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CHANDNIAZEEZ Design Portfolio


01 THE STACK Community Library

02 DISSOLVE Light Art Installation

03 COLLECT Co-working Office

04 SPIRE Micro-Project, Library

05 HOME BUILDING Foster Care Facility

06 III Custom Fixture

07 SOUS-MARIN Light Installation

08 REDHOOK NYCHA Affordable Housing

09 NEWSPAPER WOOD Material Exploration

10 LAUN-DRAW-MAT Laundromat Interior

11 FARNSWORTH HOUSE Representation & Analysis


EXTERIORVIEW


S

STACKING CONCEPT

S

STACKING CONCEPT

S

STACKING CONCEPT

S

STACKING CONCEPT

THE STACK COMMUNITY LIBRARY

SPRING 2017 DAYLIGHTING STUDIO II NEW YORK, NY

The brief for this studio was to design a community library that was a response to daylight and how it transforms from day to night. When looking into the essence of East Village it has two different characteristics during the day and once the sun has set. The intention of The Stack was to be sensitive to this change and create a beacon within the community. Architecturally, the building, instead of following the Manhattan grid, it is rotated 29 degrees to commemorate the cardinal North. This move then helps the used orient themselves within the building based on the location and movement of the sun. The stacking of the modules further creates small nooks in an open plan giving a sense of privacy while using the library. The stacking of the modules also self shades the building reducing the heat gain while still maintaining optimum daylight factor. The perforations on the facade is strategically located to avoid glare within the building, the density of which changes based on the sun exposure it recieves. This gives an oppurtunity for light to play with the architecture creating fleeting moments of sparkle in the interior. At night it transforms itself into a luminous skin sparkling along the streets of East Village. The use of colored indirect lighting is to add a act of play within the space mimicing the vivacious night life around East Village.


N SITE B

10

TH

STR

E NU

EE T

ISOMETRICVIEW

E AV

D


Day light studies using physical models and Diva calculations were used to determine the density of opening on the facade. The self shading structure was also born out of solutions used to minimize glare especially during the winter months. The perforation also creates moments of sparkle, while creating a permeable skin facilitating visual continuity to the adjacent buildings and streets.

FACADE


TAIL

SOUTHWESTSECTION

When thinking sectionally, a series of staggered double height spaces were provided to give a sense of openness while also giving an oppurtunity to program the space for exhibits and displays within the community library.

BOOKSTA


S

SOUTHEASTSECTION

SOUTH EAST SECTION

The interior of the space is divided by louvered walls housing the book shelves creating moments of visibility to the other side. The louvers also catch the colored indirect lighting creating walls of color on the vertical planes.

FACADE DETAIL


LONGSECTION

Electric Lighting Concept

BOOKSHELFDETAIL


SHORTSECTION

Electric Lighting Concept

GALLERYLIGHTING


100 88

75

63

50

38

25

13

0 L_Diffuse (Cd/Sq.m)

SECOND FLOOR

VIEWFOURTH FLOOR


100 88

75

63

50

38

25

13

0 L_Diffuse (Cd/Sq.m)

THIRD FLOOR

VIEWTHIRD FLOOR


DISSOLVE LIGHT INSTALLATION FALL 2017 LIGHT SPACE ART NEW YORK, NY

Dissolve is a temporary art installation conducted by students in the Light Space Art elective, within the Master of Fine Arts Lighting Design program at Parsons School of Design. It looks at the point of confluence between interior and exterior, artificial light and natural light, as each dissolves into the other over time. The installation was a temporary art work that served as a feature and back-drop for the Natural Light and Architecture conference that took place at Arnhold Hall, The New School on 26th October, 2017. The Light Space Art elective includes students from multiple disciplines and schools across Parsons. Here students explore the phenomenal relationship between light and material and the effect on human perception. Experiments are conducted empirically through physical constructs so that the students experience first-hand the perceptual dynamics at play. Many of the spatial, theoretical and material experiments examined early in the semester converged in the final installation. Response to the unique attributes of the installation site, light relationships and the conceptual intent were considered in relation to the physicality of the work and construction details. Thus, fabrication, prototyping and construction of intervention were significant pedagogical foci in the class.


