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ANNUAL REPORT 2017


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ANNUAL REPORT 2017

Our members and the business community were very vocal on the issue of the government’s proposed tax reform and, as a result, the Minister of Finance attended our AGM and Convention to discuss these changes with the chamber network. Fredericton, September 23.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ANNUAL REPORT 2017

MESSAGE TO MEMBERS

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10 WAYS TO BUILD A CANADA THAT WINS

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POLICY HIGHLIGHTS

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KEY PROJECTS AND INITIATIVES

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INTERNATIONAL WORK

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POLICY COMMITTEES AND BUSINESS COALITIONS

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THE POWER OF THE NETWORK

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TRADE SERVICES

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THANK YOU

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OUR BOARD OF DIRECTORS

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OUR STAFF

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STRATEGIC PLAN 2016-2019

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THE POWER TO SHAPE POLICY + THE POWER OF OUR NETWORK AS CANADA’S LARGEST AND MOST INFLUENTIAL BUSINESS ASSOCIATION, WE ARE THE PRIMARY AND VITAL CONNECTION BETWEEN BUSINESS AND THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT. WITH OUR NETWORK OF OVER 450 CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE AND BOARDS OF TRADE, REPRESENTING 200,000 BUSINESSES OF ALL SIZES, IN ALL SECTORS OF THE ECONOMY AND IN ALL REGIONS, WE HELP SHAPE PUBLIC POLICY AND DECISION-MAKING TO THE BENEFIT OF ALL CANADIANS.

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ANNUAL REPORT 2017 What could have divided us did the opposite. These challenges only rallied the business community to advocate louder than ever before. When President Trump officially announced plans to renegotiate NAFTA, we launched a concentrated outreach mission to the U.S. If there is one thing Canadians are universally known for, it is our ability to work with others. From Virginia to Texas to Pennsylvania and New York, our coalition raised awareness of the economic benefits of trade between our regions, while strengthening alliances and building new relationships along the way.

At our AGM and Convention, members of the chamber network gather to debate and approve the public policy resolutions that will set our advocacy agenda for the upcoming year. Fredericton, September 23-25.

WE CAN ACHIEVE GREAT THINGS WHEN WE WORK TOGETHER Every new year brings both challenges and opportunities for Canada’s business community. When 2017 began, it seemed there were more of the former than the latter. In January, U.S. President Donald Trump was inaugurated, and the future of the world’s most successful trade agreement, NAFTA, suddenly became less certain. Similar protectionist fevers broke out across the globe, from an uprising of nationalist protest during France’s election to the fallout from U.K.’s exit from the European Union. The global climate was fractious.

Closer to home, Canadian businesses faced their own set of obstacles. Extreme weather— in the form of fires and floods—threatened many communities and put industries on pause. The plug was pulled on a number of important job-producing projects, from an LNG facility on the west coast to the sorelyneeded Energy East pipeline. Meanwhile, the cost of electricity and labour continued rising, and the federal government proposed tax changes for private corporations that threaten entrepreneurs who take personal risks to grow their businesses and our economy.

But the most successful movement this year was led by the members of our network who advanced our #ProtectGrowth campaign against the government’s proposed tax changes. From Surrey to Saint John’s, member chambers of commerce, associations and firms worked tirelessly to make the voice of Canadian business heard. The results were inspiring and should serve as a reminder in 2018 of just how much we can achieve when we work together. We were also encouraged by the number of positive developments as 2017 drew to a close. The Trans-Pacific Partnership is still inching forward, CETA provisionally came into force and Nebraska approved TransCanada’s Keystone XL Pipeline.

AGM and Convention. Fredericton, September 23-25.

The fall economic update also contained good news, although the government still has no realistic plan to balance its budget during the lifetimes of many millions of Canadians. In 2018, we will continue working to achieve better infrastructure, fewer trade barriers and the skilled workforce Canada needs to foster innovation and compete on the global stage. We will also continue working to strengthen relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous businesses and advocate the federal government offer more tools to Indigenous peoples in support of institutional, economic and social selfdetermination. Last year at this time, many of us wondered about the future of Canadian business in the face of major changes both abroad and domestically. While the outlook is not necessarily any clearer today than it was then, the strength of our network and the success of our teamwork this year should leave us feeling optimistic, no matter what challenges lie ahead. On behalf of the staff and the Board of Directors, we thank you for your support this past year and look forward to working with you in 2018. PERRIN BEATTY PRESIDENT AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER CHRISTIANE BERGEVIN CHAIR OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS

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ANNUAL REPORT 2017 For the last several years, we have published an annual list of the Top 10 Barriers to Canadian Competitiveness. That document listed some of the self-inflicted wounds that have prevented Canada’s economy from achieving its full potential and set out our recommendations for change.

In 2017, we released a different document. Instead of focusing on barriers, we outlined 10 ways to improve our economic success, along with our specific recommendations to advocate throughout the year.

10 WAYS TO BUILD A CANADA THAT WINS IN 2017 01. PROMOTE INNOVATION AND HARNESS THE POWER OF DATA 02. FIGHT GLOBAL PROTECTIONISM 03. UPGRADE CANADA’S REGULATORY SYSTEM TO GET NATURAL RESOURCES AND OTHER EXPORTS TO WORLD MARKETS 04. WORK WITH BUSINESS TO COMBAT CLIMATE CHANGE AND MAINTAIN CANADA’S COMPETITIVENESS 05. BUILD CANADA’S BRAND 06. GROW SMALL BUSINESS TO TAKE ON THE WORLD 07. BUILD DIGITAL SKILLS TO COMPETE IN THE NEW TALENT ECONOMY 08. ASSURE BETTER ACCESS TO CAPITAL FOR INDIGENOUS ENTREPRENEURS 09. DISMANTLE INTERNAL BARRIERS THAT COST CONSUMERS AND DISCOURAGE INVESTORS

10 WAYS TO BUILD A CANADA THAT WINS

10. ENCOURAGE INVESTMENT BY CUTTING THE COST OF DOING BUSINESS IN CANADA

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ANNUAL REPORT 2017

ACCESS TO TALENT POLICY HIGHLIGHTS • Budget 2017 included:

Following the launch of our Crystal Ball Report at an event held at the TMX Broadcast Centre, we opened the Toronto Stock Exchange. Toronto, January 24.

OUR SUCCESS = YOUR GAIN We exist to ensure Canadian businesses have access to the talent, customers, infrastructure, capital and technology needed to compete and win in domestic and global markets. Our ability to influence public policy enables businesses to create

jobs for Canadians, expand their markets, increase their productivity and generate the wealth needed to support the families, schools and social programs in their communities and throughout the country.

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$1.8 billion over six years in Labour Market Development Agreements

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$900 million over six years in Workforce Development Agreements, consolidating the Canada Job Fund Agreements, the Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities and the Targeted Initiative for Older Workers

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$287 million over three years for pilot projects for adult education, to test new approaches to make it easier for adult learners to qualify for Canada Student Loans and Grants

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$132 million over four years for supporting EI recipients to pursue self-funded training while receiving EI benefits

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$225 million over four years for a new Labour Market Informationlabour market information and Development development organization, the Future Skills Lab, taking action on our advocacy around Labour Market Informationlabour market information

workers in designated professions or to fill vacancies in high-growth businesses. It has also established work permit exemptions for those in executive and professional roles for short-term stays of up to 30 days (up to 120 days for researchers). • Canada has announced higher total immigration targets in economic immigrant categories, rising from the 2017 target of 172,500 towards 177,500 in 2018 and 191,600 in 2019, including significant increases in economic immigrant categories, such as Federal Highly Skilled, Provincial Nominee Programs and the Atlantic Immigration Pilot Program. This will provide more opportunities for businesses to attract and retain international skilled workers.

• The establishment of the Forum of Labour Market Ministers (FLMM) Labour Market Information (LMI) Council, with input from the Canadian Chamber and partners on the composition and the direction for the new organization. This organization now exists as an independent non-profit organization that is working towards the publication of more detailed skills and labour market data. • The new Global Skills Strategy for the Temporary Foreign Worker program Program has set targets for processing times of two weeks for highly skilled

Perrin Beatty met with the Hon. Patty Hajdu, Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour. Ottawa, March 7.

