Chapman Taylor Achievements Magazine Issue 04

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ISSUE 04



EDITORIAL W

ELCOME TO THE FOURTH ISSUE OF ACHIEVEMENTS, OUR SHOWCASE OF THE BEST OF CHAPMAN TAYLOR’S GLOBAL PROJECTS, PEOPLE AND VIEWPOINTS.

We continue to evolve as an international practice to respond to market conditions, and to ensure we achieve our fundamental goal of producing high quality architecture which is also commercially successful and fit for purpose. As you will see, this magazine shows a wide variety of building types and characters. Two of our most successful mixed-use projects completed last year, Global Harbor in Shanghai and Trinity Leeds in the UK, highlight both the variety in international markets and our commitment to designing bespoke solutions for every project, each specially tailored to the site context and the client brief. We have continued to invest in our core sectors; improving our skills in mixed-use, retail, hospitality, leisure, workplace and residential building design. In addition, we are proud of our ability to be able to operate effectively in so many parts of the world. Our recent expansion into the Middle East and South America has strengthened our international business capability yet further. Global change is constant and our ability to innovate has ensured that we remain a strong international design company which, through the skills and expertise of our talented staff, continues to create buildings of excellence.

CHRIS LANKSBURY

BOARD DIRECTOR

ADRIAN GRIFFITHS

BOARD DIRECTOR

TIM PARTINGTON

BOARD DIRECTOR

MICHAEL COTTAM

BOARD DIRECTOR

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WORKPLACE

LEISURE

RETAIL

MIXED USE

RESIDENTIAL 2

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INSIGHT 09 14

LONDON LANDMARKS Board Director Chris Lanksbury takes a look at the history of Chapman Taylor through some of our iconic London projects.

CONTENTS

RETURNING TO OUR RETAIL ROOTS How Chapman Taylor's Düsseldorf office is keeping pace with the evolution of Germany's retail market.

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FORTUNE FAVOURS THE EAST Our Shanghai office Director Hua Lei reviews the China market and our successful schemes to date.

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25

29

IN PURSUIT OF BUSINESS & LEISURE

44

Global Harbor, China

Jon Grant, Director of Chapman Taylor's Bangkok office talks about the rise of the Southeast Asian hospitality sector.

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Trinity Leeds, UK

59

Heathrow T2A Luxury Retail, UK

RIDING HIGH IN RUSSIA AND BEYOND

62

Floreasca Park, Romania

65

Pomelo, Thailand

How Chapman Taylor’s bespoke service offer is reaping rewards in Russia and beyond.

66

Indian Museum, India

69

Mega 2, Kazakhstan

73

Europolis, Russia

BRINGING SUSTAINABILITY CLOSER TO HOME Director Stuart Carr discusses the latest developments in affordable and sustainable housing in both the UK and abroad.

33

PLANES, TRAINS & ECONOMIC GAINS

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DRAWING BOARD 100

Bristol New Venture Associate Directors Nick Thursby and Jonathan Bethel answer questions about our new UK office in Bristol.

Inspiring Creative Practice Associate Director Cathy Jeremiah discusses Chapman Taylor's internal design competition.

Global 100, China

80

Brent Cross, UK

83

Mall of Qatar, Qatar

84

Shanghai Media City, China

86

Open, France

89

Island Paradise Resort, Antigua

90

Pharmaceutical R&D Centre, China

KEEPING RETAIL RELEVANT

93

Ethos, Poland

106

Life Through a Lens

Board Director Adrian Griffiths on the challenges of keeping retail relevant in the age of online shopping.

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Plaza Bocagrande, Colombia

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Parque Oeste, Colombia

Associate Director Ben Ghibaldan on the challenges of photographing architecture.

TALKING ABOUT OUR REGENERATION Board Director Tim Partington talks about the success of MediaCityUK and its wider beneficial impact.

40

PEOPLE

77

Q&A with Director Peter Farmer discussing his views on the latest developments in the Transportation sector.

36

SHOWCASE

ACHIEVEMENTS ISSUE 04 Cover Image: Forum Shopping Centre, Nis, Serbia Editor: Emma Jane Coombes

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Shooting Stars

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From Graduate to Architect

The top-placed images in Chapman Taylor's annual staff photography competition.

Rob Griffiths in our London office talks about life as a newly-qualified architect.

© Chapman Taylor. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without the permission of the publisher

www.chapmantaylor.com

Graphic Design: Eleanor Maclure Photography: All photography by Chapman Taylor unless specified Published by: Chapman Taylor 2014

Printed by Park Communications on FSC® certified paper. Park is an EMAS certified company and its Environmental Management System is certified to ISO 14001.

WHEN YOU HAVE FINISHED WITH THIS MAGAZINE PLEASE RECYCLE IT.

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OUR LOCATIONS LONDON EST. 1959 BANGKOK EST. 2011 BOGOTÁ EST. 2014 BRISTOL EST. 2012 BRUSSELS EST. 1993 DÜSSELDORF EST. 1997 MADRID EST. 2000 MANCHESTER EST. 2000 MILAN EST. 2002 MIDDLE EAST EST. 2014 MOSCOW EST. 2007 NEW DELHI EST. 2008 PARIS EST. 2001 PRAGUE EST. 1998 SÃO PAULO EST. 2009 SHANGHAI EST. 2008 WARSAW EST. 1999

CHAPMAN TAYLOR

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OUR GLOBAL NETWORK

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WHERE WE WORK

17 85

WORK IN

LOCATIONS

COUNTRIES

ACROSS

6

CONTINENTS

45+

NATIONALITIES

35+

LANGUAGES

200+

AWARDS WON

HUNDREDS OF PROJECTS, THOUSANDS OF CONNECTIONS Chapman Taylor  ACHIEVEMENTS ISSUE 04

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6

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FEATURES LONDON LANDMARKS

09

Board Director Chris Lanksbury takes a look at the history of Chapman Taylor through some of our iconic London projects.

RETURNING TO OUR RETAIL ROOTS

14

How Chapman Taylor's Düsseldorf office is keeping pace with the evolution of Germany's retail market.

FORTUNE FAVOURS THE EAST

17

Our Shanghai office Director Hua Lei reviews the China market and our successful schemes to date.

IN PURSUIT OF BUSINESS & LEISURE

20

Jon Grant, Director of Chapman Taylor's Bangkok office talks about the rise of the Southeast Asian hospitality sector.

RIDING HIGH IN RUSSIA AND BEYOND

25

How Chapman Taylor’s bespoke service offer is reaping rewards in Russia and beyond.

BRINGING SUSTAINABILITY CLOSER TO HOME

29

Director Stuart Carr discusses the latest developments in affordable and sustainable housing in both the UK and abroad.

PLANES, TRAINS & ECONOMIC GAINS

33

Q&A with Director Peter Farmer discussing his views on the latest developments in the Transportation sector.

TALKING ABOUT OUR REGENERATION 36 Board Director Tim Partington talks about the success of MediaCityUK and its wider beneficial impact.

KEEPING RETAIL RELEVANT

40

Board Director Adrian Griffiths on the challenges of keeping retail relevant in the age of online shopping.

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NEW SCOTLAND YARD

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DRUMMOND GATE

LONDON

LANDMARKS

IN 1959, LONDON’S NEWEST ARCHITECTURAL PRACTICE TOOK ON ITS FIRST OF A NUMBER OF PIONEERING COMMISSIONS WITHIN THE UK’S CAPITAL. BOARD DIRECTOR CHRIS LANKSBURY LOOKS AT THE HIDDEN GEMS OF CHAPMAN TAYLOR’S LONDON PORTFOLIO HERITAGE AND THEIR RELEVANCE TO THE COMPANY’S PRESENT DAY WORK.

RIGHT: CHRIS LANKSBURY, BOARD DIRECTOR IN CHAPMAN TAYLOR'S LONDON OFFICE

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THE LONDON PAVILION

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t’s sometimes easy to forget the origins of Chapman Taylor, formed in London over 50 years ago by our founding partners John Taylor, Bob Chapman and Jane Durham. Our formative work, spanning the 1960s – 1980s, includes some of London’s most prominent projects built in that time, and helped Chapman Taylor develop a distinctive architectural set of values that still has relevance to our work today. When reviewing the practice’s work during this earlier period, some unlikely and famous surprises can be unearthed. In particular, it is in London that one can find some of Chapman Taylor’s most pioneering projects of the time, both for the practice and for the city itself. Perhaps more than any other, it was our first commission that raises most eyebrows – the design and delivery of New Scotland Yard, in Westminster. Few are aware that this iconic development was designed, in 1959, by Chapman Taylor. Whilst most renowned in the public eye for its famous triangular revolving sign, from a planning perspective it achieved acclaim for the successful placing of its rectangular office buildings 10

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BESSBOROUGH GARDENS, MILLBANK ESTATE


into the corresponding and challenging triangular site. Even more impressive is that this project prompted the formation of Chapman Taylor as a company in its own right in 1959, the contract being awarded to the three founding partners before the practice even existed. It was designed as a speculative office development, which was later let to its famous tenant, The London Metropolitan Police. Chapman Taylor went on to design a string of other iconic buildings in the capital throughout this period. Perhaps they are not as famous as New Scotland Yard, however they are no less powerful in their brief to deliver innovative design and, most importantly, respond to the important historic urban context that London provides. Caxton House, again in Westminster, occupies a key site in the vicinity of Parliament Square and Westminster Abbey. This office development, built in 1976-79 uses a vigorous crenellated skyline design and makes use of high quality materials such as its Portland Stone finish – all factors that contribute to answering the demands of providing an innovative design solution to an historic urban context. The same

contextual challenges were present in the design for Lansdowne House in Berkeley Square, one of London’s greatest public squares, sited in the heart of the city’s prestigious Mayfair district. The resulting building design prompted planning inspectors to conclude that it was ‘innovative and would provide a building of excellence’ and it was granted planning permission in 1983. These iconic London landmark projects had a formative impact within Chapman Taylor’s development as a leading architecture firm for commercial buildings. However, the practice’s involvement in several major London masterplanning schemes of the early 1980s was also to prove critical. The masterplanning of the Millbank Estate, for the Crown Estate Commissioners, required a considered and sympathetic response to the existing historic buildings of the famous 19th century English architect Thomas Cubitt. A 27-acre site was planned and built and stands today as testament to the quality of design and traditional materials that were used. The plan also included the development of a striking contemporary office building

OUR FORMATIVE WORK, SPANNING THE 1960s – 1980s, INCLUDES SOME OF LONDON’S MOST PROMINENT PROJECTS BUILT IN THAT TIME, AND HELPED CHAPMAN TAYLOR DEVELOP A DISTINCTIVE ARCHITECTURAL SET OF VALUES THAT STILL HAS RELEVANCE TO OUR WORK TODAY.

LANSDOWNE HOUSE

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IMAGE BY MARCO LIBERACE

SCULPTURE BY DAME ELIZABETH FRINK

UNDERSTANDING THE VALUE OF HERITAGE AND THE ARTS Not all of the practice’s early London work encompassed new building design and delivery. In 1988 London’s famous Pavilion, an internationally known listed landmark in the heart of Piccadilly Circus, was reopened by the then Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher after an extensive refurbishment. Chapman Taylor led the re-design and expansion of the Pavilion’s leisure facilities, as well as creating a striking new level above the original pediments of the 1880s' building. The original character of the building was brought to life through the addition of new sculptures created by prominent artists of the day, an approach applied to other schemes such as the Hotel Bristol on London’s Piccadilly where Dame Elizabeth Frink, one of England’s greatest sculptors, provided her horse and rider statue that still stands today opposite the famous Ritz Hotel. The use of art to enliven the public realm is still a prominent theme in many Chapman Taylor schemes today. at One Drummond Gate (1983), notable for its massive columns and fourth floor level granite cornice beam to the exterior, successfully marrying its new design with the Cubitt-inspired architectural history of its setting. In addition, during the same period the Duke of Westminster’s Grosvenor Estate asked Chapman Taylor to prepare a masterplan to take the estate through the next 100 years. 12

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The project again demanded an approach that promoted quality materials and buildings that would be designed and built to last. As we move into Chapman Taylor’s sixth decade in business, our London roots have now spread to create offices all over the world. International clients, such as those based in Asia, appreciate our combined offer of local teams

backed up by project expertise from the London office. Opportunities to work on historically famous London projects still materialise, such as our retail work on the award-winning and critically acclaimed St Pancras International station at King’s Cross which opened in 2007. But when reviewing the majority of our present day schemes can we really say that Chapman Taylor’s original values still stand true? I still believe that the answer is a resounding ‘Yes’. What our earlier London projects all portray is an ability to design architecture that provides a unique response to a particular context. The outcomes were successful, but this success was also achieved through understanding the commercial objectives of the client. It is this challenge that Chapman Taylor has successfully addressed as the business has grown over the last 50 years, and we continue to rise to it. clanksbury@chapmantaylor.com With thanks to Chapman Taylor's former partners Nigel Woolner and Rodney Carran.


WHAT OUR EARLIER LONDON PROJECTS ALL PORTRAY IS AN ABILITY TO DESIGN ARCHITECTURE THAT PROVIDES A UNIQUE RESPONSE TO A PARTICULAR CONTEXT. THE OUTCOMES WERE SUCCESSFUL, BUT THIS SUCCESS WAS ALSO ACHIEVED THROUGH UNDERSTANDING THE COMMERCIAL OBJECTIVES OF THE CLIENT.

CAXTON HOUSE Chapman Taylor  ACHIEVEMENTS ISSUE 04

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STADTGALERIE WEIDEN, GERMANY

RETURNING TO OUR

RETAIL ROOTS

THE RETAIL MARKET IN GERMANY IS TRANSFORMING, AS TOWN AND CITY CENTRES ATTRACT BACK PRIME DEVELOPMENTS AND SHOPPERS. ANDREW MACKAY, ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR IN OUR DÜSSELDORF OFFICE, TAKES A CLOSER LOOK.

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he broad range of significant retail projects currently on our drawing board demonstrates that the German retail property market is healthy and dynamic. Clients have moved beyond talking about the “threat” of online shopping. There has been a realisation that traditional European urban values, with retail, food and leisure existing at the core of the city alongside dense housing and workplaces, still ring true. It’s what consumers want. It is for this very

reason that planning authorities have forced the focus of retail development from the periphery back into inner cities. All major German city centres are well supplied with traditional shopping centres and department stores but many of these developments are no longer viable. In an increasingly complex, dynamic world we expect a lot of our built environment if we are to be taken away from computer and smartphone screens to do our shopping. The widespread demise of

DÖPPERSBERG REDEVELOPMENT, WUPPERTAL, GERMANY 14

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ABOVE: ANDREW MACKAY, ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR IN CHAPMAN TAYLOR'S DÜSSELDORF OFFICE

the multi-brand department store, dealt a final blow by online shopping, has been a key catalyst for many new retail developments. Traditional shopping centres on the other hand have realised they must remain competitive through extensive and clever refurbishments of their existing space. The size and location of such developments, often just off or at one end of a pedestrianised shopping street or main square, offer great investment opportunities if reimagined correctly. The recently completed refurbishment of the iconic Neumarkt Galerie in the centre of the city of Cologne, is evidence of this trend. The existing shopping centre, which was also designed by Chapman Taylor in 1997, received a revamped façade, entrances and interior public spaces to allow the scheme to respond to contemporary customer and tenant requirements. However, whilst the refurbishment of existing city shopping centres continues apace, opportunities to build new shopping centre developments in the larger cities are increasingly scarce.


