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EXPLORING (DAY)LIGHTING & IEQ EDUCATIONAL & WORK ENVIRONMENTS ALEX ALLEN

ARLYN HUME

CHAMRAY MACDONALD

SHAILA QUEAU-GUZZI


TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION CURRENT DESIGN PERFORMANCE EVALUATION Daylight HVAC/Lighting Artificial Lighting

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION SITE ANALYSIS PROPOSED DESIGN BIBLIOGRAPHY


04


INTRODUCTION The Architecture 2 building is a 1960s construct on the University of Manitoba Fort Garry Campus. This concrete structure was originally used as the Fine Arts building when it was initially constructed but later became the Architecture 2 building. Our space, the East side of the 300 level consists of a large studio space, faculty offices, storage and a male and female washroom. Students and teachers work in highly stimulating visual environments, enabling visual comfort to be a necessity. The definition of visual comfort resides in the satisfaction of the visual system and the absence of glare (AFE, 1995). Visual comfort is influenced by architectural, interior, and human factors. These factors include a view towards the exterior, diverse luminous conditions, and a degree of perceived control. This document aims to explore design methods to successfully achieve visual comfort as well as strive for LEED credits.

05


CURRENT DESIGN

N Furniture Plan Level 300 Architecture 2 Scale: 1/16”= 1’-0”

06


CURRENT DESIGN HVAC/Occupancy

The East 300 Level of the Architecture 2 Building is occupied by both students and staff members of the Faculty of Architecture. 50 percent of the occupied space is designated to student studio space, 25 percent is allocated to Faculty offices and the other 25 percent is occupied by circulation space, computer rooms, storage and washrooms. Currently, the North studio space is cluttered with desks, studio partitions and student work. HVAC runs along the North wall of the studio space in the form of heaters, and along the South wall of studio runs HVAC supply and return vents. The Ladies washroom has two vents for HVAC circulation; it is unknown as to the HVAC systems in the staff offices. The studio space frequently occupied all day, everyday from September to May by both students and staff, but during the summer months is rarely used. Currently the lights are always on the entire floor, wasting electricity during the summer months and sunny days when minimal to no artificial lighting is needed for studio tasks. The offices are used all year round, although most occupants are not in everyday and are only in during the daytime. Right now every office has its own toggle switches for users, which allows users to decide if they want artificial lighting or not. The circulation paths such as the hallways and stairwell are used most frequently as they are used staff, students and visitors. Lighting in these areas is also always on and because there are no windows in theses spaces, they rely solely on artificial lighting.

N

Occupancy

Rarely used

Weekday & partime weekend use

Full time weekday & weekend use

Main circulation

06


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL P

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

ED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

CURRENT DESIGN

Section C-C

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT Section D-D Scale: 1/8”= 1’-0”

08

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATION

AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Scale: 1/8”= 1’-0”


CURRENT DESIGN

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Section A-A Scale: 1/8”= 1’-0”

Section B-B Scale: 1/8”= 1’-0”

09

PRODUCED PRODUCED BY AN BYAUTODESK AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCT

PRODUCED PRODUCED BY AN BYAUTODESK AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

B

B

301

301B

301A

303

303A

301 cor

300st

304cor 306B 306A 305B 305A

300

304B 304A

A

A

Natural daylight is plentiful in the South staff offices, while natural daylight in studio is limited by its North exposure.

10

C

D

N

Level 300 Architecture 2 Scale: 1/16”= 1’-0”

Building

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

C

D

DAYLIGHTING


PRODUCED BYPRODUCED AN AUTODESK BY AN EDUCATIONAL AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED PRODUCED PRODUCED BY BY ANHVAC/LIGHTING AN AUTODESK BY AUTODESK AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL EDUCATIONAL EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT

DESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED PRODUCED PRODUCED BY BY ANAN AUTODESK BY AUTODESK AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL EDUCATIONAL EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED PRODUCED BY AN BY AUTODESK AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCT

PRODUCED PRODUCED BY AN BY AUTODESK AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED PRODUCED BY AN BY AUTODESK AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCT

Vent Supply Recessed Lighting

N

Reflected Ceiling Plan Scale: 1/16”= 1’-0”

11

PRODUCED PRODUCED BY AN BY AUTODESK AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCT

Vent Return

NO ACCESS

301301 301 301301 301

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

2’x 2’ Fluorescent

301

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

301

1’x 4’ Fluorescent

301

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUC

301 2’x 4’ Fluorescent

301

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

01

301

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

DUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT


ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING Current lighting in studio, hallways and washrooms is by fluorescent luminaires, while the staff offices are lit by both fluorescent luminaires and recessed lighting. The office lighting is controlled by single toggle switches, while hallway and studio lighting is controlled in sections. The recessed luminaires have Philips Halogen lamps which produce a pure, white, sparkling light. The principle of operation and the construction of halogen lamps enables them to provide the following benefits as compared to normal incandescent lamps: longer life, whiter light, higher efficacy, and no bulb blackening. This makes the Philips Halogen lamps the ideal choice for a wide range of applications in: shops, homes, hotels, restaurants, commercial interiors, museums, art galleries etc (Binggeli, 291). Halogen gas is added to the gas filling of these lamps which combines with the tungsten filament to form tungsten-halide molecules. The lamp is constructed in such a way that the wall temperature of the glass bulb remains above 250° C. By doing this the tungsten-halide molecules are prevented from condensing on the inner bulb wall and the wall remains clean. However,the tungsten-halide molecules migrate close to the filament and this causes them to dissociate. The tungsten is deposited on the filament and the halogen is freed, hence both are available to repeat the cycle. Unfortunately the process is not regenerative (Binggeli, 291). • Color Temperature: 2,900 degrees Kelvin • Light Output: 530 lumens • Diameter: 4.75 inches • Watts: 45W • Voltage: 130V • Beam: Flood (25o)

12


ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING Fluorescent lamps produce light by passing an electric arc through a mixture of an inert gas (argon or argon / krypton) and mercury. The mercury radiates ultraviolet energy that is transformed to visible light by the phosphor coating on the bulb. Fluorescent lamps are more efficient at producing light compared to standard incandescent and halogens. In fact, their efficacy is 4-8 times that of the filament sources (Illuminating Engineering Society, 2011). The Architecture 2 building design specifications indicated that fluorescent ballasts be used, specifically Phillips SSB2 Series 120v Electronic T8, along with 32W T8 4100K lamps. The fluorescent ballasts found on the third floor are Phillips SSB2 Electronic Series. Electronic ballasts are used to provide the proper starting and operating electrical condition to power one or more fluorescent lamps. Electronic ballasts usually change the frequency of the power from the standard mains frequency of 50 - 60 Hz to 20 000 Hz or higher, substantially eliminating the stroboscopic effect of flicker associated with fluorescent lighting (Illuminating Engineering Society, 2011). High frequency ballasts produce lighting efficiently, making their use cost effective. The ballasts also provide comfort by eliminating visible flicker and audible noise, which may be disrupting in a learning environment. The lamps used in Architecture 2 are Phillips Universal T8, 32 watt, linear fluorescent lamps. The lamps have a color temperature of 4100 degrees Kelvin and a color rating of 78; the lamps appear “cool white” in color. The lamps are 48 inches long, and use Philips ALTO technology, meaning that they have low mercury content and are consequently better for the environment than conventional fluorescent lamps. McGowan’s Light Source Selection Guide indicates lamps with 3,500- 4,100K are suited for general lighting in offices, schools, stores, medicine, display lighting, and sports lighting. Lamps with a CRI of 70-79 are suited for most offices spaces, retail, school, medical, and recreational spaces, (McGowan, 385). • Rated Lamp Life: 20,000 hours • Color Temperature: 4,100 degrees Kelvin (cool white) • Color Rendering: 78 CRI • Light Output: 2,800 lumens • Length: 48 inches • Alto Universal T8 lamps provide 33% longer life then standard T8 products. Lensed troffers are used in the studio and offices spaces. Parabolic louver troffers are used in the main corridors and in the computer labs to shape light distribution and help shield the lamps from direct view, reducing glare.