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ACCESS TO CUSTOMERS POLICY HIGHLIGHTS

ACCESS TO INFRASTRUCTURE POLICY HIGHLIGHTS

• Getting natural resources and other exports to world markets o

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We worked with five local chambers of commerce members (Kitimat, Calgary, Cambridge, Yukon and Fredericton) on a series of roundtables that formed the basis of our submission to the National Energy Board Modernization Expert Panel. As of this writing, the government had not announced its intended reforms for the federal regulator. We participated in the Expert Panel Review of Environmental Regulation and Processes and submitted comments in response to the government’s discussion paper outlining the direction of the proposed reforms. We followed these submissions with a series of in-person meetings organized with eight other industry associations targeting ministers, their staff and high-level government officials. This advocacy stressed the need for a timely, efficient and clear federal regulatory system to get Canadian natural resources to market. As of this writing, the government had

not announced its intended reforms for the federal environmental assessment process. • Canada Free Trade Agreement o

We have long advocated for all levels of government to eliminate the internal trade barriers in Canada that stifle business growth and innovation. Over the last two years, the federal and provincial/territorial governments have been negotiating a new internal trade deal. During this period, the chamber network was crucial in putting pressure on governments to conclude an ambitious new deal to allow for a freer flow of people, goods and services. A deal was concluded, and in July 2017, the new Canada Free Trade Agreement (CFTA) came into force. The agreement will help build a modern economic union in Canada by opening up trade in several sectors of the economy. It will also create a new mechanism to help reconcile regulatory differences between jurisdictions.

National Trade Corridors Fund • The long-term federal infrastructure plan, announced in Budget 2016, did not provide any new targeted funding for trade-enabling infrastructure—the infrastructure that has the most economic benefit by helping Canadian companies move their products and services to international customers. Following the

Budget, we released our report, The Infrastructure that Matters Most: The Need for Investment in Canada’s Trade Infrastructure, followed by an advocacy campaign calling for a new commitment to trade-enabling infrastructure. In Budget 2017, the government announced $10.1 billion in new funding for trade and transportation infrastructure projects.

ACCESS TO CAPITAL POLICY HIGHLIGHTS • The federal government backed down from some of the disastrous changes it proposed to taxing private corporations. The government committed to simplifying the process through which private business owners demonstrate how family members, with whom they are income splitting, are meaningfully contributing to the enterprise; a $50,000 annual passive investment threshold before new tax

measures will come into effect; and it abandoned tougher capital gains rules that would have imposed higher taxes on owners transferring businesses to family members than to strangers. Despite this, we are advocating these changes be suspended pending a comprehensive review of the tax system—ultimately a Royal Commission, if needed.

THE CANADIAN CHAMBER TEAM IS AN INVALUABLE RESOURCE TO THE ATLANTIC CHAMBER. WITH THE PROPOSED CHANGES TO THE TAXATION OF PRIVATE CORPORATIONS, THE CANADIAN CHAMBER PLAYED A CRUCIAL ROLE BY KEEPING OUR MEMBERS APPRISED OF ISSUES AND ACTIVITIES AND MOBILIZED THE NETWORK BY SHARING STRATEGIES, TEMPLATES AND SOCIAL MEDIA POSTS.

SHERI SOMERVILLE The Hon. François-Philippe Champagne, Minister of International Trade, spoke delegates at our AGM and Convention about the benefits of CETA. Following his presentation, the Minister participated in a roundtable with our Board and other corporate members. Fredericton, September 24.

PRESIDENT AND CEO ATLANTIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INC.

THE STAFF OF THE CANADIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, INCLUDING ADMINISTRATIVE AND SENIOR EXECUTIVES, PROVIDE EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE IN SUPPORT OF MEMBER CHAMBERS. THEIR COMMITMENT TO PROVIDING INSIGHTS INTO NATIONAL POLICY ISSUES AND THEIR WILLINGNESS TO SUPPORT LOCAL CHAMBER EVENTS IS A LARGE CONTRIBUTOR TO THE STRENGTH OF THE CHAMBER NETWORK IN CANADA.”

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OTHER PUBLIC POLICY IMPROVEMENTS POLICY HIGHLIGHTS • The federal government halted the coming into force of the Private Right of Action (PRA) provision of Canada’s AntiSpam Legislation (CASL). The PRA was particularly worrisome as it would have exposed business to potentially unjust and costly litigation. The provision would have allowed individuals to take legal action against any company that sent them an email they did not want to receive without proof of damages. • The House of Common’s Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology made recommendations in line with our position, calling for the revision of CASL to provide clarity to organizations, including assisting them in interpreting and applying the law. • After years of urging the federal government to implement the recommendations of the Copyright Board to address the inefficiencies that stifle the creative process, a consultation was launched to consider these concerns. The consultation paper proposed several solutions that we had recommended. • The House of Common’s Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology released a report on advanced manufacturing that contains recommendations that mirror many of our recommendations, such as improved labour market information, access to talent, improvements to SR&ED and better links between academia and industry.

• This year, there was much discussion on the Hill with respect to how intellectual property policy impacts businesses’ ability to innovate. We arranged meetings with the Innovation and Post-secondary Education Caucus to demonstrate the link between IP and innovation. This resulted in several follow-up meetings with the U.S. Chamber, Members of Congress and Members of Parliament to facilitate a better understanding of U.S. IP policy. Further, the House of Common’s Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology held a consultation and released a report on IP-technology transfer that endorsed many of our recommendations. • With a very active trade agenda over the past year, we are pleased the government has remained consistent in its approach to digital trade. Maintaining the status quo on the free flow of information across borders is important for Canada’s prosperity and ability to innovate using data. • We spearheaded a letter from the CEOs of the provincial and territorial chambers of commerce expressing support for action on climate change but warning the cost and competitive impacts of the policies need to be recognized and addressed. As of this writing, the government had not released legislation of detailed plans for key pieces of its climate policy, particularly the federal carbon pricing backstop and the clean fuel standard.

• The Supreme Court of Canada determined Section 35 of the Constitution guarantees Indigenous peoples a process but not a particular outcome when the Crown undertakes its duty to consult and accommodate when their rights could be adversely affected by a development projects. This decision is important for Canadian business as it provides further clarity regarding the circumstances under which Indigenous peoples’ consent must be obtained and/or have the power of veto. It also reasserts the need to balance the rights of all involved in a particular development, including businesses and their investors.

a program that would use the heft of federal government procurement to give our small, innovative firms that first anchor client often needed to expand at home and internationally.

• The federal government stopped its plan to tax employer-sponsored health and dental benefits. • The launch of Innovative Solutions Canada. This program aims to position the federal government as a “marquis client” for innovative Canadian companies offering solutions to problems identified by 20 departments and agencies. Up to $150,000 is available for conceptualization and $1 million for prototype/proof of concept development. The Canadian Chamber called for the creation of

As part of our Canada-U.S. agenda, we hosted a roundtable with the Hon. Scott Brison, President of the Treasury Board, to discuss his engagement with the new U.S. administration on regulatory cooperation and strategize on how the federal government and the Canadian business community can help advance the work of the Regulatory Cooperation Commission. Ottawa, March 30.

CANADIAN ENTREPRENEUR WINS OSLO BUSINESS FOR PEACE AWARD

MURAD AL-KATIB PRESIDENT AGT FOOD AND INGREDIENTS INC.

MURAD AL-KATIB, SON OF TURKISH IMMIGRANTS TO CANADA, RECEIVED THE OSLO BUSINESS FOR PEACE AWARD FOR HIS ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN LEADING THE WAY IN SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE AND FOR CONTRIBUTING TO FEEDING MILLIONS OF REFUGEE FAMILIES IN THE SYRIAN CRISIS. A MEMBER OF THE GREATER SASKATOON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND THE SASKATCHEWAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, HIS COMPANY, AGT FOOD AND INGREDIENTS, IS ONE OF THE WORLD’S LARGEST LENTIL COMPANIES, HANDLING ABOUT A QUARTER OF THE GLOBAL SUPPLY. THE OSLO BUSINESS FOR PEACE AWARD IS PROVIDED BY THE BUSINESS FOR PEACE FOUNDATION IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE INTERNATIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.

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KEY PROJECTS AND INITIATIVES #PROTECTGROWTH CAMPAIGN On July 18, Finance Canada launched a consultation on how “tax-planning strategies involving corporations are being used to gain unfair tax advantages” and proposed a major tax reform that would affect private businesses across the country by scrutinizing the salary and dividends business owners pay to family members, limiting a business owner’s ability to convert income into capital gains and imposing a punitive tax on passive investments made inside a corporation. Along with our network of chambers of commerce and associations, we organized our #ProtectGrowth campaign to ask the government to rethink its proposed tax changes to protect the growth of small businesses across Canada. We also asked the government to launch meaningful consultations with the business community to review tax policy without unfairly targeting independent businesses and to consider a comprehensive review of the Canadian tax system with a view towards fairness and simplification for all taxpayers and increasing the competitiveness of all businesses. The Hon. Bill Morneau, Minister of Finance, addressed delegates at our AGM and Convention. Fredericton, September 23.