Our refurbishment of the Neumarkt Galerie, Cologne, includes the retention of the 2001 sculpture ‘Dropped Cone’ by internationally renowned artists Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen.

Developers are therefore being attracted to the centres of small and medium-sized towns and cities. Such urban centres often serve larger rural catchment areas, might have an element of tourism and are keen not to lose local purchasing power to neighbouring cities or online stores. It is paramount for them to create and maintain thriving town centres. A case in point is our Stadtgalerie project

either end of the development, including a distinctive glass lobby giving a dramatic entrance that rises over the three levels of the scheme to the cinema within. Themes relating to local history and culture were also prevalent in our competition winning design for a 5‑storey fashion store and redevelopment of Döppersberg in the centre of Wuppertal, a mid-sized city in western

THERE IS REASON FOR MUCH OPTIMISM IF WE AS DESIGNERS CAN PRODUCE QUALITY ENVIRONMENTS THAT RESPOND TO THIS COMPLEX, MULTI-TASKING BEHAVIOUR, RESPECT LOCAL HISTORY AND URBAN FABRIC AND ACKNOWLEDGE THE ONLINE WORLD. in Weiden, a substantial retail and leisure scheme right at the heart of the town centre. The scheme‘s design had to juggle the requirement to redensify an area of disused car parks alongside the need to reconnect the main pedestrianised shopping street with its historic urban centre. Strong entrances are used to bring new life to these existing urban spaces at

Germany. The scheme was designed with an amorphous shape and slanting external walls clad with brown-golden perforated metal panels – a bold reference to the rich history of the town as a 19th century textiles hub. What is also interesting about this scheme is that it is backed by a foreign investor client, a powerful demonstration of

just how attractive mid-sized German towns and cities have become for international investors and retailers. A recent German survey published in the newspaper Immobilienzeitung has revealed that even in the main shopping precincts, only 31% of people are there specifically to shop. While it is convenient to think of people as walking credit cards, the fact is that their lives are complex, still rooted in the European tradition of shopping a little, but frequently, while undertaking errands, socialising, eating and drinking, or simply taking a stroll – all part of the daily routine. All the time we are multi-tasking, many of us with smartphone in hand, linked to friends through social media. There is reason for much optimism if we as designers can produce quality environments that respond to this complex, multi-tasking behaviour, respect local history and urban fabric and acknowledge the online world. So far, the German retail market has successfully noted that there is more to shopping than shopping. amackay@chapmantaylor.de Chapman Taylor  ACHIEVEMENTS ISSUE 04

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IN THIS RAPIDLY EVOLVING MARKET, THE ABILITY TO INNOVATE AND CONSISTENTLY PROVIDE SUCCESSFUL ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN SOLUTIONS REMAINS PARAMOUNT.

DISHUI LAKE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE CENTRE, LINGANG, SHANGHAI 16

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FORTUNE FAVOURS

THE EAST OUR SHANGHAI DIRECTOR HUA LEI UNCOVERS THE SECRETS TO WORKING SUCCESSFULLY IN CHINA AND WHAT LIES AHEAD FOR THE COUNTRY'S COMMERCIAL ARCHITECTURE.

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ABOVE: HUA LEI DIRECTOR IN CHAPMAN TAYLOR'S SHANGHAI OFFICE

n recent years, China has seen fortuitous market conditions for the commercial property sector, in particular for large scale commercial projects. Encouraged by Chinese Government economic policies, developers have fled from the overheated residential market. The result? Our business in Shanghai has been increasing at an annual growth rate of 20%, and we have seen a 33% increase in staff numbers since 2012. Perhaps we have been in the right place at the right time, but clients have favoured our international (and in particular, European) design skills and expertise, and our ability to mobilise it around the world to produce commercially effective results.

Our most recent successful example of this approach has been for Global Harbor Shanghai, which opened to the public in 2013. This 480,000m2 mixed‑use scheme’s unique European Classic style has been pivotal in its success as a memorable destination for shoppers and helped it win a number of important retail architecture and interior design awards. Our Shanghai office collaborated with Chapman Taylor’s London office from the outset, designing a project that has created a landmark destination for the city of Shanghai. We are now busy designing Global Harbor Changzhou, an even larger sister development that extends the Global Harbor ‘brand’ concept and is scheduled to open in Spring 2015. Chapman Taylor  ACHIEVEMENTS ISSUE 04

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INTERNATIONAL HOTEL CHAINS ALONGSIDE LOCAL OPERATORS ARE INVENTING NEW BRANDS TO CATER FOR THE INCREASED AFFLUENCE OF CHINESE CUSTOMERS CRYSTAL CITY, HANGZHOU, CHINA

IMAGE BY ELYSEE SHEN

GLOBAL HARBOR, SHANGHAI, CHINA

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We have also had proven success in winning a number of major design competitions. The past few years have seen design competitions become a growing opportunity for architects in China to showcase their abilities and win work. Our recent competition design for the Dishui Lake International Conference Centre in Shanghai once again draws on the international expertise in the company, creating a bold design to respond to the mixed-use brief. But rapid market growth in the region has not come without its challenges. A fast growing market will make mistakes, especially in producing well-informed design briefs. Working with developers, we have attached prime importance to upfront market research, project positioning and tenant mix reports when undertaking new projects. This ensures that developments have the correct positioning to meet the current market and our architectural


CHINA: FAST FACTS

CHAPMAN TAYLOR IN SHANGHAI

BY 2020 CHINA’S HOTEL MARKET IS SET TO BE BIGGER THAN THAT OF THE USA. CHINA USED AS MUCH CEMENT BETWEEN 2011 AND 2013 AS THE USA DID IN THE WHOLE OF THE 20TH CENTURY.

proposals can respond accordingly. For example, we recommended a business consultant to join at the preliminary planning stage of our Jingsheng mixed‑use development in Tianjin. Their professional advice was crucial in ensuring the efficiency of the planning and design proposals and provided the developer with the potential for a much more viable and financially successful project. So where does the future of the commercial architecture market lie in China? Like anywhere else in the world, the growth of online shopping has had an impact on shopping centres. The response has been to increase the proportion of food and beverage, leisure, entertainment and children’s recreation facilities in large commercial projects, to the extent that they have become the main anchor

of many retail and mixed-use schemes. Our collaboration with specialists in the European entertainment sector has helped us to take a lead in this area. Currently we are working on a number of masterplanning and architectural design projects that have entertainment and leisure at their core. Perhaps the most significant is the Global 100 theme park in the city of Haikou, on Hainan Island. Opening in 2016, this 6,000 acre project combines a very large theme park, hotel and retail services together with extensive facilities for movie studio activities and residential communities. With a total investment of 38bn yuan, Global 100 is a beacon of confidence for the hospitality and leisure industry in China. In addition, this confidence is also apparent in the hotel development market,

GLOBAL HARBOR, CHANGZHOU, CHINA

33%

20%

INCREASE IN STAFF NUMBERS SINCE 2012

YEAR-ON-YEAR GROWTH RATE

where international hotel chains alongside local operators are inventing new brands to cater for the increased affluence of Chinese customers. It is predicted that China’s hotel market will be bigger than that of the USA by 2020 (even with the softening economy), with mid-scale and boutique hotels seeing the largest growth. It is therefore essential that our focus in the Shanghai office continues to draw on our extensive cross-sector expertise within the Chapman Taylor international network in order to keep pace with client requirements. In this rapidly evolving market, the ability to innovate and consistently provide successful architectural design solutions remains paramount. We will never be ‘one step ahead of China’, but we can certainly try. hualei@chapmantaylor.com.cn

DISHUI LAKE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE CENTRE, LINGANG, SHANGHAI: COMPETITION DESIGN This innovative mixed-use development combines state of the art workplace, leisure and hospitality facilities. The building’s form responds to its prominent island location, where the city of Shanghai meets the Dishui Lake. The distinctive linked, twin tower forms and modular horizontal podium combine to create an iconic centre piece to the new city development.

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VILLA DACHA, KOH SAMUI, THAILAND

IN PURSUIT OF

BUSINESS & LEISURE

HOSPITALITY DEVELOPMENTS ARE FLOURISHING ACROSS SOUTHEAST ASIA. CHAPMAN TAYLOR DIRECTOR JON GRANT DISCUSSES THIS TREND AND THE OUTLOOK FROM OUR OFFICE IN BANGKOK. LEFT: JON GRANT, DIRECTOR OF CHAPMAN TAYLOR'S BANGKOK OFFICE

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he hospitality sector is currently experiencing a growth boom throughout Southeast Asia. Many hotel brands are repositioning, expanding and acquiring land, whilst at the same time creating new sub-brands to cater for various locations. This may come as a surprise to some, especially foreigners who are already familiar with the region’s

established hotel and tourism trade. According to recent research*, international tourist arrivals to the region have increased steadily over the last twenty years, contracting only slightly and briefly in the aftermath of three economic downturns since the early 1990s. But there are other factors outside of just international tourism that are


I PREDICT THAT WE WILL INCREASINGLY BE ASKED TO LOOK AT MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENTS WHERE BOTH RETAIL AND HOSPITALITY SERVICES ARE REQUIRED

BRIGHTON SUITES, PATTAYA, THAILAND driving the growth. Of a number of reasons that could be responsible, perhaps the most significant could be the growth of the middle classes across the region. With this has come an increase in spending power and the desire to travel to more adventurous destinations, both for holidays and for business. We have seen clients respond to these changes in a number of different ways. There is an increasing requirement for food and beverage, with function facilities becoming the major focus for many developments. This can create the scope to potentially host lucrative international events whilst at the same time providing schemes with a point of differentiation against competitors. These facilities can also cater for hosting large group tours (a growing business) which requires larger waiting areas – often segregated – and a greater number of food and beverage options to cater for varying tastes. Conventional business centre facilities within hotels have also transformed, with demands for new technology and ‘quick plugins’, as well as improved bi-lingual way

BRIGHTON SUITES, PATTAYA, THAILAND finding to cater for the increasing number of international visitors. Another trend we are seeing is for the greater provision of VIP sports car parking – perhaps the clearest indication of all that levels of disposable income are on the rise!

Our Brighton Suites scheme in Pattaya, a coastal city 2 ½ hours drive from Bangkok, is a classic example of the above. The hotel’s target markets are group tours and the international business traveller, which dictated the overall planning of the

BRIGHTON SUITES, PATTAYA, THAILAND The interior design is inspired by the theme of ‘ocean breeze’, applying unique materials such as natural rattan wall panels and coral stone used on the reception counter, printed wallpapers that will differ from room to room and continuous organic forms and patterns that flow from space to space. The overall objective is to create an airy cool interior that will provide a soothing experience for guests. The design was conceived in collaboration with our London office interiors team.

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SOUTHEAST ASIA: FAST FACTS UNWTO (UNITED NATIONS WORLD TOURISM ORGANIZATION) PREDICTS 123 MILLION INTERNATIONAL TOURIST ARRIVALS INTO SOUTHEAST ASIA BY 2020 AND 187 MILLION BY 2030. BETWEEN 1991 AND 2011, THE NUMBER OF FOREIGN TOURIST ARRIVALS TO SOUTHEAST ASIA INCREASED BY NEARLY 300%. *Tigermine Research, Growth Forecasts for Southeast Asian Travel and Tourism (2012 – 2015)

development. Scheduled to open in 2016, the 3-star, 450 room hotel will be at the core of an overall mixeduse scheme that also includes a retail development and significant function hall facilities. It is typical of the type of larger scale development we are increasingly becoming involved with. Once open, it is expected that more than 2,000 people per day will pass through the complex. On the other hand, another of our large scale hospitality schemes, Villa Dacha on the island of Koh Samui – one of the most popular tourist destinations in

Thailand - is pitched for a more select and upmarket clientele. Set over 19,000m2 of hillside land with sea views, the scheme has been designed to create a tropical but modern escape. The project consists of private 2–3 bed villas, pavilions, restaurants, a clubhouse, outdoor cinema, gym, Thai boxing ring, luxury spa and a large 30m long infinity pool which maximises the stunning sea views. Major hotel brands are also diversifying by creating sub-brands and business streams to corner new markets with disposable income.

VILLA DACHA, KOH SAMUI, THAILAND The challenge was to work around the existing tropical landscape and ensure each building was positioned to cause minimum impact to its surroundings. Traditional Thai architectural details (that hide modern interiors) and locally sourced materials were used to complete the design.

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MANDARIN ORIENTAL STORES, BANGKOK, THAILAND

POMELO, BANGKOK, THAILAND

The Mandarin Oriental Group has recently developed its retail store concept to take into major shopping centres. In 2014 our office completed two such stores in the Gaysorn and Paragon retail centres in Bangkok, where the brief was to improve and raise the standard of the existing store concept in preparation for a wider rollout across the region. The trend for small scale hospitality and food and beverage schemes could be set to grow. As for larger scale schemes, I predict that we will increasingly be asked to look at retail-led mixed-use

developments, where both retail and hospitality services and facilities are required. Our current workload in the Bangkok office consists of 40% hospitality, 30% retail, 15% food and beverage and 15% residential. It will be interesting to track how the changing economic picture across Southeast Asia will affect our statistics, and how the region continues to compete with South America and other international growth markets in the quest to attract both the local and global traveller, whether it be for business or leisure. jgrant@chapmantaylor.com

MAJOR HOTEL BRANDS ARE DIVERSIFYING AND CREATING SUB‑BRANDS AND BUSINESS STREAMS TO CORNER NEW MARKETS WITH DISPOSABLE INCOME

MANDARIN ORIENTAL STORES, BANGKOK, THAILAND

MANDARIN ORIENTAL STORES, BANGKOK, THAILAND

A new retail concept from the Mandarin Oriental Group. Two Mandarin Oriental retail stores, of 75m2 & 180m2 respectively, have been created in the Bangkok Gaysorn and Paragon shopping developments. Both stores are mixed retail and food and beverage outlets. The design was inspired by the Authors' Wing and colonial architectural detail of the original Oriental Hotel in Bangkok

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CHAPMAN TAYLOR’S SIGNIFICANT EXPERIENCE OF THE RUSSIAN MARKET HAS ALSO PLAYED A KEY ROLE IN ENSURING OUR SUCCESS IN RUSSIA’S NEIGHBOURING COUNTRIES.

KERUEN 2, ASTANA, KAZAKHSTAN 24

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EUROPOLIS, ST PETERSBURG, RUSSIA

RIGHT: RAM KHATIWADA, DIRECTOR IN CHAPMAN TAYLOR'S MOSCOW OFFICE

RIDING HIGH IN

RUSSIA AND BEYOND

DIRECTOR RAM KHATIWADA DISCUSSES HOW CHAPMAN TAYLOR’S UNIQUE BUSINESS APPROACH HAS ENABLED THE PRACTICE TO BECOME A MAJOR PLAYER IN RUSSIA AND THROUGHOUT THE REST OF THE REGION.

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ince opening its door to the world and adopting a democratic system in 1991, Russia has become a land of opportunity for investors, service providers and entrepreneurs from all over the world. With a construction market valued at £164bn, the country is set for a large volume of new building schemes

which require experience and expertise from more developed countries. Chapman Taylor’s world-wide experience as commercial architects and masterplanners has made us an obvious choice for many Russian developers in realising their ambitious mega projects. We have been involved

in masterplans, mixed-use developments, retail and entertainment projects across Russia since the late 1990s. Initially operating from our head office in London we finally opened our Moscow branch in 2007. Today our office in the heart of Moscow is strong and steadily growing, with 20 architects and designers Chapman Taylor  ACHIEVEMENTS ISSUE 04

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ZUENIGORODSKOE SHAOSSE, MOSCOW, RUSSIA

working highly successfully on a wide variety of large scale and high profile commercial projects all over Russia. The Russian market is truly unique – being the largest country on earth, it offers a vast variety of cultures, climates and people. Each region within the country differs significantly. The environment can be highly challenging and it generally takes a very long time to deliver projects due to the country’s complex and

meticulous approval procedures and high degree of bureaucracy. Despite these challenges, Chapman Taylor has already been successful in delivering a number of highly commended projects such as Galeria, a development in the historic quarter of St Petersburg and Europolis, a flagship project which opened in October 2014. We believe our success lies with our unique approach to each project.

