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OCTOBER 2012

Importance of Voting Let the Driver Voice Be Heard

Steven Jackson A Running Back’s Life Conspiracy Theories The Truth is Out There $1.99 • www.ptcchallenge.com

TRACE ADKINS Country Cool


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TRACE ADKINS COVER PHOTO: Danny Clinch Photo: Danny Clinch

cover & features

contents october 2012 • volume 8 issue 10

18 22 26 34

Conspiracy Theories

Did we really land on the moon? Did we know about the Japanese plan to invade Pearl Harbor? The truth is out there.

Steven Jackson

The St. Louis Rams’ star running back talks about quality of life on and off the field.

Trace Adkins

Now 50, the country music star is busier than ever, and make no mistake, he’s working to keep it that way.

Voting drive

The presidential election is just around the corner. We look at the issues important to the trucking industry and how your vote can impact the election.

38 42

C.R. England

From top-of-the-line equipment to monthly conference calls, C.R. England has built a reputation as a company with a foundation in safety.

Man of a Thousand Voices

Billy West is one of the busiest and most well-known actors today, but you probably wouldn’t recognize his face. He’s the talented voice behind characters like Philip J. Fry in “Futurama,” Stimpy in “Ren and Stimpy” and the red M&M. The man of a thousand voices shares his story.

46

RV JOURNEY

Five great fall RV adventures; the small town of Mitchell, S.D., gives us the world’s biggest birdfeeder; and Chad talks boondocking. sponsored by:

Challenge Magazine’s QR Code

Download a free QR reader and scan this QR Code to get a direct link to our website where you’ll find a full electronic version of the magazine and links to our Facebook and Twitter pages.

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contents in every issue

october 2012 • volume 8 issue 10

10 12

50

Healthy Choices

52

gettin’ outdoors

54

around the track

56

driving thrU d.c.

57

CHEW ON THIS

Linda reveals the myths behind the six-meals-a-day diet.

Brenda shares her interest in grizzly bear hunting, or lack thereof.

Claire swaps business cards with Carl Edwards.

Mike sees some rough roads ahead.

Charles contemplates the meaning of charity ribbons.

from the editor Vote.

letters to the editor

Readers share their thoughts and opinions on industry issues and stories from Challenge Magazine.

14 58

SHORT RUNS

Broadening the mind with the interesting and inane.

Unique United States

In honor of All Hallow’s Eve, we highlight some of the most thrilling haunted spots in the U.S. and give ourselves (and maybe you) a good scare.

60 62

truckers’ corner

The creative side of truck drivers. sponsored by:

Games

Sudoku, word search and crossword puzzles - a great way to pass the time and exercise the brain. Some clues for the puzzle come from this issue of Challenge Magazine.

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64

garmin gallery

Pictures from the road. Send in your photos and see them published in Challenge Magazine and you may be a winner. sponsored by:

66

pilot flying j stars

Drivers recognize these STAR employees who make Pilot Flying J a place you can rely on.

67 68

what’s happening

Dealer profile and new showers.

pilot flying j directory

The comprehensive Pilot Flying J directory lists everything from location addresses to services available.

82

LOYALTY

Finding specials, PFJ at GATS and MyRewards member profile.

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october 2012 volume 8 issue 10

editorial staff EDITORIAL OFFICE

655 SE BROAD STREET SOUTHERN PINES, NC 28387 PHONE: (910) 695-0077 FAX: (910) 695-0020 e-mail: editor@ptcchallenge.com www.ptcchallenge.com

PILOT FLYING J CUSTOMER SERVICE 1-877-866-7378

EDITOR

GREG GIRARD - ggirard@ptcchallenge.com

GRAPHICS EDITOR

BRAD BEARD - bbeard@ptcchallenge.com

Assistant Editor

AMANDA JAKL - ajakl@ptcchallenge.com

GRAPHIC DESIGNER JENNIFER FAIRCLOTH

PROOFREADER JENNIFER KIRBY

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

CHAD BLAKE, JOHN EGAN, MIKE HOWE, CHARLES POPE, CLAIRE B. LANG, JENNIFER PENCEK, BOB PERRY, BRENDA POTTS, BEN WHITE, JOAN TUPPONCE, Linda McGirr, Marion Kelly, Robert Nason

advertising staff ADVERTISING SALES (910) 695-0077

ACCOUNTS MANAGER

ANNE HUBERTH - ahuberth@ptcchallenge.com

ACCOUNTING / INVOICING

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SUBSCRIPTION RATES - $25 for one year in the United States. Subscriptions can be started or renewed by calling Challenge Magazine at (910) 695-0077 with your name, mailing address and credit card information; or write to Challenge Magazine: 655 SE Broad Street, Southern Pines, NC 28387, along with a check or credit card information. BACK ISSUES of Challenge Magazine can be purchased for $3 per issue to cover mailing and handling. Follow the same procedures as subscriptions to purchase a back issue of the magazine.

by greg girard

VOTE

t’s easy to say one vote won’t count. After all, one vote really can’t make much of a difference when nearly 150 million votes will be cast for this year’s presidential election. But if you think of your vote as one within a group of like-minded voters, say a few million truck drivers, then suddenly your one vote has much more power. Power to influence, power to make change. Voting is a unique act that can be both profoundly personal and overtly public. The information, rhetoric and opinions – whether we want to hear them or not – that bombard us before the election can be overwhelming. Twenty-four-hour news cycles on radio and TV don’t let up. There are demonstrations, rallies, conventions, commercials – all lauding the value of two different drummers. Yet once we’re finally alone in the voting booth, it becomes a solitary right to choose. In 1963, President John F. Kennedy said, “Our privileges can be no greater than our obligations. The protection of our rights can endure no longer than the performance of our responsibilities. Each can be neglected only at the peril of the other.” Voting is certainly a privilege and our country’s foundation is based on the right to elect our leaders but it’s also our responsibility to cast that vote knowledgably. As Kennedy went on to say, “The ignorance of one voter in a democracy impairs the security of all.” In our story on the importance of voting (Page 34), I hope we give you a primer on some of the issues facing the trucking industry and at least get you started on finding the candidates that represent your interests and ideals. If we vote with knowledge I think our country will have a better future. Another story that gives proof to the success of our form of government is on conspiracy theories (Page 18). Where else can a citizen safely and openly accuse his or her own government of covering up a UFO crash or fabricating trips to the moon? An extreme example of democracy in action, maybe, but it has provided us with a number of interesting speculations that just won’t go away. The truth is out there, somewhere. Speaking of freedom of speech, Trace Adkins (Page 26) let his thoughts be known a few years back when he published a blunt manifesto called “A Personal Stand” that addresses everything from politics to organized labor to fame. With a television show, a hosting gig for the American Country Awards and a new album due to be released, we catch up and see how life is treating country’s multimedia star. Safe driving.