THE POWER TO SHAPE PUBLIC POLICY Representing 200,000 businesses, we are the largest and most influential business association in Canada. Our views are sought after and respected by government, thought leaders and the media thanks to our wellresearched reports, analyses, position papers and policy resolutions that reflect a broad business perspective.

But, we don’t just report on the challenges facing Canadian businesses. We advocate, on your behalf, solutions that foster a strong, competitive economic environment that benefits the businesses and families in your community and throughout Canada.

Our advocacy efforts included a submission to Finance Canada, appearing before

the Senate National Finance Committee (and encouraging it to continue with its cross-Canada hearings), a letter writing campaign, a social media campaign, a petition and a discussion with the Finance Minister at our AGM and Convention. These efforts paid off. On October 16, the Finance Minister announced amendments to his original proposal. Although we still have serious concerns regarding the lack of detail regarding what is still being proposed, we demonstrated the power of the chamber network to defend the interests of its members. In addition to responding to the government’s new proposed tax changes, we have called on the government to undertake a comprehensive review of the tax system, recommending that it establish a Royal Commission to do so. In light of mounting regulatory compliance costs imposed by all levels of government, proposed carbon taxes and the prospect of U.S. tax reform, we will launch our own competitiveness assessment of Canada’s business tax system in 2018. The findings of our review will help to shape the priorities for tax reform.

ASSOCIATION ROUNDTABLES Our association roundtables are unique opportunities for executives from our member associations to network, receive updates on our advocacy work and discuss the public policy challenges affecting their associations

and the sectors they represent. This year, we held two association roundtables in Ottawa during the months of May and November that brought together over 20 association executives representing various sectors.

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Perrin Beatty and Kevin Ladner, Executive Partner and CEO of Grant Thornton LLP (far right), with representatives of the 2017 Private Business Growth Award winner, Rocky Mountaineer. From left to right: Alroy Chan, Senior Director, Corporate Development, Jonathan Hope, Managing Director, North American Sales, and Adam Charania, Vice President, Human Resources. Toronto, November 14.

Crystal Ball Symposium. Ottawa, December 4.

THOUGHT LEADERSHIP ROUNDTABLE SERIES AND CRYSTAL BALL SYMPOSIUM Our Thought Leadership Roundtable Series and Crystal Ball Symposium are part of a national program that examines how Canadian businesses can contribute to sustainable growth and development. This year, at 19 roundtables were held throughout Canada, we brought together more than 400 business, government and academic leaders to share strategies and expertise and discuss how to foster and increase Canada’s competitiveness.

experts on how trends in technology, the global economy and international politics will affect Canadian business in 2018 and beyond. This year’s event featured John Heilemann, renowned journalist and author of the New York Times best-selling books, Double Down and Game Change. Mr. Heilemann shared his insight into President Donald Trump, the U.S. administration, NAFTA and other decisions coming out of Washington D.C. that will affect Canadian business.

The Crystal Ball Symposium, which took place on December 4 in Ottawa, is an exclusive event for business and association executives and senior public servants to learn from

Input from our Thought Leadership Roundtable Series and the Crystal Ball Symposium feeds into our Crystal Ball Report, which will be released in January early 2018.

ICC CANADA INTERNATIONAL ARBITRATION CONFERENCE As the national committee of the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), each year we hold a conference to allow the members of our ICC Canada Arbitration Committee to network and gain a better understanding of the issues surrounding

international arbitration and best practices. This year’s conference was held in Montreal from November 9-10 and addressed the changes and challenges confronting the international dispute resolution community.

PRIVATE BUSINESS GROWTH AWARDS In partnership with Grant Thornton LLP, we created the Private Business Growth Award. The award seeks to recognize and celebrate dynamic, privately-held businesses whose growth strategies encompass a broad range of activities across their business.

At a gala held in Toronto on November 14 and hosted by James Cunningham, host of Food Network Canada’s Eat St., we celebrated our 10 finalists and presented the Private Business Growth Award to Rocky Mountaineer.

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE PRIVATE BUSINESS GROWTH AWARD FINALISTS! CANADA PUMP AND POWER CLARION MEDICAL

DME GROUP HIBAR SYSTEMS LTD. ORION PLASTICS

Since hosting 200 guests onboard the first train in 1990, Rocky Mountaineer has grown to become the largest privately owned luxury tourist train in the world and has now welcomed over two million guests to enjoy world class cuisine, rich historic storytelling, warm Canadian hospitality and a first-hand look at the untouched wild beauty of the Pacific Northwest. Operating all daylight journeys on four iconic routes, the company’s ethos is to be creators of life-changing experiences for all those who ride the train as

PROTOCASE INC. REDSPACE INC. ROCKY MOUNTAINEER

VENDASTA WILSON FUEL CO. LTD.

well as those who make the magic happen behind-the-scenes. Family-owned and headquartered in Vancouver, Rocky Mountaineer’s team is over 700 at peak season and stretches around the globe with employees in Canada, the U.S., U.K. and Australia. Since 2013, the company has doubled its revenue and tripled its profitability and is on track to double again in the next five years.

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CANADIAN ANTI-SPAM LEGISLATION COMPLIANCE EXPERIENCE SURVEY RESULTS Along with our partners at the Canadian Marketing Association, the Email Sender and Provider Coalition and the Retail Council of Canada, we launched a survey in October to gauge the Canadian Anti-Spam

Legislation (CASL) compliance experience of Canadian organizations after three years of the CASL regime. The results of the survey were published in November.

CLIMATE SMART CHAMBERS With national carbon pricing expected throughout Canada in 2018, businesses will have to start thinking about carbon costs the same way they think about labour, energy or the other costs of doing business. To help businesses take action, we partnered with Climate Smart Businesses, an awardwinning social enterprise that trains small and medium-sized enterprises to measure and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, to launch the Climate Smart Chambers

program. The program includes of a series of webinars, hosted by member chambers of commerce, that outline how small businesses can take action on emissions by cutting their costs. We have also launched the Climate Smart Chambers contest, which will see three chambers assemble teams of SME members to cut emissions, with the winners getting national recognition at our AGM and Convention in September 2018.

CANADA’S BUSINESS CHECKLIST FOR TRADE NEGOTIATIONS WITH CHINA Perrin Beatty met with Rick Hansen to discuss inclusivity and accessibility in the workplace. Ottawa, July 28.

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING AND CONVENTION

Our AGM and Convention (AGM) brings together over 320 chamber of commerce executives and community business leaders to discuss the economic and political issues that affect the prosperity of Canadian business, enabling our member chambers to become more relevant and successful advocates for their communities. It is also the opportunity for chambers of commerce

to present their member businesses’ key concerns to our cross-country network. The resolutions that we will adopt to suggest ways to foster a stronger economic environment for business will be presented to the federal government and shape our public policy objectives for the upcoming year. This year’s AGM was held in Fredericton from September 23 to 25 and featured a discussion with the Finance Minister on the government’s taxation proposals, a presentation by the Premier of New Brunswick, a discussion on CETA with Minister of International Trade and a presentation on accessibility and inclusivity with Rick Hansen.

Our annual Chamber Competition, which commands submissions under a different theme of best practices in chamber operations and activities each year, focused on how chambers are using video to tell their stories. Five chambers shared how their teams are using video effectively to broaden their reach, but in the end, our audience selected three finalist: gold went to the Oakville Chamber of Commerce, silver to the Greater Charlottetown Chamber of Commerce and bronze went to the Greater Langley Chamber of Commerce.

After the United States, no country matters more to Canada’s future prosperity than China. China is already our second largest export market and an important source of foreign investment. And despite a slowing economy, China continues to make up a large share of global growth, presenting big opportunities for Canadian companies. As other countries move aggressively to develop their trade with China, Canada has not laid out a roadmap detailing its ambitions for this relationship and a path for realizing them. In September, we released a report that makes several recommendations to

boost Canadian trade and investment with China. The report identifies several areas where Canada can engage with China in a way that meets the country’s unique needs, particularly in areas, like agriculture and energy, where Canada has an opportunity to play an important role as a source of clean resources and technologies. Whether it is expanding Canadian capacity to meet demand in China, developing a national strategy or furthering dialogue between the two countries, we must do to more to deepen our relationship with this vital economic powerhouse.

