of religion, and evaluate critically religions and religious traditions CONTENT

The students will study 4 separate units of work - one unit each semester. Learning experiences will be drawn from the following areas: • • •

Australian religious perspectives World religions The nature and significance of religion

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

18

STUDY OF RELIGION

Senior Handbook 2010- 2011


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

3.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment will consist of a variety of techniques – objective short answer exams, multimodal presentations, response to stimulus tasks, research assignments, essay exams and a field study. 4.

WORKLOAD

Regular homework includes making glossaries of terms and summaries of content, to about 1 to 1½ hours per week. Assignment tasks should be given about three hours per week extra, on average, depending on individual work habits.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

19


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

ENGLISH

ENGLISH 1.

INTRODUCTION

Communication and the effective use of language are central to all human endeavours and in that sense the ‘essential’ nature of English is self-evident. The aim of the English course at Corpus Christi College is to promote the linguistic maturity of students and their awareness of how language use varies according to context, purpose, audience and content, and modes and mediums. The study of English occurs in a world of rapid cultural, social, economic and technological change. These factors place complex demands on citizens to be literate. As literate citizens, students need to be able to interpret, critically analyse and respond to and construct face-to-face, paper and electronic texts using a range of language systems (written, spoken/signed, visual, nonverbal and auditory). They also need to be able to draw on a repertoire of resources to interpret and construct texts for personal, cultural, social and aesthetic purposes now and beyond school. (English Syllabus) At each level, this course is organised into different integrated units under a broad umbrella theme: Year 11 Semester 1 Year 11 Semester 2 Year 12 Semester 1 Year 12 Semester 2

Who Do You Say I Am? Am I A Cultural Construct? I am Who I am The Self In A Global World

The Value of Studying English The overall objectives for the course of study in senior English are to develop students: 1. Develop specific and detailed knowledge of how language systems operate by reading, viewing, writing, shaping, listening and speaking/signing 2. Appreciation of the ways purpose, cultural context and social situation shape meanings in texts 3. Appreciation of language for entertainment and leisure 4. Engagement with worlds real and imagined 5. Identification with characters, places, events and experiences in texts 6. Development of a fascination for language, its origins, its diversity, its dynamism 7. Engagement in critical reflection and discussion on the ways in which language is used 8. Participation in the diversity of Australian culture and contribution to its enrichment 9. Participation in life-long learning as active citizens in shaping the future.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

20


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

2.

PREREQUISITES

Students who have achieved above or equivalent of a Sound Achievement in Yr 10English should be successful in Senior English. Students not achieving these levels should consider taking English Communication. Possible Career Paths A Sound Achievement in English is a prerequisite for most university courses. 3.

COURSE CONTENT

Course Outline Students will encounter a large number of highly diverse texts in Senior English, both traditional, and contemporary. There will be a selection from – the canonical literary texts as well as a wide range of texts in other forms including: non-fiction writing, biographies, magazines, newspaper articles, films, television programs, documentaries, web pages, hypermedia, poetry, songs, and plays. These texts are selected and arranged to support the study of cultural and social issues and themes, including the representation of women in different times and places or the purposes for which narrative is used in our own and other cultures. Through the study of a rich blend of the traditional, the functional, the innovative and the critical in texts and forms, students may develop a high level of confidence and skill in their language use and practices. Year 11 Unit One: Who do you say I am? An examination of the construction of adolescence in the media and the texts of popular culture. Year 11 Unit Two: Am I a cultural construct? Australian national identity is a concept that pervades all aspects of culture, from sport to fine arts. As inhabitants of this country, our indigenous identity and outlook is shaped by these cultural discourses. Year 12 Unit One: I am who I am – Text constructs of gender This unit is designed to explore the ways gender identity is explored through an exploration of a novel. Year 12 Unit Two: The self in a global world As students complete Year 12, it is important that they reflect on themselves and others and come to an understanding of how ‘self’ is constructed in texts.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

21


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

4.

ASSESSMENT AND WORKLOAD

Throughout the two-year course of study, assessment is continuous. Assessment of language performance is based on the ability of the students to fulfil task-related criteria. At the beginning of Years 11 and 12, each student is notified of the tasks and their due dates. Students may expect to complete seven or eight pieces of assessment in both Years 11 and 12 which includes four or five written and two or three spoken. Three of the written pieces are conducted under exam conditions each year. Students are provided with a policy on submitting assessment in English which is located in the ‘English Department Student Guide’. The texts that students will be asked to create can be classified into three broad areas: ¾ Analytical or expository: written tasks of this kind are usually in response to literature, eg. an analysis of how Australian identities are constructed through selections of poetry or a critical comparison of the ways the viewer has been positioned in two film versions of a play or novel that has been studied; spoken texts of the type may include such presentations as a media analysis, a seminar or a panel discussion on a significant issue. ¾ Imaginative or creative: written tasks of this type may include the short story, the drama script, the interior monologue and the multi-genre narrative, while spoken tasks might involve storytelling, a dramatic re-creation (such as a transformation of a text) or a student – constructed monologue. ¾ Persuasive or reflective: this category includes texts suitable for a public audience, such as feature articles, columns, interviews, biographies, reviews and web pages. Examples of spoken texts of this type may be the eulogy or public address or might involve the taking of a position at a public meeting or forum. Exit Levels of Achievement The standards reached by students in speaking and writing are determined by matching their performance with criteria. Decisions are based on patterns of performance as indicated in the student’s profile. To achieve a Sound Level of Achievement, a student must meet the minimum standard for Sound Achievement in speaking and writing under both exam and assignment conditions. At other levels, teachers consider the relative contribution made by each of these two modes of expression in making a global assessment of the student’s achievement. Exit Achievement Levels reflect students’ achievement at the end of the course, taking into account: • Mandatory aspects of the Senior English syllabus • Significant aspects of the senior English Work Program • A range of task conditions • A process of continuous assessment • ‘fullest’ and ‘latest’ decision-making. Exit Achievement is usually determined by tasks completed in Year 12.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

22


ENGLISH EXTENSION (LITERATURE) 1.

INTRODUCTION

English Extension (Literature) is designed to offer more challenge than Senior English for those students interested in exploring in more depth social, cultural and textual understandings about the nature of literature and literariness. This subject is offered in Yr 12 only. This is an extension of the parent subject Senior English and should be read in conjunction with the syllabus. The subject is concerned with the ways in which reading practices, seen as sets of strategies that readers draw on when making sense of texts, have opened up the ways that texts may be read. The concepts in this syllabus build on those relating to meaning making, language and culture articulated in Senior English. This subject plays a pivotal role in enabling our young women to take their place as intelligent and articulate participants in an interdependent global world. The study of English Extension (Literature) at the College contributes to achievement of this global aim by nurturing creativity and the ability to critically engage in the nature of ‘literature and literariness’. 2.

PREREQUISITES

The QSA policy for extension subjects states that the Senior Certificate may show one or two semester units of an extension subject if it also shows four semester units of the parent subject or the equivalent. The requirement for entry into the English Extension (literature) subject, therefore is that the student has studied two semesters of Year 11 Senior English, or the equivalent, and has concurrent enrolment in Year 12 Senior English. 3.

COURSE CONTENT

At Corpus Christi College our introductory units invite students to explore theorised reading approaches. This is done through examining the literature of the Renaissance, Romantic and Victorian eras. A study of the four reading models will be undertaken. By doing this the focus will move away from what was great literature to the taking of a more relevant view underpinned by contemporary literary theory. Emphasis is placed on the notion that whatever literature is, it is dependent on when, where, by whom, and for what purposes it is read and that what is valued will be ever changing and different across cultures. Semester Three Discovering how I read:

An introduction to the four reading approaches with a focus on text centred and reader centred approaches

Deepening my Discovery:

A focus on the world Centred Approach

Embracing a global world:

Through the lens of the four approaches students are invited to engage with the notion that literature is dependent on:

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

23

ENGLISH EXTENSION

Senior Handbook 2010- 2011


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

how, when, where, by whom and for what purposes is it read.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

24


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

ENGLISH FOR ESL LEARNERS

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

25


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

26


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

English Communication Studies Focus of study area Effective communication is integral to our rapidly changing society. New technologies, the influences of globalisation and the restructured workplace require students to focus on diverse ways of communicating in preparation for lifelong learning. This study area specification aims to assist students from various cultural, social, linguistic and economic backgrounds to use language to comprehend and compose in a wide range of print, spoken, visual and multimedia texts in a range of contexts. This study area encourages students to focus on the understanding and use of the process of communication. Throughout the program of study, students develop the communication skills that enable them to function effectively in the contexts of work, community and leisure. To a large extent, these three contexts, inextricably related to our cultural identity, define the kind of person we see ourselves to be. These contexts comprise the three main components of the study area and are integrated throughout the program of study, whichever strand is offered. Overview of strands English Communication is an Authority-registered subject designed for a broad range of students in Senior Years. It offers core studies and provides for schools to offer up to three strands that may comprise both general units of work and nationally recognised vocational components. Schools develop programs of study made up of units of work, each of which incorporates one or more of the main components, work, community and leisure, as well as the study area core which focuses on the process of communication. Nature of assessment Assessment in English Communication is designed to enable students to demonstrate achievement of the objectives of the study area which are grouped under the headings of recognition and interpretation of contexts and texts, planning and production of texts, and control of textual features. A wide range of tasks is used to determine a student's level of achievement. Assessment techniques may include: observation of student skills; practical work; oral presentations; written tasks; folio presentations; and real-life projects. Assessment of a student's exit level of achievement is criteria-based. Assessment of the learning outcomes of the vocational modules is competency-based. Competency-based assessment is the process of gathering evidence and making judgments on whether the student can consistently demonstrate knowledge and skill, and the application of that knowledge and skill to the standard of performance required in the workplace.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

27


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

MUSIC

MUSIC 1.