I

Challenge Magazine is published monthly by Victory Publishing, Inc. Copyright © 2012, all rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Challenge Magazine is a registered trademark of Victory Publishing, Inc. All advertisers for Challenge Magazine are accepted and published by Victory Publishing, Inc. on the representation that the advertiser and/or advertising agency as well as a supplier of editorial content are authorized to publish the entire contents and subject matter thereof. The advertiser and/or advertising agency or supplier of editorial content will defend, indemnify and hold Victory Publishing, Inc. harmless from and against any loss, expenses or other liability resulting from any claims or suits for libel violations of right of privacy or publicity, plagiarism, copyright or trademark, infringement and any other claims or suits that may arise out of publication of such advertisement or editorial.

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Lovin’ Challenge

My boyfriend is an OTR driver and I beg him to get me your magazine every month. I love the articles and, well, everything about your magazine is awesome. Thank you so much for such a great magazine and keep up the great work!

I get sick and tired of not just men, but women also, who spread their garbage on the CB. Seems to me like instead of throwing the breath that God gave us back in His face with a curse attached, among so much trash, we would try to keep it clean. For this reason my radio stays off most of the time. Bluebird. Richard Curry Springfield, Mo.

Jamie Smith Gainesville, N.Y.

NFL Preview

Chiefs over my Broncos for the division title? I don’t think so, Robert Nason. Go Peyton! Tim Caple Colorado Springs, Colo.

CB Usage

In your 2012 August issue I read about a veteran driver being upset about others not using the CB as much as he has been accustomed to over the years. I would like to offer a possibility. First I would like to ask this question. How many of us like to drive down the highway and see all of the trash clutter? With this, how many of us like the trash that comes over the CB radio? God wants us to be caretakers of our home while we are here. I would also venture to say, He wants us to be caretakers of the airwaves.

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Sam Bass

Cool article on Sam Bass. As a fan of NASCAR for more than 20 years, you end up seeing his work all over the sport. I can’t imagine NASCAR without his paintings. Wish I had the money to get a custom guitar made. Alex Torchev DeKalb, Ill.

SUBMIT A LETTER: Question, comment or criticism? Drop us a note or email us with your opinion. We want to hear from you. Note: Letters may be edited for clarity or space. Although we try to respond to all communications, emails get first priority. Written letters take more time to process and edit.

MAIL COMMENTS TO Challenge Magazine P.O. Box 2300 Southern Pines, NC 28388

EMAIL editor@ptcchallenge.com

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SHORT

RUNS October Tour Dates

Superstitions Superstitions are fun and all, but where do they come from? Why is putting a hat on a bed or shoes on a table bad luck? And how did black cats get such a bad reputation anyway? It takes years for superstitions to form and you’d be surprised at the origin of some of them. We took a deeper look at a few I’m sure you’ve tried to avoid over the years.

Breaking a mirror This superstition stems from the idea that a reflection in a mirror reflects your body as well as your soul. So breaking a mirror can also damage your soul. Seven years of bad luck stems from the ancient Roman belief that the body and soul rejuvenate every seven years. The idea of bad luck from a broken mirror also has its roots in how expensive the first glass mirrors were to produce. Breaking a mirror meant becoming a servant to the owner for seven years. That’s really following the rule you break it, it you buy it!

Holding your breath while crossing a cemetery Here’s one that’s sure to steal your breath: While passing a cemetery, every breath you take will breathe new life into a spirit resting there. The spirits will follow you around until they possess your body. While we’re on the subject, don’t ever forget to cover your mouth while yawning. If you forget, demons and spirits can fly into your open mouth and possess you.

Picking up a penny that is face up “Find a penny pick it up, all day long you’ll have good luck.” It was said long ago that metal was a gift from the gods. A bride would put a silver sixpence in her shoe on her wedding day to ensure a blessed and successful marriage. The superstition lives on today in the penny. If you find a penny face up, you’ll have good luck. Face down, you’ll have bad luck.

under a ladder Aside from being good Being crossed by a black cat The origin of a black cat Walking safety standards, walking under a ladder could incur

crossing your path bringing bad luck dates back to the Middle Ages. Christians believed that a black cat meant a witch was nearby. It was also believed demons took the shape of a black cat and cut you off from heaven. Another reason to avoid raven felines: The Dutch say that they are terrible gossips, spreading rumors all over town.

God’s wrath, according to old Christian lore. Back in the good old days, hangmen used ladders to suspend nooses. Walking under a ladder would make Death himself notice you.

App Report Card for Teen Driving There’s an app for everything nowadays. Think that your teen driver is speeding like a demon when you’re not in the car? Or driving all over town with a carload of friends? Overprotective parents can now ask random strangers to give their

kid’s driving a performance evaluation. Howismykiddriving.com is perfect for helicopter parents. Parents pay to put a bumper sticker on their car with the words “How is my KID driving? Push Text my tag #.” Drivers who notice bad driv-

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Date

City, State

Store

13 Oct

West Memphis, AR

429

PM

West Memphis, AR

607

14 Oct

Russellville, AR

430

PM

Russellville, AR

605

Roland, OK

196

Checotah, OK

702

16 Oct

Tulsa, OK

706

17 Oct

Edmond, OK

704

PM

Oklahoma City, OK

460

18 Oct

Oklahoma City, OK

703

15 Oct PM

Sayre, OK

705

19 Oct

PM

Amarillo, TX

436

PM

Amarillo, TX

723

20 Oct

Lubbock, TX

733

21 Oct

Tye, TX

738

Weatherford, TX

206

Fort Worth, TX

434

Sulpher Springs, TX

157

Texarkana, AR

606

Benton, AR

118

PM ing or dangerous habits can send a heads up to the parents of that teen driver. Comments, sent anonymously, are mailed directly to the parents’ smartphones. It’s tattling in the digital age.