OUR LONDON AND MOSCOW OFFICES ARE NOW FOCUSED ON DELIVERING THE MEGA PLAZA, THE MOST AMBITIOUS RETAIL, ENTERTAINMENT AND CULTURAL CENTRE IN ASTANA, WHICH WILL ACT AS THE GATEWAY TO THE WORLD EXPO 2017 SKOLKOVO TRANSPORTATION HUB, MOSCOW, RUSSIA

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Utilising the experience of the Moscow office, with its carefully trained architects and designers, each scheme is led by a London-based director with many years of Russian experience and deep understanding of the local culture. This is supported by a team of highly experienced specialists in the London office who work very closely with the Russian team from day one, to mastermind a unique product that is not only cutting edge in design, but also extremely responsive to the particular requirements of our Russian market. Upcoming projects include those currently on the drawing board to those already on site, such as Galactica Park, a truly mixed-use site across 1 million m2 which will contain


MEGA PLAZA, ASTANA, KAZAKHSTAN

Universal Studio’s theme park in Moscow. Other projects in the Moscow region include the development of a sophisticated high profile retail centre in Preobrazhenskaya Ploshad, the Skolkovo Transportation Hub, Smolensky Passage 2, the Akkord residential masterplan and the Nagatino Regions Park - a theme park with riverside leisure, retail and concert hall facilities. Beyond Moscow, the Dreamworks’ theme park in St. Petersburg, Europa 1 and 2 in Kursk, and the Aquapark & Shopping Centre in Nizhny Novgorod, are only a few examples from our long list of current projects. Chapman Taylor’s significant experience of the Russian market has also played a key role in ensuring our success in Russia’s neighbouring countries, which share a similar culture and use of the Russian language. Most notable for us has been Kazakhstan, a young democratic country with a vast territory and wealth of natural resources and one of the most ambitious nations in Central Asia. The creation of its new capital Astana with its modern masterplan, the President’s goal to rank the country as one of the

top 30 in the world by 2050, and the organising of the World Expo 2017 in Astana, represent the determination and ambition of the nation to emerge as a strong and powerful country. Our first shopping centre in the central boulevard of Astana is already a major success. In 2013 we delivered Mega 2, the second phase of the Mega Centre, the most popular shopping destination in Almaty. As a result, our London and Moscow offices are now focused on delivering Mega Plaza, the

most ambitious retail, entertainment and cultural centre in Astana which will act as the gateway to Expo 2017. With our long track record of success in delivering highly ambitious projects and the unique combination of our Moscow office working hand-inhand with our experienced international team, we believe Chapman Taylor is in a truly unique position to help realise the aspirations of our clients in Russia and other CIS countries. rkhatiwada@chapmantaylor.com

5.7% RUSSIAN INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS ARE PREDICTED TO GROW 5.7% A YEAR UP TO 2025. (2013 FIGURES)

THE VALUE OF RUSSIA’S CONSTRUCTION MARKET IS £164BN, DUE TO ALMOST DOUBLE TO £327BN BY 2025

(Source: Global Construction Perspectives and Oxford Economics)

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PRINCESSHAY, EXETER, UK

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RIGHT: STUART CARR, CHAPMAN TAYLOR'S DIRECTOR OF RESIDENTIAL

BRINGING SUSTAINABILITY

CLOSER TO HOME

THE NEED FOR MORE AND BETTER HOMES OF ALL TENURES IS UNDENIABLE, AS IS THE CASE TO CONTINUOUSLY ADVANCE THE SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGIES THEY CAN BENEFIT FROM. STUART CARR, CHAPMAN TAYLOR'S DIRECTOR OF RESIDENTIAL, EXPLORES CURRENT HOUSING AND ENVIRONMENTAL BUILDING TRENDS.

Y

ou can’t lift up a newspaper these days without coming across at least one story discussing the state of the UK’s housing. There’s no doubt that times are looking brighter for the housing industry, as we slowly climb ourselves out of recession. Economic signs are encouraging. The 2014 UK Budget outlined the Government’s plans to build an additional 200,000 homes as well as the development of 21st century Garden Cities for such homes to be rooted within. To top it all, the argument continues to rage on between the residential tower developers and those who favour a more mid-rise solution, an argument given high profile through the recent comments by His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales. But such headlines can’t be allowed to disguise the key issues within the

deeper housing debate. For example, the future is still unclear as to the UK Government’s continuing subsidies to support affordable housing beyond 2015. Without this commitment, developers and Registered Social Landlords will be less keen to invest in this important area. There’s a growing awareness that affordable housing is fundamental to the economic infrastructure of healthy cities and towns. If you don’t have good housing stock for a range of demographics, then you drive down the economy of an area. Other methods must be found to cross‑subsidise the affordable offer if current government subsidies are to desist. Government policy and investment also has a critical part to play in the delivery of the necessary infrastructure required to support such housing Chapman Taylor  ACHIEVEMENTS ISSUE 04

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THERE’S A GROWING AWARENESS THAT AFFORDABLE HOUSING IS FUNDAMENTAL TO THE ECONOMIC INFRASTRUCTURE OF HEALTHY CITIES AND TOWNS. IF YOU DON’T HAVE GOOD HOUSING STOCK FOR A RANGE OF DEMOGRAPHICS, THEN YOU DRIVE DOWN THE ECONOMY OF AN AREA.

growth. Many European countries have trailblazed in this area, as well as the overall promotion of good housing design. It is to the Swedish and Dutch that the UK must look to for their pioneering approaches to government housing policy as well as good neighbourhood and community design. Whereas it is the Austrians and Germans who have set the standard for low-cost, low-carbon housing systems over the past few decades. Surely it is time for the UK to step up its game? At Chapman Taylor, we have been acutely aware of these various debates and issues and have positioned ourselves to respond accordingly, particularly with regard to client concerns and viewpoints. A number of our Directors and staff have been involved in numerous forms of private and affordable UK and International housing projects. Significant projects such as the publicly funded development of highly sustainable prototype housing for Glasgow have developed our expertise

LOUYANG JIUZHOU PLAZA, ZHENGZHOU, CHINA 30

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and reputation. We have also been ahead of the game in the debate surrounding the development of housing for our ageing population. A recent issue of the 2012 HAPPI report focussed precisely on this issue, highlighting the common features of the most successful designs. But most of the features it highlighted – such as the use of space and flexibility, future adaptability and ‘care-ready’ design, sustainable issues and Homezone design principles - we in fact addressed over a decade beforehand in my design for a care village and mixed tenure housing in St. Andrews. This was the first Homezone project to be built in Scotland, and was recognised accordingly by the Scottish Housing Design Awards. Further afield, we have seen demand for our residential services increase in the Asian market, presenting a different set of challenges. Often, good residential design is a key component within much larger, mixed-use masterplanning projects


NAMESTI KARLA IV, MELNÍK, CZECH REPUBLIC

ADMIRALTY BASIN, TALLINN, ESTONIA

IT IS THE AUSTRIANS AND GERMANS WHO HAVE SET THE STANDARD FOR LOW-COST, LOW-CARBON HOUSING SYSTEMS OVER THE PAST FEW DECADES. SURELY IT IS TIME FOR THE UK TO STEP UP ITS GAME?

THE UK NEEDS TO BUILD

240,000 HOUSES EACH YEAR FOR

THE NEXT 10 YEARS

MLINOVI RESIDENTIAL COMPLEX, ZAGREB, CROATIA alongside retail and leisure components. In Louyang, China, we provided designs for a 570,000m2 residential offer as part of our overall 1,620,000m2 masterplan for the development. Keeping ahead of the game in housing design has been a steep challenge for us, but no less important have been our efforts to address the advances in environmental and sustainable technologies. The two areas do, after all, go hand in hand in the development of good residential architecture. We all know that in this day and age the issue of sustainability, particularly within the architectural industry, should be ignored at one’s peril! Our in-house ‘Creatively Conscious’ sustainability group actively seeks to promote and develop our

17% RESIDENCES EMIT

17% OF ALL CO2

IN THE UK (2013)

staff’s knowledge and expertise in this area. The Group ensures the latest developments are discussed and shared amongst staff where appropriate. After all, the technologies to watch out for in the future are quite exciting. What about electrochromatic glazing which reacts to sunlight by darkening or lightening automatically to reduce the need for expensive heating or cooling systems? Can we make it cheap enough to install as a standard item in the 3 million houses which need to be built according to UK Government figures? And what about green facades? The research undertaken into the development of algae as an influencer of heat loss and heat absorption is a fascinating trend to monitor. At Chapman Taylor we believe we have our finger firmly on the pulse and we are constantly looking for innovative ways of doing things. Over the coming months we hope to bring forward further initiatives which we believe will capture the imagination of our clients

ON AVERAGE NEW-BUILD HOUSES IN THE UK ARE THE

SMALLEST IN EUROPE

and others who would like to work with us. We are commercially aware and this helps us to serve our clients well as we believe that innovation can lead to reduced costs. Above all we seek to ensure that the aspirations of our clients are fully achieved and exceeded where possible. Housing is a serious business but the job satisfaction gleaned from providing good quality sustainable homes for all people is very rewarding. scarr@chapmantaylor.com

MLINOVI RESIDENTIAL COMPLEX, ZAGREB, CROATIA Chapman Taylor  ACHIEVEMENTS ISSUE 04

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HEATHROW AIRPORT T5, LONDON, UK

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PLANES, TRAINS &

ECONOMIC GAINS

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RIGHT: PETER FARMER DIRECTOR IN CHAPMAN TAYLOR'S LONDON OFFICE

H

IGH PROFILE DEVELOPMENTS SUCH AS HEATHROW’S TERMINAL 2 AND CROSSRAIL IN LONDON HAVE HIGHLIGHTED A NEW WAVE OF FACILITIES AND SERVICES FOR TRAVELLERS. PETER FARMER, DIRECTOR OF OUR TRANSPORTATION BUSINESS, ADDRESSES THE KEY QUESTIONS AND WIDER CONSIDERATIONS INVOLVED.

WHAT ARE THE KEY CHALLENGES THAT CURRENTLY IMPACT ON GOOD TRANSPORTATION DESIGN? Changing populations, national and international trade and personal mobility are all putting pressure on transport infrastructure. We increasingly need to look to optimise the use of existing infrastructure, to reduce environmental impact and provide income as well as a return on investment. Transport interchanges are also having to become more multi-modal, dynamic, commercially active environments of customer interaction and leisure. The edges between the operational and commercial areas are being blurred for the benefit of the passenger, operator and

the surrounding neighbourhood. From a design perspective, this requires a more integrated approach to developments. And then of course there is the impact of technology…

AT THE INDIVIDUAL LEVEL, AS PASSENGERS AND CUSTOMERS, HOW ARE WE CREATING NEW CHALLENGES FOR DESIGNERS? Travellers may now choose to arrive at their travel departure point much earlier than before, choosing to eat, drink, relax, work or meet with friends in a way they never used to before. Developments in technology have aided these trends, as smartphones and mobile devices become part of our everyday lives. In areas such as airside departure zones or station concourses, people are behaving

HEATHROW AIRPORT T2 LUXURY RETAIL, LONDON, UK

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differently in these spaces, with changing dwell times and seat utilisation often influenced by factors such as a person’s search for a free WiFi signal. The concept of a transportation hub as an area for leisure and entertainment is now at the forefront of development planning.

SO WHAT LEISURE EXPERIENCE CAN PASSENGERS INCREASINGLY EXPECT IN OUR STATIONS AND AIRPORTS? The optimum blend of retail, food and beverage options is now more important than ever in becoming part of the leisure experience passengers can enjoy. The Queen’s Terminal (Terminal 2) at Heathrow has the world’s first personal shopping lounge at an airport and a dedicated, bespoke-designed luxury


ST PANCRAS INTERNATIONAL, LONDON, UK

shopping area, which was designed by Chapman Taylor. Our retail projects at King’s Cross and St. Pancras stations again responded to these key trends. Non-travelling customers are also a key customer segment for UK station operators, who have noticed an increase in the use of facilities by this group which now accounts for 20%+ of commercial income at key interchanges.

30% NON-TRAVELLING CUSTOMERS ACCOUNT FOR 20%+ OF COMMERCIAL INCOME AT KEY INTERCHANGES

TRANSPORT INTERCHANGES ARE ALSO HAVING TO BECOME MORE MULTI‑MODAL, DYNAMIC, COMMERCIALLY ACTIVE PLACES OF INTERACTION AND LEISURE. of transport and mixed‑use developments. This influence tends to ripple out up to a 15-minute walk, or 1.5km, of a particular Transport Orientated Development (TOD). A TOD will have a core area that includes a mixture of land uses oriented to transit services and facilities, with physical and visual amenities that encourage

AVERAGE PROPERTY PRICES WITHIN A 10-MINUTE WALK OF STATIONS ON THE NEW CROSSRAIL DEVELOPMENT IN LONDON HAVE ALREADY RISEN BY 30% SINCE 2008. (Knight Frank)

WHAT ABOUT THE WIDER CONSIDERATIONS YOU HAVE MENTIONED REGARDING THE EFFECTS OF DEVELOPMENT ON IMMEDIATE NEIGHBOURHOODS? Transport has always been a catalyst for development. Commerce, governments and society as a whole are realising increasingly the social, economic and environmental benefits of the integration

KING'S CROSS STATION, LONDON, UK

30,000 THE ECONOMIC BENEFIT OF A TRANSPORT ORIENTATED DEVELOPMENT (TOD) CAN RIPPLE OUT UP TO 1.5 KILOMETRES OR A 15-MINUTE WALK

THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE EXPECTED TO BE LIVING, WORKING AND STUDYING AT KING’S CROSS CENTRAL BY 2016 (CSIC)

transit usage. The mixture of land uses includes retail, leisure, entertainment and hotel amenities, employment centres, upper-story offices and residential. TODs will tend to increase property values by 5 – 15% in this vicinity. A recent report by estate agent Knight Frank (Action Stations; the impact of Crossrail on residential property in central London, 2013) states that average property prices within a 10-minute walk of the stations on the new Crossrail development in London have already risen by 30% since 2008.

to create development guidelines and policy suggestions. Initial studies have examined the impact of key central London developments such as at Kings’ Cross and London Bridge as well as the influence of Crossrail. These issues must be linked to overall debates surrounding the impact of increased transport services on communities and the environment. The proposed UK High Speed 2 (HS2) rail link from London to Birmingham, and the arguments for and against the development of a new runway at one of London’s major airports (and the further infrastructure that these projects in turn will demand) illustrate the opposing viewpoints and pressures that planners, authorities and many governments all over the world can face in the delivery of appropriate transportation solutions for the future. pfarmer@chapmantaylor.com

SO 'TODS' ARE A WIN-WIN SOLUTION FOR EVERYONE? It’s not necessarily as straightforward as that. Chapman Taylor is currently supporting a study by CSIC (Cambridge Centre for Smart Infrastructure and Construction) which explores the social and economic ripple effects of transport hub developments and seeks

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TALKING ABOUT OUR

REGENERATION

THREE YEARS AFTER IT OPENED, HAS MEDIACITYUK IN MANCHESTER BEEN A SUCCESS? DEFINITELY, ARGUES BOARD DIRECTOR TIM PARTINGTON, WHO LED CHAPMAN TAYLOR’S DESIGN DEVELOPMENT OF THE PHASE 1 MASTERPLAN AND BUILDINGS.