Firstly, it was determined that the scale of the windows offered an opportunity to draw attention to the fusion between natural and artificial light in a quiet but powerful way, without demanding constant attention to dazzling effects, so as to not detract from the event presentations. The scale and number of windows helped to guide the material choice towards rudimentary fabrics that could be accessible en masse, whilst the concept demanded a fabric that could act as a luminous ‘canvas’ for the interplay between interior and exterior light, allowing both sides to be seen in the same plane.


COLLECT CO-WORKING OFFICE FALL2016 LIGHTING STUDIO 1 NEW YORK

Who did we make collect for? Today’s millennial workers don’t keep a standard routine— they contemplate and create around the clock. At Collect, we know it’s important to develop sparks at the moment they strike, which is why we provide a 24/7 home for gathering thoughts and blending ideas into incredible things.Our space is inspired by the most essential, elemental aspects of nature that work to boost health and creativity whilesupporting designing, building, reflecting and iterating. The Lighting Phenomenas occuring in nature were chosen to fit a particular task that one would perform outdoors. These phenomenas were then abstracted to create interior spaces that best reflect the mood of the natural lighting through electric light. The lighting design apears fluid with a distinct character to each space creating the excitement as one moves through the space.


OBSERVED IMPACTS OF ECO-DESIGN From Terrapin Bright Green, “14 Patterns of Biophilic Design,” available online from https://www.terrapinbrightgreen.com/reports/14-patterns/

STRESS REDUCTION

COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE

MENTAL HEALTH

VISUAL CONNECTION TO NATURE

LOWER BLOOD PRESSURE & HEART RATE

IMPROVED ENGAGEMENT & ATTENTIVENESS

POSITIVELY IMPACTED ATTITUDE & OVERALL HAPPINESS

PRESENCE OF WATER

INCREASED FEELINGS OF TRANQUILITY

ENHANCED PERCEPTION & RESPONSIVENESS

POSITIVE EMOTIONAL RESPONSES

DIFFUSE LIGHT

POSITIVELY IMPACTED CIRCADIAN SYSTEM

CONNECTION WITH NATURAL SYSTEMS

ENHANCED POSITIVE HEALTH RESPONSES; SHIFTED PERCEPTION

BIOMORPHIC FORMS AND PATTERNS

OBSERVED VIEW PREFERENCE

IMPROVED CONCENTRATION & PERCEPTION OF SAFETY

REFUGE SPACE

CO-WORKING

OFFICE

CONFERENCE

CORRIOR

GLOW

GLOW

GLOW

GLOW

×

REFLECTION

×

REFLECTION

REFLECTION

×

REFLECTION

TRANSMISSION

TRANSMISSION

TRANSMISSION

SHADOW

SHADOW

×

SHADOW

× ×

TRANSMISSION

✓ ✓

SPARKLE

SPARKLE

×

SPARKLE

SPARKLE

FLEX SPACE

IMMERSION

GLOW

×

GLOW

REFLECTION

CAFE

SHADOW

STAIRCASE × ×

GLOW

TRANSMISSION

GLOW

REFLECTION

× ×

REFLECTION

REFLECTION

×

TRANSMISSION

TRANSMISSION

×

TRANSMISSION

×

SHADOW

×

SHADOW

SHADOW

SHADOW

×

SPARKLE

×

SPARKLE

×

SPARKLE

×

SPARKLE

PHENOMENON OF LIGHT IN NATURE


FIRSTFLOOR

SECONDFLOOR

THIRDFLOOR


10% 20%

SCRIM LAYERS

30% 40%

Section through a cloud

Layering of Cloud Sections

The Co-working spaces were an extract of cloudy day and the feeling of working under a diffused light thats constantly fleeting. The abstraction was done by disecting a single cloud and then lining them up with a translucent material to create suble changes of dark and shadow within the space.