13


PERFORMANCE EVALUATION Current Daylight Readings: On-Site Measurements 9 AM

(February 22nd)

7200

750 750 660 851 909 723 1000 843 707 1047 1047 770 735 1024 790 1095

845.31

612 612 107 592 766 681 820 486 687 795 831 995 937 840 784 527

692.00

283 283 245 367 298 322 337 276 397 785 520 524 520 321 610 272

397.5

328 328 190 184 189 175 256 221 201 373 183 368 130 260 401 198

261.56

145 145 119 133 167 124 193 150 132 176 212 154 195 146 273 180

165.25

176 103

94.88

56

14

AVERAGE PER ROW (LUX)

116 108 105 145 77

134 79

54

54

102 90

56

63

50

30

60

38

23

50

370 370

365

225 200 295 264 200 230

250 230 150 130

252.32

470 450

780

200 175 425 420 538 523

638 623 138 123

461.77

780 750

780

700 775 825 720 738 723

738 723 338 223

18 290

N

677.92


PERFORMANCE EVALUATION Current Daylight Readings: On-Site Measurements

3 PM

(February 22nd)

18 100

AVERAGE PER ROW (LUX)

1459 1456 1237 1237 1256 1856 1395 2005 1456 2100 2100 1450 1405 2050 1340 2630

1652.00

1256 1225 624 1065 1065 1467 1201 1016 1257 1562 1207 1307 1106 1025 1285 1260

1182.94

650 625 360 360 570 738 701 756 656 990 1040 1050 560 552 650 650

679.88

406 456 195 195 252 362 456 498 325 450 360 656 150 285 400 326

360.75

203 201 165 175 176 261 225 245 156 227 150 306 150 200 360 170

210.63

90

120 101 106 113 106 90

112.63

107 106 105 110 285 87

101 95

80

55

41

60

38

23

50

370 370

365

532 500 595 564 500 530

450 430 130 126

420.15

470 450

780

874 923 1002

450 438 138 130

589.62

780 750

780

949 538 523

1243 1208 1500 1576 1432 1232

50 200

1123 1069

238 200

1007.77 N

15


PERFORMANCE EVALUATION Plan and Section Analysis

A

B

C

N Site lines from area to perimeter section glazing Scale: 1/16”= 1’-0”

16


PERFORMANCE EVALUATION Plan and Section Analysis

A

B

C

N Optimal viewing area of perimeter glazing Scale: 1/16”= 1’-0”

17


PERFORMANCE EVALUATION Plan and Section Analysis

Standing View - POINT A

18

Sitting View - POINT A


PERFORMANCE EVALUATION Plan and Section Analysis

Standing Views- POINT B

Sitting Views - POINT B

19


PERFORMANCE EVALUATION Plan and Section Analysis

Standing Views - POINT C

20

Sitting Views - POINT C


PERFORMANCE EVALUATION Plan and Section Analysis

Plan View From these views it is easy to see that the majority of the day lit spaces provide some type of view within the occupant’s field of vision. We can even see by the amount of overlap that most of the space provides numerous views to the exterior. This also shows us possibilities for shadows and how natural light can filter in. During class lectures we discussed day lighting being used for task lighting up to a depth of two times the height of the window this means that on both sides of the building, day lighting should be able to light the majority of the space throughout the day. Section Views Point A- The full length windows maximize both the view to the exterior and amount of daylight in the user’s field of vision. This also increases glare, but fortunately most of the tall windows are narrow and surrounded by the thick structural columns. Point B- The stacked windows also maximize both the view to the exterior and amount of daylight in the user’s field of vision. Glare could be high in the affected areas, but because they are on the North side of the building only, there is less direct light. Also, the two windows at direct eye level are operable and have screens which further prevent direct daylight. Point C- The floor height windows offer lots of daylight, but only about half of which is within the field of vision of the occupant. This is acceptable because the daylight not in the field of vision is at eye level, drastically reducing direct glare on the occupant, while still allowing plenty of daylight into the space.

South View North View

21


PERFORMANCE EVALUATION Design Calculations

Our goal was to redesign with minimal changes to the building envelope, this way we can maximize the potential of the existing building and place a focus on materials and finishes. This also reduces cost and increases the potential redesign to be probable. By raising the VLT of the windows on the North side, it would bring more natural light into the space, unfortunately it would be necessary to add more windows to meet the LEED daylighting credit (0.150-0.180). Despite this, we find that the space has enough windows to provide adequate day lighting for the activities occurring in the studio space. Creating openings in the envelope 30”-90” off the ground would create glare problems for students. Including all the windows in the calculation would drastically change the daylighting measurement, however this is not an option because the horizontal windows are higher than 90” above the finished floor. By including the horizontal window strips, the calculation still falls short by approximately 0.06, but would increase the current calculation by 0.05. In order to meet the LEED standard a majority of the exterior wall would need to be replaced with windows. The wall space is currently being used by the students to hang their process work. If removed, another means of vertical display would need to be implemented. On the South side, simply raising the VLT from approximately 0.62 to 0.8 would allow most of the offices to reach LEED standards. Unfortunately, the total area of office space is less than 50% of the regularly occupied space and therefore does not fulfil the requirement.