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O

ur client The Peel Group’s vision to create a world-leading digital creative city was conceived in late 2004 when the BBC announced it was searching for a new location in the north-west to relocate five London‑based departments. Peel recognised that this could provide a catalyst for the development of a creative media hub that would play a major role in the regeneration of a 15-hectare waterfront site in the heart of Salford Quays. The proposed media hub would bring a much needed focus and significant investment to benefit both the local and wider communities of Salford and Manchester whilst also providing significant environmental improvements to an underutilised site

on the waterside of Manchester Ship Canal. Ten years after the initial seed of an idea and two years since the official opening by HRH Queen Elizabeth II, this new hub is MediaCityUK, Manchester. In June 2006, the BBC confirmed that it had chosen The Peel Group’s proposed scheme as the location for its new northern broadcast hub. It is testament to Peel’s vision and commitment that they immediately engaged their design team and contractor to ensure Phase 1 of the development would be realised within the required timescales to accommodate the BBC’s relocation. Chapman Taylor was privileged to be offered the role of overall Lead and Coordinating Architect and Contract

Administrator for Phase 1 of the development. Included in this role was the development of the design for the three BBC buildings, the new Metrolink tram interchange, two residential towers, the onsite energy centre, a multi-storey car park, project management of the TV studios’ technical fit-out and the co-ordination of the public realm. Chapman Taylor’s Manchester office is proud to have contributed so profoundly to the creation of what is considered now as the “second largest creative and digital hub in Europe”, according to MediaCityUK Managing Director Stephen Wild. But the ambition for such a prominent, mixed-use scheme was always to benefit its immediate communities and the Chapman Taylor  ACHIEVEMENTS ISSUE 04

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LEFT: TIM PARTINGTON BOARD DIRECTOR BASED IN CHAPMAN TAYLOR'S MANCHESTER OFFICE

wider Manchester area. Developers and local authorities are evolving the vision for our towns and cities, conceiving schemes which offer more potential for growth; socially, commercially, sustainably and economically. So how does MediaCityUK stand up to this wider vision? Examining its sustainable transport methods is a good place to start. A prerequisite for MediaCityUK was the extension of Manchester’s Metrolink tram network to provide a new interchange stop within the public piazza. This facilitates important connections with the city’s wider primary rail networks and Manchester Airport. A new pedestrian swing bridge across the Manchester Ship Canal together with the regeneration of the canal waterside completes a circular network of footpaths that link MediaCityUK with the Imperial War Museum North and Lowry Arts Centre. 38

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In addition, a new link road from the M62 has been provided to help relieve the congested road network and facilitate easy vehicular access to MediaCityUK. Chapman Taylor is currently working on the design of a new Cycle Hub to be located at the centre of MediaCityUK as part of a joint venture facility provided by Transport for Greater Manchester and Peel Media. This will provide secure parking, shower and changing facilities for the rapidly increasing number of cyclists who travel to work or visit the media hub. These all seek to connect MediaCityUK to other parts of the city of Manchester,

thus furthering its attractiveness to investors, visitors and employees alike. Developing a sense of ‘cultural sustainability’ is also of prime importance. In its first three years MediaCityUK has built a sense of culture and place that is the envy of many new-build schemes undertaken in recent years. This is of course aided by its raison d’etre as a creative hub, attracting like-minded, media and arts focussed businesses and complementary leisure facilities. Following the successful relocation of the BBC the scheme has also become the new home of ITV in the north-west


CHAPMAN TAYLOR IS PROUD TO HAVE CONTRIBUTED SO PROFOUNDLY IN THE CREATION OF WHAT IS CONSIDERED NOW AS THE “SECOND LARGEST CREATIVE AND DIGITAL HUB IN EUROPE”, ACCORDING TO MEDIACITYUK MANAGING DIRECTOR STEPHEN WILD.

area being voted one of the best towns to live in the UK if you are single. Sited above two of the BBC buildings are a pair of residential towers providing 378 residential apartments, all designed by Chapman Taylor. An indication of the impact of MediaCityUK is that, according to The Guardian newspaper, property values in Salford have risen faster than in any

other town in Britain since the start of 2014. Evidence of the scheme’s success continues to grow. Current figures estimate that MediaCityUK is already contributing more than £200 million a year to the region’s economy. If we are measuring success by economics then it is clear that the development is transforming the economic prosperity of Salford and the City-region of Manchester. In conclusion, it is apparent that the regenerative impact of MediaCityUK is beginning to transform the wider areas encompassing Salford, Trafford and Manchester. It is enabling Manchester’s waterfront to evolve from the proud heritage of its industrial past to a fastgrowing media capital of the future. And with plans for further development very much in the pipeline, Chapman Taylor is continuing to work on the next phase of MediaCityUK with their latest design for a mixed-use creative office and hotel building having just been granted planning consent, and construction due to start in early 2015. The MediaCityUK success story will continue to grow. tpartington@chapmantaylor.com

(including a new production centre for flagship programme Coronation Street), the University of Salford’s Media Faculty and the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra. In addition, Satellite Information Services (SIS), a major world player in the broadcast sector, has moved its London-based production and engineering staff to MediaCityUK. The major corporates are supplemented by more than 200 smaller creative, digital and tech businesses housed in The Greenhouse, The Pie Factory and The Landing buildings. But of equal importance to the work environment, the scheme has also become a place where people actively want to live, learn, visit, and relax. According to The Times newspaper, MediaCityUK is responsible for the Chapman Taylor  ACHIEVEMENTS ISSUE 04

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KEEPING RETAIL

RELEVANT

ABOVE: ADRIAN GRIFFITHS BOARD DIRECTOR BASED IN CHAPMAN TAYLOR'S LONDON OFFICE

SOCIAL MEDIA AND ONLINE SHOPPING NEED TO KNOW THEIR PLACE, AND GOOD RETAIL ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN DESIGN ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR MAKING THIS HAPPEN, ARGUES ADRIAN GRIFFITHS, BOARD DIRECTOR AND HEAD OF OUR UK FEASIBILITY TEAM.

I

f anyone out there can accurately predict the direction of future retail trends, they are a better person than me. What we do know is that there has been phenomenal change in the methods customers use to purchase goods, most of which we would not have predicted. We must expect this shopping evolution to continue at a rapid pace. The rise of online retailing and the role of social media has, and will continue to change forever the way we shop. Effective retail environments have embraced this change and now communicate with the

customer whilst they shop, as well as facilitate this exchange. For example, shopping via a mobile device can now be made easier through the provision of ample space and seating for people to “hang out” and search for their required purchases. Other internet-enabled shopping trends, such as ‘click and collect’ are also impacting shopping centre design through the requirement to embed the collection service in the centre itself. But providing facilities that support online and social media interaction by customers is only part of the story. What

Centres must increasingly possess is a sense of place that the customer can relate to. We cannot underestimate the importance of creating a development that the customer feels “at one” with. The big “wow” factor created from abstract architecture has initial impact when a new Centre is opened, but rarely stands the test of time, with the end result that the development needs constant refreshment throughout its life to try and maintain customer loyalty. Future developments must have an environment that instead delivers design longevity,

THE RETAIL REVOLUTION: EVOLVING TOWARDS A SENSE OF PLACE THE AMERICAN MODEL

ELDON SQUARE, NEWCASTLE, UK 1960s & 1970s: The American shopping centre model arrives in the UK and all over Europe.

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REGIONAL SHOPPING CENTRES

OUT-OF-TOWN CENTRES

HARLEQUIN CENTRE, WATFORD, UK

TRAFFORD CENTRE, MANCHESTER, UK

1980s: The UK undergoes a retail construction boom. Regional shopping centres take customers from city centres.

1990s: The popularity of large‑scale, outof-town shopping centres continues, with car-centric transport links.


allowing the centre to constantly build its brand rather than continually changing it. This in turn allows the customer to build familiarity with the Centre and its brand, rather than becoming confused by its changing make-overs. Using a variety of architectural styles that build on local character can also further embed the development within the community. This can be particularly important where new developments are created in the centre of older, often historic cities. Our Trinity Leeds scheme is a successful 21st century interpretation of the city’s Victorian arcades, bang at the heart of the city. But creating a sense of place is not only the preserve of the single-use shopping centre. Increasingly, designers have to look at wider masterplanning issues and multiple uses, creating retail‑led, mixed-use schemes that incorporate residential, workplace, leisure and entertainment requirements. Whilst these other elements may well give reasons to attract people to an area, retail is often seen as the prime economic and regeneration driver. The retail offer must therefore still deliver more than just the shopping essentials, as well as paying appropriate consideration to the wider services that are being designed around it. Once again, creating and responding to a sense of place is paramount, whether there is an existing historic context to it or not. The role of entertainment and ‘theatre’ within the customer retail experience must

also be considered seriously within the design process. The schemes of tomorrow must be able to cater for the likes of major fashion shows, pop‑up retail units and televised events which constantly refresh the shopping environment. The Westfield development in west London has even hosted major Hollywood film premieres, attracting crowds of thousands to watch these events. With retailers building fewer shops and becoming increasingly selective about where they are located, there is now a greater emphasis on iconic, flagship stores. Good retail architecture must accommodate this and understand that increasingly for retailers it is about providing experiences for customers, rather than providing products for purchase. Online offers consumers the chance to buy a product at any time. A physical store on the other hand offers experiences and moments to ‘fall in love’ with a brand. For many retailers, shopping has become less about purchase and distribution and more about creating experiences. No one has perhaps understood this more than Apple. Why do people queue up and even camp outside an Apple store for the latest iPhone launch? They could just buy it online… but they don’t. Finally, the turnkey ingredient for future shopping developments is the increased provision of food and beverage outlets as part of the overall leisure offer. You can’t eat on the internet. Society’s approach to eating out has

CITY CENTRE REGENERATION

INTEGRATED ENVIRONMENTS

PRINCESSHAY, EXETER, UK 2000s: City centre regeneration takes off, driven by schemes combining retail with a mix of other uses.

THE SCHEMES OF TOMORROW MUST BE ABLE TO CATER FOR THE LIKES OF MAJOR FASHION SHOWS, POP‑UP RETAIL UNITS AND TELEVISED EVENTS WHICH CONSTANTLY REFRESH THE SHOPPING ENVIRONMENT.

transformed dramatically over the last 15 years and at long last, restaurateurs are prepared to pay a competitive rent to secure their position within a centre. In conclusion, our challenge is to design an experience where the customer can shop however they want, eat and be entertained in an environment they choose and with all of these activities contained within a destination that has a sense of place that seamlessly fits with its locality and community. At the end of the day, people still value the ability to socialise and shop in the real world – and this is what the centres of tomorrow must facilitate. Life is to be enjoyed! agriffiths@chapmantaylor.com

THE FUTURE OF RETAIL

TRINITY LEEDS, UK

FUTURE CONCEPT

2010s: As the internet changes shopping habits, city centre retail environments become fully integrated developments.

2020s: Retail architecture that evolves with the times, embracing interactivity and providing a range of services.

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FEATURES GLOBAL HARBOR, CHINA

44

Majestic, mixed-use masterpiece totalling 480,000m2.

TRINITY LEEDS, UK

51

Landmark regeneration catalyst, entertainment, retail and leisure destination.

T2A, HEATHROW, UK

59

Luxury retail within industry-leading airport shopping offer.

FLOREASCA PARK, ROMANIA

62

Award-winning, sustainable workplace scheme attracting class 'A' tenants.

POMELO, THAILAND

65

Craftsmen-inspired design for contemporary island restaurant concept.

THE INDIAN MUSEUM, INDIA

66

Refurbishment to future-proof India’s largest museum, founded in 1814.

MEGA 2, KAZAKHSTAN

69

Completion of a powerful retail hub in the country’s main commercial city.

EUROPOLIS, RUSSIA

73

Corporate identity design inspired by the best of Europe.

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MIXED USE | RETAIL | LEISURE | WORKPLACE | RESIDENTIAL | HOSPITALITY

GLOBAL HARBOR SHANGHAI, CHINA

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ALL IMAGES BY ELYSEE SHEN

AT 480,000M2 THE PROJECT IS THE LARGEST BUILT MIXED-USE SCHEME THAT CHAPMAN TAYLOR HAS EVER DESIGNED

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IN ADDITION TO ITS STRIKING SIZE, THE INTERIOR ADOPTS AN OPULENT EUROPEAN CLASSIC DESIGN THAT HAS CREATED A DISTINCTIVE DESTINATION FOR VISITORS AND SHOPPERS.

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MIXED USE | RETAIL | LEISURE | WORKPLACE | RESIDENTIAL | HOSPITALITY

GLOBAL HARBOR SHANGHAI, CHINA towers above a 6-storey podium, is the largest completed mixed‑use project that Chapman Taylor has ever designed, and one of the largest urban shopping centres in the whole of Asia. In addition to its striking size, the interior adopts an opulent European Classic design that has created a distinctive destination for visitors and shoppers. The interior design features

AWARD-WINNING 2014 Asia Pacific Property Awards: Best Retail Architecture China Best Retail Architecture Asia Pacific Best Retail Interior China (Highly Commended)

ALL IMAGES BY ELYSEE SHEN

July 5th 2013 saw the opening of one of the most significant and high profile global retail destinations to be built in recent times. Global Harbor Shanghai is a 480,000m2 commercial complex located at an important transportation hub in the central area of the Putuo District in Shanghai. Its substantial size, incorporating a 320,000m2 shopping centre and two 245-metre high office, hotel and apartment

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A LANDMARK PROJECT • • • • • •

480,000m2 project – the largest built mixed-use scheme Chapman Taylor has ever designed One of the largest urban shopping centres in Asia 400 brands have leased units 1,200m2 of frescoes decorating the interior 20% of space dedicated to public art and cultural displays Shanghai’s first large scale commercial scheme to incorporate a major cultural heritage component within a shopping complex

3 dramatic atrium spaces – Sun Plaza, Central Plaza and Garden Court that adopt a mixture of Italian Renaissance and romantic interior design styles. Sun Plaza at the south end of the scheme adopts the style of ancient Greece and Rome, Central Plaza in the middle adopts the classic and romantic styles of Venice and Garden Court combines natural plant patterning with Renaissance and Victorian styles. Corinthian columns, statuary and 1,200m2 of painted frescoes are also an important feature. The exterior is designed in a grand style using columns, cornices, pilasters and porticos to define a very strong stone clad urban character. The project has given the city two very large new urban

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squares to the north and south of the development which have become vibrant meeting and activity places for Putuo. 20% of the scheme has been dedicated to major public art and cultural exhibits as well as tourism, entertainment and cultural heritage protection. It is Shanghai’s first retail complex to dedicate such a significant proportion of space to these requirements. The quality of the design has been fundamental to the success of the scheme’s leasing. At the time of opening, 400 brands had leased units – a testament to the successful combination of unique design and the correct proportion of public space and shops to meet commercial requirements.