22 Oct PM 23 Oct PM

Dates subject to change.

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A Soapy Situation

If you’re one for cleanliness and use antibacterial soap on a daily basis, you may want to ease up on that soapy solution to fighting germs. A new study released from the University of California-Davis found use of the chemical triclosan, which is a common ingredient in antibacterial soaps, slows muscle function. In the study, scientists exposed human heart and skeletal muscle cells to triclosan at a level consistent with daily use. An electrical stimulus was then used to force the cells to contract. Normal reaction would have the cells contracting immediately but those cells exposed to the chemical were slow out of the gate. Another study by the University of Michigan found that triclosan may also compromise the human immune system, making people more susceptible to allergies. Triclosan is not only found in soap, either. The chemical is also found in body washes, deodorants and toothpastes. Experts suggest checking labels for triclosan before buying products.

By the Numbers: HALLOWEEN

24.7

pounds of candy a person eats on average in a year.

1.2

pounds of candy a person eats on Halloween alone.

41

million kids who went trick-or-treating last year.

35

million pounds of candy corn that are sold annually.

1,686

number of candy manufacturing plants that produce Halloween candy.

28

the date in October with the highest candy sales of the entire year.

90

percent of parents that take candy from their kids’ Halloween bag. Statistics from www.census.gov, www.inquisitr.com, www.huffingtonpost.com and www.candyusa.com

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feature

the truth is out there

by: jennifer kirby

hat happened at Roswell? Who was behind JFK’s assassination? Is Elvis alive – and is Paul McCartney dead? “Most people can’t resist getting the details on the latest conspiracy theories, no matter how far-fetched they seem,” says prominent conspiracy theorist Jonathan Elinoff. “At the same time, many people quickly denounce any conspiracy theory as untrue – and sometimes as unpatriotic or just plain ridiculous.” Brick Williams, a retired truck driver from Fayetteville, N.C., considers himself a realist when it comes to conspiracy theories. “I’m not a major member of the conspiracy thing,” he says. “I’ve read a lot, and I’ve seen several shows on Discovery or the History channel. I think they’re well-documented. I don’t believe or not believe [most conspiracy theories]. I don’t think there’s enough proof.”

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He says he knows people who seem to be onboard with every theory out there. “Maybe they believe 100 of them and 10 of them are true,” he says. “It doesn’t mean they’re crazy. It means they have too much time on their hands.” Like Williams, most of us probably wouldn’t classify ourselves as conspiracy theorists, but we have to admit that some of the cases can be intriguing. Movies like “JFK,” “The Manchurian Candidate” and “All the President’s Men” have brought plausibility to some of the more popular theories, as have TV shows like “Conspiracy Theory with Jesse Ventura.” And with the rise of the Internet, there’s a place for every opinion, no matter how outlandish: Most world leaders are alien reptiles. Stephen King killed John Lennon. The Early Middle Ages never occurred. The arguments may not be convincing, but they’re usually entertaining.

Williams says that despite his interest in conspiracy theories, he really buys into only two of them. “I believe that our government knew about the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, and allowed it to happen because they knew that would take Americans’ opinions and put them behind the war effort. It’s really that short and sweet,” he says. “I also truly believe that our government was behind the assassination of JFK. I truly believe that.” Most conspiracy theories will probably never be proved true (or false). But believers are quick to point to a handful of high-profile acknowledged conspiracies, including Watergate, the existence of the Mafia, cover-ups by tobacco and asbestos companies, and the Tuskegee syphilis experiment, the infamous 40-year study in which the U.S. Public Health Service observed the effects of untreated syphilis in poor black men who thought they were getting free health care. Not to mention countless more obscure examples. Each such revelation leaves bona fide conspiracy theorists a little more vindicated and the rest of us, perhaps, a little more willing to hear their side. “While intelligent cynicism certainly can be healthy, some of the greatest discoveries of all time were initially received (often with great vitriol) as blasphemous conspiracy theories,” says Elinoff, who claims he can list at least 75 conspiracy theories that turned out to be true. “Think of the revelation that the earth was not the center of the universe, or that the world was not flat but actually round.” Here, for your own consideration, are half a dozen of the perennial favorites.

Kennedy Assassination The claim: President John F. Kennedy was not killed by Lee Harvey Oswald.

Polls have consistently found that a majority of Americans believe there was a conspiracy to kill Kennedy, and a significant percentage believes there was a government cover-up. “The greatest and grandest of all conspiracy theories is the Kennedy assassination conspiracy theory,” says John McAdams, a Marquette political science professor who maintains a website committed to debunking such speculation. But there’s less agreement among conspiracy theorists as to who else might have been behind Kennedy’s assassination: “the FBI, the CIA, the Federal Reserve, Lyndon B. Johnson, the Bush family or anti-Castro Cuban radicals, depending on which wing of the conspiracy fringe you are talking to,” according to the Herald Daily blog. w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m


Roswell The claim: An alien spaceship and the aliens aboard it crashed in Roswell, N.M., in 1947.

The official version is that the debris found was from a surveillance balloon involved in a classified government program. Conspiracy theorists believe that the military captured the aliens, cleaned up the ship, and then covered up the incident. Hundreds of eye witnesses say they saw the landing, but when pressed, just a few of them claim to have personally seen aliens up close. Whatever the truth, Roswell will probably always be associated with UFOs.

9/11 The claim: The U.S. government either allowed the Sept. 11 attacks to occur or actually carried them out, through controlled demolition of the twin towers. Popular Mechanics, the National Institute of Standards and Technology and others have refuted 9/11 conspiracy claims, but the notion that the U.S. government was somehow involved “can never be concretely disproved.”

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According to conspiracy theorists, the government’s motives for killing about 3,000 of its own citizens were to raise support for the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq and to limit civil liberties through the ensuing Patriot Act. Popular Mechanics and

the National Institute of Standards and Technology, among others, have refuted 9/11 conspiracy claims, but not to everyone’s satisfaction; “the ‘we let it happen’ version can never be concretely disproved,” notes the Herald Daily.

