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Prepared by:

In Association with:

Abacus Project Management Togawa Smith Martin Residential, Inc. Bennitt Design Group DRC Engineering, Inc.

FILMMAKER’S VILLAGE May 2011


Executive Summary Project Site

Project Location

Chapman University Specific Plan Area

The 3.5-acre Filmmaker’s Village project site is located on Shaffer Street

the Chapman University campus in the City of Orange and is Grand Street

Orange Street

Rose Avenue

University Drive

Center Street

Glassell Street

Olive Street

Lemon Street

Cypress Street

Railroad to the west. The Orange Transportation Center, which is located to the south on Atchison Street. Regional access to the

Sycamore Avenue

Amtrak/Metrolink Railroad

to the south, N. Cypress Street to the east, and the SF & AF provides Metrolink/Amtrak rail services and OCTA bus services,

Walnut Avenue

Filmmaker’s Village project site is available from four freeways: Orange Freeway (Route 57), Garden Grove Freeway (Route 22), Costa Mesa Freeway (Route 55) and Riverside Freeway (Route 91). Local access to the property is available from N. Cypress Street, W. Palm Avenue and W. Maple Avenue. The Filmmaker’s Village project is located on the site of the former Anaconda Wire & Cable Company complex. The project proposes to preserve portions of the complex, while

Palm Avenue

constructing three new dormitory buildings that will be used to provide housing for film students. The dormitories will be three stories in height and will provide 397 beds. A minimum of 358 parking spaces will be provided in a new parking garage to be Maple Avenue

Atchison Street

Parker Street

bounded by W. Palm Avenue to the north, W. Maple Avenue

PROJECT SITE

Chapman Avenue

constructed on-site. The project site is located in the Chapman University Specific Plan area and within the Old Towne District. Implementation of the project will require approvals of Major Site Plan Review,

The Plaza

Design Review, Variance, and Demolition Review requests.

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Project Description

Project Background

universal challenge by developing new and innovative student

create variety and visual interest, while reinforcing the pedestrian

The Filmmaker’s Village project is located on the site of the

housing solutions. By providing more on-campus housing,

scale found in Old Towne Orange.

former California Wire & Cable Company building, which later

the University will continue to convert some of the current

became part of the Anaconda Wire & Cable Company. The

commuting students to residents, thereby reducing traffic on

The three dormitory buildings will total approximately 169,835

subject property is listed on the National Register of Historic

area streets, particularly during peak morning and afternoon

square feet, in size and include the following unit types:

Places and on the California Register of Historical Resources

traffic periods. Students who live on campus also tend to be

• 5 bedrooms/2 baths - 1,706 sf (17 units, 85 beds total)

as a contributing resource to the Old Towne Orange Historic

more involved in campus life and the community. As of fall

• 4 bedrooms/2 baths - 1,484 sf (3 units, 12 beds total)

District, and is also a contributor to the City of Orange’s locally

2010, approximately 1,340 undergraduate and graduate Chapman

• 4 bedrooms/2 baths - 1,300 sf (74 units, 296 beds total)

designated Old Towne District. Recognizing the complex’s

University students were taking classes in the Dodge College of

• 2 bedrooms/1 bath - 797 sf (2 units, 4 beds total)

significance to the industrial heritage of Orange, Chapman

Film and Media Arts. The intent of Filmmaker’s Village is to

University is committed to retain and restore the southeastern

provide housing for a portion of these students.

section of the building (currently used as the University’s Entertainment Technology Center, or ETC), the entire south

Each unit will contain a living room and compact kitchen with dining area for use by residents of the unit.

New Student Housing

building façade along W. Maple Avenue, and a portion of the

The Filmmaker’s Village project will provide up to 397 beds in 96

Commissary Building

east building façade along N. Cypress Street (herein referred

units in three separate 3-story dormitory buildings located in the

The existing ETC building, which dates back originally to 1922,

to as the “Baja” building facade after its former tenant, Baja

northern portion of the site. The 397 beds will be distributed as

will be preserved and restored by Chapman University to as

Shop Motor Sports). The remaining portions of the building

follows:

close to its original appearance as possible. The building will be

will be demolished because they are either in poor condition or

• Building A (closest to N. Cypress Street): 103 beds

retrofitted inside to contain the Commissary, which will include

were constructed outside of the period of historic significance.

• Building B (the center building): 168 beds

a food service/restaurant. In addition, the building will contain

The design of Filmmaker’s Village recognizes and respects the

• Building C (closest to the railroad tracks): 126 beds

a grand living room, meeting rooms, gym, multi-purpose room, and other support uses. A loading/unloading zone will be

industrial heritage of the site. The proposed new buildings have been designed with an industrial character compatible with the

In addition to three above-ground levels, one of the buildings

preserved building on-site and the surrounding neighborhood.

(Building B - the center building) will also have a basement,

located on the east side of the building ─ on N. Cypress Street.

which will contain residential units. The three buildings will

Parking Garage

College campuses throughout the nation are faced with limited

be connected by exterior staircases and two elevators. The

A new parking garage is planned at the southwestern corner of

land resources. Chapman University has responded to this

residential buildings are designed with pop-outs and insets to

the site, adjacent to the preserved Anaconda building and the

May 2011

Filmmaker’s Village

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Project Description

railroad tracks. This garage will accommodate a minimum of

border. Evergreen Australian Willow trees will provide shade in

of the site along the railroad/Metrolink line will be planted with

358 parking spaces in three levels above grade and one-and-a-

the courtyards. Along the perimeter of the courtyards, plantings

Blue Palo Verde trees for solar control and aesthetics.

half levels below grade. The entry/exit to the parking garage will

of native, drought tolerant plants will enhance and accentuate the

be mid-block on N. Cypress Street, opposite a proposed future

courtyard experience. Perimeter fencing will secure the safety

The Commissary Building Garden

vehicular entry/exit on the University’s Marion Knott Studios

and privacy of the students in the dormitory and courtyard areas.

Directly adjacent to the north side of the Commissary building,

site.

an intimate outdoor garden is planned to accommodate outdoor Orange Grove Gathering Area

dining for a new restaurant to be provided in the Commissary

Project Landscape Design

The northeast corner of the project site (at the intersection of

building. This space will be defined by low walls at its perimeter,

The planned landscape associated with the Filmmaker’s Village

W. Palm Avenue and N. Cypress Street) will be designed to recall

as well as California Sycamore trees for shade and scale. The

affirms the legacy and tradition of the Chapman Campus and

the citrus packing industry that formerly thrived in Old Towne

bike parking, tables and chairs, shade umbrellas and enhanced

open space and the evolving West Campus development. It

Orange. A small Valencia Orange tree grove will be established

plantings promise to make this dining area an important

embraces the existing heritage of the site to dramatically

along with corten steel raised planters, low seatwalls, and gravel

gathering area on campus.

transform it into not only student residences, but also a gateway

paving. Tables, chairs and benches will be provided to encourage

to the Chapman University campus. Filmmaker’s Village

spontaneous student gatherings and activities.

provides a welcoming new street edge with appropriately scaled

Filmmakers Village Main Entry

Immediately north of the Commissary garden is the main

buildings, inviting indoor and outdoor dining restaurant facilities,

Cypress Street, Maple and Palm Avenue Landscape Edges

entrance to the site for both vehicular and pedestrian access.

and the renovated, historic Commissary building. The landscape

The plan incorporates a single row of evergreen canopy

The entry paving will consist of precast pavers with enhanced

design for the project incorporates a unique palette that respects

Camphor trees along N. Cypress Street, Sweet Gums along W.

concrete bands and borders. A mountable curb on both sides

and celebrates the agricultural and industrial heritage of the site,

Maple Avenue, and Southern Magnolias along W. Palm Avenue

of the drive will assist with directing traffic to the parking

including the use of materials such as gravel surfacing, drought

in the parkway area adjacent to the sidewalk, as required by the

garage. In addition, a narrow paved area with the same paving

tolerant plant material, Valencia Orange tree groves, and railroad

Chapman University Master Landscape Plan. The trees will be

will extend to the Commissary main entry to facilitate deliveries

and former building remnant installations on the site.

planned to reinforce the pedestrian scale of the area, provide

and special event functions. On the opposite side of the drive, a

shade, and serve as privacy screening for the dormitories. The

fire access lane will manage water runoff infiltration for the site.