ALL IMAGES BY ELYSEE SHEN Chapman Taylor  ACHIEVEMENTS ISSUE 04

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RETAIL | LEISURE | INTERIORS | DELIVERY

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AWARD-WINNING UK Property Awards 2014 Mixed-Use Architecture: Highly Commended RLI Awards 2014 Best International Shopping Centre

TRINITY

LEEDS, UK

RLI Awards 2014 Best Hospitality (Trinity Kitchen) ICSC European Shopping Centre Awards 2014 Best New Development: Large Scheme Variety Property Awards 2014 Best Development of the Year Oracle Retail Week Awards 2014 Best Retail Destination of the Year BCSC Awards 2013 New Centre Gold Award Yorkshire Property Awards 2013 Best Commercial Development West Yorkshire Building Excellence Awards 2013 Best Commercial Development Yorkshire Property Industry Awards 2013 Development of the Year MAPIC Awards 2013 Best Retail Real Estate Development in City Centre The Structural Awards 2013 Commercial or Retail Structure Award (Commendation)

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RETAIL | LEISURE | INTERIORS | DELIVERY

Opened in March 2013, Trinity Leeds is an 817,000ft2 shopping and leisure destination situated in the heart of the city of Leeds, in the North of England. The scheme, in a prime city centre site, unites three of Leeds’ busiest shopping thoroughfares around a new central space and includes the refurbishment of an existing shopping centre. Chapman Taylor created a new design that completely modernised and integrated these shopping districts into an all year round late night venue for fashion, food and film. It is a naturally ventilated scheme composed of buildings linked by a series of open air arcaded streets and public spaces above which, self-supporting glazed grid-shell roofs rise 30.5 metres above street level. The design, although contemporary, echoes the character of the original Victorian streetscape and respects the adjacent 18th century Holy Trinity Church. The scheme consists of two parts: Trinity East, a new-build development on the site of the former Trinity and Burton Arcades, and Trinity West, the redeveloped former Leeds Shopping Plaza.

In addition to creating a modern shopping experience, almost 25% of the total number of units have been dedicated to food and leisure, including the creation of a rooftop dining terrace, basement cocktail bars and a 27,000ft2, 4-screen art-house cinema. Most revolutionary of all has been the creation of ‘Trinity Kitchen’, the UK’s first authentic indoor street food venue. An extensive public arts programme complements the leisure offer, with the architectural design accommodating several sculptures by renowned artists. Obtaining the right mix of retail and leisure elements at Trinity Leeds has proved central to driving footfall and dwell‑time, as well as facilitating the late night shopping and social destination elements. The scheme, for which Chapman Taylor was both Design and Delivery architect, has proven a revolutionary project and had an extraordinary socio‑economic impact on the local area. By early 2014 the city of Leeds had enjoyed a reported increase in overall visitor numbers of 2 million as a result of the development. Having

attracted over 22 million visitors in its first year of trading, Trinity Leeds has also catapulted the city into sixth place on the UK’s hierarchy of top retail locations, as well as recently being voted one of UK's Coolest Brands for 2014/15.

TRINITY LEEDS: FAST FACTS • Client: Land Securities • £400 million development • 817,000ft2 of floor space • Created over 3000 jobs • Over 96% of the space let on opening • 25% of space dedicated to food and leisure facilities • Attracted over 60 new brands to open in the city for the first time • Contributed to Yorkshire being rated the third best global destination to visit in 2014 by Lonely Planet • 22 million visitors in first year of trading • By early 2014, responsible for increase of 2 million visitors to Leeds • Responsible for turning Leeds into the 6th top retail destination in the UK (CACI UK retail rankings 2013)

• Voted official 2014 UK ‘Coolbrand’ (The Centre for Brand Analysis)

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RETAIL | LEISURE | INTERIORS | DELIVERY

TRINITY LEEDS

PUBLIC ART

An unprecedented public art programme has become a signature attraction within the Trinity Leeds scheme. A £500,000 investment involved 17 regional artists creating sculptures, intricate gate designs and public seating that all referenced particular aspects of Leeds’ cultural heritage. A 15-metre high packhorse sculpture ‘Equus Altus’ in the central square, and the draped figure ‘Minerva’ on Briggate are both by the internationally renowned sculptor Andy Scott and are inspired by Leeds’ historic cloth and wool trade. LUCY FLINTOFF, PROJECT ARCHITECT “Facilitating the public art installations was an important part of our role as architect for the scheme. The art is there to enhance the experience of the visitor, therefore it was essential we ensured the architectural design worked to support and showcase the various

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pieces as well as possible. It was critical for us to work closely with Antonia Stowe, the client’s arts coordinator responsible for the artist liaison, the artworks and their placement. Working with Antonia, we were able to understand the requirements of the client, artists and contractor and ensure that issues such as exclusion zones, views of the Church, size, maintenance, safety and installation issues were all considered as part of the design and build process.”


TRINITY KITCHEN Almost a quarter of the centre’s floor space is dedicated to restaurants, cafes and bars at Trinity Leeds. This includes Trinity Kitchen, a first-of-its-kind dining offer for a retail scheme. The innovative concept combines a permanent residency of emerging restaurants, cafes and bars alongside a rotating mix of the UK’s best street food vendors – all housed within a 20,000ft2 industrial warehouse and street alley venue on the first floor level. Since opening in October 2013 it has attracted an average of 25,000 visitors a week. LUKE KENDALL, PROJECT ARCHITECT “It was exciting to be involved in such an innovative concept as Trinity Kitchen. Our role was to help the client team develop the overall concept and design brief for the interior designers and work with them to realise the overall vision. We

were also responsible for creating the shell and support areas for the scheme, integrating this with the programme for the main Trinity project. But perhaps our biggest challenge was working out how to move the street food vans from outside at street level, up and into the first floor of an indoor centre! We managed to develop a strategy for a bespoke lifting solution, which is able to transport the vans in and out of the building on a monthly basis.”

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RETAIL | LEISURE | INTERIORS | DELIVERY

DELIVERING

A RETAIL VISION

IN ADDITION TO OUR DESIGN SERVICES, CHAPMAN TAYLOR IS OFTEN PROCURED AS ARCHITECT FOR THE DELIVERY PHASE OF MAJOR PROJECTS. FOR TRINITY LEEDS, OUR LONDON AND MANCHESTER OFFICES UNDERTOOK THE SEPARATE ROLES OF DESIGN AND DELIVERY ARCHITECT. BELOW, BOTH CLIENT AND CONTRACTOR – LAND SECURITIES AND LAING O’ROURKE – TALK ABOUT DELIVERING THE SCHEME AND THEIR DECISION TO APPOINT THE SAME ARCHITECT.

ANDREW DUDLEY, HEAD OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT, LAND SECURITIES

HOW DID LAND SECURITIES’ RELATIONSHIP WITH THE TRINITY SCHEME BEGIN? Our involvement with Trinity Leeds started in 2005 with the purchase of Leeds Shopping Plaza. Our interests subsequently expanded to include the Trinity Quarter site where we inherited redevelopment proposals and existing planning consents.

EARLY ON YOU TOOK THE DECISION TO CHANGE THE DESIGN. HOW DID THIS AFFECT YOUR CHOICE OF ARCHITECT? We wanted to review the full scheme design and took the opportunity to consider the design team which resulted in a change of architect. We knew that 56

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Chapman Taylor understood retail and we trusted them to get working quickly and build relationships with the City Council and planners. Having worked together on previous major UK schemes such as Cabot Circus in Bristol and St. David’s in Cardiff, we knew that they had the expertise to deliver a quality design that would respond to the changing retail world.

WHAT WERE THE BIGGEST CHALLENGES OF THE PROJECT? The major structural change that retail and retail property underwent during development. The decision to create Trinity Kitchen and incorporate Primark came late in the construction process. We had to completely deconstruct part of Trinity West to accommodate Trinity Kitchen, whilst for Primark we had to create an entire extra floor to create their flagship unit, which in all doubled the scope of the refurbishment works.

WHAT DO YOU BELIEVE ARE THE KEY SUCCESSES OF THE SCHEME DESIGN? The quality of space created in such a constrained, historic city centre site. The multi-level nature of the

project has worked very well. We have an eye-catching contemporary glass roof, yet the nature of the surrounding Victorian streetscape is also respected, all whilst moving forward the experiential nature of UK retail.

CHAPMAN TAYLOR WORKED FOR BOTH CLIENT AND CONTRACTOR. DID YOU FEEL THIS WAS A SUCCESS? Absolutely. It is an approach we don’t always follow, however in this case we found enormous benefits. Keeping the same architect enabled knowledge to be retained through to the build stage and strong relationships with planners to be built upon. With thanks to Land Securities


KEEPING THE SAME ARCHITECT ENABLED KNOWLEDGE TO BE RETAINED THROUGH TO THE BUILD STAGE AND STRONG RELATIONSHIPS WITH PLANNERS TO BE BUILT UPON. on the delivery requirement. This arrangement was very successful in avoiding any conflicts of interest.

DAN DOHERTY, DIRECTOR, LAING O’ROURKE CONSTRUCTION NORTH

WHAT WAS YOUR ROLE ON THE TRINITY LEEDS PROJECT? Laing O’Rourke was the main contractor and we came on board in 2007 for the enabling works. After the development was stopped in 2009, we kept a watching brief on the project with the client, ready to resume our role when work restarted in August 2010. I was born and bred in Leeds, so it was a project I was passionate about, both professionally and personally.

YOU ENGAGED CHAPMAN TAYLOR AS THE DELIVERY ARCHITECT. HOW DID THIS WORK ALONGSIDE THEIR ROLE AS THE DESIGN ARCHITECT FOR THE CLIENT?

AS THE CONTRACTOR, WHAT WERE THE MAIN CHALLENGES? Accommodating the late introduction of Primark and Trinity Kitchen was not easy. The logistics of managing such a major city centre project also required careful consideration. Alongside traffic congestion, existing retailers had to be kept happy, so tenant liaison was very important. These factors meant that our team had to work quickly and materials had to be transported in and out of the build site at pace. One section of the building was manufactured completely off site and erected at night.

WHAT IS THE SECRET TO A SUCCESSFUL CONTRACTOR/ARCHITECT TEAM? Both contractor and architect have to establish a mature and collaborative

relationship to overcome such issues. With Chapman Taylor we were able to do just that. With this foundation in place, we certainly bonded under those times of pressure. Some lasting relationships were formed! Overall, the synergy of client, contractor and architect worked really well. Professional relationships and personalities just clicked.

YOU ARE LEADERS IN DfMA. WAS THIS USED ON TRINITY LEEDS? Yes it was. Laing O’Rourke has used DfMA (Design for Manufacturing Assembly) on a number of schemes. For Trinity, it was used in the ‘bull nose’ part of the building, near the Boar Lane entrance. It enabled us to overcome the main logistical challenges involved with the site, as well as having benefits for speed of construction, quality control and safety. Components were manufactured off site and lifted in by crane at night-time to minimise disruption. With thanks to Laing O'Rourke

Clearly from the outset, the arrangements and relationships had to be carefully thought through. Dedicated offices and contacts were split between client and contractor, with Chapman Taylor’s London office representing Land Securities’ interests, and the Manchester office working with us

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RETAIL | TRANSPORTATION

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HEATHROW T2A LONDON UK

LUXURY RETAIL ZONE

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RETAIL | TRANSPORTATION

HEATHROW T2A LONDON, UK

LU X UR Y RE TA IL ZONE On the 4th June 2014, Heathrow Airport’s brand new and much anticipated Terminal 2 opened to the public. The Terminal’s new facilities and iconic art installation ‘Slipstream’ had already received widespread publicity and for passengers, the prospect of a new and ground-breaking shopping experience was eagerly awaited. The Terminal is a £2.5 billion project and marks the latest phase of an £11 billion private sector investment that has transformed Heathrow for passengers. Chapman Taylor played a key role within the overall design and delivery of the retail offer, having been commissioned 60

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by Heathrow to design the southern zone of Terminal 2’s departure lounge. This zone is a bespoke area designed to host luxury fashion houses Bottega Veneta, Bulgari, Harrods, Paul Smith and Hugo Boss. The design incorporates eight retail units and a centrepiece flagship store unit, for which Chapman Taylor also delivered the core and shell works. The fit out of these units was guided via Heathrow’s Design Guidelines, for which Chapman Taylor fulfilled a second key role as Lead Consultant. Materials and finishes are carefully chosen to accentuate the organic configuration of the units. Whilst sharing

the main concourse flooring, the zone is distinguished from the remaining retail offer through the use of elegant shopfronts incorporating pilasters and fascias. A feature translucent, illuminated ceiling completes the design. In all, the luxury shopping area offers passengers a best-in-class retail experience. It sits alongside a number of airport retail firsts for Terminal 2 such as the debut of British high street favourite John Lewis and the world’s first free Personal Shopping Lounge at an airport. Terminal 2, named ‘The Queen’s Terminal’, was formally opened by Her Majesty the Queen on 23rd June 2014.


THE TERMINAL IS A £2.5 BILLION PROJECT AND MARKS THE LATEST PHASE OF AN £11 BILLION PRIVATE SECTOR INVESTMENT THAT HAS TRANSFORMED HEATHROW FOR PASSENGERS.

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WORKPLACE

FLOREASCA PARK

BUCHAREST, ROMANIA Completed at the end of 2013, Floreasca Park is an award-winning, high specification office development in the Floreasca area, just north of the city centre of Bucharest. Chapman Taylor’s Prague office was asked by long-standing client Portland Trust to create a unique and efficient office park scheme containing class 'A' offices for flagship tenants. The 36,800m2 scheme comprises 2 separate buildings – A and B – that sit within an attractively landscaped plot of 1.5 hectares, which includes a dedicated bio-diversity habitat

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heavily planted with local species. The buildings provide large and regularshaped floor plates, varying from 1,800m2 to 3,600m2. The highly flexible office space can be open plan, or cellular, depending on the users' requirements. Building B contains two internal atria to bring natural light into all areas of the office space. These atria are also used to provide stack-effect natural ventilation and night cooling where airflow is pulled through the ceiling voids from the external façades in to the atria and then out through the rooflights above.

The largest ground sourced heat pump (GSHP) in Bucharest provides pre‑cooling in summer and pre-heating in winter thereby helping to reduce overall energy consumption and service charges to tenants. Many other energy saving features are incorporated within the development, which has achieved BREEAM Excellent rating with a score of 81.3%, establishing the development’s status as a benchmark for sustainable workplaces in the region. The Floreasca area is becoming the most popular suburban office


location in Bucharest. The locality offers excellent road links to the city centre, to the main northern residential areas and the city’s airports. Access by public transport is amply served by the Aurel Vlaicu metro station, city trams and the regional bus network. The project is fully let to international class 'A' tenants, including Oracle, Kellogg’s, Allianz, Saint Gobain and

BASF as well as URSUS Breweries - part of the SABMiller PLC Group and one of the largest brewers in Romania. Floreasca Park is the latest in a number of successful developments Chapman Taylor has designed for our long-term client Portland Trust. A follow-on, high-specification scheme providing 70,000m2 of office space is already on the drawing board.