INTRODUCTION

Students live in a world in which music has a strong and important presence. Music is an integral part of everyday life and serves self-expressive, celebratory, social, cultural and educational roles. The music curriculum at Corpus Christi College is based on an approach to music education inspired by the Hungarian composer and educator, Zoltan Kodรกly (1882-1967). The primary goals of this approach are to make music accessible to all people, and to cultivate a love and appreciation for music that is supported by understanding and direct musical experience. Throughout Kodรกly's writings are the notions that a person cannot be complete without music, and that music serves to develop a person emotionally, spiritually and intellectually. Kodรกly believed that it was the right of every individual to be taught the basic elements of music. The use of the voice is one of the most defining features of the Kodรกly approach. Students sing in every music class at Corpus Christi College. The voice is the most accessible of all instruments and this makes it most suitable for musical instruction. It offers direct access to the world of music without the technical problems associated with playing an instrument. Moreover, singing without the aid of an instrument leads to highly developed aural skills. Music literacy is a key component of the approach and is developed gradually and sequentially. Kodรกly envisaged a deep literacy that went beyond just knowing letter names. Instead, the musically literate should be able to look at musical notation and think sound. The music curriculum promotes mental development by challenging students to memorise and recognise complex musical patterns. Students will be challenged to perform several musical patterns simultaneously. This multi-tasking and memory work promotes neurological development, and can enhance student performance across many subject areas. The unique skills developed through the study of Music are skills that students will have for life. 2.

PREREQUISITES a) A High Achievement in Music and English in Year 10 is recommended. b) Performance skills in voice or any other instrument are necessary. All Year 10 Music students have already had the opportunity to develop performance skills. In Senior Music students are given the opportunity to learn how to sing with correct vocal technique in every class. Private music lessons can be helpful for assessment tasks, however they are not considered necessary.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

28


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

c) It is highly recommended that all students studying Senior Music have an electric keyboard on which to practice at home.

3.

CONTENT

The Units studied over the two year course are:YEAR 11:• • •

Hooked on Classics Rock Around the World Evolution of Jazz

YEAR 12:• • •

4.

Music As An Emotive Force Dreamers and Innovators Finding Your Identity ASSESSMENT

Analysing repertoire, performing and composing are the three objectives assessed in Senior Music.

Year 11 – three pieces of assessment are required to formulate a final result for the year.

Year 12 – four pieces of assessment are required to formulate a final result for the year.

The three objectives are weighted equally. Students will be assessed more frequently than the number of required assessment pieces throughout the course. This enhances their musical development, encourages discipline, and also ensures that only their very best work is used to formulate final results. 5.

EXPERIENCE OF MUSIC

A course of study based on this syllabus develops understanding through ‘the experience of music framework’ as represented in the accompanying diagram. Audiation, the cognitive processes by which the brain gives meaning to sounds, is developed through a study of the seven musical elements within a variety of contexts, genres and styles.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

29


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

FIGURE 1

EXPERIENCE OF MUSIC FRAMEWORK

du r

t

dynam ics

timbre

rmony

rtoir

el od y

re

s t ructure

m

genr

r perfo ming

ex

6.

con t

audiation

tu

pe

sing

ha

re

ion at

tex

i ng analys

style

po m co

e

e

WORKLOAD

Students are expected to work consistently throughout the course to keep up with the demands of the subject. Students will be encouraged to attend concerts and performances both in their own time and in school time. For performance assessment students will require a dedicated space at home in which to practice for extended periods of time.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

30


VISUAL ART

Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

VISUAL ART 1.

INTRODUCTION

Visual Art is offered as an Authority Subject to students in Years 11 and 12. It is an essential subject if the student is interested in the areas of - Architecture, Town Planning, Landscape Design, Interior Design, Art Teaching and any of the Fine Art and Graphic Art Courses which are offered at tertiary institutions. Visual Art is also helpful if students are interested in Early Childhood or Primary Teaching, Childcare, or Occupational Therapy as professions. Emphasis in the Senior Syllabus is placed on individuality and inventiveness; while it is recognised that art skills can be learned by all, it is not possible to teach creativity. This comes from within the student herself. The student must therefore have some confidence in her own artistic ability before choosing to study Visual Art in Years 11 and 12. It is strongly recommended that careful consideration be given by the student and her parents to her ability to cope with Year 11 Art as an Authority subject. 2.

GENERAL AIMS

(a) (b) (c) (d)

To develop discrimination and appreciation To acquire skills in the handling of Art media and equipment To develop creativity through practical and visual experience To acquire knowledge of design elements and principles, related art theory, and the historical development of Art.

3.

PREREQUISITES

• • • • •

4.

High Achievement in Visual Art in Year 10 is recommended. A genuine interest in art and craft areas and an ability to think creatively. A responsible and mature attitude towards the subject. It is desirable that students have good practical skills and an interest in history. Students who have not studied Art in Year 10 may study the subject at the discretion of the Head of Department. COURSE ORGANISATION AND STRUCTURE

The are two objectives which are essential to the course. 1. MAKING – is the production of artworks that communicate thoughts, feelings, ideas, experiences and observations. This objective is divided into two criteria. Visual literacy entails communicating meanings through: • researching, developing and resolving artworks to reflect a personal aesthetic • defining and solving problems relevant to concept(s) • using visual language and contexts

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

31


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

Application entails communicating meanings through applying knowledge and understanding when selecting, exploring and manipulating materials, techniques and processes through researching, developing and resolving. 2. APPRAISING – is the appreciation of artworks from past and present social and cultural contexts. Appraising entails determining and communicating meanings through: • demonstrating knowledge and understanding of artworks in contexts relating to concepts(s) and media • analysing, evaluating, synthesising and justifying sensory information • using suitable terminology, language and referencing conventions. VISUAL ART is a two year course of study which comprises concepts, focuses and media areas. • • •

5.

Concepts are the unit organisers or “themes” which will be used as starting points to develop focuses for artworks. Focuses are pathways that define interpretations and responses to concepts within a folio. Media Areas involve knowledge, Skills, techniques and processes. They can include: - drawing, ceramics, electronic imaging, installation, painting, printmaking, sculpture, photography, video and film.

ASSESSMENT

Students are assessed on all three criteria. Assessment tasks involve creating practical artworks, writing written responses and developing ideas using a Visual Diary. IN YEAR 11: Tasks are teacher directed, developmental and formative. IN YEAR 12:

Tasks are student directed, more complex and summative.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

32


FILM AND TELEVISION AND NEW MEDIA

Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

FILM, TELEVISION AND NEW MEDIA “It’s the movies that have really been running things ever since They were invented. They show you what to do, how to do it, when to do it, how to feel about it, and how to look how you feel about it - Andy Warhol

1.

INTRODUCTION

Our world is saturated with visual forms of communication. In fact television, film, the internet, images, advertising and mobiles are considered by many to be the dominant means of expression in our culture. Therefore it is vital that students have the opportunity to be critical consumers and producers of media products. If we don’t teach students to be visually literate, then we are doing them just as much disservice in the 21st century, as we would if we failed to teach them to read. Furthermore – the development of an upsurge in new media and film production in Queensland, plus the wide spread use of digital media in everyday life has caused a shortage of skilled personnel in many areas of these industries. Students who begin media studies in secondary schools like Corpus Christi College will be able to explore these opportunities. Film, Television and New Media is offered to students as an Authority subject and as such it counts towards an OP. It endeavours to give students an understanding of the concepts underlying in the Film, Television, and New Media industries, while also aiming to develop the skills to put these concepts into practice. The course deals with both theoretical and practical aspects of film, television and new media. Learning experiences include “hands on” productions, in addition to developing critical abilities through the study of media theory. These learning experiences allow students to be active and conscious consumers of media products. 2.

PREREQUISITES

There are no prerequisites for this subject, but a level 5 or 6 in Yr 10English is recommended. 3.

COURSE STRUCTURE

During the four semester course, the students will study units that challenge them to produce (digital video products), design (film/television/new media productions) and critique (critique of film/TV technologies, film/TV languages, film/TV representations, film/TV institutions and film/TV languages) media products. Film, video, television and new media technologies (such as the internet, games, mobiles etc) will be examined throughout the course.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

33


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

A variety of learning and practical workshop experiences are undertaken enabling the students to produce visual works using different techniques. Seminar class discussions, theoretical critique and image analysis are also undertaken in this course. Imagination, creativity and individuality are highly encouraged. 4.