Dormitory Courtyards

City sidewalk wraps the edges of the site paralleling the street

The fire lane will have reinforced gravel paving with intermittent

Two courtyards will be provided between the dormitory

and is set behind the 5’ parkway. Additionally, the western edge

linear strips of low meadow grass plantings. Bike parking areas

buildings, which will have gravel paving with a concrete band

adjacent to the fire lane will be available for student use.

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Conceptual Site Plan Gravel with Groundcover in Strips

Private Courtyards

Entrances to Commissary

Entrance to Commissary Outdoor Dining Area

Building Access Orange Tree Grove Garage Entry / Exit with Enhanced Paving

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The Future Commissary Building’s Southeastern Façade (As It Appears Today)

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Illustration - Southeastern Façade Viewed From Maple Ave./Cypress St. Intersection (“After” Condition)

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Illustration - Southern Façade Viewed From Orange Transportation Center

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Illustration - Vehicular Entry/Exit on N. Cypress Street

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Illustration - Eastern Façade Viewed From Film School Across Cypress Street

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Illustration - Northeastern Façade Viewed From Palm Avenue/Cypress Street Intersection

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Illustration - Northwestern Façade Viewed From Palm Avenue and Railroad

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Typical Unit Plans

2 Bedrooms - 797 SF (2 Units, 4 Beds Total) 5 Bedrooms - 1,706 SF (17 Units, 85 Beds Total)

4 Bedrooms - 1,484 SF (3 Units, 12 Beds Total)

4 Bedrooms - 1,300 SF (74 Units, 296 Beds Total) May 2011

Filmmaker’s Village

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Commissary Floor Plan

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Building Program Summary (FUTURE COMMISSARY BUILDING)

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Conceptual Landscape Plan

TREE LEGEND

Platanus racemosa - California Sycamore Tree

Cinnamomum camphora - Camphor Tree

Geijera parviflora - Australian Willow Tree

Cercidium floridum - Blue Palo Verde Tree

Magnolia grandiflora - Southern Magnolia Citrus ‘Valencia’ - Valencia Orange Tree Cupressus sempervirens Italian Cypress Tree Washingtonia filifera - California Palm Liquidambar styraciflua ‘Rotundiloba’ Rotundiloba Sweetgum Tree

May 2011

Filmmaker’s Village

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Prepared by:

CE NTE R F O R TH E ARTS

In Association with:

Abacus Project Management Pfeiffer Partners Architects, Inc. Bennitt Design Group

September 14, 2011

DRC Engineering, Inc.


Executive Summary Project Site

Located in the City of Orange, the Chapman University

Chapman University Specific Plan Area

Center for the Arts project site is bounded by Walnut Avenue to the north, University Drive to the south, N. Glassell Street Shaffer Street

SITE

Grand Street

Orange Street

Rose Avenue

the east, and the Merle and Marjorie Fish Interfaith Center to

Grove Freeway (Route 22), Costa Mesa Freeway (Route 55) Center Street

Glassell Street

from four freeways: Orange Freeway (Route 57), Garden

Olive Street

Lemon Street

O’Bryan Aquatics Stadium/Lastinger Athletics Complex to the southeast. Regional access to the project site is available

Walnut Avenue

Cypress Street

to the west, Chapman University’s Global Citizens Plaza and

and Riverside Freeway (Route 91). Local access to the site is available from N. Glassell Street, Walnut Avenue and W.

Amtrak/Metrolink Railroad

University Drive

The proposed Center for the Arts will provide an approximately 88,142 square-foot performance and educational facility for use by the University’s College of Performing Arts students and the general public. The

Palm Avenue

performance hall will seat up to 1,050 persons. The project site is partially located in the existing Chapman University Specific Plan area and entirely within the City of Maple Avenue

Orange Old Towne District. Implementation of the project will require approvals of a General Plan Amendment, Specific

Atchison Street

Parker Street

Sycamore Avenue/University Drive. Sycamore Avenue

Chapman Avenue

Plan Amendment, Zone Change, Conditional Use Permit, Tentative Tract Map, Major Site Plan Review/Design Review and Demolition Permit requests. A Mitigated Negative Declaration The Plaza

is being prepared by BonTerra Consulting that analyzes the project’s potential for significant environmental impacts.

September 2011

Center for the Arts

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Project Description

Center Use

• Two balconies with wraparound boxes

the east side of the project. Event-related drop-off and valet

The Center for the Arts will provide a state-of-the-art

• 1,050 seats

parking will be accommodated at the existing turnaround at

performance and educational facility for use by students from

• Orchestra pit

the east end of University Drive. This turnaround area has

the theater, music, and dance departments of the Chapman

• Wardrobe, prop, A/V, lighting, drapery and general storage

sufficient foot print to accommodate the anticipated drop

University’s College of Performing Arts. Currently, these

areas

off/pick-up movements. Bollards will be located near the

departments operate classes and conduct performances in

• Restrooms (including two family restrooms)

crosswalk at the Glassell Street/University intersection to

multiple venues owned by the University. The new Center

• Dressing rooms and performer staging areas

prohibit vehicular access, except during scheduled events or in

for the Arts will bring all disciplines together in an integrated

• Scenic work room/staging area

the event of an emergency. Pedestrian access from the corner

performance facility, enhance the visibility of the Arts on

• Sound recording studio

of N. Glassell Street and University Drive will be maintained

campus, and create a new “front door” for the University.

and enhanced. A VIP drop-off area is planned to the northeast

Building Height

of the project site near Walnut Avenue, along with a VIP

The Center for the Arts will be used to stage University

Much of the building will be set into the ground to reduce

entrance located on the northeast side of the building.

performances and productions, including concerts, recitals,

its pedestrian-level height (thereby limiting the facility’s

operas, musicals, plays, dance performances, and Chapman’s

exposure to approximately 54’-7” above the current grade

Landscaping

annual American Celebration. The venue may also be used for

level as measured from a location adjacent to Walnut

The Center for the Arts not only creates a welcoming new

booking professional touring attractions and shows, as well as

Avenue). The building will be approximately 49 feet below

campus gateway for Chapman University, but also provides

be available for key City events.

grade as measured to the bottom of the Orchestra Lift Pit

a variety of appropriately scaled inviting outdoor venues for

(non-occupied). The main entry (which faces south) will be

campus events, performances, meetings and gatherings.

Facilities

recessed approximately 9.5 feet below the existing grade of N.