SASKATCHEWAN CEO DINNER On September 6, in partnership with Global Public Affairs, The Greater Saskatoon Chamber of Commerce and Saskatchewan Chamber of Commerce, we hosted our first-ever Saskatchewan CEO Dinner. During dinner, over 60 senior business leaders gathered to discussion the current NAFTA negotiations and the importance of the Canada-U.S. trade relationship to Canadian business. The event featured remarks from three prominent Saskatchewan business

leaders: Peter Stoicheff, President and ViceChancellor, University of Saskatchewan, Jochen Tilk, President and CEO, PotashCorp and Chuck Magro, President and CEO, Agrium Inc., and a panel discussion led by Steve McLellan, CEO, Saskatchewan Chamber of Commerce Hon. Perrin Beatty, President and CEO, Canadian Chamber of Commerce and Tom Clark, Chair, Public Affairs and Communications, Global Public Affairs.

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STUCK IN TRAFFIC FOR 10,000 YEARS CANADIAN PROBLEMS THAT INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT CAN SOLVE

U.S. Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Tom Donohue spoke to the Economic Club of Canada where he provided an overview of the vibrant U.S.-Canada trade relationship, its role in establishing North America as the world’s most competitive economic region, and its future in the wake of U.S. political transition. Ottawa, February 6.

CANADA-U.S. RELATIONS Canada and the United States share one of the most remarkable and prosperous relationships in the world. Our supply chains are so deeply intertwined that we literally build things together. While Canada must continue to diversify its international trade, it must also work to strengthen its relationship with its largest trading partner. TRADE MISSIONS With this in mind, we organized a series of trade missions in selected states across America—Virginia, South Carolina, Tennessee and Texas. The goal of the missions was to raise awareness among business leaders and legislators about how important the CanadaU.S. relationship is to businesses on both sides of the border, particularly amid NAFTA negotiations. ASSOCIATION ROUNDTABLES On January 26 and March 6, we hosted roundtable discussions with a number of national business associations to lay the groundwork for a trans-border advocacy strategy designed to expand business relationships with the U.S. and the world. Hon. Andrew Leslie, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and Special Advisor on Canada-U.S. Relations, joined the meetings. Participants welcomed Mr. Leslie’s early efforts to strengthen the relationship

and they expressed strong support for a united Canadian effort on an issue that transcends sectoral, regional and partisan boundaries. The business associations in attendance pledged to work with the Canadian government to help ensure U.S. legislators and opinion leaders are aware of the millions of American jobs that depend on the Canada-U.S. relationship. MEETING WITH THE PRIME MINISTER On February 6, our President and CEO, Perrin Beatty, and the President of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Tom Donohue, met with Prime Minister Trudeau to discuss trade and the future of Canada-U.S. relations. This meeting was part of Mr. Donohue’s 24-hour stop in Ottawa, where he and Mr. Beatty met with government officials, foreign dignitaries, business leaders and the media to advocate strong Canada-U.S. relations and a stronger free trade agreement. In partnership with the Economic Club of Canada, we hosted Mr. Donohue at a luncheon where he provided an overview of the U.S.-Canada trade relationship, its role in establishing North America as the world’s most competitive economic region and its future in the wake of a U.S. political transition.

While the government is contemplating tens of billions of dollars in new federal seed money for infrastructure investments, the private sector is continuing to invest in Canada’s infrastructure needs. There are many proposed private sector-led projects that are facing political or regulatory hurdles from various levels of government. These are large projects that will have significant economic benefits and do not require taxpayer funding but are moving slowly or

not at all because of increasing risk aversion from regulators, shifting political priorities and concerns over social licence. Released in July, this report examines the effects of various deficiencies in infrastructure, ranging from traffic in major cities to access to broadband internet, improving the Ontario-Québec trade corridor with the U.S., lack of new pipelines and the unexplored potential of Canada’s North.

NEW ERA IN PUBLIC SAFETY AND SECURITY INNOVATING THE SERVICE DELIVERY MODEL On June 1, we held a public safety and security conference that featured leading figures from the public and private sectors and academia who discussed how increasingly difficult it is for cities to provide their residents with the level of public safety they require. These experts provided valuable insights into the potential publicprivate partnerships have in ensuring the sustainability of policing services in Canada.

The conference also featured international speakers who shared the lessons learned from the implementation of public-private partnerships in policing services in their countries. Most importantly, this event convened all stakeholder groups to facilitate an open dialogue on the future of policing services in Canada and the role the private sector can play in its sustainability.

Our public safety and security conference featured a panel that examined case studies from the U.K. and Switzerland to better understand how these countries took action through public-private partnerships. From left to right: Jacques Duchesneau, Former President of the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority, Chris Sims, Retired Police Chief of West Midlands, U.K., Blair Gibbs, Former Senior Policy Advisor to the U.K. Secretary of State for Justice and Lord Chancellor, Katy Bourne, Police and Crime Commissioner, District of Sussex, U.K., and Armin Berchtold, CEO, Securitas CH and Secretary General, International Security League. Ottawa, June 1.

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COMING TOGETHER, MAKING PROGRESS BUSINESS’S ROLE IN RECONCILIATION WITH INDIGENOUS PEOPLES INVESTMENT CAN SOLVE In the cut and thrust of global economic competition, we can no longer afford for our governments, businesses and Indigenous peoples to work at cross-purposes. We need meaningful reconciliation with our Indigenous peoples—our youngest and fastest-growing population with control over vast tracts of our country—and we need to get working on it now. The lack of clarity regarding businesses’ roles in reconciliation can stall— even kill—private sector projects that have the potential to provide long-term economic and social benefits to not only Indigenous peoples but all of Canada. The federal

government, as the primary interlocutor between Indigenous peoples and other constituencies, needs to lead the way. Perrin Beatty launched this report in May at a Reconciliation Canada roundtable in Ottawa in which he called for more collaboration amongst business, the Crown and Indigenous peoples to make real progress in the reconciliation process. This progress is crucial for Canada to move forward as a unified, stronger and, ultimately, more competitive country.

CYBER SECURITY IN CANADA PRACTICAL SOLUTIONS TO A GROWING PROBLEM Canada is losing $3.12 billion per year to cyber crime. Cyber crime has direct costs to business and combined with other societal costs, Canada’s economy is at risk. We advocate recognized cyber security standards, resources and tools for business training and a recognition of the impact of cyber crime on business in Canadian privacy legislation. Standards exist for regulated industries and critical infrastructure but there remains a gap for the majority of

DATA GOVERNANCE There are extraordinary volumes of data currently being generated globally— behavioural data, energy consumption, consumer preferences, logistics, diagnostics—that are all largely driven by internet connectivity. This year, we examined the opportunities to innovate that are created by harnessing this massive data resource. We also examined what threats those opportunities face from a data security perspective and from both domestic and multijurisdictional regulatory perspectives,

CANADA’S RESOURCE CHAMPIONS Established in 2014, in partnership with our Resource Champions network of 110 chambers of commerce, this grassroots initiative aims to increase the awareness

of the importance of natural resources to Canadian cities and advocates the infrastructure crucial to diversifying Canada’s markets for natural resources and energy.

businesses that are unregulated—both large and small—to protect intellectual property, proprietary data and personal data. Released in April, this report examines the growing threat of cybercrime to Canadian businesses and makes practical recommendations for closer collaboration between government and the business community to develop a new cyber security framework in Canada. THE FREIGHT MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION OF CANADA (FMA) FOCUSES ON THE COMPLEX FREIGHT TRANSPORTATION ISSUES FOR ITS MEMBER COMPANIES IN ITS GOVERNMENT RELATIONS ACTIVITIES WITH ALL LEVELS OF GOVERNMENT AND WITH UN AGENCIES AND HAS BEEN DOING SO FOR OVER A CENTURY.

AN ANALYSIS OF THE ADOPTION OF INTERNET-BASED TECHNOLOGY CANADIAN BUSINESS SPEAKS UP In December 2016, we launched an online survey to determine how companies were using Internet-based technology. In February, we released a report that benchmarks Canadian businesses’ use of

recognizing that Canada’s ability to compete globally depends on its domestic policy approach to privacy and security. Our examination incorporated both qualitative and quantitative enquiries of corporate Canada, including the perspectives of both data innovators and privacy experts. In 2018, we will release a report that outlines a series of recommendations to the Government of Canada to foster a favourable climate for data-driven innovation.

technology, compares technology adoption rates to other countries and makes policy recommendations to the government; the survey provided the baseline data for the report.