Pearl Harbor The claim: The destruction of Pearl Harbor was carried out with the full knowledge of President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Along the same lines as the 9/11 conspiracy theory, believers in this storyline claim that Roosevelt allowed Pearl Harbor to be attacked in order to drum up support for U.S. involvement in World War II. Supposedly, several countries warned the U.S. government of an attack, but FDR ignored the warnings. Some conspiracy theorists also

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Conspiracy theorists love to speculate on what “really” goes on at the Nevada military base known as Area 51. believe FDR gave Hawaii “bogus intelligence about oncoming Japanese fleets to purposely throw our defenses off,” according to the Daily Herald.

Area 51 The claim: Nuclear experiments, alien cover-ups, genetic modification and radioactive testing are among the activities completed at this military base in Nevada.

Officially, the facility – its exact location is secret – is used for testing and development of weapons and aircraft systems. However, conspiracy theorists love to speculate on what “really” goes on there; while plenty of theories have a movie made about them, this one got its own video game.

Moon Landing The claim: The Apollo did not land on the moon; the U.S. government faked it to encourage patriotism.

Believers in this conspiracy theory say the government created or tampered with evidence of the landing, such as transmissions and samples of moon rock. The Flat Earth Society (which, yes, also propagates the theory that the earth is flat) claims that the landing was staged in Hollywood. “Fortunately, the Soviets didn’t think of the gag first,” says Dr. Tony Phillips of NASA. “They could have filmed their own fake moon landings and really embarrassed the free world.” PCM

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Elvis faked his death

Since his death in 1977, the theory that Elvis Presley faked his death remains popular and Elvis sightings continue to this day. Theorists point to several inconsistencies following his death, including the misspelling of Presley’s middle name on his headstone (Aron is spelled with one “a” but two were on the stone), the circumstances surrounding the disappearance of the original death certificate, and the mystery behind a man that looked remarkably like Presley who bought a plane ticket to Buenos Aires in cash under the name John Burrows – an alias name Presley used in the past – two hours before Presley’s death was announced.

Men in Black

Some conspiracy theorists believe men dressed in black suits are from secret government agencies or secret military units with the aim of intimidating and harassing UFO witnesses. Others contend that the Men in Black are actually aliens (witnesses say they look unusually pale and odd) sent to prevent information on UFOs from being released to the general public.

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The Philadelphia Experiment

This theory claims that in 1943, a Navy destroyer, the USS Eldridge, was successfully made invisible and teleported from Philadelphia to Norfolk, Va., and back. The experiment allegedly turned sailors invisible and caused many others to go insane and so was discontinued. The U.S. Navy denies the project ever existed although some say the Navy’s attempts at making other things invisible, namely torpedoes, succeeded.

Secret Societies

Theories have persisted for centuries of secret societies, led by a small group of “global elite,” controlling world events for financial and political gain. While many of the societies existed in the past or still do exist, the extent of their influence on world affairs is open to debate. The Illuminati, one of the most notorious of these secret groups, is said to be bent on creating a worldwide government with Satanic leanings. The Freemasons, of which many of our founding fathers were members, is also said to be secretly plotting world domination.

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PhotoS: St. Louis Rams

feature

Rushing to Judge by: demarco williams

teven Jackson’s workday begins much like anyone’s. The alarm goes off at 6 a.m.; there’s a morning routine of getting dressed and eating a healthy, protein-packed breakfast around 6:30; and then there’s the commute to the job. Once he’s at the office, by 7, it’s meetings and more meetings. A few hours of team-building physical exercises and boring video presentations are thrown in there, too. “You typically get home around 5 p.m.,” Jackson says of the fall-winter routine he’s carried out as an employee with the St. Louis Rams the past seven years. “We usually put in eight-, nine-hour days with the team.” When it’s time to relax after a hard day

S

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of his boss yelling and coworkers dropping the ball on their assignments, Jackson chills much like you’d expect a three-time NFL Pro Bowl running back to – with a good book. “I love to read biographies about great leaders,” he says. “If I’m not reading, I typically watch the Travel Channel,” Jackson continues. “Those two things help me decompress and get away from some of the stress of football and what I need to do in the week coming up.” OK, so maybe Jackson’s routine isn’t the most typical one. But then again, Jackson’s playing style doesn’t exactly fall under the status quo either. When Sunday comes around, the tranquil Jackson transforms into

something rarely seen on the gridiron. Like the Incredible Hulk on skates, No. 39 barrels his way through the line of scrimmage yet somehow avoids opposing linemen like they’re debt collectors. It’s equal parts menacing and majestic, and most teams have managed only minimal answers for it. “I go into the offseason and I try to identify what I did the best last season,” explains Jackson, who’s coming off a 2011 season where he accounted for nearly 1,500 allpurpose yards. “Secondly, I want to work on maximizing my skills in the offseason. I never just assume I have one thing perfected. I am working on everything all the time.”

Ten thousand yards rushing and 5,000 yards receiving for a running back. That’s an elite group to be part of. I hope to achieve that before I retire. – Steven Jackson

But for all the highs Jackson has accomplished on an individual level (seven straight seasons of more than 1,000 rushing yards and all-time leading rusher in Rams franchise history), there have been nearly as many lows for the organization. St. Louis is a combined 15-65 over the past five seasons. The Rams haven’t gone to the postseason since a Marc Bulger-led bunch in 2004. “For quite some time we’ve been in flux,” Jackson says candidly. “There’s no stability. We have had no real set goal for everyone to go and achieve. So, I think now having the stability with Coach [Jim] Fisher, his staff and our new GM Les Snead, I think that gives us stability. It looks like they’re going to be there for a while to allow us to get back to those winning ways.”

Defining a Pro

It was evident Jackson was unique early on. Not many great football players have come from Las Vegas. But it was there that Jackson first dominated, leading Eldorado High School to the state finals, scoring 81 career touchdowns and being named Nevada’s player of the year. The star running back wanted to play college ball for a team he felt was up and coming, so he went to Oregon State University. Over his three-year career in Corvallis, he’d win over Beaver fans and NFL scouts w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m


More than a football player, Jackson gives back to the community with the Steven Jackson Foundation, which is committed to encouraging educational values and healthy choices in today’s youth.