ASSESSMENT/WORKLOAD

One of the aims of this subject is that students learn to communicate through the visual medium, hence a number of assessment items are in practical formats. It is important to understand that these assignments take time (including outside class time) to prepare, plan, film and edit. Just as written assignments must be researched, written and rewritten, practical assignments also take time, effort and real commitment. It is a mistake to assume that work in Film, Television and New Media just involves picking up a camera and shooting or just involves class time. After school, weekend and lunchtime work is required. Assessment includes design tasks (e.g. storyboard & treatment etc), production tasks (e.g. music video, art film, documentary etc) and critique tasks (e.g. essay etc) each semester.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

34


DRAMA

Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

DRAMA 1.

INTRODUCTION

A major function of the arts in society is to recreate and synthesise experience. Drama is a unique way for students to blend intellectual and emotional experience in order to identify their identity in the context of their immediate surroundings and of the broader society. Its role is to provide both a medium and a celebration of social criticism. Drama, within the terms of the syllabus, is defined as follows: “The art form of Drama is the dynamic embodiment of events involving human beings. It comprises a group of people who have agreed to suspend their disbelief in order to be other than themselves in a fictional context. If they enact the events in front of others who accept the fiction, the drama becomes theatre.” 2.

GENERAL AIMS

The study of Drama aims to promote students’ development and appreciation of Drama by: ∗ ∗ ∗ ∗ ∗ ∗

3.

providing aesthetic experience assisting students to achieve their unique potential through the arts building self discipline and confidence fostering personal communication and social understandings of the communication process encouraging on-going involvement in dramatic activities. exploring and addressing competencies appropriate to a wide range of career and other life paths. PREREQUISITES

It is highly recommended that students undertaking the study of Drama: (1)

have studied Yr 10Drama; They should have an enthusiastic, creative and positive attitude towards the subject.

(2)

have attained Level 6 in Yr 10English.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

35


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

4.

COURSE OUTCOMES

By the conclusion of the course, through the use of a range of communication skills and processes, students should demonstrate proficiency in the strands of Forming, Presenting and Responding to drama. 1. Forming: involves creating and shaping dramatic action; exploring, analysing and shaping dramatic text; transforming existing artistic work into new dramatic forms. 2. Presenting: involves using elements of drama to present dramatic action appropriate to a range of audiences; using acting techniques in a variety of dramatic contexts; interpreting a range of dramatic styles. 3. Responding: involves demonstrating an understanding of the elements of drama; identifying and analysing the cultural content and context of drama; identifying and analysing forms, structures and styles of drama; communicating orally and in writing. Learning experiences will appear within three contexts: ∗ ∗ ∗ 5.

Student devised Drama Australian Drama Other significant forms of World Drama. ASSESSMENT

A review folio of the students’ accomplished assessment tasks will be collected to include: ∗

a minimum of six and a maximum of nine pieces of work including:

(1) Three pieces of individually written work, two of which must be extended analytical writing (2) Three pieces of practical work (which must be videoed) demonstrating dramatic action, one of which must be a pair/group presentation of scripted text and one an individual forming task. ASSESSMENT CONDITIONS: ∗

Practical Task: Year 11: 3-4 2-3 Year 12: 4-6 3-5

mins for individual tasks mins for student for pair/group tasks mins for individual tasks mins for student for pair/group tasks

Written Work: (extended analytical writing) Year 11: 600 - 800 words Year 12: 800 - 1000 words

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

36


GEOGRAPHY

Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

GEOGRAPHY “Geography is the study of the earth’s surface as the space in which people live”. 1.

INTRODUCTION

Geography is the study of the earth’s surface as the space in which people live. Geography includes studies of place and of people-environment relationships. The environment consists of human and physical elements that interact to produce a variety of biotic zones and patterns of human occupancy on Earth. An understanding of the human and physical components of the environment, and of the ways that people in different parts of the world have perceived and responded to their environment, is a particular focus of geographical studies. Also of major importance is the investigation of the different environmental, social, economic and political processes that operate to produce patterns of people-environment relationships in the human use of the earth. Geography is offered in the school curriculum at Corpus Christi College because it is a valuable medium for the education of young people. Its contributions lie in the content, cognitive processes, skills and values that Geography can promote to help students better explore, understand and evaluate the social and environmental dimensions of the world. GENERAL AIMS Skills gained in Geography are transferable to other aspects of Senior Curriculum, such as QCS Test and researched analysis. As an integrated subject it relies on many skills from maths and science to critical analysis geography embodies many common curriculum elements based on research. Through studying Geography, students will ∗ ∗ ∗ ∗ ∗ ∗

recognise, evaluate and understand patterns and processes of the way phenomena are arranged on the Earth’s surface. develop practical skills in data such as statistics, maps and photographs, using a variety of media. study and appreciate the character and beauty of landscapes develop empathy for the other cultures and life styles through understanding their environment settings develop a concern for the sustainability of the environment and the quality of human life to develop the knowledge, ability and ethical commitment to participate as an active citizen in shaping the future.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

37


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

RELEVANCE AFTER YEAR 12 Geography has many applications in many careers paths including the following Tourism and Travel Hospitality Environmental Science Forestry: National Parks and Wildlife Engineering Landscape Architecture Architecture Town Planning Agriculture Agri-business Plant and Nurseries Ecologist 2.

Foreign Affairs Geophysicist Journalism Oceanographer Property/Resource Management Mining Engineer Archaeologist Cartographer Meteorologist Volcanologist Tornado Chaser

PREREQUISITES

Whilst Yr 10Geography could be an advantage, it is not essential. A student with sufficient interest and motivation could achieve well in this subject.

3.

CONTENT

THEME 1

Managing the Natural Environment

Managing Catchments − Local catchments, eg Kedron Brook, Downfall Creek − Murray – Darling Basin

Responding to Natural Hazards − Volcanic hazards − Landslides in Nepal

THEME 2

Social Environment

Sustaining Communities − Brisbane’s sustainability and liveability (field trip)

Connecting People and Places − Strategic planning in South-East Queensland − Transport infrastructure

THEME 3 ∗

Resources and Environment

Living with Climate Change − Atmospheric systems and indicators − Management and solutions

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

38


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

Sustaining Biodiversity − Biogeographical regions − Physical elements − Human impact

Managing Coastal Resources: Noosa (field trip)

THEME 4:

People and Development

Exploring the geography of disease – HIV/Aids in Africa and Papua New Guinea

Feeding the World’s People − Food crises in sub-Saharan Africa − Population growth and shifting agriculture in Papua New Guinea

The case studies and field studies for individual topics can change as new resources and issues of interest arise.

4.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment can take a variety of forms including assignments, field studies, class tests, practical exercises and essays. These will be assessed using the following criteria:

• • • •

Knowledge Analytical processes Decision–making processes Research and communication skills

Field work is a compulsory component of Geography and students will participate in at least four days of field work during the course. This may involve overnight stays. All field excursions will incur a cost to students.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

39


MODERN HISTORY

Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

MODERN HISTORY “If we do not understand History, then we maybe forced to relive it” 1.

INTRODUCTION

Studying History can help us live more effectively as global citizens. Through the study of History we can understand why our modern world is the way it is. Students can understand the processes of change and continuity that have shaped today’s world, their causes and the roles people have played in those processes of informed critical enquiry, debate and reflection, and through empathetic engagement with the other points of view. History is critical in the development of skills for understanding various perspectives, identifying causes of change and continuity, making judgements and reflecting on decisions. A diverse range of communication skills are developed and practised in all phases of historical study. Skills attained in Modern History can be utilised in other areas of the Senior Curriculum. The skills of Critical Analysis and Reflection based on research can be transferred to subjects like Study of Religion, Geography, Science and Modern History. Practical skills such as essay writing and research arms students with the necessary tools that shapes much of the Senior Curriculum. The research process of History provided students with the opportunities to establish routine study habits and self discipline. GENERAL AIMS ∗

Understanding history as an interpretative, explanatory discipline.

Understand the forces and influences that have shaped the modern world.

Develop proficient skills in the processes of historical enquiry and explanation.

Critically evaluate ideas, political doctrines, heritages and traditions.

Investigate the role of values in history and refine their own value commitments.

Develop the knowledge, abilities and ethical commitment to participate as active citizens in the shaping of their own destiny and that of the future.

Teaching Common Curriculum Elements in an explicit and implicit manner (39 + of these are embedded within the scope of historical inquiry and action.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

40


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

RELEVANCE AFTER YEAR 12 1.

The knowledge and skills acquired in the study of Modern History provide a broad canvas for participation in all careers and professions.

2.

The skills of inquiry research process, evaluation of evidence, and the derivation of informed, balanced position are essential life skills.

3.

Modern History has relevance in the following career examples:

Public Administration Foreign Affairs, Diplomatic Corps Journalism Law Forensics Medicine Environmental Studies Teaching Tourism Hospitality Palaeontology

2.

Politics Public Relations Advertising Media and The Arts Economics Social Work Human Resources Research positions in Business & Commerce Archaeology Anthropology

PREREQUISITES

Previous study of history, whilst advantageous, is not essential. A standard of C or above in English and History (if studied).