R.H. BALLANTYNE, P. ENG. PRESIDENT FREIGHT MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION OF CANADA

WHILE TRANSPORTATION IS A VITAL ENABLER OF INTERNATIONAL AND DOMESTIC TRADE, FREIGHT TRANSPORTATION AND LOGISTICS ACTIVITIES EXIST WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF BROADER PUBLIC POLICY, AND AT FMA, WE FIND THE INFLUENCE, IMPACT AND SUPPORT OF THE CANADIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE IN ADDRESSING THE BROADER POLICY ISSUES VITAL TO OUR WORK AND WE VALUE OUR LONG ASSOCIATION WITH THE CHAMBER.”

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REGULATORY EFFICIENCY Over time, Canada’s regulatory environment has become a collection of complicated, overlapping and inefficient sets of rules. While Canada’s overall ranking in the World Economic Forum’s 2015-2016 Global Competitiveness Report is a respectable 13th of 140 countries, in the sub-ranking on the burden of government regulation, Canada ranks 37th. This regulatory burden makes Canada a less desirable destination to start or grow a business.

INTERNSHIP PROGRAM FOR CHAMBERS This year, we examined areas where Canada’s regulatory environment is failing as well as the need for a system that is more open, transparent, predictable and efficient. In 2018, we will advance the idea that all regulators have economic mandates and that a more dynamic regulatory environment can significantly improve Canadian business competitiveness.

2017 saw the start of a highly successful program with local chambers of commerce. Local chambers were encouraged to send a staff member to Ottawa for a weeklong internship with our Policy team. The intent was two-fold: to have our staff learn more about the concerns and policy interests of local chambers and for the local chambers to learn about the workings of our Policy team and the meetings they conduct at the federal level.

SKILLS FOR AN AUTOMATED FUTURE

2017 INTERNS

The OECD estimates that, due to technological advancements, 9% of jobs in Canada are at risk of elimination and 32% of Canadians are at risk of having their employment substantially altered. Canada’s skill training programs are designed around assumptions of low turnover, long-term careers and a direct progression from primary and secondary education to postsecondary job training to employment. This model is at risk. As the pace of technological change increases, jobs are being altered or eliminated, and more business sectors

• Peter Casurella, Communications and Policy Analyst, Lethbridge Chamber of Commerce • Sandra Dueck, Policy Analyst and Communications Specialist, Greater Peterborough Chamber of Commerce • Curtis Hemming, Director, Government Relations, Saskatchewan Chamber of Commerce

ROBERTA SCARROW EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR CENTRE WELLINGTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

are disrupted. Programs, like the Canada Job Grant, were designed to encourage employer spending on training, but are they effective? In 2018, we will release a report that examines the impacts and necessary policy responses related to immigration, skills training and labour market information that would enable Canadian businesses to access the skilled workers they require to grow and remain competitive.

THE CANADIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE IS AN EXCELLENT VALUE FOR THE WORK THEY DO AT THE NATIONAL LEVEL TO KEEP THE NETWORK CURRENT. THE ADVICE THEY PROVIDE ON POLICY MATTERS HELPS US TO KEEP OUR MEMBERS INFORMED. FROM NAFTA, TO CORPORATE TAX CHANGES AND GREENHOUSE GASES, THE REPORTS, UPDATES, CONFERENCE CALLS AND SOCIAL MEDIA POSTS ON THESE TOPICS HELP TO KEEP THE LOCAL CHAMBER MEMBERS CURRENT ON THE WORK BEING DONE BY THE CANADIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE STAFF. THE CANADIAN CHAMBER ALSO PROVIDES AFFINITY PROGRAMS THAT HELP TO SAVE OUR LOCAL MEMBERS MONEY OR PROVIDE A NEEDED SERVICE. IF YOU ARE A CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OR BOARD OF TRADE, YOU NEED TO CONNECT AND BELONG!”

Through our internship program, we welcomed six staff from chambers of commerce to our Policy team. In addition to briefing our team on local priorities and issues, the interns assisted our policy directors with projects, visited Parliament Hill to meet their MPs and other political figures, participated in our membership media work and got a better understanding of our activities from the inside.

• Nick Lumia, Communications and Policy Analyst, Dufferin Board of Trade • Sherry Martell, Executive Director, Truro and Colchester Chamber of Commerce • Nick Stewart, Manager, Policy, Research and Communications, Timmins Chamber of Commerce • Huzaifa Saeed, Policy and Research Analyst, Hamilton Chamber of Commerce

One of our chamber interns, Sandra Dueck, Policy Analyst and Communications Specialist, Greater Peterborough Chamber of Commerce (centre), poses with members of our Policy team. Ottawa, March 24.

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INTERNATIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

PAUL FRAZER PRESIDENT PD FRAZER ASSOCIATES

WE HAVE A PRESENCE IN WASHINGTON, D.C.

From February 19 to 23, our President and CEO, Perrin Beatty, had the honour of accompanying Their Excellencies the Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General of Canada, and Mrs. Sharon Johnston on their State visit to Sweden. This visit was an opportunity to further enhance Canada-Sweden relations and to promote CETA, which was ratified by the European Parliament the previous week. The social democratic government of Sweden is a strong supporter of CETA. Malmö, Sweden, February 22.

A GLOBAL VOICE FOR CANADIAN BUSINESS As national governments cooperate more to manage the spillovers that come with deeper economic integration—from financial crises and tax leakage to protectionism and climate change—international institutions are playing a more important role in domestic policymaking. Our exclusive arrangements with international organizations give our members special access and opportunities

to shape the global agenda across a wide range of policy areas. Whether it is by nominating companies to international expert committees or accrediting senior executives for global summits, we are committed to showcasing Canada’s business leadership and expertise to a global audience.

IN 2010, WE ENTERED A PARTNERSHIP WITH PAUL FRAZER, A LEADING EXPERT ON CANADA-U.S. ISSUES AND THE PRESIDENT OF PD FRAZER ASSOCIATES, BASED IN WASHINGTON, D.C., TO BOLSTER OUR ALREADY EXTENSIVE WORK ON CANADAU.S. ISSUES. AS OUR SPECIAL ADVISOR, PAUL MONITORS CAPITOL HILL AND REPORTS ON ISSUES AND EVENTS THAT HAVE IMPLICATIONS FOR CANADIAN BUSINESSES. OUR MEMBERS ARE ENCOURAGED TO REACH OUT TO HIM DIRECTLY.

The ICC is the global business organization representing private sector interests from every industry around the world. As Canada’s national committee of the ICC, we provide you with direct input into the many global organizations where the ICC has an official seat at the table: World Trade Organization (WTO), United Nations Framework

Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), World Customs Organization, CODEX, United Nations Environmental Program (UNEP), United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL), United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) and the United Nations Development Program (UNDP).

GLOBAL BUSINESS COALITION The Canadian Chamber of Commerce and 14 13 other national business associations from G20 countries, along with CEOs from a number of global companies, have formed the Global Business Coalition to advocate policies at national, regional and international levels that contribute to global growth and job creation. The Global Business Coalition uses its vast membership base—representing more than 6.5 million businesses— as a global sounding board and an initiator of new ideas and proposals for G20 economic policy coordination. B20 AND B7 SUMMITS Each year, we represent Canadian business at the B20 and B7 Summits.

In the run-up to these important events, we work with our members, Global Business Coalition partners and business leaders from around the world on public policy recommendations to bolster global economic growth. These recommendations are then presented at joint meetings with the G20 and G7 leaders. Many of the recommendations, in areas such as trade, investment, infrastructure, small business, and cybersecurity, have been reflected in the communiqués of the G20 and G7. More than a dozen of our members were involved in this year’s B20 and B7 activities in Berlin, Germany and Rome, Italy, respectively.

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Phil O’Reilly, Chair of Business at OECD (BIAC), and Perrin Beatty. Ottawa, January 25.

BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY ADVISORY COMMITTEE AND THE ORGANISATION FOR ECONOMIC COOPERATION AND DEVELOPMENT BIAC is the doorway to providing private sector input to the OECD policy deliberations. Each of the 35 industrialized countries of the OECD has a business association that is a member of BIAC. As BIAC Canada, we ensure the voice of Canadian business is heard in international fora. BIAC formulates public policy recommendations in multiple areas, including trade liberalization, sustainable development, ecommerce,

intellectual property, taxation and finance. Through BIAC, we ensure you have a voice in OECD policy. BIAC Canada is chaired by the Hon. Ted Menzies, President and CEO, CropLife Canada, and Milos Barutciski, Partner at Bennett Jones LLP. Participation is open to our corporate, association and chamber members.

JAPAN-CANADA CHAMBERS COUNCIL We also partner bilaterally to advance priority trade relationships. The JapanCanada Chambers Council is a platform to build relationships, share knowledge and advocate policies to support bilateral trade and investment. It does this through joint events, delegations, research, public statements and meetings with policymakers. Housed in the Canadian Chamber of Commerce and Japan Chamber of Commerce & Industry, the Council includes senior executives from leading member

companies in both groups. The Council is chaired by Steve Dechka, former CEO of Canpotex, and Shoei Utsuda, Global Chairman of Mitsui & Co., Inc. Participation in the Japan-Canada Chambers Council is open and free of charge to our corporate, SME, chamber and association members. This includes those exporting to or investing in Japan, as well as Japanese subsidiaries in Canada.

We participated in an EI Employer Forum organized by ESDC where we discussed issues around the Premium Reduction Program, EI rate-setting, new initiatives for e-payroll integration, and the Temporary Foreign Worker Program. We also shared our views around the new skills organization, and how it would fit with the EI training mandate. The Hon. Jean-Yves Duclos, Minister of Families, Children and Social Development (centre) also participated. Gatineau, November 30.

ENGAGE. INFLUENCE. ACHIEVE. As the Voice of Canadian Business, we research and develop public policies in consultation with our members in order to influence change that benefits businesses and all Canadians. Critical to our efforts is the work of our policy committees and business coalitions, which involve 560 individuals representing 345 organizations that are

committed to ensuring the economic and political environments in which our members operate support and encourage business success. An important complement to our policy team, many significant policy public positions originate from our committees or coalitions.

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POLICY COMMITTEES AND BUSINESS COALITIONS BUSINESS LAW COMMITTEE Chair: George Addy, Davies Ward Phillips & Vineberg LLP Policy Contact: Aaron Van Tassel

ECONOMIC POLICY COMMITTEE Chair: Peter H. Harris, Earnscliffe Strategy Group Contact: Jason MacDonald

Our Business Law Committee raises awareness about frivolous legal proceedings and puts forward recommendations that positively reform regulatory bodies, legislatures and the courts in order to strengthen Canada’s overall competitiveness.

Our Economic Policy Committee provides advice and direction on issues related to national economic policy with particular reference to monetary and fiscal policy, productivity and competitiveness.

CANADIAN INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY COUNCIL Chair: Vacant Policy Director: Scott Smith The Canadian Intellectual Property Council provides a central voice to advocate for stronger intellectual property protection both in Canada and worldwide. CANADIAN SERVICES COALITION Chair: Michael Landry, Davenport Advisory Inc. Policy Director: Adriana Vega The Canadian Services Coalition provides a cohesive voice to advocate the importance of the services sector both domestically and internationally, including the liberalization of service markets. COMPETITION LAW AND POLICY COMMITTEE Chair: Subrata Bhattacharjee, Heenan Blaikie LLP Contact: Jason MacDonald Our Competition Law and Policy Committee monitors and responds to issues and proposals in the field of competition law and policy.

HUMAN RESOURCES POLICY COMMITTEE Chair: Vacant Policy Director: Patrick Snider Our Human Resources Policy Committee provides strategic and technical advice on the execution of our skills action plan, with a focus on skills, training and immigration issues. ICC CANADA ARBITRATION COMMITTEE Chair: Stephen Drymer, Woods LLP Contact: Stacey Roy Our ICC Canada Arbitration Committee responds to requests by the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) International Court of Arbitration and its Secretariat for proposals of Canadians to serve as arbitrators in ICC cases, provides the Canadian voice at the ICC Commission on Arbitration and ADR and promotes ICC Arbitration as a dispute resolution mechanism. IMMIGRATION POLICY COMMITTEE Chair: Jonathan Leebosh, Ernst & Young LLP Policy Director: Patrick Snider Our Immigration Policy Committee examines immigration, temporary entry and other global mobility issues and shapes our advocacy activities on these files.

INDIGENOUS AFFAIRS POLICY COMMITTEE Chair: John Logimodière, Aboriginal Consulting Services Policy Director: Susanna Cluff-Clyburne Our Indigenous Affairs Committee examines the relationships between Canada’s businesses and Indigenous peoples and advocates opportunities/guideposts both can use to ensure private sector projects can move forward in a way that meets the competitive priorities of business while respecting the rights of Indigenous peoples. INNOVATIONS COMMITTEE Chair: Vacant Policy Director: Scott Smith Our Innovations Committee monitors and responds to international and domestic policy issues related to electronic commerce and telecommunications. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY COMMITTEE Chair: Lee Webster, Osler, Hoskin & Harcourt LLP Policy Director: Scott Smith Our Intellectual Property Committee monitors domestic and international developments that could affect the intellectual property rights of our membership. INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS COMMITTEE Co-Chairs: Milos Barutciski, Bennett Jones LLP, and Cliff Sosnow, Fasken Martineau DuMoulin Policy Director: Adriana Vega Our International Affairs Committee monitors and responds to international policy issues and reviews trade and investment developments. NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT COMMITTEE Chair: Jeanette Patell, GE Canada Policy Director: Katrina Marsh Our Natural Resources and Environment Committee considers and reports on matters relating to national policies and legislation affecting the environment.

OTTAWA LIAISON COMMITTEE Chair: Sam Boutziouvis, Snc-Lavalin Policy Director: Susanna Cluff-Clyburne Our Ottawa Liaison Committee holds quarterly informal discussions with senior federal officials, politicians and opinion leaders on policy issues of relevance to Canadian business. SME COMMITTEE Chair: Vacant Policy Director: Susanna Cluff-Clyburne Our SME Committee identifies issues of importance to small- and medium-sized businesses and develops policy proposals to foster an improved environment in Canada for SMEs. TAXATION COMMITTEE Chair: Peter H. Harris, Earnscliffe Strategy Group Contact: Jason MacDonald Our Taxation Committee monitors and responds to matters of federal concern in the field of taxation. TERRITORIAL POLICY COMMITTEE Chair: Deneen Everett, Yellowknife Chamber of Commerce Policy Director: Susanna Cluff-Clyburne Our Territorial Policy Committee identifies, monitors, develops and advocates policy to increase the economic footprint of business in the territories. TRANSPORTATION AND INFRASTRUCTURE COMMITTEE Chair: Marc-André Roy, CPCS Transcom Limited Policy Director: Ryan Greer Our Transportation and Infrastructure Committee considers and reports on matters of federal concern in the fields of transportation and infrastructure.

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CHAMBERS SHAPE NATIONAL POLICY At our AGM and Convention, our member chambers of commerce can bring forward the key concerns of their member businesses so that workable solutions, in the form of policy resolutions, and an approved policy platform can be established and presented to the federal government with the ultimate goal of advancing national public policies that help Canadian businesses grow and

prosper and, in turn, contribute to the health of Canadian communities. Guided by the policy resolutions that are adopted by the chamber network at our AGM and Convention and with input from our policy committees and our Board of Directors, we can set our policy priorities for the year.

CHAMBERS ARE IMPORTANT RESOURCES FOR BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE Our policy directors are a great resource to tap into and are available to brief chamber staff on policy issues so they can better understand the issues and communicate with their members or prepare for stakeholder meetings as issues develop locally.

Duncan Wilson, Chair 2016-2017, poses with the finalists of our Chamber Competition. From left to right: Colleen Clark, Executive Director, Greater Langley Chamber of Commerce, Sandra Dueck, Policy Analyst and Communications Specialist, Greater Peterborough Chamber of Commerce, Pamela Therrien, Vice President, Greater Sudbury Chamber of Commerce, Penny Walsh McGuire, Executive Director, Greater Charlottetown Area Chamber of Commerce, and John Sawyer, President, Oakville Chamber of Commerce. Fredericton, September 23.

THE POWER OF THE NETWORK While we are a primary and vital connection between business and the federal government, our network of 450 member chambers of commerce enable businesses to shape public policies at the municipal, regional, and provincial/territorial levels

of government. The ability to connect 200,000 businesses and organizations and to communicate to all levels of government on business issues as the voice of business is what gives our chamber network its power.