AWARD-WINNING CEE Real Estate Quality Awards 2014 Office Development of the Year SEE Real Estate Awards 2014 Office Development of the Year RoGBC Awards 2014 Green Building of the Year CIJ Awards 2013 Best Office Development of the Year

EXCELLENT

CLIENT Q&A WITH ROBERT NEALE, PORTLAND TRUST How long have you been working with Chapman Taylor? Since 2000 on about 10 separate projects. Why do you think Floreasca Park has been so successful? We did something different than a standard office building and brought in new concepts for energy saving, new materials and had a very efficient design. Why do you enjoy working with Chapman Taylor? The individuals know what Portland Trust wants in terms of efficiency and quality. Response times are good. What is your next major project with Chapman Taylor? Oregon Park, which is another office park development of 3 separate buildings on a 4-hectare site with over 70,000m2 of net office space. Chapman Taylor  ACHIEVEMENTS ISSUE 04

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LEISURE

POMELO

BANGKOK

THAILAND Pomelo is a 150m2 food and beverage installation located in the Gaysorn Shopping Plaza in central Bangkok. The restaurant provides a combination of Asian fusion cuisine with strong packaged takeaway products. The brief was to provide a unique Indochinese concept that reflected an artisan atmosphere. This could then be developed as a wider food and beverage (F&B) theme for other venues in the existing Gaysorn shopping mall, as well as future malls currently underway. Increasing foot traffic to the upper levels of the mall was also an important requirement, providing interesting F&B concepts that entice customers to have a break from shopping. In Thailand, smaller independent restaurant brands are laying increasing importance in having a unique design

concept that enables differentiation from their larger international brand competitors. Local, culturally inspired concepts are also becoming popular due to the impact of tourism as a driver within the market. The Chapman Taylor team in Bangkok worked closely with a local sculptor to create a design concept inspired by artisan rattan culture and early Thai construction techniques, with 75% of the materials consisting of natural bamboo or rattan. The end result is conceived to resemble a traditional Thai fishing basket. Pomelo and its fellow Chapman Taylor project in the Gaysorn Plaza – The Mandarin Oriental’s retail concept store – are both island spaces, so designing them in a way that afforded privacy to customers was a key part of the design brief. Chapman Taylor  ACHIEVEMENTS ISSUE 04

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LEISURE

THE INDIAN

MUSEUM

KOLKATA,INDIA The Indian Museum in Kolkata, founded in 1814 by the Asiatic Society of Bengal, is the largest museum in India and houses rare collections of antiques, armour and ornaments, fossils, skeletons, mummies, and Mughal paintings. Funded by the Union Ministry of Culture, Chapman Taylor’s offices in New Delhi and Milan are currently undertaking a major restoration and renovation of the museum in two phases. Phase 1, which opened to the public in February 2014, saw the restoration of both the external and internal façades, a change of flooring, construction of a new ticket counter, restrooms and

cafe plus the full refurbishment of the museum’s Anthropology, Gandhara, Archaeology and Textile and Decorative galleries. Phase 2 of the works began in June 2014 and includes the restoration of an administrative block, plus the full refurbishment of the remaining galleries. On Sunday 2nd February 2014, the Honourable Prime Minister of India, Shri Manmohan Singh, inaugurated the museum and ‘rededicated it to the nation’ as part of its much‑anticipated bicentenary celebrations. The Honorable Lieutenant Governor M. K. Narayanan, also in attendance, described the museum as ‘an epitome

THE INDIAN MUSEUM: FAST FACTS • Founded in 1814 • The largest museum in India • Phase 1 refurbishment works complete – opened to the public 2nd February 2014 • Phase 2 refurbishment works commenced June 2014 • Future-proofing the museum for the next 200 years

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of modernity in antiquity; comparable to the best in the world’ and praised the renovation works which have taken place without disturbing the historic antiquity of the building. The Museum and its refurbishment work are viewed as a project of national significance and one that is pivotal to international tourism, as well as providing a leadership role to the country’s future cultural and museology efforts. The improvement works have been seen as essential for the museum to ‘become more interesting for the common visitor’ and help it remain relevant for the next 200 years.


THE MUSEUM AND ITS REFURBISHMENT WORK ARE VIEWED AS A PROJECT OF NATIONAL SIGNIFICANCE AND ONE THAT IS PIVOTAL TO INTERNATIONAL TOURISM Chapman Taylor  ACHIEVEMENTS ISSUE 04

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MEGA 2

IMAGE BY FRANK HERFORT

ALMATY, KAZAKHSTAN

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RETAIL | LEISURE | INTERIORS

MEGA 2

ALMATY, KAZAKHSTAN

Directly linked to the existing and very successful Mega Center Mall in Almaty, Mega 2 opened to the public in November 2013. The scheme has almost doubled the amount of retail space on this site providing over 100 additional retail units, as well as a major restaurant court. The unified complex creates a very powerful retail hub in this part of Kazakhstan’s main commercial city and is expected to receive 15 million visitors in its first year of operation. With an area of more than 78,000m² encompassed by a sweeping, angled roof, the building climbs up its sloping site 70

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and is surmounted by a restaurant court that offers dramatic views of the mountain range that encircles the southern edge of the city. A rich external landscape is also incorporated with the surface parking in front of the building with an amphitheatre, stage and large LED screen forming a focal point to the development’s outside space. Chapman Taylor undertook the layout planning and design of Mega 2 from concept through to tender stage and also played a major role in overseeing the construction works on site. Team members from both our Moscow and London offices worked with the client

team and Design and Build contractor, with regular liaison and site visits. The interior design for the main malls within the scheme and the double-stacked linking malls to the original Mega Center were undertaken by Chapman Taylor’s London-based interiors team. Design themes relate to Kazakh landscape and iconography and include motifs based on mountain lakes and streams, a Kazakh market place as well as poppies and eagles. These are integrated with a number of unique artworks specially commissioned from local artists for the project.


MEGA 2: FAST FACTS THE UNIFIED COMPLEX CREATES A VERY POWERFUL RETAIL HUB IN THIS PART OF KAZAKHSTAN’S MAIN COMMERCIAL CITY AND IS EXPECTED TO RECEIVE 15 MILLION VISITORS IN ITS FIRST YEAR OF OPERATION.

ALL IMAGES BY FRANK HERFORT

• Opened November 2013 • Area of over 78,000m² • 15 million visitors predicted in first year • Providing over 100 additional retail units to the existing Mega Center Mall

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GRAPHICS

EUROPOLIS: GRAPHICS SOLUTIONS Centre Website Branding Brand Guidelines Exterior Signage Marketing Brochure 72

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BY WORKING WITH OUR ARCHITECTS AND INTERIOR DESIGNERS IN MOSCOW AND LONDON, THE GRAPHICS TEAM WERE ABLE TO GAIN IN-DEPTH INSIGHT INTO THE CONCEPTS THAT UNDERPIN THE SCHEME

EUROPOLIS

ST PETERSBURG, RUSSIA Europolis is a 141,700m² family retail and leisure development situated in north-west St Petersburg, which opened in October 2014. Since 2012 the Graphics team at Chapman Taylor have been working with the client to produce corporate identity and marketing material for the centre including a marketing brochure, brand guidelines and website, as well as developing signage for the scheme. Chapman Taylor has provided a fully integrated design service, incorporating external architecture, interior and graphic

design concepts. By working with our architects and interior designers in Moscow and London, the Graphics team were able to gain in-depth insight into the concepts that underpin the scheme and the client’s vision to create a sophisticated fashion destination. This approach was fundamental in developing the brand book, a comprehensive guide illustrating the various applications of the Europolis identity, from stationery to shopping bags. It was also crucial to ensuring the design of the website appropriately references

both the European theme of the interior malls as well as emphasising fashion. The resulting concept was based on the fashion style of each of the European cities Europolis is designed to reflect: London, Paris, Rome and Barcelona. For more information on Chapman Taylor’s graphic design services, please visit our website at: www.chapmantaylor.com/en/ projects/category/graphics or contact Edyta Sipta, Head of Graphics: esipta@chapmantaylor.com Chapman Taylor  ACHIEVEMENTS ISSUE 04

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FEATURES GLOBAL 100, CHINA

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400-hectare film industry flagship, set to rival the world’s largest theme parks.

BRENT CROSS, UK

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Major masterplanning and regeneration project in the north of London.

MALL OF QATAR, QATAR

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Qatar’s first super-regional luxury shopping centre and premier destination for the country.

HUANGPU RIVER MASTERPLAN, CHINA

84

Prestigious international competition win for a major Shanghai city centre site.

OPEN, FRANCE

86

Stunningly located, innovative mixed-use scheme with sustainability at its heart.

ISLAND PARADISE RESORT, ANTIGUA

89

Residential villa design and multi-island masterplanning in this tropical paradise.

PHARMACEUTICAL R&D CENTRE, CHINA

90

Cutting-edge workplace design as a catalyst for corporate change management.

ETHOS, POLAND

93

First of a kind, prestigious retail and workplace destination on Warsaw's 'Royal Route'.

PLAZA BOCAGRANDE, COLOMBIA

94

Waterside mixed-use scheme evoking the glamour of Cartagena de Indias' International Film Festival.

PARQUE OESTE, COLOMBIA

95

Retail architecture inspired by terraced valleys, rivers and rocky landscapes.

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GLOBAL

HAIKOU, CHINA

100 Chapman Taylor  ACHIEVEMENTS ISSUE 04

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MASTERPLANNING | MIXED USE | RETAIL | LEISURE | RESIDENTIAL | HOSPITALITY

GLOBAL 100

HAIKOU, CHINA

Global 100 is a mixed-use, leisure, retail, hospitality and residential scheme based in the city of Haikou on Hainan Island, China. This ambitious scheme occupies a 400-hectare site and combines hotel, retail and entertainment facilities alongside a 170-hectare theme park containing attractions influenced by international filmmaking from Europe, China and America. Chapman Taylor has been appointed to undertake the overall masterplanning of the project, as well as the planning of 6 national film-themed villages. These villages occupy a 70-hectare site and each represent the countries of China, the Netherlands, England, Italy, Spain, 78

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Germany and Switzerland. Chapman Taylor developed the overall masterplan for all the villages, as well as providing the concept and architectural design for those representing China and England. The concept of the Chinese Village draws on the ancient Loulan kingdom or “ancient desert city” and features twin towers housing a major entertainment facility at the centre of the design. A waterfront component features a fishing village, an indoor street and the giant ship from the legendary story of “Zheng He’s Expedition”. All these elements work together to create an impression of “The Great Silk Road” journey.

For the English village, film characters including James Bond 007, Alice in Wonderland and Mr. Bean have been juxtaposed with English cultural and architectural icons such as historic castles, traditional country villages and markets. Elements have also been drawn from the country’s important industrial heritage. In addition, bespoke studio facilities are being developed, creating a best‑in-class base for film and television businesses involved in everything from animation and special effects to skills and industry education. The client’s objective is to create a new world-class flagship for the film and


GLOBAL 100 IS WITHOUT DOUBT AN UNPRECEDENTED PROJECT THAT IS SET TO RIVAL EXISTING GLOBALLY FAMOUS ATTRACTIONS OFFERED BY DISNEY AND OTHER ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY LEADERS

GLOBAL 100: FAST FACTS • • • •

400-hectare site 170-hectare theme park 38 billion yuan investment Phase 1 completion 2016

television industry, attracting interest from both businesses and consumers. In addition to the theme park, villages and the production facilities there will be a resort hotel covering an area of 60 hectares. This hotel will contain integrated retail facilities as well as a spa inspired by the volcanic natural environment of Hainan. The whole project is being developed in two phases. Phase 1, consisting of the theme park, is predicted to open to the public in 2016. Global 100 is without doubt an unprecedented project that, upon completion, is set to rival existing globally famous attractions such as those offered by Disney and other entertainment industry leaders.

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MASTERPLANNING | MIXED USE | RETAIL | LEISURE | WORKPLACE | RESIDENTIAL | HOSPITALITY

BRENT CROSS LONDON, UK A £1 billion redevelopment of the existing Brent Cross shopping centre is the first phase of the £4 billion Cricklewood regeneration project. It will create a new town centre for the regeneration of Cricklewood, an area in north-west London. The original shopping centre, opened in 1976, was the first out-of-town, stand‑alone retail scheme in the UK and currently has one of the largest incomes per unit area of retail space in the country. Chapman Taylor has developed a comprehensive mixed‑use masterplan for the shopping centre, as part of the overall Brent Cross Cricklewood masterplan conceived by Allies and Morrison. Intended to regenerate and revitalise the existing shopping centre, the scheme aims to breathe new life into its surrounding communities, whilst at the same time addressing a challenging site and environmental considerations. The new scheme will comprise 78,000m2 of new shops, including two new department stores, a new restaurant and leisure quarter, four hundred homes, two parks, two hotels, 5,500m2 of offices plus new car parks and improvements to transport links including a new world-class bus station. These will be set around new 80

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streets, landscaping and a riverside park along the River Brent which lies within the site. The project includes moving the river and creating eight new road bridges that cross it, as well as five new bridges that pass over the North Circular Road, a major 25.7 mile long gyratory road which bisects the north of London.

THE SCHEME WAS GRANTED PLANNING PERMISSION IN JULY 2014, WITH LONDON’S MAYOR, BORIS JOHNSON, DESCRIBING IT AS ‘A LANDMARK MOMENT’ THAT ‘LOOKS TO TRANSFORM BRENT CROSS CRICKLEWOOD At the heart of Brent Cross will be a new town square hosting experiential events and activities. It is surrounded by multi-level retail that links to a rooftop restaurant and leisure quarter. It is proposed that this new square be linked to the new town centre in the southern regeneration area, via a landscaped civic

space – ‘the Living Bridge’. The intention is for the bridge to provide a seamless connection between the two centres, whilst at the same time enabling an essential access route for pedestrians and cyclists over the busy North Circular Road. This unprecedented project will provide a catalyst for rejuvenating a major portion of north London. The scheme was granted planning permission in July 2014, with London’s Mayor, Boris Johnson, describing it as ‘a landmark moment’ that ‘looks to transform Brent Cross Cricklewood into one of the premier places to live, work and visit in the capital’. The design of the Living Bridge is a partnership between Chapman Taylor, URS - the Bridge engineers, and MacGregor Smith Landscape Architects. It is envisaged as a sculpture with plates folding out to form viewing portals to the River Garden and to the south. The Bridge is both functional and at the same time a unique city garden space. This seamless connection is an important catalyst for the area’s regeneration. Towards the end of 2014, Chapman Taylor will be commencing the concept design of the individual buildings and streets with MacGregor Smith, RTKL and other architects.


BRENT CROSS CRICKLEWOOD: ILLUSTRATIVE MASTERPLAN Sturgess Park

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112 110 Brent Cross Shopping Centre

109 107

106

treet High S

108 CHP

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North 104

Brent Cross Main Square

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River

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Brent

New Brent Cross Bus Station

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Office District Park Tower Square

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Station Square

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New Thameslink Station

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Brent Cross LUL Station Square

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Whitefield Street 69

High Street South

Eastern Park

Market Square

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3 School & Education Campus

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65 66

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Station Square

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64 Whitefield Square

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New Waste Handling Facility

42 53 New All Weather Sports Pitches

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Spine Road North

Clitterhouse Stream Nature Park

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52 39 54

Existing Football Ground 38

51 Clitterhouse Playing Fields

Claremont Primary School

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46 82

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New Rail Freight Facility

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Gas Govenor Square

OVERALL MASTERPLAN CONCEIVED BY ALLIES AND MORRISON

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ont

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THE LIVING BRIDGE 35

BRENT CROSS

Millennium Green

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0 10 M

100 M

Cricklewood Station Square

1 KM

Allies and Morrison Architects

BRENT CROSS CRICKLEWOOD

BX Cricklewood Site Plan 649_SK_00_309 SCALE 1 : 2000

@ A0

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MIXED USE | RETAIL | LEISURE | HOSPITALITY

THE 400 SHOPS WILL INCLUDE THE WORLD’S LEADING POWERHOUSE AND LUXURY BRANDS AND AN EXCITING ARRAY OF FOOD, BEVERAGE AND ENTERTAINMENT FACILITIES, MAKING THIS THE PREMIER DESTINATION IN QATAR.