3.

CONTENT

The senior programme is comprised of a number of themes studied over two years. The Modern History syllabus is extensive and these themes are selected from a total of 16 themes. Units contained within a work programme can be changed at any time to stress relevance to contemporary political, economic or social phenomena. Students and staff will select from a number of themes including: • The History of Ideas and Beliefs • Studies of Conflict • Studies of Power • Studies of Hope Within • • • •

these themes students will investigate topics such as: The rise of Adolf Hitler and the Nazis The Cold War The Vietnam War Martin Luther King and the Civil Rights Movement

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

41


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

• • • • •

The Women’s’ Liberation Movement Indigenous History The Irish Conflict Arab Israeli Conflict The Historical Background to the War on Terror

4. ASSESSMENT Assessment can take a variety of forms including: research assignment, multi-modal (oral) tasks, essays under exam conditions, response to stimulus tests and short-answer tests. These will be assessed using the following criteria:

• • •

Planning and using an historical research process Forming historical knowledge through critical inquire Communication of historical knowledge.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

42


ANCIENT HISTORY 1.

INTRODUCTION

Studying history can help us live more effectively as global citizens. To live purposefully, ethically and happily with others, we must be able to make wise decisions. Studying history can help develop the knowledge, skills and values needed to make those decisions. To understand the development of human history, it is desirable to look at its beginnings in terms of a general understanding of human experience, and of the evidence available that reveals human society in all its significant aspects. Students who come to this course, are beginning to concern themselves with the complex problems of living in a society governed by law, organised by means of various kinds of political institutions, influenced by a long history of religious, cultural and political developments and stimulated by complex economic and social changes. Through the study of history, students can understand the processes of change and continuity that have helped shape today’s world, their causes, and the roles people have played in those processes. Students develop these understandings through processes of critical inquiry, debate and reflection, and through emphatic engagement with other points of view. History is critical in the development of skills for understanding various perspectives, identifying causes of change and continuity, making judgements and reflecting on decisions. A diverse range of communication skills are developed and practised in all phases of historical study. Skills attained in Modern History can be utilised in other areas of the Senior Curriculum. The skills of Critical Analysis and Reflection based on research can be transferred to subject like Study of Religion, Geography, Science and Ancient History. Practical skills such as essay writing and research arms students with the necessary tools that shapes much of the Senior Curriculum. The research process of history provides students with the opportunities to establish routine study habits and self-discipline 2.

GENERAL AIMS

Understanding history as an interpretative, explanatory discipline.

Understand the forces and influences that have shaped the modern world.

Develop proficient skills in the processes of historical enquiry and explanation.

Critically evaluate ideas, political doctrines, heritages and traditions.

Investigate the role of values in history and refine their own value commitments.

Develop the knowledge, abilities and ethical commitment to participate as active citizens in the shaping of their own destiny and that of the future.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

43

ANCIENT HISTORY

Senior Handbook 2010- 2011


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

Teaching Common Curriculum Elements in an explicit and implicit manner (39 + of these are embedded within the scope of historical inquiry and action.

3.

CONTENT Semester One The Nature of Historical Study Studies of Archaeology A Study of Pharonic Power in Egypt Semester Two Studies of Political Structures Personalities in history Semester Three Studies of Conflict Studies of Power Semester Four A Study of Political Centrism in Rome Studies of Europe in Transition

4.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment can take a variety of forms including: research assignments, multi-modal (oral) tasks, essays under exam conditions, response to stimulus tests and short-answer tests. These • • •

will be assessed using the following criteria: Planning and using a Historical Research Process Forming Historical knowledge through critical inquiry Communication of historical knowledge

RELEVANCE AFTER YEAR 12 1.

The knowledge and skills acquired in the study of Ancient History provide a broad canvas for participation in all careers and professions.

2.

The skills of inquiry research process, evaluation of evidence, and the derivation of informed, balanced position are essential life skills.

3.

Ancient History has relevance in the following career examples:

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

44


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

Public Administration Foreign Affairs, Diplomatic Corps Journalism Law Forensics Medicine Environmental Studies Teaching Tourism Hospitality Palaeontology

2.

Politics Public Relations Advertising Media and The Arts Economics Social Work Human Resources Research positions in Business & Commerce Archaeology Anthropology

PREREQUISITES

Previous study of history, whilst advantageous, is not essential. A standard of C or above in English and History (if studied).

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

45


PHYSICAL EDUCATION INTRODUCTION Physical activity forms a fundamental part of everyday life - from simple movement to institutionalised and formalised physical activities. Physical education in concerned with the study and practice of physical activity, and focuses on the importance of physical activity in the life of individuals and on the significant role that physical activity plays in modern society. Physical education has been identified as a national priority and key learning area for Australian Schools. It aims to provide for the physical development, personal health and fitness of students, and for the creative use of leisure time. Relevance to future work and further study This subject would be valuable assistance to students interested in pursuing the areas eg:Nursing, Medicine, Veterinary Science, Physiotherapy, Human Movement, Health and PE Teaching, Sports and Recreation, Coaching, Health Science, Occupational Therapy.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

46

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Senior Handbook 2010- 2011


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

1.

CONTENTS

An Overview

Sports Psychology

Learning Skills

Anatomy and Biomechanics Money Media and Power

∗ Interactive Teams (Basketball/Hockey/ Volleyball/Indoor Cricket) ∗ Aesthetic Performance (Tap Dance/Competitive aerobics)

Energy & Exercise Physiology

Values

Designing Training Programs

Technology in Sport

Body and culture and media

Fitness Lifestyle and leisure

Please Note The course will have equal time allocated to participation in physical activity and theoretical components.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

47


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

2.

PREREQUISITES

Students should have a genuine interest in participating in and learning about a broad range of physical activities. They must recognise that the course contains a 50% theoretical component, which relates to the content listed on the previous page. Girls who have chronic health conditions or injuries could be disadvantaged. 3.

ASSESSMENT

Students will be assessed on their ability to ACQUIRE, APPLY AND EVALUATE knowledge, skills, values, attitudes and capacities. Assessment will involve a wide range of tasks including:-

4.

•

WRITTEN

-

exams, essays, journal, research report

•

PHYSICAL

-

group/team and individual performances, demonstrations, game play

WORKLOAD

As the course involves both theoretical and practical components, the student must divide her time between written work, theoretical study and the practice of practical skills. It must be acknowledged that the development of physical skills also takes time and persistence and therefore must be an integral part of the study routine. This is especially true with respect to group work/choreography or team practice.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

48


ACCOUNTING 1.

RATIONALE

Accounting is an information system which involves recording, reporting, analysing, and interpreting of financial and other information used for making and evaluating decisions. The study of accounting is of benefit to students because it: • Provides a foundation in the discipline of accounting • Promotes the development of numeracy, effective communication skills, and logical reasoning processes • Introduces students to relevant information and communication technologies • Enables students to participate more effectively and responsibly in a changing business environment • Provides information useful to individuals in the management of their personal financial affairs • Assists students to appreciate the necessity for accuracy and the presentation of high-quality work • Prepares students for further education, training and employment

2.

AREAS OF STUDY

The course is organised under five areas of study: • Foundation Studies • Recording and Controls • Reporting and Decision Making • Accounting Package • Elective Studies The following are the topics that will be studied: • Double-entry accounting • Preparation of accounting records and reports • Accounting for the GST • Use of accounting packages and spreadsheets • Control of cash, credit, inventories and non-current assets • Analysis and interpretation of financial reports • Managerial decision making • Electronic business • Personal financing and investing or independent study

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

49

ACCOUNTING

Senior Handbook 2010- 2011


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

3.

LEARNING

The learning experiences reflect the active and practical nature of the course. Together with many of the more traditional teaching and learning activities, students may be involved in activities which include analysing and evaluating case studies, using computers, completing assignments and projects, listening to guest speakers and participating in excursions. 4.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment techniques of objective/short response, extended response, response to stimulus, practical application are used in examinations and assignments to determine student achievement in the criteria of Knowledge, Interpretation and Evaluation, Routine Practical Procedures and Challenging Practical Application. (Source: QSA Accounting Subject Guide)

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

50


CERTIFICATE III IN BUSINESS

Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

CERTIFICATE III IN BUSINESS

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

51


INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY (ICT) 1.

INTRODUCTION

Computers are an integral part of today’s work, study and leisure, and students must know how to use them effectively, efficiently and ethically. Most social environments involve the use of information and communications technology in some form for entertainment, educational and recreational purposes. Because technology changes so rapidly, the specific knowledge, processes and skills associated with working with information and communications technology should be periodically updated to ensure that the facilities provided by newly developed technologies can be exploited. Students should concentrate on developing abilities that are not software- or system-specific, and be able and willing to adapt to change. Even if not directly using computers, all individuals in society are affected in some way by their use within the organisations with which they interact. People need to understand the reasons for using computers and their potential for misuse, and be able to recognise when it is appropriate to use a computer-based application. For the student, this understanding is most meaningful if based on practical experience. Students also need to make decisions about the effective, legal, ethical and aesthetic use of technology. ICT is an Authority registered subject. 2.