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alike with his hardnosed running style and soft, reliable hands. “I learned from two different [Oregon State] head coaches (Dennis Erickson and Mike Riley) that had NFL experience,” he recalls. “They really just helped me develop my skills to the point where I could get drafted. Then, with the 24th pick in the first round [of the 2004 NFL Draft], the Rams decided to draft me as the first running back off the board. I had a chance to back up Marshall Faulk. Step by step, I had a chance to learn the game and see it from different aspects each year.” Another thing Jackson learned over time was how to maintain his body. Though far from the only NFL star taking his diet and exercise seriously, he is arguably one of the game’s most dedicated. The aforementioned weekly work routine also includes ice baths, acupuncture treatments and hyperbaric chambers. And it shows in a chiseled, 29-year-old frame that rivals a player’s 10 years his junior. Of course, Jackson’s going to have to remain in optimum physical shape if he, Bradford and promising youngsters like linebacker James Laurinaitis are to lead the Rams back to respectability this season. On an individual level, Jackson has one career goal left: joining the exclusive 10,000/5,000 club. “Ten thousand yards

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rushing and 5,000 receiving for a running back,” he clarifies of the fraternity that includes only legends Marcus Allen, Marshall Faulk and Tiki Barber. “That’s an elite group to be a part of. I’m pretty close. I have a little ways to go as far as receiving, but it’s still doable. I hope to achieve that before I retire.” At the start of the 2012 season, Jackson had 3,003 receiving yards. As if he needed anything else to separate himself from the football crowd.

Defining a Person

Turn on ESPN’s “SportsCenter” right now and you’ll probably see a story about a football player who’s done something senseless away from the field. It’s sad. But chances are slim you’ll ever see Jackson’s mug on TV for drugs or a DUI. The proud father would much rather be behind the camera than get caught in cuffs in front of one. “I’m very into filmmaking, storytelling, the art of it,” says Jackson, who has his own production company that already has dayin-the-life-styled documentaries on Steven’s website, SJ39.com. “How directors and actors have to put it together is almost like a game plan to execute. The producers are more like the GMs, so I can see how it relates to sports. But film is something that is exciting because it just allows you to tell stories

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Along with his charity work, Jackson’s off-the-field interests include filmmaking.

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Career Stats (2004-2011) Steven Jackson • #39 Running Back Height: 6’2” • Weight: 240 Year

2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 Totals

Rushing Yds.

Receiving Yds.

TDs

1,145 1,241 1,416 1,042 1,002 1,528 1,046 673 9,093

333 383 322 379 271 806 320 189 3,003

6 6 4 8 6 16 10 4 60

and draw to demographics of people that may not even pay you attention, but the storyline may grab them and captivate them.” Jackson’s also an architecture and travel nut. New York City and New Orleans are his favorite places to visit during the NFL season, but come the spring and summer, he likes to spread things out a bit. He visited London this past July. He hopes to make his way to Asia for the first time in the near future. But if there’s one thing Jackson loves more than stamping his passport, it’s giving back. While it seems like every player in the league has some sort of organization that hands out turkeys at Thanksgiving, Jackson’s desire to instill educational and healthy living values into Las Vegas and St. Louis youth runs deeper. “Although I’m an NFL player,” the man behind the Steven Jackson Foundation details to Bloomberg Radio, “we’re a part of the community and we care about [it].” And they say there are no more role models in pro sports. The next time you hear someone make a similarly flawed statement, kindly point him or her in the direction of St. Louis’ Edward Jones Dome. There he’ll find a clean-cut, well-spoken man named Steven Rashad Jackson walking into the office. He’ll look like any other guy working in the NFL. The only difference is that this one cares as much about cinema and children as he does about making opposing cornerbacks look clueless. PCM w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m

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by: joan tupponce

he deafening cheers that Trace Adkins receives during a concert never fail to energize the country music superstar. “It’s that immediate gratification that applause gives you,” he says. “As a performer, that is our oxygen. That is what keeps us going.” Adkins got his share of applause this spring and summer during his “Songs & Stories Tour,” which visited some of America’s most beautiful theaters. The tour took shape after Adkins released his 10th studio album, “Proud To Be Here,” last summer. The intimate performances incorporated stories, both humorous and meaningful, that paid homage to Adkins’ working-man roots and musical heritage. “Sharing songs, stories and some laughs ‘around the campfire’ is the country music tradition,” Adkins says. “It’s been refreshing.” He enjoys the rowdy performances

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Photos: Danny CLinch

where he can go out and “mash the accelerator to the floor and keep it there the whole time” but “Songs & Stories” has allowed him to be more interactive with the audience. “This is a different kind of show,” he says. “It’s not a romp and stomp through the hits.” The towering 6 feet 6 inches baritone is one of country music’s most versatile and accomplished entertainers, earning gold, platinum and multi-platinum albums with total sales surpassing 10 million. He is the author of “A Personal Stand: Observations and Opinions from a Freethinking Roughneck,” and was a finalist on NBC’s “The Celebrity Apprentice.” Adkins, whose recognizable voice can be heard in a variety of commercials, also had a role in “The Lincoln Lawyer” with Matthew McConaughey as well as a cameo in “The Healer,” a supernatural adventure about a family’s resilience, which will be released this year.

During the latter part of the “Songs & Stories Tour,” Adkins also was taping his new Great American Country television series, “Great American Hero,” which began airing Aug. 22. The show celebrates people who are making a difference in the world. Camera crews followed the country star during six performances of the tour. Adkins knew what he wanted to accomplish with the series but had challenges getting that message through to some networks. “There is no real drama, no confrontation element,” he says. “A couple of networks wanted to do that but I didn’t want to do it like that. This is a positive show giving people a pat on the back.” The show highlights a broad spectrum of people with one thing in common - acts of kindness. “It’s about people who have taken it upon themselves to live a selfless kind of life,” Adkins says. “They are not always thinking


Adkins and KristIn Chenoweth will return as hosts of the American Country Awards in December. when they get up ‘How am I going to better my position [in life]?’ They think of other people and spending time helping folks.” Even in the current economic conditions, he has found people around the country reaching out to others. “There is a greater need out there and a lot of people are stepping into the breach to fill those needs,” Adkins says. “It’s been a lot of fun.” Adkins lives his message of giving back. His own charitable endeavors include performing in honor of the individuals who died on United Airlines’ Flight 93 on 9/11 and for the military in the Middle East. “I was raised patriotic,” he says, noting that his grandfather was in the Army. “From the very first time I did anything with the military for the USO I just realized these people are a courageous breed. If you have the chance to associate and hang out with these people, you should do that and hope that a little rubs off on you.” The recipient of the 2010 Artist Humanitarian Award from Country Radio Broadcasters, Adkins also has raised more than $750,000 for the Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network and par-