Designed to comply with contemporary standards of

The 88,142-square-foot facility will feature a multi-purpose

Glassell Street.

sustainability, water conservation and energy use, the

Proscenium-style theater hall, rehearsal space, associated

landscape concept for the Center for the Arts project

Access

embodies the University’s spirit of excellence and community

offices, and a multi-level lobby. Key features of the facility

The primary access points to the Center for the Arts will face

responsibility. The integration, coordination and composition

include the following:

the new campus green located to the south and just north

of the gardens unequivocally creates a compelling array of

• Three-level lobby with box office, conference room, and

of University Drive, and the Global Citizens Plaza located on

inviting venues that add to the diversity and richness honoring

performer and support space and storage, administrative

office space and concessions

the Chapman legacy of quality and tradition.

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Campus Green and Tempietto

The walkways will be approximately 20’ wide and incorporate

canopy trees on each side of the plaza. Further to the east,

The most significant landscape feature is the new campus

sustainable paving materials. Benches will be provided to

new plantings of Cypress (relocated from elsewhere on the

green that incorporates formal pathways (the allees) featuring

allow for a cool respite beneath the trees and afford views

building site) will reinforce the plaza edge and soften the view

flowering Crape Myrtle trees, colorful plantings and garden

of activities on the campus green. Garden alcoves will be

toward the Athletic Complex.

alcoves for sculptures and seating. The campus green will

provided for sculpture busts significant to the University. Function Garden and VIP Entry

extend from the edge of University Drive to the south facade of the Center for the Arts. The lawn area with its

Plaza at the Center for the Arts

North of the Global Citizens Plaza, an intimate outdoor

focal Tempietto will slope at less than 5%, with tree-lined

The plaza at the terminus of the campus green in front of

garden is configured to accommodate a variety of small scale

allees bordering the green. A staggered pathway down the

the Center for the Arts will allow for pre-function uses,

gatherings such as outdoor dinners and celebrations. This

approximate center of the lawn will further define the space

special gatherings and outdoor classes. Enhanced concrete

space is defined by a low evergreen hedge at its perimeter and

to provide inviting vistas and articulate the surrounding

paving with stone band accents will be incorporated into the

canopy trees for shade and scale. Immediately north of the

gardens. The Tempietto will be approximately 20’ in diameter

plaza. At the southeastern corner of the proposed building,

function garden, an inviting landscape walkway is provided for

and 25’ tall with 8 supporting columns, 4 of which will

an intimately scaled outdoor plaza space will accommodate

VIP and guest arrival. This walkway is near the VIP drop-off

represent the Four Spiritual Pillars of the University. The lawn

amphitheater type seating or terraces created by stepped

area and provides convenient and semi-private access.

area will be well suited for special events, performances and

planter walls. This outdoor space engages and invites

classes. It is anticipated that students may use the lawn space

pedestrians from the adjacent campus green and seamlessly

Glassell Street Edge

for informal gatherings, study and reflection.

incorporates American with Disabilities Act (ADA) access.

Acknowledging the historical significance of Glassell Street,

Architectural stairs provide a strong linkage to the Global

the landscape plan incorporates a row of Queen Palms along

The Allees

Citizens Plaza and the second level of the Center for the Arts

the east side of the street to reflect the existing palm tree

The allees will be lined on one side by canopy trees to clearly

entry located approximately 12’ above the lower plaza.

plantings adjacent to Beckman and Kennedy Halls. In the setback area, evergreen Camphor trees will be planted to

define the space and provide a shade covered walkway from the primary drop-off area at University Drive to the main

The integrity and significance of the Global Citizens Plaza

help create pedestrian scale and provide solar control for the

entry plaza of the Center for the Arts. The allees not only

is carefully maintained as a primary building entry point

western facade.

provide inviting pedestrian access, but also artfully frame the

for guests/visitors approaching the east. This space will be

west façade and the main ceremonial entry of the building.

enhanced and the entry framed by plantings of small scale

September 2011

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Walnut Avenue and Commercial Land Use Interface

beverages may be purchased at the concessions area in the

Timing

The setback areas adjacent to Walnut Avenue and the off-site

main lobby, and may be served and consumed throughout the

The Center for the Arts project is anticipated to complete

Hoov’s Market (not owned by Chapman University) located

lobby (all levels) and in the outdoor terrace area along the

construction and be open for performances in late 2014.

at the southeast corner of N. Glassell Street and Walnut

south and east sides of the Center for the Arts. Alcohol may

Avenue will be generously planted with vertical screening

also be sold and served from a portable bar on the outdoor

trees such as Sweet Gum trees. The intent is to provide a

terrace. A small number of tables and seats may be provided

positive and continuous large scale green buffer appropriately

in the lobby and in the terrace areas for use by theater

acknowledging this residential and commercial edge.

patrons. Alcohol will be stored in the concession storage area by the main lobby in a room that can be locked.

Fish Interfaith Center Interface

Linear plantings of vertical deciduous trees, such as Sweet

Energy Efficiency

Gums, will be provided along the Fish Interfaith Center

Project design incorporates energy efficient features that

building perimeter on the west and north facades. The

will meet or exceed Title 24 building efficiency standards and

existing required exitways and Fire Department access will be

include additional sustainable features as prescribed by the

maintained.

California Green Building Code.

Typical Operating Hours

Buildings and Uses to be Demolished

The Center for the Arts will have a typical curtain time of

The project will involve demolition of the existing uses on-

8 p.m. for weekday and weekend events. Beer, wine and

site, including Chapman University’s Orange Parking Lot

champagne, as well as water and non-alcoholic beverages,

and its access roadway link to University Drive, Chapman

will be served at the Center for the Arts events. No hard

University’s Public Safety building and the adjacent parking

liquor will be permitted. The hours of operations associated

lot, Glassell Apartments and their associated parking lots; the

with alcoholic beverages services (preparation, sales and

Walnut Center, and the former Papa Hassan’s Café (shuttered

cleanup) will vary somewhat, but will generally occur between

due to a fire) and the associated residence behind the former

the hours of 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. on days of events. Alcoholic

café. The above buildings and uses to be demolished are not contributing historic resources.

September 2011

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Conceptual Site Plan

VIP Drop-Off

Event-Related Drop-Off and Valet Parking

PLAZA

Secondary Entrance to the Center for the Arts

VIP Entrance Outdoor Function Area

Primary Entrance to the Center for the Arts

Tempietto Structure

Campus Green

Sign Location Enhanced Concrete Paving Plaza Paving

September 2011

Center for the Arts

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Illustration - Southern Building Faรงade / Primary Building Entrance

Note: The Tempietto depicted herein is conceptual and subject to design refinement. The final structure will feature 8 columns instead of the 4 shown here.