FLOORPLAN

CEILINGPLAN


CO-WORKINGOFFICE


GLOW

×

REFLECTION

× ×

TRANSMISSION

SPARKLE

SHADOW


Evolution of form from stars

Reflectors to direct the light creating sparkle

CEILINGPLAN The hallways at collect was to reimagine what it feels like to take a stroll under the starry sky.


CORRIDOR


MOCK-UP ONE TO ONE SCALE


Evolution of form

Movement of light around the form

CEILINGPLAN

SECTION


FLEXIBLESPACE


SECTION


SPIRE LIBRARY AND STUDY SPACE SPRING2017 DAY-LIGHTING STUDIO I PARSONS, NEW YORK Professor: Derek Porter, Nelson Jenkins, Davidson Norris, Matt Franks

Floating volumes of light within a generally dark space function as the focal piece of Spire. As one ascends from the groundto the top level, their sense of perception and scale to the sky changes, they transition between dark to light, disappearing into the light as they enter the spire (carrels) and re-appearing into the darkness as they exit. In order to perceive a sensitivity to light, uniformity of material such as concrete is intentionally chosen as the encompassing material. Three structural masses are extruded from the ceiling, evoking buildings rising up from the ground, while the surrounding elements like the entry lounge and meeting area are situated in the surrounding landscape. Light slices the volumes at different planes, exposing hidden movement within the spires. The two lower spires function as conventional study carrels, letting in diffused daylight, while the top spire functions as a sanctum for studying opening up to the sky, letting in direct daylight. Natural light also pours in from the skylight above the meeting room and the offset northwestern wall which helps for wayfinding as well as drawing people to the back of the space (hence the transition from dark to light). The electric lighting captures the same essence of day by strategically placing lights in the same areas where the sun intervenes. The pathway to the final spire glows with concealed light further emphasizing the journey.


SECTIONALELEVATION

PLAN


SECTION


SECTION


AGi32VIEW


LIGHTING WITHIN THE SPIRE

LIGHTING DETAIL FOR THE BACK WALL


HOME BUILDING A BUILDING WHERE HOMES ARE KEPT FALL 2017 ALLIED STUDIO

HARLEM, NEW YORK

The objective of this project was to readapt an existing building at Harlem on 125th street into a Foster Care Facility for children between the ages of 13 to 21. The intention was to house teen in different home types based on their needs. The design of the space addressed the relationship between dependency and interdependency among the teens to best facilitate their growth as individuals and in society. The challenges faced with the project was to communicate design solutions for an underprivileged part of a community using economic and budget friendly design concepts. One had to be mindful of designing spaces that brought about a sense of ownership of the space while still being sensitive to the trauma faced by the teens occupying the space. Lighting played a significant role in bringing about the idea of control within the space. The idea that the teens have the freedom to transform their environments through design while still giving them a secure space that they could always turn back to.


A central core runs through the height of the building providing a multifunctional core. Besides being a circulation path between the different floors of the building it also provided an oppurtunity to facilitate a front door to each Home creating a sense of entering one’s own Home. The perforated wall also acted as a glowing Hearth at night orienting one within the building


COREDETAIL


GROUP HOMESECTION


GROUP HOMESECTION

GROUP HOME

GROUP HOME NIGHT RENDER


BACKYARDOPPURTUNITY

BACKYARDCHOICE The intention of naming the public spaces The Backyard is to create a sense of belonging with programs that would resemble activities that one would find oneself doing in a suburban backyard. There are two lighting modes within the space Oppurtunity : The space is fitted with occupancy sensors that would turn on an ambient light giving the user an idea of the different oppurtunity that the space provides Choice: Once the space is presented to the teen, the teen then has the freedom to choose the activity which then allows them to turn on the light related to that particular task. This is a metaphor to the sense of agency the space can provide to the teens who chose to use it.