MALL OF

QATAR

DOHA, QATAR Set to be Qatar’s first super-regional shopping centre, the Mall of Qatar is a world-class retail and entertainment destination located 20 minutes from the centre of Doha in the Al Rayyan Village. With a total build area of 388,000m2 the development sits at the intersection of the Al Rayyan Highway and Celebration Road, adjacent to the popular Al Rayyan Sports Club and a future FIFA 2022 World Cup Stadium. The Mall will have over 162,000m2 of retail leasable space on 3 levels, in addition to underground and surface parking for 7,000 cars. The 400 shops will include the world’s leading powerhouse and luxury brands and an exciting array of food, beverage and entertainment facilities, making this the premier destination in Qatar. A large proportion of the Mall’s façade has been devoted to shop fronts and animated signage, along with engaging cafes, lush landscaping and water.

One of the major distinguishing features of the scheme design will be a 3-storey high, sophisticated urban-lifestyle market place running the full length of the central spine. This area, with its vaulted glass ceiling, opens out into a breath-taking central amphitheatre called “The Oasis”. With its impressive domed roof, this space will become the heart of the scheme and the overall visitor experience. Chapman Taylor’s Madrid office is also undertaking the architectural concept and detailed design services for a major five-star hotel and a signature restaurant, directly adjacent and connected to the Mall of Qatar. Also intended is a dedicated Metro Station, which will be integrated into the centre as part of Doha's new transportation system. This will enable unrivalled access to the Mall of Qatar from Doha and the surrounding regions. The scheme is planned to open in late 2015, with an estimated 20 million customers anticipated annually. Chapman Taylor  ACHIEVEMENTS ISSUE 04

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MASTERPLANNING | MIXED USE | WATERSIDE

HUANGPU RIVER MASTERPLAN SHANGHAI, CHINA

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OUR SHANGHAI TEAM DESIGNED A MASTERPLAN THAT PROVIDES A TRULY MIXED‑USE, SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY… A WORLD LEADING ENVIRONMENT CONTAINING A RICH AND DIVERSE MIX OF LIVING, WORKING AND LEISURE ACTIVITIES

In March 2012 Chapman Taylor’s Shanghai office won a prestigious international competition to design a world-class business district for the city. Covering an area of 280 hectares, the site, fronting the Huangpu River in central Shanghai, surrounds the existing Oriental Sports Centre facilities, which the design had to incorporate. In response to the client’s brief, our Shanghai team designed a masterplan that provides a truly mixed-use, sustainable community with integrated modern transport solutions. A world-leading

environment is created, containing a rich and diverse mix of living, working and leisure activities. Using a hierarchical transport network of roads, tramways, cycle and pedestrian routes the masterplan establishes a series of neighbourhoods, each containing a mix of office, retail, education and hospitality facilities arranged around open parks and waterways. A maximum walking distance of 400m is used as the basis for all planning requirements, dictating the placing of all amenities and creating a truly sustainable living environment for all users.

The scheme shares much common ground with MediaCityUK in Manchester, which opened in 2011 and for which Chapman Taylor continues to provide ongoing masterplanning and design services. The outstanding sustainable principles were developed according to BREEAM Sustainable Communities guidance and includes a Tri-Gen plant. The proposal also incorporates a comprehensive media production and broadcast facility providing Shanghai with a centralised, modern and world-leading media hub.

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MIXED USE | RETAIL | LEISURE

OPEN SAINT-GENIS-POUILLY, FRANCE

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Open is an innovative mixed-use destination for shopping, leisure, sport and rest currently under construction in Saint-Genis-Pouilly, a town located in Eastern France near the Swiss border, at the foot of the Jura mountains. This impressively designed landmark project has remarkable architecture and is covered by an “intelligent roof” which perfectly integrates into the landscape and generates spectacular views of the Alps and Jura mountains.


THIS IMPRESSIVELY DESIGNED LANDMARK PROJECT HAS REMARKABLE ARCHITECTURE AND IS COVERED BY AN “INTELLIGENT ROOF” WHICH PERFECTLY INTEGRATES INTO THE LANDSCAPE AND GENERATES SPECTACULAR VIEWS OF THE ALPS AND JURA MOUNTAINS.

Designed by Chapman Taylor’s Paris office, the project sits on a natural sloping site so has been developed on two levels with the lower level, which hosts the car park and feature garden, recessed into the terrain. The garden forms a central focus to the scheme and shopping area, with elevators, ramps and pedestrian travelators incorporated into its landscape design. The higher level contains the main retail area as well as another car park. Further terraces, a large canopy

and pedestrian walkways are merged within the minimalist architecture. Sustainability and environmental concerns have been a driving force behind the architectural design. The building will host a dramatic roof cover, a ‘smart’ awning capable of regulating temperature, filtering natural light, collecting rain water and through its photovoltaic systems, producing its own energy. The roof is wound around a central disc with a canopy between

the two, allowing natural light into the mall. Its overall form is inspired by CERN, the European Organisation for Nuclear Research and its Large Hadron Collider, which is based nearby in Switzerland. The scheme has a very high HQE (High Environmental Quality) profile – the French equivalent of the BREEAM sustainability assessment. As such, Open is seen as a ‘zero-energy project’ and is the first scheme of this kind in its category in France. Chapman Taylor  ACHIEVEMENTS ISSUE 04

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MASTERPLANNING | MIXED USE | LEISURE | RESIDENTIAL | HOSPITALITY

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THE VISION INTERPRETS THE COLOURS, LANDSCAPE AND AMBIENCE OF ANTIGUA TO PRODUCE A VERY SPECIAL PLACE, FULLY INTEGRATED WITH THE ENVIRONMENT.

ISLAND PARADISE RESORT ANTIGUA As part of their wider masterplan created for the Island Paradise Resort in Antigua, in the Caribbean, Chapman Taylor was asked to create a series of luxury beach villa designs. These villas formed an integral part of the project, which encompassed four islands of varying size and large peninsula areas on the mainland of Antigua. All the sites had extensive coastlines of mangrove and beach-lined waterfront.

A number of villa types and sizes were created, ranging from a more traditional to highly contemporary style. The designs were moderated according to the particular sea views, climatic conditions and exceptional landscape present on each of the islands and the mainland sites. The whole concept was carefully conceived to integrate the new villas and development into the existing sites and celebrate the natural and

extensive tropical landscape. Overall, the vision interprets the colours, landscape and ambience of Antigua to produce a very special place, fully integrated with the environment. The villas are part of a project which is the largest mixed-use development proposal in the whole of the West Indies. It is a key ingredient in determining the future prosperity of Antigua and its status as a world-class destination.

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WORKPLACE

PHARMACEUTICAL R&D CENTRE

SHANGHAI, CHINA

This concept design for a new R&D ‘Beacon’ project for a major pharmaceuticals company combines the latest concepts in laboratory planning and flexible collaborative working environments. Arranged over three floors, surrounding a central atrium, the 15,000m2 of accommodation, comprises specialist research laboratories, scientific and non-scientific business support offices, a flexible multi-function auditorium, restaurant, café, shops and general support facilities. In conjunction with the client, Chapman Taylor’s Shanghai office conducted the early briefing stages for 90

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THE 4 STAGES OF THE SOFT LANDINGS APPROACH: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Functionality and Effectiveness Environmental Facilities Management Commissioning, Training & Handover

what is now known as ‘Soft Landings’ – a relatively new concept that applies a holistic approach to the build project life cycle. A detailed concept design was created in response to the completion of stages 1 and 2 of the Soft Landings

IT WAS PARAMOUNT THAT THE DESIGN TEAM GAINED AN IN-DEPTH UNDERSTANDING OF HOW STAFF WORKED AND WHAT THEIR ASPIRATIONS WERE approach, assessing the functionality, effectiveness and environmental factors. End-user engagement formed a crucial

THE PROJECT PROVIDED A DIVERSE AND NOVEL SET OF CHALLENGES, PITCHING THE CHAPMAN TAYLOR TEAM IN AT THE FOREFRONT OF A CORPORATE CHANGE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY

part of the analysis, with regular laboratory visits and staff consultations. It was paramount that the design team gained an in-depth understanding of how staff worked and what their aspirations were. This had to be finely balanced with the overall corporate aspirations of the client. The client’s innovative corporate blueprint for laboratory design was a pivotal factor driving the initial analysis stages. Aimed at increasing productivity, creativity and efficiency, the blueprint outlined solutions that improved knowledge-sharing, the public display of staff work, enabled flexibility for future‑proofing and improved resource allocation. Other design references included a report created by an innovation consultancy which outlined recommended concepts to improve the visibility, communication and interaction

amongst staff and scientists from different disciplines. The provision of on-site shops, gardens and a concierge service were also suggested as solutions to encourage staff to achieve a better work-life balance. The project provided a diverse and novel set of challenges, pitching the Chapman Taylor team in at the forefront of a corporate change management strategy and educating staff as to proposed new ways of working.

LEED GOLD AND 3-STAR RATING Sustainability, with an emphasis on energy reduction, was a key aspiration for the project. At the end of Concept stage the design was on course to meet the desired LEED Gold & Chinese 3-Star ratings.

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MIXED USE | RETAIL | WORKPLACE

UPON COMPLETION OF ETHOS IN 2016, THREE CROSSES SQUARE WILL BECOME THE MOST RECOGNISABLE AND DESIRABLE ADDRESS IN WARSAW AND THE ONLY ONE OF SUCH CLASS ON THE ROYAL ROUTE.

ETHOS

WARSAW, POLAND Ethos is a prestigious mixed-use, retail and office scheme on the historic Royal Route in Warsaw, the capital city of Poland. Upon completion in 2016, it will redefine Warsaw’s Three Crosses Square that is located in the heart of the city, adjacent to the Warsaw Stock Exchange and Polish Parliament. Chapman Taylor’s Warsaw office is providing turnkey architectural services relating to the retail and office public spaces of the project, which is being undertaken for the client Kulczyk Silverstein Properties. These include interior design and commercial advisory for the expansion and refurbishment of the existing building, which aims to become Warsaw’s first truly high-end retail and fashion destination. Luxury and premium brands of both Polish and international origin will be accommodated within boutique spaces that will open up to Three Crosses Square through impressive glazed window shop fronts almost 8 metres high. Mezzanine flooring options are also provided to maximise commercial retail space potential as well as underground parking facilities.

The c.17 000m2 project includes the addition of a new 5-storey office extension on the east side of the property towards the Vistula River. Two separate entrance lobbies are provided for class 'A' office space tenants as well as six dedicated elevators. Management of the office complex will

be assisted by a state of the art Building Management System, which will monitor heating devices and air ventilation to ensure the highest possible levels of energy efficiency. Sustainability is a focal theme to the development, with all work being carried out to achieve BREEAM Excellent rating.

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MIXED USE | RETAIL | LEISURE | HOSPITALITY

PLAZA BOCAGRANDE

CARTAGENA, COLOMBIA This world-class, mixed-use complex in the hotel district of Cartagena de Indias provides a mix of residential, commercial and leisure spaces within a unique, film-inspired concept. Chapman Taylor’s Madrid and Bogotá offices have been appointed to support the scheme development through the provision of the façade, architecture and interior designs. The 11,900m2 commercial area includes a shopping mall comprising of 90 shops, a VIP cinema, gym, food 94

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court and restaurants. The complex also includes a Hyatt Regency hotel and convention centre plus ample parking. The design concept, both exterior and interior, is inspired by the important and famous international cinema festival that takes place every year in Cartagena de Indias. A dynamic and glamorous finish will be communicated through the materials chosen and colour contrasts created. Overall, the design concept, coupled

with the project’s size and location makes this scheme a new highlight destination for the area and one that will contribute strongly to local tourism. The project was originally developed by Daniel Bonilla, a well‑known Colombian Architect. Phase 1 of the project, which includes the retail and leisure aspect, has been completed and opened in October 2014. Phase 2 is under construction and is scheduled for completion in 2015.


RETAIL | LEISURE THE ARCHITECTURE TAKES ADVANTAGE OF THE TERRACED VALLEY LOCATION AND DRAWS REFERENCE FROM THE LOCAL, ROCKY LANDSCAPE.

PARQUE OESTE

CALI, COLOMBIA Parque Oeste will be an innovative, large‑scale retail mall in Cali, a city in western Colombia near the foothills of the Cauca Valley. Located close to the University in the city centre, the scheme is specifically designed to merge seamlessly into its locality and respond to the natural, green environment that characterises much of the city. Chapman Taylor’s Madrid and Bogotá offices have been appointed to provide architecture and interior

design services for the 110,000m2 project, which includes 186 retail units, a supermarket, cinema, children’s park and food court alongside 5,000m2 of green space. The architecture takes advantage of the terraced valley location and draws reference from the local, rocky landscape. The rivers of the city, which are held in high regard by Cali residents, are also a strong influence on the design through the inclusion of multiple cascading water features.

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FEATURES BRISTOL NEW VENTURE

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Associate Directors Nick Thursby and Jonathan Bethel answer questions about our new UK office in Bristol.

INSPIRING CREATIVE PRACTICE

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Associate Director Cathy Jeremiah discusses Chapman Taylor's internal design competition.

SHOOTING STARS

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The top-placed images in Chapman Taylor's annual staff photography competition.

FROM GRADUATE TO ARCHITECT

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Rob Griffiths in our London office talks about life as a newly-qualified architect.

LIFE THROUGH A LENS

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Associate Director Ben Ghibaldan on the challenges of photographing architecture.

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BRISTOL

NEW VENTURE 98

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IMAGE BY LAURA-LEIGH BESSELL

OPENING AN OFFICE IN BRISTOL GIVES CHAPMAN TAYLOR A MORE COMPREHENSIVE COVER OF THE UK AND ALLOWS US TO EXPLORE OPPORTUNITIES AND NEW BUSINESS WITH CLIENTS WHO VALUE A LOCAL OFFICE AND UNDERSTANDING.


RIGHT: NICK THURSBY, ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR FAR RIGHT: JONATHAN BETHEL ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR

WITH A HEAD OFFICE IN LONDON THAT OPENED IN 1959, AND THEN THE OPENING OF A MANCHESTER OFFICE IN 2000 CHAPMAN TAYLOR HAS MAINTAINED A STRONG PRESENCE IN THE UK. ASSOCIATE DIRECTORS NICK THURSBY AND JONATHAN BETHEL ARE BEHIND THE PRACTICE'S LATEST UK OFFICE VENTURE, IN THE CITY OF BRISTOL. HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN AT CHAPMAN TAYLOR?

WHAT HAVE BEEN SOME OF YOUR KEY ACHIEVEMENTS?

Nick: Since 1999. I started out as a student before becoming a Project Architect and running jobs on-site. I was made an Associate Director in July 2006.

Nick: I was involved in the design of PrincessHay and Cabot Circus, which are major retail and mixed-use schemes in the south-west of England. However, beyond that I’ve also had the chance to work on some smaller, more bespoke schemes which I’ve enjoyed, and the more recent opportunity to establish a new office.

Jonathan: Since 2000. I became an Associate Director in 2007, after starting out as a Project Architect.

WHAT WOULD YOU SAY ARE YOUR MAIN AREAS OF EXPERTISE? Nick: I work mostly on mixed-use developments, urban regeneration and masterplanning but I am also a BREEAM Assessor and led the establishment of our certified Environmental Management System. One of my key objectives is to always provide good, responsible, sustainable designs that are appropriate to their surroundings. You can’t just put a wind turbine on something and call it sustainable. Jonathan: I specialise in mixed-use schemes and urban regeneration and have been involved in projects of varying sizes. I firmly believe that quality design needs to be embedded in a project from the start. I also have good experience in the appropriate use of materials, particularly at the detailed design stage.