HOW DOES IT BENEFIT STUDENTS?

The study area specification in Information & Communications Technology is concerned with using information and communications technologies (ICTs) to provide practical solutions to real life or simulated real-life problems. Its student-centred approach promotes confident, competent and self-motivated users and consumers of ICTs. This is important if students are to be successful in the next phase of their life, whether it is to pursue a career with ICTs, undertake further study, or gain employment. Students should also be able to keep pace with new technologies and be responsible users of ICTs, aware of the social, environmental and legal impacts of their actions. This course of study aims to help students: • become confident and competent users and consumers of ICTs • manage time and resources effectively and efficiently • develop the skills needed for creative work, practical problem-solving and communication in a variety of media • direct their own learning by developing self-reliance, personal responsibility, and selfmanagement • develop the ability to work and communicate with others in a team • develop the processes, skills and attitudes needed to become responsible users of ICTs in the community • develop an ability to make informed decisions in situations and practices involving ICTs • develop a commitment to the safe and ethical use of ICTs.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

52

INFORMATION INFORMATION FORMATION TECHNOL AND OGY COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY (ITS)

Senior Handbook 2010- 2011


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

3.

CONTENT

The aims outlined in the previous section are implemented through the study of a series of units of work. The units studied will include: • Web site development (Dreamweaver) • Animation (Flash and other programs) • Multimedia Authoring (Flash) • Robotics (Lego robotics) • Digital still imaging (Photoshop, Illustrator) • Digital video (Premiere Pro) • Game development (GameMaker) As seen from the above many of the units involve using software from the Adobe Creative Suite (Dreamweaver, Flash etc). As needed other software will of course be used.

4.

ASSESSMENT

Project development is a key assessment technique in ICT. Students will work individually and in teams to undertake minor and major projects. Other assessment techniques will include written tasks involving short and extended written responses, oral presentations, practical exercises, tests and examinations. 5.

PREREQUISITES

There are no official prerequisites for ICT.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

53


JAPANESE

Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

JAPANESE 1.

INTRODUCTION

The study of Japanese in Years 11 and 12 builds upon the foundation of the language established in Years 8 to 10 and is primarily concerned with the development of communicative proficiency in the language. 2.

GENERAL AIMS

Realistic objectives for the student are to (within the standards of the course): (a) (b) (c) (d)

understand standard polite Japanese express herself with fluency and accuracy in spoken and written Japanese read with comprehension and enjoyment both known and new material gain insights which will better equip her to adjust to changing patterns of life in Japan.

3.

RELEVANCE

The study of Japanese is of direct relevance in Queensland with the growing interconnectedness between Australia and Japan - broad and deep economic relations as well as important cross-cultural links ensure that Queenslanders will be brought more and more into contact with Japanese business people, tourists and residents. Many benefits are to be derived from the study of another language. A wide range of cognitive as well as inter-cultural skills are developed. Social interactions are encouraged as is a better understanding of international affairs and relations. The student’s experience is enriched by giving her an appreciation of cultural diversity and the ideas, beliefs and way of life of other peoples. Only by studying a foreign language in depth can a person actually experience what it is like to try and think in another way. The student thus acquires insights which should remain with her into adult life. The study of Japanese is not only invaluable in widening one’s horizons but especially relevant to the Queensland educational system. 4.

PREREQUISITES

It is advisable that students achieve at a satisfactory level in each of the four skills in Japanese in Year 10 to undertake this subject. 5.

CONTENT

The four skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking are reinforced and expanded over the two year course. The skills are not developed in isolation and are fostered by independent activities so that a balanced approach is achieved. The study of further Kanji extends the proficiency of writing more creatively in true Japanese style. Study of Japan’s rich cultural traditions are integrated with study of the language. The students read, write and learn to engage in conversation about topics such as:

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

54


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

(a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) (h) (i) (j) (k) (l)

personal identification/relationships with other people house-home environment entertainment school/daily routine eating and drinking/shopping transport and travel/services weather/celebrations youth culture important social issues the media love, romance and marriage sport, interests and hobbies

By the end of Year 12, the learner should be able to communicate her needs and opinions and converse within the limits of the functions studied. This study will provide a basis for further work in the language which may lead to vocational opportunities. 6.

PROCESS

(a)

Learning Experiences

Learning experiences are varied and include: Encouraging speaking and listening in real life situations; simulating situations in the class room and engaging in role play; through drama; essay and dialogue writing; comprehension of narratives and dialogues; by involving exchange students where possible, and members of the local Japanese community. (b)

Assessment and Work Load

Each of the four skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking is assessed. The main test instruments are listening comprehension, teacher/pupil interviews, oral reports, essays, reading comprehension, short answer questions on reading material and grammar questions. There is no assignment or research work but students must be prepared to devote some time each night to learning vocabulary and new structures and make opportunities to obtain extra reading practice. 7. EXCURSIONS Students will have opportunities to experience Japanese culture and food. In the past, overseas trips to Japan have been taken and student may or may not have the chance to participate in such a venture depending on opportunities arising. Clearly a cost would be incurred for this type of event.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

55


HOME ECONOMICS 1.

INTRODUCTION

GENERAL AIMS This course of study is designed to develop in students: • • • • •

knowledge and understanding of the diversity of individuals and families, and of the basic needs that underpin their well-being knowledge and understanding of the concepts, principles, processes and practices that inform the field of study understanding of the range of contexts, perspectives and issues that influence individual and family well-being reasoning processes that are fundamental to critical and effective participation in a range of life roles related to food, textiles and living environments skills and understandings to take informed, practical action that promotes the wellbeing of individuals and families in the context of food, textiles and living environments commitment to active, informed and collaborative participation to promote the wellbeing of individuals and families in the context of a socially just and ecologically sustainable environment.

At the conclusion of the two-year course of study, students should: • • •

respond sensitively to the diversity amongst individuals and families be willing to take informed action by working individually and collaboratively with others and in teams take into account social justice ecological sustainability when considering issues and actions in the contexts of food, textiles and living environments.

RELEVANCE AFTER YEAR 12 There are many pathways by which it is possible to gain access to undergraduate degree courses at universities, colleges and institutions of higher education. Post Secondary Education also includes industry and vocational education and training. A study of Home Economics offers links to career paths in business and in industry as well as in academic studies leading to professions in the Home Economic fields of Food and Fashion, Health and Fitness, Dietetics, Nursing, Food Science and Technology, Secondary Education Teaching, Hospitality, Catering, Travel and Tourism, Business Management, Psychology, Early Childhood Education, Fashion and Design. Students should be prepared to work hard and consistently; to read widely beyond the course of study, to develop the ability to work through the problem solving process creatively, and ultimately independently, and to complete all set assignments by the given date.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

56

HOME ECONOMICS

Senior Handbook 2010- 2011


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

2.

PREREQUISITES

At least one food unit (TT5B or PE6C) and a Textile unit (TT5A) 3.

CONTENT

There are three areas of study:(i)

FOOD STUDIES

(ii)

LIVING ENVIRONMENTS Human Development and Relationships The Built Environment

(iii)

TEXTILE STUDIES Each of these has a core minimum of 25 hours Foundation studies incorporating significant aspects In addition to the Core Foundation Studies, it is mandatory that students study a minimum of two electives from two different areas of studies over 2 years Electives offered will vary, depending on such factors as availability of staff, time tabling issues, room availability, student’s interests and staff expertise.

ELECTIVES which students may be offered in each area are:(i)

FOOD STUDIES • Food Nutrition and the Life Cycle • Food Science • Food Technology and the Consumer • Food and Australian Identity • Contemporary Food and Nutrition issues for the Adolescent

(ii)

LIVING ENVIRONMENTS • Social issues for individuals and families • Advocacy skills for individuals • The built environment – balancing human needs with environmental Concerns • Launching and landing – transition education for individual living • The child in the Australian family – child development and parenting issues

(iii)

TEXTILES • Creating with textiles • Design and fashion • Textile science and the consumer • Textiles and culture

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

57


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

4.