September 2011

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Building Elevations

West Elevation (As viewed from N. Glassell Street)

East Elevation (As viewed from internal to the Chapman University campus) September 2011

Center for the Arts

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Building Elevations

North Elevation (As viewed from Walnut Avenue)

South Elevation (As viewed from the Campus Green) September 2011

Center for the Arts

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Basement Floor Plans - Orchestra Pit & Stage Level

STAGE LEVEL FLOOR PLAN

SOUND RACK ROOM

RESTROOM

STAGE EQUIPMENT STORAGE

RESTROOM

SOUND RECORDING

PROP STORAGE

INSTRUMENT STORAGE

S/L LOCK

STAR DRESSING

SCENIC STAGING

STAR DRESSING

TOOL ROOM

TOILET STAIR #3 STAGING AREA

ARBOR PIT

FD

FD

IDF

MECHANICAL ROOM

CREW ROOM

CUSTODIAL S/L LOCK

FD

S/L LOCK SUMP ROOM

PIANO STORAGE

ELECTRICAL

TRAP ROOM

ELEVATOR #3

ELEVATOR #4

TOILET

CORRIDOR

CORRIDOR

SHAFT CORRIDOR

MACHINE ROOM

CORRIDOR

S/L LOCK

FD

CORRIDOR ORCHESTRA PIT

CORRIDOR

STAIR #4 STAIR #2

SHAFT

ELEVATOR #3

VESTIBULE

STAIR #2

S/L LOCK

S/L LOCK

VESTIBULE

S/L LOCK

Orchestra Pit:

STAIR #4

5,457 SF

S/L LOCK ORCHESTRA VESTIBULE

Orchestra Pit

STAIR #4 VESTIBULE

Stage Level:

19,275 SF

Total Basement Level:

24,732 SF

Stage Level

September 2011

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First Floor Plan - Orchestra

RESTROOM IND DRESSING RESTROOM

CORRIDOR

LOCKER ROOM

STORAGE

LARGE ENSEMBLE DRESSING ROOM

LARGE ENSEMBLE DRESSING ROOM

LOCKER ROOM

WARDROBE STORAGE/MAINTANANCE

RESTROOM

RESTROOM IND DRESSING

RESTROOM IND DRESSING

MACHINE ROOM

STAIR #3

ROAD COMPANY OFFICE

CORRIDOR

IDF

MEDIUM ENSEMBLE DRESSING ROOM

ELECTRICAL

MEDIUM ENSEMBLE DRESSING ROOM

AV STORAGE

ELEVATOR #4

CORRIDOR CUSTODIAL

CORRIDOR

GREEN ROOM

HOUSE MANAGER CORRIDOR FIRST AID/ USHER ROOM

CORRIDOR

ELEVATOR #3

SHAFT

CORRIDOR SHAFT

CUSTODIAL

STAIR #2

First Floor - Orchestra: 32,353 SF

LIGHTING POSITION

LIGHTING POSITION

S/L LOCK

S/L LOCK

STAIR #4

WOMEN

THEATER UP

UP

THEATER SUPPORT LOBBY CIRCULATION

ELEVATOR MACHINE ROOM

BUILDING SUPPORT

MEN

EXTERIOR BALCONY/ PATIO SOUND PORCH SOUND CONTROL

S/L LOCK ELEVATOR #1

ELEVATOR #2

LIGHTING CONTROL

ORCHESTRA LOBBY

S/L LOCK FOH STORAGE

CONCESSIONS

BOX OFFICE MANAGER

EDGE OF BALCONY ABOVE, TYP BOX OFFICE

STAIR #1

VOID

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Second Floor Plan - 1st Balcony PLUMBING/ FIRE PUMP ROOM

LOADING DOCK

RECEIVING/ STAGING AREA

CONFERENCE ROOM

EXTERIOR PATIO

TRANSFORMER & GENERATOR ROOM VESTIBULE

STAIR #3

LIGHTING STORAGE

CATERING PREP ROOM

PRACTICE ROOM IDF

TECHNICAL DIRECTOR ELEVATOR #4

EMERGENCY ELECTRICAL

MAIN ELECTRICAL

VESTIBULE

ELECTRICAL

SECURITY

CORRIDOR

CUSTODIAL STORAGE CORRIDOR

MAINT. STORAGE

BUILDING STORAGE

TABLE/CHAIR STORAGE

Second Floor - 1st Balcony: 31,820 SF

VESTIBULE

SHAFT

ELEVATOR #3

VESTIBULE SHAFT

STAIR #2

CUSTODIAL

WOMEN

LIGHTING POSITION

LIGHTING POSITION

STAIR #4

S/L LOCK

S/L LOCK

OPEN TO BELOW

OPEN TO BELOW

CUSTODIAL

CO CANOPY ABOVE

FAMILY RESTROOM

MEN

THEATER THEATER SUPPORT LOBBY

EXTERIOR BALCONY

ELEVATOR #1

CIRCULATION BUILDING SUPPORT

ELEVATOR #2

EXTERIOR BALCONY/ PATIO FIRST BALCONY LOBBY

OPEN TO BELOW

FOH STORAGE

FOH STORAGE

S/L LOCK

S/L LOCK

OPEN TO BELOW

PROJECTOR

EDGE OF BALCONY ABOVE, TYP

STAIR #1

EXTERIOR BALCONY VOID

EXTERIOR BALCONY

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Third Floor Plan - 2nd Balcony

OPEN TO BELOW

COOLING TOWER

CHILLER ROOM

BOILER ROOM

CORRIDOR MECHANICAL ROOM

Third Floor - 2nd Balcony: 21,728 SF

ELEVATOR #3

SHAFT

SHAFT

STORAGE VESTIBULE

SHAFT

LIGHT POSITION

LIGHT POSITION

STAIR #4

ELECTRIC ROOM

STAIR #2

WOMEN

OPEN TO BELOW

OPEN TO BELOW

CUSTODIAL

ELEVATOR #1

EXTERIOR BALCONY

FAMILY RESTROOM

MEN

ELEVATOR #2

S/L LOCK

S/L LOCK

SECOND BALCONY LOBBY

OPEN TO BELOW

OPEN TO BELOW

STAIR #1

EXTERIOR BALCONY

EXTERIOR BALCONY

VOID

THEATER THEATER SUPPORT LOBBY

September 2011

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Conceptual Landscape Plan TREE LEGEND Phoenix dactylifera - Date Palm Syagrus romanzoffiana - Queen Palm Cinnamomum camphora - Camphor Tree Platanus racemosa - Sycamore Tree Cercidium floridum - Blue Palo Verde Tree Lagerstroemia indica - Crape Myrtle Liquidambar styraciflua ‘Rotundiloba’ Rotundiloba Sweet Gum Tree Cupressus sempervirens - Italian Cypress Tree Magnolia grandiflora - Magnolia Tree

September 2011

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Illustration - View of Campus Green Looking South

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Illustration - Aerial View of the Center for the Arts and Campus Green

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Illustration - View of the Tempietto

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Center for the Arts

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Illustration - Plaza with Amphitheater Seating

September 2011

Center for the Arts

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Illustration - Plaza with Amphitheater Seating

September 2011

Center for the Arts

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Historic Core Classroom Building

Se p te mb e r 19, 2011 Prep a re d b y:


PROJ E CT OVE RVI E W

Project Site Rose Avenue Shaffer Street

Grand Street

Orange Street

Chapman University Specific Plan Area

Wilkinson Hall

University Drive

Glassell Street

Amtrak/Metrolink Railroad

Sycamore Avenue

Center Street

Glassell Street

Olive Street

Lemon Street

Cypress Street

Walnut Avenue

Chapman University Specific Plan Boundary

Overview

Palm Avenue

SITE

Reeves Hall

Roosevelt Hall

Bert C. Williams Mall

The HCCB site falls within the Academic 1 planning area of the Chapman University Specific Plan, which allows for classrooms and other support uses. The HCCB will consist of a two-story building with a basement, totaling approximately 17,059 square feet. Up to 234 classroom seats will be provided.