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ticipated in an episode of “Extreme Makeover: Home Edition.” This June he was in Charlotte, N.C., to help celebrate the renovated Urban Ministry Center, which works with the homeless. The revitalization was part of the Maxwell House Community Project, Drops of Good. In August Adkins canceled a concert in Cle Elum, Wash., because of devastating wildfires in the area. He wrote to fans on his website saying, “I know all too well what residents are feeling as they evacuate their homes. I thank God that reports indicate no loss of life. As the hundreds of firefighters, National Guardsmen and community leaders work overtime to keep everyone safe, I hope that those who have the means will also offer their help.” A member of the Grand Ole Opry, Adkins was raised on country and gospel music. His musical influences include his granddaddy, who sang in church, and his uncle JW, who was a singing evangelist and a piano player. Adkins started his own career at 17, singing with a quartet in Louisiana. He played clubs on weekends and slowly began to network. “I was introduced to the right people,” he says. “Every bit was luck.” The Louisiana native has a blue-collar heritage. He began working in construction and oil fields where he drove a truck haul-

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ing pumping units in the oil field. He has worked hard and played hard during his lifetime. Early on, he spent a lot of time in

As a member of the Grand Ole Opry, he appreciates being on stage with singers that he looks up to,

I can go out and, on any given night, be surrounded by legends. the clubs, living a rowdy lifestyle. “I’m not that way anymore,” he says. “I’m a boring, old married guy and the father of the clan.” Adkins says that the births of his five

daughters were the best moments of his life. Now, as they age, he’s taking on a different role. “I’m basically working security, watching out for whatever,” he says with a laugh. “I’m the guard dog but I get to sleep in the house.” He encourages his daughters to savor their youth. “Life is fleeting,” he says. “It goes by fast.” Even though he’s a proud father, he doesn’t claim to be father of the year. “I’d never win that. When everything is clipping along OK I can be guilty of not engaging with them as much as I should. I have to remind myself to engage from time to time.” His family suffered a tragedy in June 2011 when a fire destroyed their home south of Nashville. The family is fine, Adkins says, but they have not rebuilt their home yet. “It’s been a slow process. We are leasing a nice house in Tennessee.” Throughout his life, Adkins has possessed an even-keel outlook, even in the tough times. “I’m really a pretty quiet, laidback, easy-going guy,” he says. He’s also a forthright straight shooter who stands up for his beliefs. His autobiography “A Personal Stand: Observations and Opinions from a Freethinking Roughneck,” published in 2007, talks about personal responsibility and identifying and solving problems in the star’s typical candid manner.

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The song “Them Lips (On Mine)” is the first single from Adkins’ new album set to debut this fall.

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Adkins’ life and thoughts play into his music. His last studio album, “Proud To Be Here,” was released in 2011 and debuted at No. 2 on the Billboard Country Album Chart. It included everything from love songs such as “Million Dollar View” to Adkins’ signature lighter songs such as “It’s a Woman Thang.” He is currently working on a new album for Show Dog-Universal Music that will be released this year. The first single from the album, “Them Lips (On Mine),” a lighthearted up-tempo track, was released in June. Going back into the studio and bringing a fresh prospect to the project was a challenge for the 17-year music veteran. “You always have to one-up yourself,” he says. “It gets a lot harder to do but I think we did it one more time.” The new album has a mix of songs. “It’s not a departure and it’s not a theme album,” Adkins says. “Hopefully it has a good balance, which I always try to strike.” Adkins wrote the album’s title track, “Big Road.” “It’s about how I make my living and how truck drivers make their living,” he says, noting that he can relate to truck drivers and their life on the road. The seed for the song goes back to his youth when he was learning to drive through pastures and on dirt roads. “I remember my daddy saying don’t get out on the big road.” Being able to drive on the interstate was a “rite of passage,” he adds. “Now that is how I make my living. I don’t get paid to sing. I get paid to ride the bus and be gone from home. I do the singing part for free.” Adkins used his truck driving skills when he was taping “The Healer.” “I was the devil driving a truck full of souls to hell,” he says with a sly edge to his voice.

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TRACE ADKINS October 2012 Tour Dates 5

Southern Illinois Country Fest, Spartan, IL

14

Blake Shelton Cruise, Miami, FL

December 2012 Tour Dates 14

Colorado Belle, Laughlin, NV

15

Riviera Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas, NV

20-22

Walt Disney World Epcot, Lake Buena Vista, FL

Catch Trace online @ Website: www.traceadkins.com MySpace: TraceAdkins Twitter: /traceadkins Facebook: TraceAdkins YouTube: /traceadkins Reverb Nation: TraceAdkins The roles that he has had on the big screen and on television have not only been fun but have also given him confidence in himself. He believes his success in country music enabled him to get the roles he has landed. “It has opened doors for me,” he says. “Without the music I wouldn’t have gotten a second look for the acting stuff I have done.” Over the course of his career, Adkins has guest starred on numerous television shows, including “King of the Hill” and “Politically Incorrect,” moments that he has enjoyed. His stint on Donald Trump’s “The Celebrity Apprentice” was a different story. “It was not a fun diversion,” he recalls. “It was like a really intensive month-long job. I learned that I can survive in that environment even though I am not comfortable in it; that I can function.” Even though he didn’t win - he came in second, behind talk show host Piers Morgan - Adkins was able to raise awareness for the Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network and that was his goal from the beginning. When it comes to his rank as superstar, Adkins remains humble. He is a music fan at heart, idolizing the legends of the industry. As a member of the Grand Ole Opry, he appreciates being on stage with singers that he looks up to, he says. “I can go out and, on any given night, be surround by legends.” He thinks it’s funny that his dad was blasé about his son’s career until NASCAR named a Busch series race after him - the Trace Adkins Chrome 300. “He said that he guessed I finally made it,” Adkins says. What would his granddaddy and uncle think of his career today? “I am sure I still do things from time to time that would elicit a pretty stern look from my granddaddy,” he says. “I think overall, though, they would be proud.” PCM w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m

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enacts the laws, we the voters are still ultimately responsible for the actions and policies of our leaders.

feature

Issues in the Industry

voting drive

by: greg girard

he future of transportation in our country is very much at a crossroads. The acceleration of technology and inflation within the industry has raised innumerable questions ranging from driver privacy to alternative fuels to crumbling infrastructure. Whoever will be leading us in the next four to 10 years is going to have some tough and expensive decisions to make that will impact not only those of us in the trucking and transportation business but also every person who walks into a store to buy a product. Nov. 6 will mark the 57th time citizens of the United States have gone to the polls to elect a president. While the merits and impact of some of the elected over the years are open to debate, the simple act of voting for our next leader every four years has become a unique symbol of freedom throughout the world. Voting is our right, but not everyone on this planet can say the same.