We also have a wealth of information—from our 5 Minutes for Business publication to our policy reports and our blog posts—that can be shared by chambers with their local business members.

CHAMBERS PROVIDE PROGRAMS AND SERVICES TO PROMOTE BUSINESS SUCCESS In addition to our advocacy work, we have developed a number of costsaving programs aimed at saving small businesses money. Our member chambers of commerce can offer these programs to their members to help them improve their bottom lines. These programs include preferred pricing on payroll services, sales communications tools, group travel, cybersecurity tools, computers, gasoline, insurance, shipping services, audio and web conferencing and credit and debit card processing.

Peter Casurella, Communications and Policy Analyst, Lethbridge Chamber of Commerce, and one of our chamber interns, participates in our policy debate at our AGM and Convention. Fredericton, September 24.

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ATA CARNET Acting as a passport for goods, the ATA Carnet is an international customs document that assists in the temporary importation of goods worldwide, free of duties and taxes.

Our exclusive service offering simplifies customs procedures, reduces business costs and saves time and paperwork. ATA Carnets are accepted in over 76 countries.

DOCUMENT CERTIFICATION

TRADECERT CANADA

Many countries require a chamber of commerce to confirm of the origin of goods before the goods are allowed into the country. We help Canadian exporters by certifying Certificates of Origin and other related documents.

To simplify the document certification process, we offer TradeCert, an online service for the certification of Certificates of Origin and related documents.

OUR MEMBERS ARE CONTINUALLY IMPRESSED WHEN THEY COME TO UNDERSTAND JUST HOW LARGE AND INFLUENTIAL THE CHAMBER NETWORK IS. KNOWING THE CANADIAN CHAMBER HAS EXPERTISE IN SO MANY AREAS OF OUR NATIONAL ECONOMY IS INCALCULABLE, AND THE WORK OF THE DEDICATED TEAM AT THE CANADIAN CHAMBER TO CONTINUALLY ACT AS CHAMPION FOR SMALL BUSINESS IN OTTAWA IS IMMEASURABLE.

DAN ROGERS

Members of our Services and TradeCert teams exhibit at our Chamber Expo. Fredericton, September 24.

TRADE SERVICES We continue to provide the business community with unique and essential products and services that allow for fair trade and investment across international borders.

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR KELOWNA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

THERE HAVE BEEN SEVERAL ISSUES RAISED THIS YEAR THAT HAVE REINFORCED THE IMMENSE VALUE OF THE CANADIAN CHAMBER. HAVING A STRONG NATIONAL NETWORK WAS ABSOLUTELY CRITICAL WHEN THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT PROPOSED SIGNIFICANT TAX POLICIES CHANGES THAT WOULD HAVE HAD A HUGE IMPACT ON SO MANY SMALL BUSINESSES ACROSS THE COUNTRY. THE GRASSROOTS RESPONSE HELPED PUT THE BRAKES ON MUCH OF THE PROPOSED CHANGES, BUT THAT LOCAL RESPONSE WOULDN’T HAVE BEEN NEARLY AS EFFECTIVE HAD IT NOT BEEN FOR THE LEADERSHIP PROVIDED BY THE CANADIAN CHAMBER. AS ONE OF THE LARGEST CHAMBERS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, OUR TEAM AT THE KELOWNA CHAMBER PLACES A HIGH VALUE ON BEING ABLE TO TAP INTO THE INVALUABLE RESOURCES THE CANADIAN CHAMBER PROVIDES. WHETHER IT’S COORDINATING NATIONAL AFFINITY PROGRAMS THAT HELP OUR MEMBERS ACHIEVE BOTTOM LINE BENEFITS OR PROVIDING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES, WE COULDN’T DO WHAT WE DO ON THE FRONT LINES WITHOUT THE REMARKABLE PARTNERSHIP WE HAVE WITH THE CANADIAN CHAMBER.”

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EXCELLENCE PARTNERS

PARTNERS

Chamber Expo. Fredericton, September 24.

THANK YOU Our power to influence public policy is very much enhanced by sponsored projects. With expert advice and financial support from sponsors, we are able to conduct analyses and develop recommendations on various subjects of importance to Canadian business—a true benefit of being an organization with a broad business perspective. In the last few years, we have made a significant impact on issues

surrounding a skilled workforce, international trade negotiations, natural resource trade and environmental sustainability. With each project, the common denominator was the strong support of sponsors. We thank our partners for their contribution to the success of our events and policy initiatives.

1800Members AGNORA Inc. Agrium Aird & Berlis LLP Algonquin College Andrew Peller Ltd. AON Reed Stenhouse Arbitration Place AstraZeneca ATCO Ltd. Bell Canada BHP Blake, Cassels & Graydon LLP British Columbia Institute of Technology Canada Post Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers Canadian Electricity Association Canadian Energy Pipeline Association Canadian Natural Resources Ltd.

Canadian Nuclear Association Canpotex Limited Cat-Tec Inc. CBDC Restigouche Cenovus Energy CIRA Cogeco Cohen Hamilton Steger & Co. Colleges and Institutes Canada Commonwealth Legal ConocoPhilips Canada CropLife Canada Cummins Eastern Canada CyberNB DAVIDsTEA Desjardins Dow Chemical Canada ULC Driver Trett Canada Edelman Canada Facebook Canada First Data

Frontier North Adventures George Brown College Global Affairs Canada Gomez International Harvard Developments Home Hardware Stores Ignite Management Services Ltd. Imperial Oil Indus Travel Informe Affaires Innovative Medicines Canada Inversa Systems Ltd. IPEX Johnson Inc. Kinder Morgan Canada LoyaltyOne Manulife Microsoft Canada NMP LLP Norton Rose Fulbright

Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada OUTSTAND Chamber Partner Affinity Program Polycorp PotashCorp Raymond Chabot Grant Thornton Repsol Ryerson University Southern Alberta Institute of Technology Securitas Seven Generations Syncrude Canada Ltd. TransCanada Pipelines University of Ontario Institute of Technology University of Saskatchewan Via Rail Canada Wex Inc.

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ANNUAL REPORT 2017 CHAIR Christiane Bergevin Board Director Yamana Gold Montreal, QC

George Addy Partner Davies Ward Phillips and Vineberg LLP Toronto, ON

FIRST VICE CHAIR Virginia (Ginny) Flood Vice President, Government Relations Suncor Energy Inc. Calgary, AB

Roxanna Benoit Vice President, Public, Government and Aboriginal Affairs Enbridge Inc. Calgary, AB

SECOND VICE CHAIR Phil Noble, FCPA, FCA Past CEO and Senior Advisor to Firm Leadership Grant Thornton LLP Toronto, ON

Brent Bergeron Executive Vice President, Corporate Affairs and Sustainability Goldcorp Inc. Vancouver, BC

THIRD VICE CHAIR Martine Irman Senior Vice President, Wholesale Banking TD Bank Group Toronto, ON

Adam Bolek Director, Government Relations TELUS Ottawa, ON

TREASURER Umberto Delucilla, FCPA, CA, CISA, CRISC, CRP Partner, Enterprise Risk and Innovation Deloitte Montreal, QC IMMEDIATE PAST CHAIR Duncan Wilson Vice President, Corporate Social Responsibility Port Metro Vancouver Vancouver, BC

OUR BOARD OF DIRECTORS

PRESIDENT AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Hon. Perrin Beatty The Canadian Chamber of Commerce Ottawa, ON

John Bowles President and Chief Executive Officer Inversa Systems Ltd. Fredericton, NB Bernard Brun Vice President, Government Relations Canada Desjardins Group Ottawa, ON John Capobianco Chair-elect Ontario Chamber of Commerce Toronto, ON Lisa Carroll Vice President, Public Sector – Ontario CGI Group Inc. Ottawa, ON

Ralph Chapman Client VP, TD Bank Group IBM Canada Ltd. Ottawa, ON Peggy Cunningham Professor and R.A. Jodrey Chair in Commerce Dalhousie University Halifax, NS Maria Isabel (Maribel) de Luis Director, International Relations Repsol Madrid, Spain Blair Dickerson Vice President, Canada Rio Tinto Ottawa, ON Chris Dugan Chair Alberta Chambers of Commerce Sherwood Park, AB Richard Dunn Vice President, Regulatory and Government Relations Encana Corporation Calgary, AB Kelvin Dushnisky President Barrick Gold Corporation Toronto, ON Glenn Feltham President and Chief Executive Officer Northern Alberta Institute of Technology Edmonton, AB