Memorial Hall

Atchison Street

Maple Avenue

Chapman Avenue

Smith Hall

PROJECT SITE Chapman Univ. Specific Plan Boundary

The Plaza

Palm Avenue

The Historic Core Classroom Building (HCCB) project is located in the Chapman University main campus area on the south side of the Bert C. Williams Mall, which is the lawn in front of Memorial Hall bordering Glassell Street. The mall is flanked by four historic buildings that were part of the former Orange Union High School campus — Reeves Hall and Smith Hall (built 1913), Roosevelt Hall (1928), and Memorial Hall (1921). Along with Wilkinson Hall (1904), which is located to the northeast of the mall, these neoclassical buildings are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The design of the proposed HCCB will complement the adjacent historic structures and reflect the architectural heritage of the campus.

The HCCB project includes a request for Major Site Plan Review and Design Review, as well as for a setback Variance and a height Variance. The project is covered under the certified Chapman University EIR. Therefore, no additional environmental documentation is required.

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CHAPMAN UNIVERSITY HISTORIC CORE CLASSROOM BUILDING

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PROJ E CT DE SC RI PTI O N Campus Core History Originally built in 1904, the former Orange Union High School campus, where the Chapman University main campus is now located, is one of the few remaining examples of neoclassical architecture in Southern California. Five buildings on the original campus are listed on the National Register of Historic Places because of their architectural and historical significance, including the Education/Art Building (now Reeves Hall), the Founder’s Hall (now Roosevelt Hall), the Old Science Building (now Smith Hall) and Memorial Hall that have their main entrances facing onto a formal grass quadrangle (now known as the Bert C. Williams Mall), and Wilkinson Hall. These neoclassical buildings were part of the former high school for 50 years and served as the cultural center of Orange from 1904 to 1954. Constructed in 1904, Wilkinson Hall is the oldest structure on the campus. It was originally located in the area where the Bert C. Williams Mall is today, but was moved to its present location northeast of the mall in 1922. Both the Education/Art Building and Old Science Building were constructed in 1913 as “twin buildings,” followed by Memorial Hall in 1921 and the Founder’s Hall in 1928.

Project Description The HCCB project is located on a grassy area within the historic campus core. University planners believe that, based on the existing layout of the historic core, the original designers of the former Orange Union High School had intended a structure be built on this vacant site to complete the symmetry of the buildings surrounding the grass quadrangle. After conducting careful historical research and working closely with The Historic Resource Group, AC Martin Partners and the Old Towne Orange Preservation Association, Chapman University commenced the

design process for the HCCB to fulfill the historic plan most likely envisioned by the original campus designers. Since the building elevations of Reeves Hall and Smith Hall mirror each other across the mall, the front exterior facade of the HCCB has been designed to reflect that of Roosevelt Hall. The architectural design of the HCCB derives from the neoclassical style of the adjacent historic buildings. The HCCB is rectilinear in form and massing, with strong entry identity and articulation. The building design shows an emphasis on a horizontal appearance and expression of a base, middle and top. Inside the HCCB, a basement and two floors are proposed to accommodate nine classrooms, two seminar rooms, one lounge room, fourteen offices, storage and other support/ancillary uses. Up to 234 classroom seats will be located within the HCCB. The building will be used for a variety of classes, and will not be affiliated with any particular college or program. New landscaping, including a variety of shrubs, accent planting, hedge and groundcover will be planted around the building. These plantings will be compatible with other existing plant materials found around the Bert C. Williams Mall. An outdoor patio over a portion of the basement will be provided on the east side of the building, adjacent to an expanded fire lane. Tables and chairs will be provided for lounging on the patio. Along the north side of Palm Avenue, several of the existing palm trees will be relocated into the palm grove between Memorial Hall and Palm Avenue. In addition, a row of street trees (Magnolia grandiflora) will be planted along Palm Avenue, consistent with the approved Chapman University Master Landscape Plan.

Parking for the HCCB The project will generate a need for 110 parking spaces. According to the 2010 Parking Management Plan for Chapman University, there was a surplus campus-wide of 544 parking spaces during the fall 2010 semester. The HCCB project would result in a surplus of 434 parking spaces campus-wide after building completion. Parking for the HCCB building will be provided primarily in two parking structures on campus – the Lastinger Parking Structure and the Fred L. Barrera Parking Structure. Between the two parking structures, there is sufficient excess capacity to accommodate this demand.

Consistency with the Chapman University Specific Plan The HCCB project is designed to be consistent with the Chapman University Specific Plan. The building is located within the Academic 1 planning area of the Specific Plan, which allows for classrooms and support uses. The project incorporates the Specific Plan’s design guidelines that respect the historic and local context, reinforce the architectural identity, and maintain a consistent landscape character of the campus and adjacent neighborhood.

Variances The Variance requests seek permission from the City’s Planning Commission to approve a height Variance for the proposed 42’1” building height (height to top of gable at entry) and a setback Variance for the 10’ building setback from Palm Avenue, which vary from the maximum 35’ building height (allowed at the 10’ setback line) and minimum 20’ building setback prescribed by Sections 6.4.1.C and 6.4.1.D, respectively, of the Specific Plan.

CHAPMAN UNIVERSITY CHAPMAN HISTORIC UNIVERSITY CORE COMMUNITY CLASSROOM LAW BUILDING CLINICS

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PROPOSE D SI TE PLAN

Project Summary • One Basement + Two Floors • 17,059 SF Building, Including: » 9 Classrooms » 2 Seminar Rooms » 1 Lounge » 14 Offices » Storage Areas » Other Support/Ancillary Uses

Historic Core Classroom Building

• Total 234 Classroom Seats

N. T. S.

Note: This is a conceptual illustration. CHAPMAN UNIVERSITY HISTORIC CORE CLASSROOM BUILDING

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VI E W OF HCCB FROM BE RT C. WI LLI AM S M ALL

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CONTE XT E VALUATI O N Context Evaluation Design of the HCCB has taken into consideration the project’s relationship and compatibility with the surrounding buildings and neighborhoods through an assessment of historic context, land uses, architectural character, landscape and streetscape. Recent photographs of the site and its surrounding neighborhood are included herein.

1. Adjoining Land Uses • The project is surrounded by a mix of academic uses, open space and residential uses. Historic campus buildings are located to the north, northeast and west. The Bert C. Williams Mall and a palm tree grove border the site to the north and east, respectively. Single-family homes (some of which are now used for commercial purposes) are located on the south side of Palm Avenue across the street from the site. • The General Plan land use designation of the project site is PFI (Public Facilities Max. 0.5 FAR and Institutions Max. 2.0 FAR). The land use designations of the surrounding areas are: PFI to the north, west and east; LDR (Low Density Residential 2-6 DU/AC to the south; and OTMIX (Old Towne Mixed Use Spoke Max. 15 DU/AC, Max 0.6 FAR) to the southwest. The project’s land use designation is compatible with the surrounding area. • The zoning designation is P-I (SP) - Public Institution (Specific Plan). The zoning designations of the surrounding areas are: P-I (SP) to the north, west and east; R-3 (Residential Multiple Family) the south; and C-2 (General Business) to the

southwest. The project’s zoning designation is compatible with the surrounding area.

2. Historic Context • The HCCB project is located within the City of Orange Old Towne Historic District, as well as within the Orange Union High School District on the National Register of Historic Places. The HCCB is surrounded by Memorial Hall, Reeves Hall, Smith Hall and Roosevelt Hall, which are individual buildings listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The project has been designed to respect the historic context of the area, and be architecturally compatible with the adjacent historic structures.

addition of painted metals. Many of the differences result from the use of modern building materials and techniques and the necessity of conforming to modern building codes. • There are three skylights in the roof that will provide natural lighting to the second floor of the building. • The rooftop mechanical equipment will be visually screened from ground level views by a parapet around the building roof. • An ADA-accessible ramp will provide handicap access to the building at the main entrance.