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According to census.gov, during the 2008 presidential election, 64 percent of citizens eligible to vote cast a ballot, approximately 131 million people. Conversely, 36 percent, or 75 million people, who could vote did not. In 1977, Bill Vaughan, a columnist and author, wrote, “A citizen of America will cross the ocean to fight for democracy, but won’t cross the street to vote in a national election.” That still rings true today. “Every time you vote for a member of Congress, they have a direct input on what a truck operator is going to drive, how long he’s going to drive, and under what conditions he’s going to drive,” says Don Schaefer, executive vice president, Mid-west Truckers Association. “So it’s important to find out what your congressperson’s positions are on some of the big issues you’re concerned with.” Whether it’s the president who sets the agenda and tone of his term or Congress that

In this year’s election season, transportation, as well as many other industries, are fatalistically tied to the overall issue of producing a budget and getting control of the deficit. It’s the elephant in the room that won’t disappear no matter how much we wish it would. As it stands, the national debt now tops out at $16 trillion. It’s a figure that’s hard to fathom but can’t be ignored. “The deficit and management of the country’s finances is at the very top of the priority list,” says Tonn Ostergard, CEO and president of Crete Carrier Corp. “How you get there is a matter of opinion, but right now there hasn’t even been an overall acknowledgment that the deficit and growing debt have to be reined in. Nothing can be successful until we get the budget issues resolved and address the spending. Until that is well thought out and planned, I don’t think much else really matters.” Reining in the spending, as Republican vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan continues to emphasize, will take sacrifice. The hard part, however, will be figuring out where to save in transportation when the major issues of the industry are much like a DNA strand – all the parts are interconnected. If we want to stop the nation’s debt from growing, we need to make difficult decisions that could limit funding to repair bridges. If roads aren’t repaired, then maintenance costs go up on vehicles. If we want to transition to alternative fuels, we have to find political compromise in order to tap into our nation’s enormous supply of natural resources. But as we transition to natural gas or biofuels, new technologies will need to be installed in existing fleets. Regulations have improved safety in trucking; overregulation has put a financial burden on carriers and owner-operators that will be difficult to sustain. Meanwhile, fuel prices continue to rise. “Unless we have another source that can get us off of Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), we’re going to be in serious trouble,” says Heather Pontruff, a former owner-operator and blogger. “As oil prices go up, our diesel prices go up. I think we’re setting ourselves up for disaster.” It’s the driver, Pontruff says, that ends up being caught in the middle. As fuel prices rise, rates rise, creating tension with customers. “We had a hard time getting our customers to understand that our rates had to go up with fuel prices going up.” So regardless of who is occupying the w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m


White House and what political party controls Congress, some tough decisions lay ahead.

Candidates’ Positions

In many ways, the transportation system is a victim of its own success. “The truth is [transportation] always tends to take a back seat to conversations about the economy, tax policies, trade policies, health care, some very big issues,” says Bill Graves, president and CEO of the American Trucking Associations. “I think we have become so very good at what we do, so very dependable, that we are, to a great extent, taken for granted.” Regardless of rising costs, repressive regulations and deteriorating infrastructures, the freight still arrives on time. The bread is on the grocery store shelf and the new style of jeans is on the rack, so what’s the problem? The campaign trail, in many ways, is reflective of that attitude. Building and repairing roads and bridges is mentioned occasionally, but specifics are lacking. Alternative fuels are a hot topic, but where’s the game plan? Regarding transportation, the Democratic National Platform notes Obama’s successful passing of the Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century (MAP-21) authorization bill that appropriates $105 billion to trans-

portation programs. The Federal Highway Administration website says MAP-21 is the first long-term highway authorization enacted since 2005, although you’d be hardpressed to find someone in the industry that considers two years long term. The platform also notes support for investing in a faster “transition to cleaner fuels in the transportation sector” and sustaining the Highway Trust Fund, without much detail on how to achieve it.

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As people go to the polls and vote, they need to ask that question, what do I need to hear instead of what do I want to hear just to make me feel good to get somebody elected.

- Tonn Ostergard

The Republican National Platform also addresses the fund, noting that “securing sufficient funding for the Highway Trust Fund remains a challenge given the debt and

deficits and the need to reduce spending. Republicans will make hard choices and set priorities, and infrastructure will be among them.” It also emphasizes domestic energy independence and strengthening federalstate and public-private partnerships to “modernize our country’s travel lifelines.” Romney’s record as governor of Massachusetts may provide a glimpse into his strategies concerning transportation. During that time, he adopted a “fix it first” approach, identifying roads and bridges across the commonwealth for repair. In addition, midway through his term, Romney unveiled a long-term (20 years), $31 billion transportation plan with the majority of the money going to decongesting and expanding roadways – a plan many in the industry who have begged for a long-term transportation strategy will find encouraging. It’s clear that Romney’s top priority is the economy and debt, so we can probably expect many of the existing transportation programs to come under strict budgetary scrutiny before being funded. Obama will be pleased with MAP-21, which is probably the reason he’s put transportation on the backburner of his campaign rhetoric.

Voting Made Easy

While it seems a bit of a cliche, every vote does count. The most recent example is Al

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Election Day is coming. With early voting options, there’s no excuse to skip the polls this November.