ASSESSMENT AND WORKLOAD

There are three criteria for Assessment. • KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING Test instruments in this area may include:Exams • REASONING PROCESSES Test instruments in this area may include:Short response answers, research assignments, reports. • PRACTICAL PERFORMANCE Test instruments include a written component (process journal) and a major piece of practical work. Each criterion is assessed every semester.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

58


MATHEMATICS Mathematics is an integral part of a general education. It can enhance understanding of our world and the quality of our participation in a rapidly changing society. Mathematics is a discipline to be studied in its own right, as well as being a support subject for the other areas of learning such as the sciences, accounting, economics and the humanities. SUBJECTS The available courses of Mathematics A, Mathematics B, Mathematics C and Prevocational Mathematics are available for selection. STATEMENT ON CHOICE OF MATHEMATICS SUBJECTS There are three Authority subjects available for students of senior Mathematics. Choice of subject may be helped by considering the following statements on prior study and future pathways. The Senior Syllabus in Mathematics A is a recommended precursor to further study and training in the technical trades such as toolmaking, sheet-metal working, fitting and turning, carpentry and plumbing, auto mechanics, tourism and hospitality, architecture, nursing, and administrative and managerial employment in a wide range of industries. It is also suitable as a precursor to tertiary studies in subjects with moderate demand in mathematics. Students should have consistently demonstrated outcomes at Level 6 of the Years 1 to 10 Mathematics Key Learning Area Syllabus before commencing studies in Mathematics A. The Senior Syllabus in Mathematics B is a recommended precursor to tertiary studies in subjects with high demand in mathematics, especially in the areas of science, medicine and health sciences, engineering, information technology, mathematics, finance, design and built environment, mathematics and science education, and business and economics. Students should have consistently demonstrated outcomes at Beyond Level 6 of the Years 1 to 10 Mathematics Key Learning Area Syllabus before commencing studies in Mathematics B. The Senior Syllabus in Mathematics C is a recommended companion subject to Mathematics B. It provides additional preparation for tertiary studies in subjects with high demand in mathematics, especially in the areas of science, medicine, mining and engineering, information technology, mathematics, finance, and business and economics. Students should have consistently demonstrated outcomes at Beyond Level 6 of the Years 1 to 10 Mathematics Key Learning Area Syllabus before commencing studies in Mathematics C. There is one non-Authority subject available for students of Senior Mathematics, that being Prevocational Mathematics. (Source: QSA Statement of Choice on Mathematics Subjects)

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

59

MATHEMATICS

Senior Handbook 2010- 2011


MATHEMATICS A

Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

MATHEMATICS A 1.

RATIONALE

Mathematics A involves the study of Financial Mathematics, Applied Geometry, and Statistics and Probability. These are used to develop: • knowledge and skills of computation, estimation and measurement • simple algebraic manipulation • a capacity to interpret and analyse information presented in a variety of forms • the ability to make judgments based on evidence and reasoning • a capacity to justify and communicate results in a variety of forms. 2.

AREAS OF STUDY

Throughout the two years of the course all students will study the following topics: • • • • • • • • • • • •

3.

Mathematics skills – incorporated into units as required Earnings, taxation, spending and budgeting Interest, investment, consumer credit, present and future value Perimeter, area and volume Latitude, longitude and time zones Scale drawing and construction Models for data Collection, display and comparison of statistical data Interpretation of statistical data Probability Trigonometry Networks and queuing

LEARNING

Learning experiences include life-related applications of mathematics with real and simulated situations, use of instruments, technology and, opportunities for modelling and problem solving. Students will be involved in a variety of activities to assist in developing mathematical understanding. Learning experiences may require students to work individually, in small groups or as a class. 4.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment techniques include extended modelling and problem solving tasks, reports and supervised tests to determine student achievement in the criteria of Knowledge and Procedures, Modelling and Problem Solving and Communication and Justification. (Source: QSA Mathematics A Subject Guide)

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

60


MATHEMATICS B

Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

MATHEMATICS B 1.

RATIONALE

Mathematics B involves the study of mathematical functions and their applications, differential and integral calculus and applied statistical analysis. These are used to develop: • knowledge and skills in advanced computation and algebraic methods and procedures • mathematical modelling and problem-solving strategies and skills • the capacity to justify mathematical arguments and make decisions • the capacity to communicate about mathematics in a variety of forms.

2.

AREAS OF STUDY

Throughout the two years of the course all students will study the following topics: • • • • • • • • • • • 3.

Exponential functions Applied geometry Introduction to functions Rates of change Periodic, logarithmic and growth functions Maxima, minima and optimization Structures and patterns Financial mathematics Definition and applications of the integral. Rates of change of periodic, logarithmic and growth functions Statistics and probability LEARNING

Learning experiences include life-related applications of mathematics with real and simulated situations, use of instruments, technology and, opportunities for modelling and problem solving. Students will be involved in a variety of activities to assist in developing mathematical understanding. Learning experiences may require students to work individually, in small groups or as a class. 4.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment techniques include extended modelling and problem solving tasks, reports and supervised tests to determine student achievement in the criteria of Knowledge and Procedures, Modelling and Problem Solving and Communication and Justification. (Source: QSA Mathematics B Subject Guide)

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

61


MATHEMATICS C RATIONALE Mathematics C involves the study of mathematical concepts such as groups, real and complex number systems, matrices, vectors, calculus, mathematical structures, linear programming, conics, dynamics, and advanced periodic and exponential functions. These are used to develop: • knowledge and skills in advanced computation and algebraic methods and procedures • mathematical modelling and problem-solving strategies and skills • the capacity to justify mathematical arguments and make decisions • the capacity to communicate about mathematics in a variety of forms. Mathematics C is a companion subject to Mathematics B. It aims to extend the competency and confidence of students in mathematics beyond the scope of Mathematics B, to build on and combine many of the concepts introduced in Mathematics B (in particular in the study of vectors, matrices and calculus), and to provide further opportunity for students to participate more fully in lifelong learning. 2.

AREAS OF STUDY

Throughout the two years of the course all students will study in the following topics: • • • • • • • • 3.

Introduction to groups Real and complex numbers Matrices and applications Vectors and applications Calculus Structures and patterns Introduction to number theory Advanced periodic and experimental functions LEARNING

Learning experiences include life-related applications of mathematics with real and simulated situations, use of instruments, technology and, opportunities for modelling and problem solving. Students will be involved in a variety of activities to assist in developing mathematical understanding. Learning experiences may require students to work individually, in small groups or as a class. 4.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment techniques include extended modelling and problem solving tasks, reports and supervised tests to determine student achievement in the criteria of Knowledge and Procedures, Modelling and Problem Solving and Communication and Justification. (Source: QSA Mathematics C Subject Guide)

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

62

MATHEMATICS C

Senior Handbook 2010- 2011


BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 1.

INTRODUCTION

Biological Science is the study of the living world, which aims to help the student develop a scientific understanding of life on Earth and an ability to apply this understanding to appropriate problems. It is hoped that the study of Biology will help to develop open-mindedness, rationality, awareness and co-operation in its students. It deals with “here and now� of life and provides students with a relevant basis for their observation of the world around them. Biological Science helps to equips students for further study in the areas of Science, Medicine, Environmental studies, Laboratory Techniques, Forestry, Teaching etc. Biology is also an excellent subject for providing students with an opportunity to develop a good general knowledge. 2.

PREREQUISITES

To be accepted into Biology, a student should have at least a high C standard in ISS Biology and a sound standard in Year 10 English 3. CONTENT Biological Studies covers a wide spectrum of topics and includes: TAXONOMY:

The study of classification of living things and sorting organisms into groups on the basis of their structure.

ECOLOGY:

The study of the structure of living things and their environment.

ANATOMY:

The study of the structure of living things.

PHYSIOLOGY: The study of function of living things. GENETICS:

The study of the origins of individual differences within a species and how these characteristics are passed from generation to generation.

EVOLUTION: The study of how life forms have changed over the history of the planet. The topics will be integrated into themes and contexts. 4.

LEARNING EXPERIENCES

Students are expected to do course-associated reading in their own time. Class time is devoted to: investigation of concepts and issues outlined by text; practical work; enrichment activities, structured opportunities for further learning etc.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

63

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Senior Handbook 2010- 2011


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

5.

WORKLOAD

Students should have an interest in the subject that will lead them to extra reading on various topics. There is a large language component that requires attention and students will consistently be given homework. 6.

ASSESSMENT

The syllabus identifies three assessment categories: • • •

extended response, which includes written oral or seminar type assessment carried out in class written tasks, which include instruments such as tests, essays and work under supervised conditions extended experimental investigation which covers open-ended practical research projects.

The syllabus specifies that the range of instruments must be used. Fieldwork is an essential part of the course and students will participate in 2-3 days fieldwork which will contribute to their final result.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

64


CHEMISTRY

Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

CHEMISTRY 1. 1. INTRODUCTION The study of Chemistry provides students with a means of enhancing their understanding of the world around them, a way of achieving useful knowledge and skills and a stepping stone for further study. It adds to and refines the development of students’ scientific literacy. An understanding of Chemistry is essential for many vocations. (Senior Syllabus Chemistry, 2007 p2)

2.

RELEVANCE TO FURTHER WORK AND FURTHER EDUCATION

Chemistry is either a prerequisite or recommended subject for degree courses in Science, Environmental Science, Agricultural Science, Information Technology, Engineering, Human Movement, Health Science, Veterinary Science, Dentistry, Occupational Therapy, Physiotherapy, Nursing, Podiatry, Speech Therapy and number of Applied Science courses. Many of these fields offer excellent employment prospects in government positions, private enterprise or education. 3.

CONTENT

The Queensland Senior Syllabus in Chemistry has two Key organisers, Structure and Reactions, and the Chemistry course is organised into the following eight units1 Tools for engagement 2 Types of reactions and stoichiochemistry 3 Analysis of household substances 4 Organic chemistry 5 Industrial processes 6 Corroding environments 7 Equilibrium. acids, bases and solubility 8 swimming pool chemistry There will be a very strong emphasis on practical work in the course. Through this the students will gain a better understanding of the topics studied, develop their understanding of the processes of science and have the opportunity to develop their skills in handling chemicals and scientific apparatus.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

65


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

4.