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Claude Gagnon Chair Fédération des chambres de commerce du Québec Montreal, QC

Anne-Marie Hubert Advisory Managing Partner, EY Canada Ernst & Young LLP Montreal, QC

Paul Genest Senior Vice President Power Corporation of Canada Montreal, QC

Brian Humphreys Vice President, Government, External Relations Nexen Energy, ULC Calgary, AB

Greg Grice Executive Vice President, Business Financial Services RBC Toronto, ON

Lianne Ing Vice President Bubble Technology Industries Inc. Chalk River, ON

Lucie Guillemette Executive Vice President and Chief Commercial Officer Air Canada Ottawa, ON

Brenda LaRose Partner Leaders International Winnipeg, MB

Merv Gunter Chair Manitoba Chambers of Commerce Winnipeg, MB Karen Hawes Chair British Columbia Chamber of Commerce Kelowna, BC John Hopkins President Chamber of Commerce Executives of Canada Regina, SK Craig Hougen President Hougen Group of Companies Whitehorse, YT

Stephen Lindley Vice President, Aboriginal and Northern Affairs SNC-Lavalin Inc. Toronto, ON Terry Malley Past Chair Atlantic Chamber of Commerce Inc. Dieppe, NB Lisa Meeches Partner Eagle Vision Winnipeg, MB Fiona Murray Vice President, Industrial Products CN Montreal, QC Shawna Nelson Immediate Past Chair Saskatchewan Chamber of Commerce Saskatoon, SK

BOB MASTERSON PRESIDENT AND CEO CHEMISTRY INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION OF CANADA

THERE HAS NEVER BEEN A MORE IMPORTANT TIME TO BE A MEMBER OF THE CANADIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE. TODAY’S PUBLIC POLICY ENVIRONMENT, FROM BOTH DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN POLICY PERSPECTIVES, IS EXTREMELY CHALLENGING FOR CANADIAN BUSINESS. THE CHAMBER HAS THE ACCESS AND INFLUENCE TO HELP NAVIGATE THE CHALLENGES FACED BY THOSE LOOKING TO INVEST IN CANADA’S FUTURE.”

The passing of the gavel from Outgoing Chair Duncan Wilson to Incoming Chair Christiane Bergevin. Fredericton, September 23.

The Honourable Christian Paradis Senior Vice President, Strategic Development, Protective Services GardaWorld Montreal, QC Pierre Pyun Vice President, International and Government Affairs, Corporate Office Bombardier Inc. Ottawa, ON James Rajotte Vice President, Provincial and Municipal Government Relations Rogers Communications Inc. Toronto, ON

Pierre Rodrigue Vice President, Industry Relations Bell Canada Verdun, QC Darryl Stann Senior Vice President, Finance and Chief Risk Officer PotashCorp Saskatoon, SK Karl Tabbakh Managing Partner, Quebec Region McCarthy Tétrault LLP Montreal, QC

Mario Thériault Chief Executive Officer ShiftCentral Inc. Moncton, NB Myriam Truchon Director, Regional Affairs and Communities Hydro-Québec Montreal, QC Scott Walton President Envenio Fredericton, NB Peter Wilkinson Senior Vice President, Regulatory and Public Affairs Manulife Toronto, ON

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ANNUAL REPORT 2017 EXECUTIVE OFFICE The Honourable Perrin Beatty, President and CEO Jackie King, Chief Operating Officer Janet Boden, Executive Assistant and Secretary to the Board of Directors POLICY AND ADVOCACY Jason MacDonald, Senior Vice President, Policy Susanna Cluff-Clyburne, Director, Parliamentary Affairs Guillaum Dubreuil, Senior Director, Public Affairs and Media Relations Ryan Greer, Director, Transportation and Infrastructure Policy Katrina Marsh, Director, Natural Resources and Environmental Policy Scott Smith, Director, Intellectual Property and Innovation Policy Patrick Snider, Director, Skills and Immigration Policy Adam Van Tassel, Business Law Committee Coordinator Adriana Vega, Director, International Policy CORPORATE RELATIONS AND SERVICES Jean-Jacques Hermans, Senior Vice President, Corporate Relations and Services Amélie Baudin, Coordinator, Corporate Relations Kimberly Gale, Managing Director, Northern and Western Canada Stephen Johns, Senior Director, Corporate Member and Association Relations Grace Locke, Inside Sales Representative Melissa McGee, Associate Director, Corporate Relations and Sponsorship Jean Perron, Senior Director, Corporate Relations, Quebec and Eastern Ontario Chuck Wright, Director, Sponsorship and Business Development

We released our report on cyber security at a roundtable hosted by Lockheed Martin. Ottawa, April 3.

OUR STAFF

CARNET AND DOCUMENT CERTIFICATION SERVICES Anick de Sousa, Director, Services Ariola Jakupi, Manager, Services

Manon Bélisle, Senior Representative Helen Chang, Supervisor, Regional Services Team Geneviève Desjardins, Representative Sarah Godefroy, Representative Olga Kaze, Representative Daniella Labonne, Supervisor, Regional Services Team Alexandra Miceli, Representative CHAMBER NETWORK Jennifer Hagen, CAE, Senior Director, Chamber Development and Services Angela Roy, Coordinator, Chamber Development and Services OPERATIONS AND PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION Stacey Roy, Vice President, Operations and Program Implementation Natalie Bergeron, Marketing and Digital Communications Specialist Émilie Bourguignon, Media Relations Assistant Michelle Croteau, Web and Production Specialist Tammy Leroux, Administrative Officer Kristy Murray, CRM Marketing Analyst Natalie Ouellette, Administrative Assistant FINANCE Manuela Lacroix, Vice President, Finance Marilyn Aitken, Accounts Payable Analyst Chantal Gagnon, Accounts Receivable Analyst Evgenia Sternik, Accounting Clerk HUMAN RESOURCES Danielle Mongeon, Senior Director, Human Resources RISK AND COMPLIANCE Adèle Laronde, CPA, CA, Chief Risk and Compliance Officer

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MISSION

VISION

The Canadian Chamber of Commerce fosters a strong, competitive economic environment that benefits business and, ultimately, all Canadians.

The Canadian Chamber of Commerce is the most interconnected, valued and influential business network in Canada.

STRATEGIC IMPERATIVES AND OBJECTIVES 1. INCREASE OUR PUBLIC POLICY AND ADVOCACY IMPACT 1.1 Strengthen our core public policy advocacy effectiveness 1.2 Deepen member and stakeholder collaboration and strengthen network alignment 1.3 Develop public policy expertise for emerging or underserved sectors of the economy 2. LEVERAGE THE POWER OF THE NETWORK 2.1 Create a truly interconnected network to strengthen our advocacy and drive policy change 2.2 Create a virtual marketplace for members 2.3 Define how chambers of the 21st century will be successful 3. CREATE NEW GROWTH PATHWAYS 3.1 Target SMEs and Growth-oriented Businesses

Perrin Beatty addresses the delegates of our New Era of Public Safety and Security Conference. Ottawa, May 30.

STRATEGIC PLAN 2016-2019 DRIVING COMPETITIVENESS IN THE NEW ECONOMY

Oriented towards action and growth, our Strategic Plan will support our mission and vision and will allow us to strengthen our core policy and advocacy efforts

while pursuing new growth pathways, increasing collaboration with our network and embracing a culture of innovation and change.

3.1.1 Attract SMEs and growth-oriented businesses early by providing targeted services

3.1.2 Act as a catalyst for business growth

3.1.3 Support the continued Canadian ownership of SMEs by helping owners surmount business transfer challenges

3.2 Advance an International Trade Agenda Conducive to Canadian Competitiveness

3.2.1 Contribute to trade policy that creates a competitive environment for Canadian businesses to succeed

3.2.2 Promote international trade for Canadian business

3.3 Capitalize on Association Consolidation Opportunities

3.3.1 Establish a consolidation framework

3.3.2 Achieve growth through alliances, mergers and acquisitions

4. EMBRACE A CULTURE OF INNOVATION AND CHANGE 4.1 Review existing programs and identify new opportunities 4.2 Invest in attracting, training and retaining the best talent 4.3 Mobilize all levels of the Canadian Chamber in organizational renewal

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CCC Annual Report 2017  
CCC Annual Report 2017  
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