4. Landscape and Streetscape 3. Building Architecture

• The HCCB is rectilinear in form and massing, with strong entry identity and articulation.

• Several of the existing palm trees on the north side of Palm Avenue will be relocated into the existing palm grove by Memorial Hall. In addition, a row of Magnolia grandiflora will be planted within the street parkway of Palm Avenue, consistent with the approved Chapman University Master Landscape Plan and the City of Orange street tree guidelines.

• The building design shows an emphasis on a horizontal appearance and expression of a base, middle and top.

• A variety of shrubs, accent planting, hedge and groundcover will be planted around the building.

• The exterior of the HCCB has been designed to mirror that of Roosevelt Hall across the Bert C. Williams Mall. A few minor differences in architectural details exist between the HCCB and Roosevelt Hall, mainly the simplified column capitals, cornice and architectural banding profiles on the HCCB, different sizes and locations of windows and decorative screens, different entry door and porch details, and the

• An outdoor patio will be built over a portion of the basement on the east side of the building, adjacent to an expanded fire lane. This patio will be available for relaxation by the students, faculty and staff of Chapman University.

• The HCCB is designed to reflect the neoclassical style and architectural elements of the adjacent historic buildings.

CHAPMAN UNIVERSITY CHAPMAN HISTORIC UNIVERSITY CORE COMMUNITY CLASSROOM LAW BUILDING CLINICS

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PRE LI MI NARY BASE MENT PLAN

CHAPMAN UNIVERSITY HISTORIC CORE CLASSROOM BUILDING

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PRE LI MI NARY FI RST FLO O R PLAN

CHAPMAN UNIVERSITY HISTORIC CORE CLASSROOM BUILDING

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PRE LI MI NARY SE COND FLOO R PLAN

CHAPMAN UNIVERSITY HISTORIC CORE CLASSROOM BUILDING

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PRE LI MI NARY BUI LDI NG SPACE PRO G RAM HISTORIC CORE CLASSROOM BLDG.

3/29/2011

Chapman University Basement Floor Plan First Floor Plan Second Floor Plan Total

BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN Room # 004 006 007 008 009 010 012 014

FIRST FLOOR PLAN Room #

SECOND FLOOR PLAN Room # 6341 5359 5359 17059

Room Name Storage Classroom Below Grade Storage Classroom Classroom Classroom Seminar Storage Total

gsf gsf gsf gsf

Classroom Seats

18 36 36 36

Room Name

Area 32 417 912 823 858 826 420 119 4407 sf

201A 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 224

Room Name Desk Storage Classroom Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Copier/Break Room Total

Classroom Lounge Room Classroom Classroom Classroom Seminar Total

18

234

167 114 425 127 202 130 139 133 121 121 134 134 121 121 129 158 126 167 2769 sf

Area

Grand Total 106 107 108 111 112 114

Area

18 18 36 18

9907 sf

420 101 457 941 434 378 2731 sf

CHAPMAN UNIVERSITY HISTORIC CORE CLASSROOM BUILDING

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CON CE PTUAL LANDSCAPE PLAN

Note: This is a conceptual illustration. CHAPMAN UNIVERSITY HISTORIC CORE CLASSROOM BUILDING

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COMMUNITY LAW CLINICS

De c e mb e r 2010 Prepared by:

In Associ ati on wi th:


PROJ E CT OVE RVI E W

Introduction

Project Site Chapman University Specific Plan Area

The Chapman University Community Law Clinics consist of several law clinics with different emphases, offering the community valuable free legal services. As of September 2010, the University proposes to relocate five of these law clinics from their various locations to an existing vacant building located at 544 North Cypress Street in Orange. The building is surrounded by a mix of industrial and single-family residential uses. The existing zoning designation of the site is “Industrial Manufacturing” (M2). The lone existing structure on-site was built as a grammar school and dates back to 1931. The children of Mexican immigrants attended the school. Today, the building is considered to have historic importance to the community, since it is the last remaining example of a segregated school in Orange County.

SITE

Shaffer Street

Grand Street

Orange Street

Rose Avenue

Center Street

Glassell Street

Olive Street

Lemon Street

Sycamore Avenue

Amtrak/Metrolink Railroad

University Drive

Chapman University proposes to improve the building in appearance, while retaining the remaining historic integrity of its former use as a schoolhouse. The interior of the building will be converted to accommodate legal clinic and related uses, and will be designed to ensure ADA compliance. It is Chapman University’s intent that the final renovated building be LEED certified.

Palm Avenue

Required Entitlements

Maple Avenue

The project includes a request for a Major Site Plan Review. In addition, approval of a Conditional Use Permit by the City’s Planning Commission will occur concurrently to allow for “General and Professional Office” uses to take place on the project site within the M2 zone. This designation will

Atchison Street

Parker Street

Cypress Street

Walnut Avenue

Chapman Avenue

The Plaza

N. T. S. CHAPMAN UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY LAW CLINICS

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PROJ E CT DE SC RI PTI O N accommodate the proposed uses associated with the law clinic operations.

Community Law Clinics Chapman University’s School of Law provides pro bono legal services to the community through several distinct law clinics with different emphases. Clinics provide services in a diverse range of subject areas, including elder law, tax law, entertainment law, military law, immigration law, family law, and domestic violence law. Each clinical program is directed by a faculty member with significant clinical experience. Students participate in classroom training sessions as well as hands-on field work that may include client contact, research projects, document preparation, brief writing, and court appearances. Designed to augment the students’ classroom experience in real-world legal settings, the Chapman University Community Law Clinics enable qualified students attending the School of Law to handle legal cases under the supervision of professors and attorneys. Over the years, these clinical programs have garnered great success in assisting those in need, and have provided an important bridge between the academics of law school and the real world of litigation. The clinics that make up the Chapman University Community Law Clinics are described below: • Chapman AMVETS Clinic: Newly launched in January 2009, this first West Coast military law clinic provides free legal assistance to veterans, active-duty military personnel and

their families. The clinic operates in partnership with AMVETS — a non-profit organization dedicated to veterans and community services. The clinic also partners with Brandman University, which has satellite campuses with office space for clinic participants throughout the Western United States. Some of the Brandman University campuses are located on or near military bases. This arrangement allows the Chapman AMVETS Clinic to serve all of California and its 200,000 military families spread over 27 bases. The Chapman AMVETS Clinic is currently located on the Chapman University campus in Orange in the School of Law building. It will relocate to the building located at 544 N. Cypress Street as part of the planned project. • Family Violence Clinic: Created in 2007 to address the unique challenges faced by survivors of domestic violence, the Family Violence Clinic offers free immigration and family law assistance to those who are undocumented immigrants. The clinic provides counseling services, as well as legal assistance on obtaining domestic violence-related immigration benefits. The Family Violence Clinic is currently located in the Anaheim Family Justice Center. It will relocate to the building at 544 N. Cypress Street as part of the planned project. • Alona Cortese Elder Law Center: The Alona Cortese Elder Law Center was founded in 2000 to provide legal services to seniors in Orange County. The center partners with local legal aid organizations and pro bono attorneys to assist the needy elderly, including will drafting, advance health