The 7th floor of the building provided a double height space which was transformed into a multi-functional hub where teens could gather to eat a meal, socialize and meet other residents of the building. Sense of inclusivity was a big factor in deciding how this space was designed.


This sense of inclusivity was brought about by small interventions that would make the experience of the space convenient to all users. Ramps were provided at the meal counter for better reach. Counter heights were varied in the open kitchen to encourage physically challenged kids to feel a part of the space. The dining table itself was considerate to multiple users, customizing it to provide easy access to a wheelchair user


Sense of inclusivity was emphasized by the cafetaria tables that easily folded in to create a opening where a wheelchair could comfortable slide in without requiring help. This was to give the physically challenged an option to decide where they wanted to sit and eat, instead of providing dedicated tables which might hinder their sense of belonging from the Foster Community that was housed in the building


I I I CUSTOM FIXTURE FALL 2017 ALLIED STUDIO

HARLEM, NEW YORK

This was a custom fixture built around an off-the shelf fluorescent lamp and ballast. The fixture was designed for a Foster Care Facility where economy of means played a huge role in making design decisions both in terms of lighting and interior of the place. The fixture itself is made of a 2x4 piece of wood with a cnc-ed piece of ply that holds two mesh structures on either side acting as shielding from the glare from the lamp. The mesh itself is coated with a pulp made of recycled paper creating an organic pattern on the exterior. This makes for moments of sparkle when moving around the fixture itself. The fixture was designed in order to be adaptable to multiple lamp lengths and mounting positions making it a flexible, easy to use custom fixture.


1


SOUS-MARIN LIGHT INTERVENTION FALL2016 LIGHTING STUDIO 1 PARSONS, NEW YORK

Sous-Marin is a light installation that was proposed and built in a team of three. The project site was the Recycling Station located on the 5th floor of The New School, University Centre, New York. The project was installed permanently for a month. The intent of our intervention is to capture and create attention to the space through light, shadow and color; creating a challenge to overlay new elements over the already existing presence of color and light in the environment.The ultimate goal is to transform the existing conditions to excite the users of the space. The Installation was based on the concept of reflection creating multiple beams of light in different directions with just one source of light. This idea was further developed by introducing color. reflectors were designed in a modular format using acrylic mirror and dichroic plastic placed at angles that were calculated on site based the required direction of light. This was made possible by mounting the modules on a panel of ball bearings which could then be adjusted according to site conditions.


MOUNTING PANEL

DICHROIC ACRYLIC MOUNTED ON PANEL

PLYWOOD PANEL

3

BALL JOINTS


REFLECTOR | MODULES


Light flooding from the adjacent Locker Room with reflective white metal locker doors, creating a glowing white space near the hallway. Light from the adjacent studio class rooms shed some light onto the hallway through the clear stories above

PLAN

REFLECTED CEILING PLAN

HIGHEST LIGHT LEVEL: 190.9 LUX LOWEST LIGHT LEVEL: 2.2 LUX

SITE SURVEY | LIGHT LEVELS


SOURCE4 JR.

REFLECTOR PANEL

LIGHT INSTALLATION | PROPOSAL


SITE MAP | REDHOOK, BROOKLYN


REDHOOK AFFORDABLE HOUSING SPRING2016 INTERIOR STUDIO 2 BROOKLYN, NEW YORK

The objective of the project was to formulate a design solution for affordable housing in Redhook, Brooklyn. This was then to be supported by a Program that would help sustain the design over a scale of 1200 apartment units through the campus of Redhook. One of the biggest challenges of a community like Redhook is the sheer amount of people who live on campus. The Program was to transform this into a strength. With more people comes more household waste. So The question asked here was ‘How can one use hosehold waste as resources to make materials that can then be reapplied to the same source of waste as a finished interior product?’ This then led to designing transformable interior spaces that could be customized to the occupants needs as the family grows and changes during their life in the apartment. By standardising the core grid of the furniture and breaking them up into panels, the issue of maintainance and reapplication is solved. All one needs to do is replace a panel instead of an entire door or closet.