PREREQUISITES

In order to be accepted into the Senior Chemistry Course, a student should have achieved at least a B standard in both ISS Chemistry and Year 10 prep Maths B. The student should also have achieved a sound standard in Year 10 English. 5.

ASSESSMENT

In Chemistry there are three categories of assessment- Extended experimental investigations, Supervised assessments and Extended response tasks each of which contribute equally to the students overall rating. 6.

WORKLOAD

Students should have an interest in the subject that will lead them to extra reading and research into various topics. There is a large language component that requires attention and students will consistently be given homework.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

66


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

PHYSICS

PHYSICS 1.

INTRODUCTION

There are two clear reasons to study of Physics at senior level. First, it is the study of the universe and how it works, and second, its applications have produced and continue to produce benefits to our society. Physics explains so many things in our everyday life. The way we hear things, how we see things, how our clothes keep us warm, the way electrical appliances work, how musical instruments produce sound and what we must do to drive a car safely are all explained by Physics. Knowledge of Physics can provide us with a better understanding of these and a greater enjoyment of hobbies and sport such as photography, sailing, music, driving and ball games. 2.

RELEVANCE TO FUTURE WORK & FURTHER STUDY

Physics is either a prerequisite or a recommended subject for degree courses in Veterinary Science, Dentistry, Engineering, Information Technology, Mathematical Science, Radiography, Aviation, Human Movement, Health Science and Natural Resources. Physicists are employed by the government and private enterprise in the areas of industrial research and development, science education, environmental control, engineering, medical science, telecommunications, meteorology, nuclear energy and computing. 3.

CONTENT

The study of Physics three main strands – Forces, Energy and Motion. Within the Forces section, concepts examined include the nature of force, forces influencing the equilibrium, motion and shape of objects, kinetic theory and nuclear forces. The Energy strand concepts covered include the different forms of energy (heat, electrical, light, etc), the conservation of energy, the relationship between energy and work, the laws of thermodynamics. Included in the Motion section are Newton’s Laws of Motion and Gravitation, scalar and vector methods of describing motion. There will be a strong emphasis on practical work so that students will develop a better understanding of the topics studied and the processes of Science. 4.

PREREQUISITES

In order to enrol in Physics, a student must: ∗ ∗ ∗

Have at least a B in the Introduction to Senior Sciences (ISS) Physics unit; Be accepted to study Mathematics B in Year 11; Have a C rating in Year 10 English.

There is some overlap in the topics studied in Physics with those studied in Mathematics C and Chemistry. Mathematics covers much of Mechanics while Chemistry covers Heat and Atomic Physics. While it is advantageous to study these subjects and Physics, it is not necessary to do so.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

67


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

5.

ASSESSMENT

In Physics, students are assessed three areas: • Knowledge and Conceptual Understanding which includes the ability to: recall and interpret concepts, theories and principles of Physics; describe and explain processes and phenomena of Physics; link and apply algorithms, concepts, theories of Physics. • Investigative Processes in which the student should be able to: conduct and appraise Physics research tasks; operate scientific equipment and technology safely; use primary and secondary data. • Evaluating and Concluding in which students should be able to: determine, analyse and evaluate the interrelationships involved in the applications of Physics; predict outcomes and justify conclusions and recommendations; communicate information in a variety of ways. The types of assessment are: • Supervised Assessments. These are conducted under supervised conditions, that is, traditional exam conditions. Items could include short responses, practical exercises, application of algorithms, responses to seen or unseen stimulus material. • Extended Experimental Investigations. Within this category students investigate a hypothesis or answer a practical research question. They are to produce a written scientific report about the investigation. • Extended Response Task. In this category, students can be asked to create a written report, assignment or article or a non-written response such as a PowerPoint presentation in reaction to a Physics circumstance or issue. It is essentially non-experimental but students may draw on secondary data. Research will often be the focus.

6.

WORKLOAD

Students should expect to have written exercises to reinforce most lessons. As well they will need to read from their text book and other sources to supplement lesson material. There is a large language component in the course that will require attention. Experimentation and the subsequent reports will form an integral part of the course.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

68


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

PRE- REQUISIRES FOR STUDENTS TAKING SENIOR SCIENCES SUBJECT

PRE-REQUISITES

Physics

At least a B standard in ISS* Physics unit, accepted to study Year 11 maths B and a sound in Year 10 English

At least a B standard in ISS Chemistry unit and Year 10 Maths B prep unit and a sound in Year 10 English

Chemistry

At least a high C standard in Year 10 ISS Biology unit and a sound in Year 10 English

Biology

Physical Education

At least a high C standard in Year 10 P.E. unit and a sound in Year 10 English

ISS Introduction To Senior Sciences Students who do not meet these requirements may be accepted to courses but only after consultation with the Head of Department or College Administration.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

69


BUSINESS

Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

BUSINESS (BUSINESS STUDIES) Business is an Authority Registered subject. This Study Area Specification (SAS) is offered as an alternative to Accounting and Business Communication & Technologies. The course comprises both general and vocational education components and provides students with a variety of intellectual, technical, operational and workplace skills. This practically focused subject is designed to provide an understanding of the role of business. It provides the context in which students are afforded the opportunity not only to understand issues associated with workplace culture and practises, but also to develop the skills, processes and attitudes crucial for making valid decisions about future career paths. Skills implicit in business and personal effectiveness include working in teams, demonstrating effective communication, organisational and interpersonal skills, as well as using a range of technologies. 1.

TOPICS

This primarily practical course will cover the following topics: • • • • • • • • •

Business Venture Entrepreneurship Sales and Marketing Career Development Publishing Human Resource Management Retail Accounting Applications Cash Management 2. LEARNING

Learning experiences may include simulations involving business procedures, business venture, using equipment and computer software, developing resources for use by others eg brochure, debates and discussions, undertaking case studies, industry simulation games and participating in work experience or industry placement. 4.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment is contextualised and practical, using techniques of projects, procedural applications, non-written presentations and objective/short answer response to determine student achievement in the criteria of Knowledge and Understanding, Practical Skills and Communication. (Source: QSA Business SAS Guide)

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

70


HOSPITALITY 1.

INTRODUCTION

Hospitality Practices is an Authority Registered Subject. Corpus Christi College offers the Vocational Learning Strand in Hospitality, which provides vocational learning as well as general knowledge and skills needed in the hospitality industry. The course is practical based, designed to develop knowledge, application, practical skills and attitudes related to the preparation of food and its service in the hospitality sector. Many components of this course, particularly the skills and attitudes, are highly transferable to other aspects of students’ lives, and also provide them with a solid foundation in an industry that is a source of expanding employment opportunities. 2.

AIMS

This subject assists students to develop: • the knowledge and skills essential for effective participation in the workforce in general and the hospitality industry in particular • a responsible attitude toward the safety, health and well-being of self and others in work related situations • the ability to communicate effectively using hospitality-related language accurately and appropriately in both written and oral formats • the skills associated with team work, cooperative planning, problem solving and decision making • empathy with an understanding of social justice issues and cultural diversity as related to the hospitality industry • an awareness of ethical and responsible attitudes in the work environment. 3.

PREREQUISITES

There are no prerequisites for Hospitality. 4.

CONTENT

The topics studied across the two year course are based around five core areas: • the hospitality industry • communication for the hospitality industry • cultural awareness for the hospitality industry • workplace health, hygiene and safety procedures • hospitality even management. In addition to this, electives are incorporated to make the course more practical focussed. These are: • food production • beverage production • food and beverage service. These focus topics are integrated into four semester units as outlined below:

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

71

HOSPITALITY

Senior Handbook 2010- 2011


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

Semester 1: The World of Hospitality Students are introduced to the hospitality industry and look at the role and function of sectors and services within the industry. They explore customer needs, expectations and trends within the industry, and learn the importance of communication, attitudes and customer service skills. The diversity of the industry becomes evident as students consider the needs of people from different cultural backgrounds and, observing safety and security procedures, apply practical skills to produce and present food and beverages from international cuisines in a restaurant setting. Semester 2: Fancy Foods Students learn techniques and procedures related to the production of specialty foods such as breads, cakes, gateaux, conserves, soufflés, pastry and petit fours. Costing and food hygiene, preparation and storage are focussed on as students work together to plan, prepare for and run a high tea event that sees them demonstrate not only their practical cooking skills but also their service ability and etiquette. Semester 3: Creative Menus In this unit, students are encouraged to design and create meals and beverages that meet professional and customer expectations. They research and plan menus to consider hospitality trends, culture, nutrition and food availability. Cooking for special events is a focus, and students are encouraged to experiment with food and recipes to create unique products whilst practicing hygiene and safe working practices. Students also learn to be creative in the presentation and marketing of food. Semester 4: The Coffee Bar The focus of this unit is for students to work together in teams to plan menus, prepare food and beverages and consider occupational health, safety and hygiene and customers needs and expectations in the context of a café or coffee shop. Emphasis is again placed on the importance of communication, attitudes and customer service skills. Portion size, waste control, image development and stock control are examined. Students learn about and learn how to prepare soups and salads, appetisers and sandwiches and hot and cold beverages such as coffees, tea, milkshakes, fresh juices, mocktails and frappes. 5.