care directives, representation at administrative hearings and addressing physical and financial elder abuse. The Alona Cortese Elder Law Center is located at 462 N. Glassell Street. It will relocate to the building at 544 N. Cypress Street as part of the planned project. • Claremont Institute Center for Constitutional Jurisprudence: The Claremont Institute Center for Constitutional Jurisprudence provides students with an opportunity to earn independent study credit, conducting research, drafting discovery requests, preparing draft summary judgment motions and appellate briefs, attending hearings, and even preparing briefs for filing with the Supreme Court of the United States. Since its founding, the Center has participated in more than three dozen cases before the U.S. Supreme Court, including such landmark cases as Boy Scouts v. Dale, Zelman v. Simmons-Harris (the Ohio school vouchers case), Elk Grove Unified School District v. Newdow (the Pledge of Allegiance case), Kelo v. New London, Connecticut (the property takings case), and Hamdi v. Rumsfeld (terrorism case), urging the Court to restore the constitutional principles adopted by our nation’s Founders. The Claremont Institute Center for Constitutional Jurisprudence is currently located in the School of Law building. It is not currently planned for relocation at this time.

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PROJ E CT DE SCRI PTI O N

• Ninth Circuit Appellate Clinic: Chapman’s Ninth Circuit Appellate Clinic was founded in 2000. The clinic provides students with real-world experience litigating significant federal cases at the appellate level. During this year long program, students are assigned a case in the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in the fall and work during that semester on developing the legal theory and writing the brief for the case. During the second semester, students draft a reply brief and then engage in substantial moot court preparation for oral argument in the Ninth Circuit. The students end the second semester by arguing the case to the Ninth Circuit in Pasadena, California. Every year, the students perform admirably, and have drawn strong praise from the federal bench for the quality of their advocacy and their dedication to cases that need pro bono appellate counsel. The class affords students an important opportunity to work on a real case for a real client where the factual and legal complexities of a case are not manufactured moot court scenarios. Thus, the class provides an important bridge between the academics of law school and the world of lawyering. Over the years, the Clinic has litigated many cases raising novel and important questions of constitutional and federal law. The Ninth Circuit Appellate Clinic is currently located in the School of Law building. It is not currently planned for relocation at this time. • Tax Law Clinic: The Tax Law Clinic is the oldest clinical program at Chapman University School of Law. Since 1997, students have represented over 2,800 clients and saved taxpayers an estimated $1.5 million dollars in taxes. The clinic

now handles over 500 client cases per year, making it one of the highest volume law school tax clinics in the nation.

cases that are on appeal under the supervision of experienced appellate tax litigators.

Chapman University is currently one of only two law schools in California - and a very small percentage of ABA approved law schools nationwide - to be awarded a federal grant to operate a Low Income Taxpayer Clinic (“LITC.”) The school has been a recipient of the LITC grant in each year since the program’s inception.

Students conduct research on legal issues, draft appellate briefs, and depending on the jurisdiction of the court and the nature of the case, present their brief before an appellate court. Students in this clinic develop their written and oral argument skills and, at the same time, gain valuable lawyering skills.

In the clinic, senior law students have the chance to handle tax cases in all stages of controversy. The majority of the cases are cases docketed with the U.S. Tax Court. Although the students are under the supervision of attorney-professors, they are responsible for all aspects of their cases. Students interview clients, gather facts and evidence, perform research, and meet with the IRS to negotiate a settlement. If settlement efforts fail the student has the chance to take the case to trial. The clinic is a win-win for the clients, the students, the IRS and the U.S. Tax Court. The clients benefit from receiving counsel and representation that they otherwise could not afford and the students learn invaluable skills handling live-clients while still in law school. The newest tax law clinical opportunity provided by Chapman University is the first of its kind. Started in 2008, the Appellate Tax Advocacy Clinic lets students participate in actual appellate tax cases conducted under the auspices of The Center for Fair Administration of Taxation. The course is designed to give students interested in appellate work the opportunity to handle tax related

The Tax Law Clinic is currently located in the School of Law building. The Tax Law Clinic is anticipated to relocate to the building at 544 N. Cypress Street as part of the planned project. • Entertainment Contracts Law Clinic: The Entertainment Contracts Law Clinic provides students with a unique opportunity to work directly with low budget independent filmmakers and to serve as production legal counsel for a feature length motion picture. In conjunction with entertainment industry organizations such as the Directors Guild of America, the clinic’s director identifies eligible film(s) that are ready to begin production. The producer and/or director of the selected film then work directly with clinical students who will draft all production-related contracts and documents. Students typically assist in setting up the corporation or LLC, filing for copyright, drafting employment agreements for the producer, director, actors and crew, as well as executing releases and location agreements. Students typically complete the production legal work for a minimum of two films per semester. This clinic is expected to relocate from its existing location to 544 N. Cypress Street as part of the planned project.

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PROJ E CT DE SC RI PTI O N Building History As the Mexican population in Orange increased in the 1920s, both the communities of El Modena and Orange set up segregated schools. The building located at 544 N. Cypress Street was built in 1931 as the Cypress Street School, a segregated school that served grades K-5. Many of the students were Mexican immigrants from the Cypress and El Modena barrios. Cypress Street School served as an important focal point in the community, in conjunction with the nearby packinghouse and the local Catholic Church. Many former neighborhood residents spent a significant portion of their childhood at the school. For them, the school was akin to a second home. The students would eat and shower there, since many did not have a shower at home. The students would also spend their free time enjoying the playground.

Cypress Street School students posing for a class photograph in front of the Cypress Street School building in 1935

Segregation within the Orange Unified School Distirct continued until 1943 when a lawsuit was filed and the Board decided to close Cypress Street School in 1944 and transferred students to other schools in Orange. Segregation of students was officially ended as a result of the Mendez v. Westminster School District (1946) decision by the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and later the Brown v. Board of Education (1954) decision by the United States Supreme Court.

the central tower feature was remodeled from a flat roof to a hip roof. A window over the front door was removed and replaced with a quatrefoil. Some of the building’s historic integrity was permanently lost during the remodeling.

The building remained vacant for decades, until the Villa Park Orchards Association purchased the structure in 1972 from the Orange Unified School District and, in 1981, remodeled it into administrative offices for their packinghouse operations. Several additions to the building were added during renovations, and

The building was purchased by Chapman University from Villa Park Orchards Association in September 2004. As part of the planned law clinics project, Chapman University intends to not only retain the existing building, but will renovate the structure to reflect more closely its original appearance when the building served as the Cypress Street School. The structural modifications that were made to the building in the 1980s will remain after the renovation, but the building color, doors and windows will more closely match their original 1930s appearance.