90” 30”

e

90”

c 30”

22

d

a b


PERFORMANCE EVALUATION Design Calculations

LEED Certification Calculations 0.150 < VLT x WFR < .180 VLT~0.62

Room 300

Room 305A

window c- 48 x 29 = 1392sq/in x 1 = 1392sq/in = 116sq/ft window d- 48 x 8.5 = 408sq/in x 1 = 408sq/in = 34sq/ft

window d- 48 x 8.5 = 408sq/in x 1 = 408sq/in = 34sq/ft window e- 39 x 30 = 1170sq/in x 3 = 3510sq/in = 292.5sq/ft

floor- 116 x 173 = 20 068sq/in = 1 672.3sq/ft

floor- 137 x 173 = 23 701sq/in = 1975.1sq/ft

116 + 34 / 1 672.3 = 8.97%

34 + 292.5 / 1975.1 = 16.53%

0.0897 x 0.62 = 0.056

0.1653 x 0.62 = 0.10249

Room 301

Room 305B

window window window window

abcd-

18 21 48 48

x x x x

28 = 504sq/in x 5 = 2520sq/in = 210sq/ft 28 = 588sq/in x 5 = 2940sq/in = 245sq/ft 29 = 1392sq/in x 1 = 1392sq/in = 116sq/ft 8.5 = 408sq/in x 1 = 408sq/in = 34sq/ft

floor- 936 x 364 = 340 704sq/in = 28 392sq/ft

window e- 39 x 30 = 1170sq/in x 3 = 3510sq/in = 292.5sq/ft floor- 120 x 173 = 20 760sq/in = 1730sq/ft 292.5 / 1730 = 16.91% 0.1691 x 0.62 = 0.10484

210 + 245 + 116 + 34 / 28 392 = 2.13% 0.0213 x 0.62 = 0.0132

Rooms 304A, 304B window e- 39 x 30 = 1170sq/in x 4 = 4680sq/in = 390sq/ft floor- 140 x 173 = 24 220sq/in = 2 018.3sq/ft 390 / 2018.3 = 19.32%

Room 306B window e- 39 x 30 = 1170sq/in x 4 = 4680sq/in = 390sq/ft floor- 128 x 173 = 22 144sq/in = 1845.3sq/ft 390 / 1845.3 = 21.13% 0.2113 x 0.62 = 0.131

0.1932 x 0.62 = 0.11978

23


PERFORMANCE EVALUATION Daylight Filtration

September 21, 9:00am Model

Sketch-Up

Rm 306A

24

Corridor 304

Rm 305A

Studio 301


PERFORMANCE EVALUATION Daylight Filtration

September 21, 3:00pm Model

Sketch-Up

Rm 306A

Studio 301

Corridor 304

25


PERFORMANCE EVALUATION Daylight Filtration

December 21, Sunrise 8:34 am Model

Sketch-Up

Rm 305A

Rm 304A

26

Corridor 304


PERFORMANCE EVALUATION Daylight Filtration

December 21, Sunset 4:27 PM Model

Sketch-Up

Rm 305A

Rm 304A

Corridor 304

27


SITE ANALYSIS

South Facade

Where and how a building is positioned on the earth affects its design. Climates vary with the Earthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s position in relation to the sun and with latitude and longitude. The climate of a particular building site is determined by the sunâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s angle and path. Winnipeg is located at 49 degrees latitude north, which is considered a cold climate. From a point on the ground at this latitude, the sun is above the horizon for 16 hours, 12 minutes during the summer solstice and 8 hours, 14 minutes during the winter solstice (Pearson Education, 2012). Plants near buildings foster privacy, provide wind protection, and reduce sun glare and heat. They can frame views and also moderate noise. Deciduous plants grow and drop their leaves in a cyclical response to outdoor temperature than to the position of the sun. The sun reaches its maximum strength between March 21 and September 21, while providing the most shade between June and October when the days are the warmest (Binggeli, 12). Deciduous and coniferous shade trees are found at the north and south sides of the building that help to shade the building from the hot sun in the summer and allow winter sunlight through. The evergreen tress located on the south east side of the Architecture 2 building help to reduce snow glare and cast long shadows while the sun is low in the early mornings (Binggeli, 12). Trees ability to provide shade depends upon their orientation to the sun, proximity to a building, shape, height, and spread of foliage. 28