RELEVANCE AFTER YEAR 12

The hospitality industry is a diverse one providing many options. Students can pursue many occupations including: chef, baker, kitchen hand, catering manager, food demonstrator, food photographer, waitress, cook, confectioner, food and beverage attendant, front office receptionist and house keeping attendant to name a few. There are several options available to the school leaver who wants to enter the hospitality industry. These include: • leaving school to secure a position that does not require a qualification, for example, in a hotel, restaurant, café, resort • securing an apprenticeship through a restaurant or other hospitality establishment • enrolling in a course at an institution to undertake study in the hospitality area, these courses include: Diploma of Hospitality Management Diploma of Event Management

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

72


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

-

Bachelor of Hospitality Management Bachelor of Business (Hotel Management)

In addition to this, the strand of hospitality offered at Corpus Christi College provides students with life skills advantageous to any area of work. These include: • • • • • 6.

The need to communicate with colleagues and customers observing cultural sensitivities The importance of working cooperatively with colleagues and in teams The importance of personal grooming, hygiene and ethical behaviour The need for a responsible attitude towards the safety, health and well-being of self and others in the work environment Practical decision making ASSESSMENT & WORKLOAD

Students should be prepared to work consistently and use management skills to complete all set homework activities and ensure they are prepared for practical lessons that require them to bring ingredients, work plans, aprons, etc. from home. As the subject does not include a VET component, no competencies will be assessed or issued, and assessment will be criteria based as follows: Criteria 1: Practical skills and application • Practical function (cookery, service and presentation assessed) • Hospitality service for College functions • Practical exam (cookery and presentation assessed) Criteria 2: Practical decision making • Written preparation for practical function • Excursion report • Response to stimulus exam (usually based on article or video) • Written preparation for practical exam Criteria 3: Knowledge • Folio work (short response, ongoing assessment) • Theory exam (short answer, multiple choice questions)

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

73


PRE-VOCATIONAL MATHEMATICS

Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

PREVOCATIONAL MATHEMATICS 1.

RATIONALE

Prevocational Mathematics is an Authority Registered subject. This course is not linked to the TAFE modules and so there are no vocational certificates available. Prevocational Mathematics is the minimum Mathematics study required by the Queensland Studies Authority. Prevocational Mathematics is designed to help students improve their numeracy by building their confidence and success in making meaning of mathematics. Numeracy requires mathematical knowledge and understanding, mathematical problem-solving skills, literacy skills and positive beliefs and attitudes. When students become numerate they are able to manage a situation or solve a problem in everyday life, work or further learning. 1.

AREAS OF STUDY

Over the two years of the course some of the topics to be studied are: • • • • • • • • • • • • 3.

Mathematics of health and wellbeing Purchasing and owning assets Earning money Income Tax Budgeting Data collection and statistics Planning to leave home Organising an event Personal finance Travelling locally and overseas Renovating a property Field trip or practical activities using basic mathematics LEARNING

Learning experiences include applying mathematical concepts in meaningful contexts, learning practical skills, explaining reasoning and significance of solutions, and working cooperatively in groups and/or independently. 4.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment is contextualised and practical, using a wide range of tasks. They are conducted mostly in class time and examinations, which are open-book and/or teacher supported, are kept to a minimum. Tasks are used to determine student achievement in the criteria of Knowing, Applying and Explaining. (Source: QSA Prevocational Mathematics SAS Guide)

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

74


CHINESE

Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

CHINESE 1.

INTRODUCTION

The study of Chinese in Years 11 and 12 provides an opportunity for native speakers to study the language at senior level. Chinese at Corpus Christi College is offered under a Shared Campus Arrangement with St Joseph’s Nudgee College (CRICOS Provider Code 00572G). The classes are held at: St Joseph’s Nudgee College 2199 Sandgate Road Boondall QLD 4034 Class times and room details are advised at the beginning of each year and communicated to students through the Daily Bulletin. 2.

GENERAL AIMS

Through the development of practical skills in Chinese, students should: increase awareness of aspects of their own culture as a result of learning about another culture ‰ increase their understanding of cultural references in literature, film and song ‰ enhance their general cognitive development, particularly the abilities to: – collect, analyse and organise information – plan and organise activities – use mathematical ideas and techniques – apply strategies to solve problems and achieve outcomes ‰ extend their awareness and understanding of the nature of language through analysing the linguistic systems of Chinese ‰ acquire language-learning strategies that can be applied in further formal and informal studies ‰ develop the capacity to work with others from different cultural backgrounds and in teams to achieve shared goals for purposeful communication ‰ enhance post-school options and meet the growing needs of industry for language skills and cultural understanding ‰ develop the ability to use technology in a variety of communicative situations and multicultural settings. ‰

3.

RELEVANCE

The study of Chinese is of direct relevance in Queensland with the growing interconnectedness between Australia and China - broad and deep economic relations as well as important cross-cultural links ensure that Queenslanders will be brought more and more into contact with Chinese business people, tourists and residents. Many benefits are to be derived from the study of another language. A wide range of cognitive as well as inter-cultural skills are developed. Social interactions are encouraged as is a better understanding of international affairs and relations.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

75


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

The student’s experience is enriched by giving her an appreciation of cultural diversity and the ideas, beliefs and way of life of other peoples. Only by studying a foreign language in depth can a person actually experience what it is like to try and think in another way. The student thus acquires insights which should remain with her into adult life. The study of Chinese is not only invaluable in widening one’s horizons but especially relevant to the Queensland educational system. 4.

PREREQUISITES

It is advisable that students intending to study Chinese in Years 11 & 12 are native speakers of the language. 5.

CONTENT

The four skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking are reinforced and expanded over the two year course. The skills are not developed in isolation and are fostered by independent activities so that a balanced approach is achieved. Study of China’s rich cultural traditions are integrated with study of the language. The students read, write and learn to engage in conversation about topics such as: (m) personal identification/relationships with other people (n) house-home environment (o) entertainment (p) school/daily routine (q) eating and drinking/shopping (r) transport and travel/services (s) weather/celebrations (t) youth culture (u) important social issues (v) the media (w) love, romance and marriage (x) sport, interests and hobbies By the end of Year 12, the learner should be able to communicate her needs and opinions and converse within the limits of the functions studied. This study will provide a basis for further work in the language which may lead to vocational opportunities. 6.

PROCESS

(a)

Learning Experiences

Learning experiences are varied and include: Encouraging speaking and listening in real life situations; simulating situations in the class room and engaging in role play; through drama; essay and dialogue writing; comprehension of narratives and dialogues; by involving exchange students where possible, and members of the local Chinese community. (b)

Assessment and Work Load

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

76


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

Each of the four skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking is assessed. The main test instruments are listening comprehension, teacher/pupil interviews, oral reports, essays, reading comprehension, short answer questions on reading material and grammar questions. There is no assignment or research work but students must be prepared to devote some time each night to learning vocabulary and new structures and make opportunities to obtain extra reading practice.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

77


Senior Handbook 2010- 2011

RELIGION AND ETHICS SAS GUIDE This SAS guide pertains to the Authority-registered subject developed from the study area specification in Religion and Ethics (2004).

Focus of study area Religion and Ethics helps students to know and understand the influence that values, belief systems or religious traditions have on their own and other people’s behaviour. A search for meaning helps students from various cultural, social, linguistic and economic backgrounds to learn about and reflect on the richness of religious and ethical worldviews. Religion and Ethics encourages students to develop ethical attitudes and behaviours required for effective participation in the community and to think critically, creatively and constructively about their future role in it. The study-area core of Religion and Ethics focuses on the areas of ethics and meaning in life, incorporating personal, relational and spiritual dimensions of religious experience. Students investigate these using an inquiry approach and relate them to their own life situations through a number of elective topics and a variety of learning experiences. The study-area core is integrated across four to eight elective topics selected by schools. The electives provide the context through which the three dimensions of religious experience are explored. They are the Australian Scene Religions of the World Ethics and Morality , Indigenous Australian Spirituality,Buddhism Exploring the Meaning of Life, Christianity, Gender and Spirituality, Hinduism, Good and Evil,Islam, Heroes and Role Models, • Judaism Life Choices ,Sacred stories Origins, Purpose and Destiny Social Justice Peace Studies, Spirituality and Ritual Religious Citizenship

Opportunities for students The program of study assists students to develop ethical attitudes and behaviours that encourage effective participation in the community and to think critically, creatively and constructively about their future role in it. Students should be involved in using the community as a resource for their learning and have opportunity to gain knowledge and skills they can use in life outside school. Through a range of activities, students should develop positive attitudes and strategies for engaging as reflective learners in lifelong learning. Students will be involved in learning experiences that require creative and critical thinking, problem solving, networking, and planning and organising resources for presentations and projects that may incorporate collaborative and cooperative behaviours.

D:\Timetable Data\Subject

Selection CCC\Handbook Senior 2010-2011.doc

78


Mary MacKillop College Curriculum Handbook