Cypress Street School students posing for a class photograph in front of Mission San Juan Capistrano in 1935

Former Cypress Street School students, sitting on a bench inside the existing building entry hall (2005)

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PROJ E CT DE SC RI PTI O N Building Renovation & Enhancements The project will modify and rejuvenate the old Cypress Street School building’s faded exterior to more accurately reflect the appearance of the building when it served as Cypress Street School. To accomplish this, the building will be sandblasted, retextured with a “Santa Barbara” semi-smooth finish and then repainted a neutral shade of off-white, similar to its original stucco color (determined through paint scrapings). The aluminum-frame windows that exist in the building today were installed by the Villa Park Orchards Association in 1981. These windows are poorly insulated and do not reflect the original character of the building. Therefore, all of the building’s existing windows will be replaced with multi-light windows with steel mullions that have the architectural appearance of windows from the 1930s-40s, combined with the energy efficiency and insulating properties of present-day windows. The original windows were larger than those currently installed in the building — the window openings were made smaller when the building was renovated in 1981 to accommodate the drop ceilings and air conditioning vents. The drop ceilings will be removed and the high plaster ceiling restored; however, the smaller window sizes will be retained. The existing aluminum awnings on the side of the building facing Cypress Street, which were a later addition to the building by the Villa Park Orchards Association, will be removed. As part of the building renovation, the two sets of doors facing Cypress Street will be removed and replaced with windows to create more usable space inside. The elimination of the doors also will provide greater security by limiting access to the building.

The double doors at the main entry will be replaced with new doors that better reflect the building’s original architectural style. Other exterior improvements will occur to the hard surfaces along the front of the building. Chapman University will work with the Orange Barrio Historical Society (OBHS) to develop a commemorative plaque to be installed adjacent to the main entry archway. The exact inscription will be determined in consultation with the OBHS. The interior of the building will be renovated to repair water damage that has occurred to portions of the building. In addition, plumbing, electrical, and heating and cooling systems will be evaluated by the University and upgraded, if necessary, to ensure that the building complies with current State and City codes and regulations. Two new ADA-compliant bathrooms will be installed, and the fixtures in the two existing bathrooms will be upgraded and replaced and new tiling installed. The project has been designed to keep new wall construction to a minimum. All of the existing original walls within the structure will be retained, and new interior walls will be added according to the building improvement plans. All existing wallpaper will either be removed or covered by a light coat of plaster before being painted a “Swiss Coffee” color or other soft neutral color. The structure will be improved in appearance, while the historic integrity of its former use as a schoolhouse will be enhanced, where feasible. The renovated building is designed to ultimately accommodate several of the Chapman University law clinics. Upon project completion, at least five of the Community Law Clinics (Chapman AMVETS Clinic, Family Violence Clinic, Elder Law Center, Tax Law Clinic, and Entertainment Contracts Law Clinic) will be relocated to the building.

Parking Based on the City’s Zoning Code, the parking requirement for the proposed project is 38 spaces, at 4 spaces per 1,000 square feet. The project will provide 38 parking spaces consisting of 26 faculty/employee/student spaces (including 2 handicapped spaces with van loading) in addition to 12 visitor spaces (including 2 handicapped spaces with van loading).

Landscape and Drainage The proposed project improvements will not impact the existing drainage patterns on-site. After improvements, the site will continue to drain toward the rear of the site (i.e., toward the railroad tracks) in accordance with our LEED goal to maintain existing drainage patterns on-site. To provide a more pleasing streetscene and soften the edges of the entire property, the existing asphalt in front of the building will be replaced with turf, trees, shrubs and groundcovers, and pea gravel, and the parking lot will be sealed and landscaped. The landscaping will incorporate drought-resistant plantings and water-conserving irrigation heads to help conserve water usage. Automatic gates will be installed at the entry into the faculty/staff/student parking area. A manual gate will be installed at the alley on the north side of the building. The existing chain link fence along Cypress Street will be removed.

Lighting and Signage Standard Chapman University parking lot lighting fixtures will be used in the parking lot. The project will provide buildingmounted signage specifying the building name and address with the Chapman University logo. A freestanding vertical building identification sign will also be provided as shown on page 26.

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PROPOSE D SI TE PLAN AREA CALCULATIONS Lot Size = 47,916 Square Feet Open Space = 12,252 Square Feet % of Open Space = 25.6%

PARKING CALCULATIONS Building Area = 9,532.5 Square Feet Existing Zone = M2 Proposed Use via CUP = General and Professional Office Parking Required @ 4 Spaces Per 1,000 Square Feet = (9,532.5 / 1,000) x 4 = 38 Spaces Parking Provided = 38 Spaces

LEGEND 4’ x 4’ Standard Concrete 2’ x 2’ Standard Concrete Pervious Concrete Pavers Landscape Visitor Parking

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CONTE XT E VALUATI O N Context Evaluation Design of the building renovation has taken into consideration the project’s relationship and compatibility with the surrounding neighborhood through an assessment of historic context, land uses, architectural character, landscape and streetscape. Recent photographs of the site and its surrounding neighborhood are included herein.

1. Adjoining Land Uses • The project is surrounded by a mix of industrial and residential uses. Industrial buildings are located to the north on both sides of Cypress Street, as well as to the south on the west side of Cypress Street. Single-family homes are located on the east side of Cypress Street across the street from the project site and to the south. The railroad is located directly west of and adjacent to the site. • The current zoning designations of the surrounding area are “Light Industrial” (M1), “Industrial Manufacturing” (M2), and “Duplex Residential” (R-2-6). The proposed “General and Professional Office” use on the site under the M2 zoning designation is compatible with the surrounding area.

2. Historic Context

4. Landscape and Streetscape

• The existing building will be preserved and renovated to be compatible with the integrity of the original structure, which was formerly used as a schoolhouse.

• New parkway landscaping with a sidewalk will be provided along the project frontage on the west side of Cypress Street. The parkway planting will continue the existing City street tree program, including species and planting patterns.

• A metal commemorative plaque will be installed on the building to signify the historical importance of this structure. The language content on the plaque will be developed by Chapman University in conjunction with the Orange Barrio Historical Society (OBHS).

3. Building Enhancements • The building exterior will be modified to more closely reflect the building as it existed in the 1930s and 1940s, when it functioned as a schoolhouse. The building interior will be renovated to ensure that the building complies with current State and City codes and regulations. All of the existing original walls within the structure will be retained, and new interior walls will be added according to the building improvement plans.

• Drought-tolerant and water-conserving landscaping will replace the existing pavement along the front of the building and will help to screen the parking lot, resulting in a more pleasant streetscene. The parking lot will be sealed and landscaped, and new lighting will be installed. • Valencia Orange trees, a nod to the area’s agricultural heritage and to the site’s former Villa Park Orchards Association use, will be planted in two groupings of four each in the front yard setback.

• The existing facility is not currently handicap accessible. The renovated building will be improved to be ADA compliant.

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C ON T EX T EVALUAT IO N: EX I STI N G CONDI TI ONS ( SOUTHE A ST E LE VATI O N)

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C ON T EX T EVALUAT IO N: P ROPOSE D PROJ E CT - BUI LDI N G E XTE RIO R O NLY

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C ON T EX T E VALUAT IO N: P R O P O SE D PROJ E CT - BUI LDI N G WI TH LA NDSC API NG

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C ONT EX T EVALUAT ION: E XI STI NG CONDI TI ONS ( E AST E LE VATI O N)

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C ON T EX T EVALUAT IO N: P ROPOSE D PROJ E CT - BUI LDI N G E XTE RIO R O NLY

Note: Although not shown in the proposed project condition, the existing telephone pole will remain its current location in the post-development condition. Note: Although not shown in the proposed project condition, the existing telephone pole will remain its current location in the post-development condition.

CHAPMAN UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY LAW CLINICS

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C ON T EX T E VALUAT IO N: P R O P O SE D PROJ E CT - BUI LDI N G WI TH LA NDSC API NG

Note: Although not shown in the proposed project condition, the existing telephone pole will remain its current location in the post-development condition.

CHAPMAN UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY LAW CLINICS

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