Jonathan: I’ve been involved in some key UK projects for Chapman Taylor but some of the ones I’m most proud of would include PrincessHay in Exeter, Cabot Circus in Bristol, SouthGate in Bath plus the Royal Exchange in Belfast. Now my focus is on building the profile of our Bristol office.

WHAT DO YOU CONSIDER TO BE THE KEY AREAS OF OPPORTUNITY FOR CHAPMAN TAYLOR IN BRISTOL? Nick: Opening an office in Bristol gives Chapman Taylor a more comprehensive coverage of the UK and allows us to explore opportunities and new business with clients who value a local office and understanding. We have worked on some very successful projects in the surrounding areas and many of our clients appreciate the need for, and benefits of a regional business approach. Further

to this, Bristol is fast becoming a hub for sustainable design which fits well with Chapman Taylor’s experience in the area. From a personal point of view it’s a particularly exciting opportunity as I was born and raised in Bristol so I have good local knowledge and appreciation, which is always a key benefit. Jonathan: Bristol is ideally located to serve the entire south-west of the UK including southern Wales and many parts of the south coast while still only being 1hr 40mins from London by train. This means that we can work locally with clients and consultants but still have a strong connection with the London head office and our clients based there. Not only that, the new office gives us great scope to explore different sectors of work including smaller, more bespoke, mixed-use schemes. nthursby@chapmantaylor.com jbethel@chapmantaylor.com

KEY CHAPMAN TAYLOR PROJECTS IN THE AREA • • • • •

Cabot Circus, Bristol PrincessHay, Exeter SouthGate, Bath St Davids, Cardiff Drake Circus, Plymouth

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INSPIRING

CREATIVE PRACTICE

INSPIRING A GREAT DESIGN ETHOS AMONGST OUR STAFF IS A KEY OBJECTIVE FOR CHAPMAN TAYLOR. CATHY JEREMIAH, ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR IN OUR LONDON OFFICE, TALKS ABOUT CHAPMAN TAYLOR’S INTERNAL DESIGN COMPETITION AND THE WINNING 2013 ENTRY.

T

he most successful architectural solutions are those that set out to fully interrogate the brief and respond with a solution that is both creative and commercially sensitive. With this in mind, how should architectural practices inspire and encourage a strong design ethos within the office? Chapman Taylor organises several initiatives to encourage all our staff to create, communicate and connect with each other

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and more importantly with our clients. Our staff photography and design competitions are each run on an annual basis and aim to attract the very best creative entries from across our global office network. The 2013 Design Competition proved to be a true test of the architectural design skill held within the company. Staff were challenged, either individually or as teams, to respond to a fictional competition brief to design a new City Garden Bridge. The

ABOVE: CATHY JEREMIAH, DESIGN COMPETITION ORGANISER.

bridge was proposed as a solution to re-connect two mixed-use developments divided by a major motorway, providing a ‘public space in the sky’ and creating a ‘seamless connection for pedestrians crossing from one side to the other’. Whilst the competition brief was fictional, the criteria that needed to be met were demanding and set the bar high for the standard of entry. Successful entries had to clearly demonstrate well-considered


THE CHALLENGE IS NOW TO ENSURE THAT THIS TALENT IS DEVELOPED TO ITS FULL POTENTIAL AND THAT ULTIMATELY IT IS TRANSLATED THROUGH TO THE CLIENT WORK WE PRODUCE.

and beautifully illustrated architectural, public realm and landscape design concepts, supported by strong rationales depicted in words, diagrams and imagery. The realities and restrictions of structural design, technical delivery and buildability also had to be considered and were scrutinised by guest judge and structural engineer Timothy Roe of Ramboll. The winning design was entitled ‘The Living Interactive Bridge’ and

THE LIVING INTERACTIVE BRIDGE: DESIGN COMPETITION WINNER

showcased what the judges felt was a truly innovative response to the brief. At the heart of the proposal was the theme of connectivity, inspired by the original brief of connecting the two separated areas of the city. This theme was cleverly transferred to the issue of generating connectivity and communication between people. This was done by incorporating a 3D adaptive skin and LED projections along the bridge, allowing pedestrians to interact as never before. It was proposed that this skin could be used as a backdrop for street theatre, a billboard for promoting community initiatives or even impart information to pedestrians’ mobile devices as they cross the bridge. All these functions would be programmable through a computer interface. For the overall structure, inspiration came from nature, with the bridge’s flexible, adaptive form drawn from both the human and snake skeleton. The ‘ribs’ allow the bridge and its various functional spaces to adapt in size accordingly. A spine of trees runs down the centre of the bridge, forming the foundation from which the landscaped offshoot areas lie. Overall, the philosophy of spine, skeleton and skin is used to enable the theme of connectivity to be translated into the bridge design. This holistic approach was seen as a well-developed concept

by the judging panel that successfully incorporated both the natural and digital world and would be the most successful solution for the two communities that the bridge ultimately had to unite. But was the winning entry given a run for its money? Absolutely. The judging panel praised many of the other submitted projects, which ranged from a design based on the biomimicry of leaf structure through to the imaginative interpretation of the bridge as a new gateway between a fictional Legoland and its new flagship Lego store… built entirely of Lego, of course! As Chair of the judging process it was important to remind the judges of the strict criteria set within the design brief, as this was an important reminder of what had to be evident within the winning submission. Alongside our photography competition, the success of the 2013 design competition has revealed the depth of creative talent residing across the Chapman Taylor Group. The challenge is now to ensure that this talent is developed to its full potential and that ultimately it is translated through to the client work we produce. From Brent Cross in London to Global Harbor in Shanghai and our Paris office’s Open scheme in France, the benefits can be felt and seen everywhere. cjeremiah@chapmantaylor.com Chapman Taylor  ACHIEVEMENTS ISSUE 04

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ROUND 1 WINNER: PASCAL JEANGOUT (PARIS OFFICE) POMPIDOU CENTRE, PARIS, FRANCE “Whenever I can, I like walking around Paris with my camera. I took this photo of the Georges Pompidou Centre around midday. The weather was rather bad, only a few rays of sunshine were lighting this singular building. I quickly realised that it would be a good picture for the theme. Good choice apparently!”

SHOOTING STARS

A

key initiative to inspire and promote creativity amongst staff, Chapman Taylor’s photography competition is now in its second year. Open to our global office network, the competition takes place over three rounds, with each adopting a particular theme. The first two rounds of the 2014 competition have been completed, focussing on architecture and urbanism, and then on 102

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landscape and nature respectively. The competition has received over 100 entries so far. Here we showcase the top-placed images, with our Paris and Brussels offices sharing the winning places to date. For each round, a client is invited to join the judging panel. The competition will complete in November 2014 with entrants invited to submit images on the final round’s theme of ‘The human body’.


ROUND 1 RUNNER-UP

ROUND 2 RUNNER-UP

Peter Hirsch (Manchester Office) Photograph taken in the Northern Quarter, Manchester, UK

Euan Courtney-Morgan (London Office) Photograph taken in Fayence, South of France

ROUND 2 WINNER: MARIIA GRACHOVA (BRUSSELS OFFICE) FISHING HUTS, TUSCANY, ITALY “Do fishermen notice the beauty that surrounds them while they are fishing? That was my first thought when I stumbled across this sight whilst on holiday. This photo shows the peace and calm of one of Tuscany’s lesser known bays. Sometimes the mistakes of a GPS system on the last day of a summer road trip and an iPhone near at hand leads to unexpected consequences.”

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FROM

GRADUATE TO

R

OBERT GRIFFITHS IS AN ARCHITECT BASED IN THE LONDON OFFICE OF CHAPMAN TAYLOR. HE RECENTLY COMPLETED HIS PART 3 AND CURRENTLY WORKS WITH THE TRANSPORTATION TEAM ON A VARIETY OF DIFFERENT PROJECTS.

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IT'S BEEN INTERESTING TO LEARN THE REQUIREMENTS OF ARCHITECTURE WITHIN SUCH A SPECIFIC SECTOR.

WHERE DID YOU STUDY? I studied at the University of Huddersfield and completed my Part 3 in 2013 at the RIBA Northwest.

WHAT LED YOU TO STUDY ARCHITECTURE? My interest in architecture grew from a very young age. Initially I was drawn to it because I watched a lot of films and always wanted to imitate places that I had seen in them.

SKETCH: HEATHROW T2A, LONDON, UK HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN WORKING AT CHAPMAN TAYLOR? WHAT INITIALLY BROUGHT YOU TO THE COMPANY?

number of different projects. It's been interesting to learn the requirements of architecture within such a specific sector.

YOU’VE RECENTLY COMPLETED YOUR PART 3, HOW DID YOU FIND TRYING TO BALANCE WORKING WHILE STUDYING?

PARK CITY, HO CHI MINH, VIETNAM

Northern Quarter, Newcastle International Airport and London Euston Station.

HAVE YOU FOUND THAT YOU LEARNT ANYTHING PARTICULAR FROM COMPLETING YOUR PART 3? HAS IT CHANGED THE WAY YOU WORK?

It has been a demanding transition and finding suitable experience to satisfy the course requirements has been a challenge for me and my fellow students. Having said that you must always make time to celebrate!

I have gained an extra sense of appreciation for the challenges that various projects face on the journey to realisation. I think completing the Part 3 changes the way everyone works by raising your awareness between a project as a whole and its detail.

WHAT TYPE OF PROJECTS DID YOU USE AS CASE STUDIES FOR YOUR PART 3?

YOUR FAVOURITE THING ABOUT BEING AN ARCHITECT?

My main case study focused on Heathrow Terminal 2 and further narrowed its scope to the Luxury Retail area which I worked on from concept stage to construction.

I get to collaborate with a diverse range of people and be a part of creating tangible things.

WHAT PROJECTS ARE YOU INVOLVED IN AT PRESENT? I am currently working on a number of different projects including Portsmouth

WHAT WOULD BE YOUR DREAM PROJECT? Any project that maintains its integrity from start to finish is a dream for me. Having said that I’d also quite like to work on a racetrack, a film-set and if ever possible, a space station!

I have been working at Chapman Taylor since 2011. Previously I had never worked for a large practice so it was an opportunity to work on a variety of projects with people from many different disciplines.

WHAT TEAM DO YOU WORK IN? I currently work in the transportation team led by Director Peter Farmer where I've had the opportunity to work on a

HEATHROW T2A. LUXURY RETAIL, LONDON, UK Chapman Taylor  ACHIEVEMENTS ISSUE 04

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LIFE THROUGH

A LENS

PHOTOGRAPHING ARCHITECTURE BY BEN GHIBALDAN 106

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MEDIACITYUK, MANCHESTER, UK

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B

EN GHIBALDAN IS AN ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR AT CHAPMAN TAYLOR AND HAS WORKED WITH THE INTERNATIONAL FEASIBILITY TEAM SINCE 2006 ON SOME OF CHAPMAN TAYLOR’S MOST SIGNIFICANT SCHEMES. WHEN BEN IS NOT DESIGNING HE CAN BE FOUND OUT PHOTOGRAPHING OUR PROJECTS ACROSS THE UK AND INTERNATIONALLY. HERE HE GIVES US AN INSIGHT INTO WHAT MAKES A GREAT ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHER.

HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN WORKING IN PHOTOGRAPHY AND WHAT LED YOU INTO ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHY? I have been working in professional photography for approximately 10 years but it has been a passion of mine for much longer than that. Having lived in London all of my life the city has formed a constant visual backdrop. It seems only natural to be drawn to photographing its architecture.

WHAT ARE THE KEY CHALLENGES FACING ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHERS? One of the key challenges is working in relatively small spaces with tall buildings. This often necessitates the use of wide

angle lenses. Careful composition is essential in these cases to ensure a natural looking perspective. One way to approach this is to get close to an element in the foreground, perhaps from a low viewpoint, and use it to draw the eye into the image Possibly the biggest challenge facing the architectural photographer is that of dynamic range (the range of brightest to darkest parts of the image). Typically the sky is very bright in relation to the rest of the image. One method is to use a filter in front of your lens. When photographing at night it is often not possible to control the brightest elements of the image with a filter. In this case it is

LEFT: BEN GHIBALDEN, PHOTOGRAPHER AND ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR AT CHAPMAN TAYLOR.

important to understand the limitations of the camera’s dynamic range. With careful post-production or blending of several different exposures you can ensure the scene is captured faithfully.

WOULD YOU SAY THAT THE PHOTOGRAPHY OF COMMERCIAL ARCHITECTURE HAS ITS OWN SET OF UNIQUE CHALLENGES? Absolutely! The key aspect to successfully capturing a commercially-led scheme is that of people interacting with the buildings. The worst thing you can do is show an empty-looking retail centre. My favoured time of year for commercial photography is during the autumn/early

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TRINITY KITCHEN, LEEDS, UK

THE KEY ASPECT TO SUCCESSFULLY CAPTURING A COMMERCIALLY-LED SCHEME IS THAT OF PEOPLE INTERACTING WITH THE BUILDINGS. THE WORST THING YOU CAN DO IS SHOW AN EMPTY-LOOKING RETAIL CENTRE. winter and spring time as the retail centres are usually still open when the light is at its best. The challenge is making sure the people look like they are moving. To do this you must set the right shutter speed to convey the right amount of movement. Overcoming the mixed lighting sources used in commercial schemes requires a great deal of skill, especially in the post production stage. It is essential to shoot in ‘RAW’ format which allows for a great deal of adjustment at the processing stage to ensure the image looks natural.

DO YOU USE ANY SPECIALISED EQUIPMENT TO GAIN GREATER CONTROL OVER YOUR PERFORMANCE? My 17mm and 24mm tilt and shift lenses form the backbone of my kit for architectural photography. Both of these are wide angle lenses that afford complete control over perspective correction

and focus. They also deliver extremely high‑quality images but do require a lot of technical skill to use properly. Another important part of the kit is my filter system which is important in controlling exposure. For example, graduated filters allow me to reduce the brightness of part of an image, such as the sky, to balance the exposure in camera accurately.

from the Imperial War Museum North. During October and March the sun sets in the perfect position to illuminate the canal-facing side of the scheme and light rakes across the water. It really does show off the scheme to its very best. I also enjoyed photographing Trinity Leeds. Capturing the vibrancy of the main space with its beautiful grid shell roof was tricky, but produced great results.

WHAT HAVE BEEN SOME OF YOUR FAVOURITE PROJECTS TO PHOTOGRAPH FOR CHAPMAN TAYLOR? WHY? My favourite project to photograph so far has been MediaCityUK. I have had the opportunity to photograph the scheme several times at various stages of completion and also seen it from inside and out. The site itself is in a fantastic location by the Salford Quays in Manchester. This provides a great water and canal-side setting, directly across

ALLEE SHOPPING CENTRE, BUDAPEST, HUNGARY Chapman Taylor  ACHIEVEMENTS ISSUE 04

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INNOVATIVE AND SUCCESSFUL DESTINATIONS We are a multi-award winning international practice of architects, masterplanners and interior designers. Our global team has world‑beating experience in Retail, Mixed-use, Hospitality and Leisure, Workplace and Residential building design. Working from 17 locations across Europe, Asia and South America, our mission is to produce commercial architecture of excellence and the world’s most successful destinations. To learn more about our work or to contact your regional office, please visit our website:

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