SITE ANALYSIS December 21, Sunset 4:30pm

N

December 21, Sunrise 8:24am

September 21, 9:00am

September 21, 3:00pm

These diagrams show that there is a large enough distance between the surrounding buildings that it does not shade or shadow our building. 29


PROPOSED DESIGN Exterior Shading: High skin-to-volume ratio is good for day lighting but may adversely affect thermal balance. Use building form and exterior shading to reduce peak cooling load and save on HVAC costs (Envelope & room decisions). Lighting controls: Energy efficient lighting control strategies can reduce consumption over uncontrolled installations by up to 60% without reducing light effectiveness (Binggeli, 297). Lighting control systems are used for working, aesthetic, and security illumination. Digital control interfaces allow users the ability to remotely power individual or groups of lights, operate dimmers, and pre-program space lighting levels. A major advantage of a lighting control system over conventional individual switching is the ability to control any light, group of lights, or all lights in a building from a single user interface. Any light or device can be controlled from any location. This ability to control multiple light sources from a user device allows complex â&#x20AC;&#x153;light zonesâ&#x20AC;? to be created (Daintree, 2010). A room may have multiple scenes available, each one created for different activities in the room. Lighting schedules can be devised based on chronological timing throughout the day, specific astronomical times including sun rise and sun set, specific days of the week or days in a month or year. This type of lighting schedule would accommodate for the times of the year where there are typically less hours being spent in studio spaces. Higher Reflectance Surfaces: Insuring that wall and ceiling surfaces are finished in high reflectance materials will help day light travel deeper into the space. Optimal surface reflectance includes: Ceiling-80-92% reflectance Walls 49-60% reflectance Floors 20-40% reflectance Furniture 25-45% reflectance (Binggeli, 283). In 2008, ICI Paints launched Ecosure, a range of decorative paints under the Dulux Trade brand that were specifically designed to balance performance with strong environmental credentials. Several technologies were applied in parallel: the use of low carbon opacifying pigment, opacifying polymer spheres, highperformance polymer resin and dry hiding technology. ICI Paints developed a range of paints with enhanced reflectivity called Light & Space. These paints have a light absorption value of 8%, compared with 16% for a conventional paint. As a result, they make rooms feel lighter, brighter and more spacious (Green Business Award, 2009). Independent testing by the Buildings Research Establishment discovered that up to 22% less lighting energy is needed in rooms using paints from the Light & Space range. As a result, lower lighting power levels can be installed or artificial lighting can be left off for longer. Alternatively, a wider range of colours can be used while still meeting current recommended standards and legal obligations for light reflectance value (Green Business Award, 2009). 30

Occupancy sensors: Incorporating passive infrared sensors (PIR), in the washrooms and the small print lab in the studio would allow electric light to be utilized only when the space was being occupied (Binggeli, 297).


PROPOSED DESIGN Daylight sensors: Reducing the amount of unnecessary light in spaces will not only reduce costs, but also create healthier work environments. Installing luminaires with daylight sensors would create a space that would stay the same brightness when being used. It would take advantage of all possible daylighting, but as the natural light fades, photosensors constantly measuring the amount of light in the space would increase the amount of artificial light. Lower partitions: Tall objects, like dividers and bookcases obstruct both direct and reflected light. Implementing horizontal storage units with adjustable shelving in the studio space would enable students to store models, drawings, materials and equipment below their workspaces. Vertical shelving installed along the back walls of the space may help to remove stacked clutter that has formed in the central studio work zone. Providing students with partitions that are 48” or less in height would accommodate adequate division of space and privacy as well as permit the light to travel further in the space (Dubois, 2007). Replace Windows: For our calculations, we assumed the windows had an approximate VLT (visible light transmittance) of 0.62. Most windows are between 0.6 and 0.8, so to simply install newer windows that have both a higher R-value and closer to 0.8 VLT would drastically increase the amount of daylight in the space. This would not only raise the overall studio prescriptive, but would make the offices on the South side within LEED standards. An example of the type of window that could be a replacement are Clear, triple pane windows from All Weather Windows. They have a VLT of almost 0.8, but still have a higher R-value than the dual pane option (All Weather Windows, 2012). Add Windows: Complex views with changing activities are preferable to static views. Sky alone is not a preferred view and views that include the horizon are better. We would therefore add a row of windows following the lowest windows on the studio side to add daylight to the overall space and give the occupants access. Esthetically, it would also mimic the lower windows on the South side of the building, giving the two sides a more coherent look. Ceiling: By converting the existing waffle ceiling configuration to a smooth sloped surface the light will bounce deeper into the space. We would recommend doing this in the studio space, starting 11’ up at the perimeter and sloping down to the 9’ bulkhead near the core of the building. The ceiling should be finished in a material that has 49-60% reflectance. Borrow Light: The way that the building was designed, offices make up the South side of the building, this is unfortunate as that is where the most daylight comes in. We would use transient windows above the doors and introducing translucent materials into the doors themselves (such as frosted windows) to borrow some of the excess daylight from those spaces for the long narrow corridor. This would cut back on how much artificial lighting was necessary to light that space.