PROGRAM | REDHOOK, BROOKLYN

4.3

AVG PERSON POUNDS OF GARBAGE PER DAY

7 TONS OF GARBAGE CAN FILL

1 FOOT OF THE

APARTMENT WITH RUBBISH

10,000 PEOPLE ADDING UP TO 43,000 POUNDS OF

REDHOOK HAS AN AVG OF

GARBAGE PER DAY

1/3 SOLID WASTE 7 TONS PER DAY THE APARTMENT WILL

FULL

BE RUBBISH IN

8 DAYS

2/3 COMPOST WASTE 14 TONS PER DAY

SECTION

OF

BASEMENTPLAN


GLASS

PAPER

PLASTIC

WASTESHOOT

SEGREGATION OF FLOOR PLATE

METAL


FLOOR PLAN | TWO BEDROOM APARTMENT


SECTION 1

SECTION 2

SECTION 3

SECTION 4


PLAN | MOVING ELEMENTS

KITCHENCOUNTERDETAIL

DININGTABLEDETAIL


GLASS

PAPER

PANEL WITH HIDDEN FRAME

PLASTIC

PANEL WITH FRAME SHOWING

FRAME

PANELDETAIL

METAL


DOORDETAIL


NEWSPAPER WOOD MATERIAL STUDY FOR AFORDABLE HOUSING SPRING2016 DESIGN STUDIO II PARSONS,NEW YORK

An Ongoing Material Study to make materials for interior space made out of household waste. The material study is part of a studio project to reimagine apartment interiors for low-income housing. Newspaper wood is still under testing and development in aims of making a viable, lightweight and cost effective material.

6” x 4” x 3/4”


The process involves making a trunk using veneers of Newspaper. All purpose flour was used to make the adhesive to hold the form

The Newspaper Trunk is then cut like how one would cut a wooden trunk.

The text and imagery in the Newspaper form together to mimic the grains of wood


LAUN-DRAW-MAT THE ART OF LAUNDRY FALL2015 DESIGN STUDIO I NEW YORK

The Brief of the project was to reimagine the task of Laundry and how one could transform the interior space. The inspiration of the project came from the cyclic movement constantly present at a Laundromat and to transform this movement into a form of interactive art that changes the interiors with time. The frequency and inhabitation of space is the desiding factor of how the interior changes.


A Machine is connected to the motor that spins the Washer/Dryer and with this action the Drawing Machine is set in motion. The Washer/Dryers are further interlinked with each other, hence the drawings on the walls would change depending on how many machines are being used at a time or at what time. This then creates an abstract mapping of the activity of the space. Markers are fixed to the carts that circulate the space, turning the space black overtime with use.


FARNSWORTH HOUSE A STUDY OF STRUCTURE FALL2015 REPRESENTATION &ANALYSIS PARSONS, NEW YORK

An analysis of the Farnsworth House by Mies Van de Rohe and using various media represent the character of the house.

EXPLICIT CORPSE

A Split Axonometry Medium: Marker, White Charcoal and Ink on Velum. Backed by watercolor on paper


GRID RELATION collage of axonometry, perspective & plan Medium: Gold Fillement, White Charcoal and Ink onVelum. Backed by watercolor on paper


NEWSPAPER WOOD MATERIAL STUDY FOR AFORDABLE HOUSING SPRING2016 DESIGN STUDIO II PARSONS,NEW YORK

An Ongoing Material Study to make materials for interior space made out of household waste. The material study is part of a studio project to reimagine apartment interiors for low-income housing. Newspaper wood is still under testing and development in aims of making a viable, lightweight and cost effective material.

6” x 4” x 3/4”

azeec677@newschool.edu Ph: (929) 312 5392

Design Portfolio | Chandni Azeez  

Lighting | Architecture | Interior

Design Portfolio | Chandni Azeez  

Lighting | Architecture | Interior

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