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Residential Care

Care homes will offer varying facilities and activities and may have different rules on the amount of independence residents can have. For example, will they be allowed out into the gardens on their own? Also ensure the care home is able to fulfil required dietary specifications or religious or cultural needs. Visiting arrangements are also important. Is the care home easy to reach for family? Are visiting times convenient? Will you be able to take your loved one on outings and will you be able to contact them by telephone? Social services will be able to provide you with information about residential homes in your area. Websites are available that offer useful tools to quickly compare care homes by area and the facilities they offer. This may be a useful place to start your search. You could also contact a voluntary organisation that has expertise in the particular disability of your loved one. Useful organisations include Counsel and Care, for older people, Mencap, for people with a learning disability, the National Autistic Society, for people with autism, Leonard Cheshire Disability, for people with a physical disability and Mind, for people with a mental health problem. Bear in mind that it could be a fairly traumatic time for someone going into residential care. The fear of the unknown and thought of leaving familiar surroundings behind can be difficult until they settle in, so be understanding and try to make their transition as stress-free as possible. You may be upset yourself to see them move away from you, but try not to show it. î Ž 10

MY CARE GUIDE

My Care Guide  

Your personal guide to caring services in Sefton & West Lancashire

My Care Guide  

Your personal guide to caring services in Sefton & West Lancashire

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