31


PROPOSED DESIGN Model AFTER

BEFORE

In model view we can see how the sloped ceiling would bounce more light to the back of the back wall in the studio space. It also shows how the addition of another row of windows casts a brighter wash across the floor of the space.

32


PROPOSED DESIGN Sketch-Up AFTER

BEFORE

In Sketch-Up we can again see the overall brightened space, but we can also see a larger view the exterior at a eye level, which would raise the visual comfort of the space.

33


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

B

B

301

301B

301A

303

303A

301 cor

300st

304cor 306B 306A 305B 305A

300

304B 304A

N

Level 300 Architecture 2 C

D

= Higher reflectancy walls = Translucent doors with transient windows above = Exterior Shading lattice with vines = Sloped Ceiling = Added windows

Occupancy/daylight sensors will be installed on all fixtures, in all rooms. Lighting controls be right beside all doorways at eye level. The faculty will implement lower partitions within the studio space.

A

A

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

C

D

PROPOSED DESIGN

Building

Scale: 1/16”= 1’-0”

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT North Interior Elevation

34

Scale: 1/4”= 1’-0”


PROPOSED DESIGN

North - South Interior Sections

Section D-D Scale: 1/4”= 1’-0”

Section C-C Scale: 1/4”= 1’-0”

35


36


BIBLIOGRAPHY

All Weather Windows. (2012). Glass performance. Retrieved from http://www.allweatherwindows.com/windows.php?sid=131 Assisted Interior Design (AID). (n.d.). Calculating the daylight factor. Retrieved from http://home.wlv.ac.uk/~in6840/ Daylightfactor.htm Binggeli, C. (2010). Building systems for interior designers. (2 ed.). New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons. Daintree. (2010). The value of wireless lighting control. Daintree Networks, Retrieved from http://www.daintree.net/ downloads/whitepapers/smart-lighting.pdf Dubois, C., Demers, C. & Potvin, A. (2007, July 7-12). The influence of daylighting of occupants. Conference Proceedings of ASES, Retrieved from http://www.grap.arc.ulaval.ca/attaches/Demers/ASES-Light-Ambiences.pdf EVIE-4004 Class Notes Green Business Awards. (2009). Green Bussiness- Green Products. WINNER - ICI PAINTS AKZONOBEL. Retrieved from: WINNER ICI PAINTS AKZONOBEL McGowan, Rose; Kruse, Kelsey.(2004). Interior Graphic Standards: Student Edition. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons. Ochshorn, J. (2010). Summary and critique of “leed” 2009 green building design & construction reference guide. Retrieved from http://www.ochshorndesign.com/cornell/writings/leed2009critique/IAQ.html Pearson Education. (2009). Latitude and Longitude of U.S. and Canadian Cities. Retrieved from: http://www.infoplease. com/ipa/A0001796.html Read more: Latitude and Longitude of U.S. and Canadian Cities — Infoplease.com http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0001796. html#ixzz1noCFTNlC Unknown. (n.d.). Envelope & room decisions. Tips for Daylighting with Windows, Retrieved from http://windows.lbl.gov/ daylighting/designguide/section3.pdf seminoleUSGBC. (2009). [Web log message]. Retrieved from http://www.scribd.com/doc/57876844/LEED-EBOM-Rating-System 37

EXPLORING (DAY)LIGHTING & IEQ  

A group exploration of visual comfort in educational work environments as influened by architectural, interior, and human factors.

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