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Franken’s election to the Senate in 2008. The Minnesota Democrat won by a mere 312 votes out of nearly 3 million ballots cast – a 0.011 percent margin of victory. Franken’s fate was determined by fewer people than can fit in a 747 airplane. If you’re on the road, the best way to make your voice count is through an absentee ballot. The rules for absentee voting differ among states, as do deadlines for applying. Residents of Indiana, for example, have a deadline of Oct. 29 to apply for an absentee ballot, whereas in Massachusetts you have until noon the day before the election. There are also different deadlines for voting absentee in person versus by mail. Check with your state’s election division for details. Some states require an excuse for the absentee ballot, such as traveling out of the country on Election Day or serving in the military. Thirty-two states and the District of Columbia, however, offer no-excuse or early voting. Early voting allows you to cast your bal-

lot before Election Day, sometimes weeks before, without explanation. Many voters take advantage of early voting simply to avoid the long lines at polling locations on Election Day. To make it even easier, citizens are also able to register to vote on Election Day. Just go to your designated polling location and sign up. It’s voting made easy. “I think the day is coming when politicians in general need to tell us what we need to hear and not what we want to hear,” says Ostergard. “And so as people go to the polls and vote, they need to ask that question, what do I need to hear instead of what do I want to hear just to make me feel good to get somebody elected.” This can be another election where the status quo reigns by mere apathy of the electorate or we can hold our elected officials accountable for their actions by the power of our vote. It’s a power we may have taken for granted at times but thankfully we’re given the ability to use that power again this November. Make your voice count and vote. PCM

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PhotoS: C.R. England

feature

He currently drives a Freightliner Cascadia with a new Detroit motor DD15, “best in the industry right now.” Safety also extends to job security. In an industry with a high turnover rate, C.R. England guarantees graduates of their driving schools a job with the company. C.R. Eng-

Safety has to be the first priority because if we don’t deliver freight safely nothing else really matters. Rules have changed, our hours of service have changed, but at C.R. England,the focus is still the same, to be a safe, courteous driver. – Randy Immoos

C.R. England by: amanda jakl

afety first” is Randy Immoos’s motto. Driving between Salt Lake City and Memphis, Tenn., twice a week, he’s on the road for several thousand miles every month. After almost two decades, Immoos reached 3 million miles accident-free last year. It’s not an accident how he got there, either. He drives for C.R. England, a transportation company that puts safety first. “I really feel as a driver that CR England doesn’t compromise safety in any way,” Immoos says. “Safety is first in our company.” By making safety a priority, C.R. England, founded in 1920, has grown from a sin-

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gle Model T hauling milk for local farmers in Weber County, Utah, to a fleet of more than 2,800 trucks, including Freightliners, Volvos, Internationals and Peterbilts, that service the contiguous United States and Mexico. True to its milk-hauling roots, C.R. England is one of the leaders in temperature-controlled transportation but also provides dedicated and regional routes. Top-of-the-line equipment is one way C.R. England offers safety to its drivers. Trucks outfitted with the newest technology can offer benefits, like back-up cameras, that older trucks cannot. C.R. England drivers never drive a truck older than three years. Immoos says he gets a new truck every year.

land currently has more than 7,500 drivers, about a third operating as independent contractors. And they’re hiring. C.R. England has driving schools in five locations around the country – Burns Harbor, Ind.; Dallas; Fontana, Calif.; Richmond, Ind.; and Salt Lake City. “We’re in a pretty aggressive growth mode,” says Thom Pronk, vice president of recruiting, training and corporate development. “We’ve been very successful at hiring new people into the industry and training them the C.R. England way.” The C.R. England way includes monthly RoadSmart conference calls that address the safety issue of the day. “We invite our drivers to call in,” Pronk explains. “It’s a live safety call, or recorded if they can’t get to the live one, where we go over some of the challenges we’re going through but also some specific tips and things that we want our drivers to focus on for the month.” Drivers are given a forum to discuss the problems they see on the road every day. One major safety issue that C.R. England has addressed is fatigue. The company has a full-time fatigue manager who monitors drivers and offers advice depending on the situation. “If it’s the middle of the night and you’re fatigued, you can get on your headset and call one of the safety managw w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m


Randy Immoos started with C.R. England almost 20 years ago and sees himself retiring with the company.

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ers,” who will either recommend a place to pull over or talk drivers through until the next stop, explains owner-operator Annette Dellinger. “There’s always somebody there, somebody willing to help you out.” Qualcomm messages are used too. Immoos points out that all drivers receive nightly fatigue messages designed to make them aware of fatigue and how to recognize the signs. Driver incentives also encourage a safety-first mind set. C.R. England has quarterly giveaways (currently a HarleyDavidson motorcycle), cash drawings and acknowledgment gifts for qualified drivers. Drivers who maintain a safety record and a consistent mpg are entered into regular drawings. Passing DOT inspections is another way to be entered into a drawing to win $500. Safety starts with the drivers. Whether they are company drivers or owneroperators, C.R. England drivers all have something in common. “That attitude of accountability, discipline, commitment and hard work,” Pronk says. “We can teach people how to drive but we can’t teach those things necessarily.” Dellinger graduated from C.R. England Premier Driving School and has been driving for almost a year with her husband, Adam. She says she appreciates the wel-

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Annette Dellinger is a new driver and appreciates all the support she receives from C.R. England. coming attitude of the company. “With C.R. England you feel like part of the family,” Dellinger explains. “You don’t feel like you’re just a driver out there on the road. You can be in Fargo, N.D., or you can be in Oakland, Calif., and you’re still part of the family.” “Safety has to be the first priority because if we don’t deliver freight safely nothing else really matters,” Immoos says. “Rules have changed, our hours of service have changed, but at C.R. England, the focus is still the same, to be a safe, courteous driver.” PCM

C.R. England

4701 West 2100 South • Salt Lake City, UT, 84120, USA

800-421-9004

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West has also voiced several other famous characters. In 1996 he provided the voices of Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd in the movie “Space Jam.” He’s voiced so many of the Looney Tunes characters that Entertainment Weekly called him the next Blanc, which doesn’t sit well with West. “Yipes! I just want to be the best me there is.” Born in Detroit in 1950, West’s talent emerged at a young age. “I used to shout out voices and noises from about age 4 or 5,” he says. Mostly it was to comfort his mother and to ease the tension caused by his alcoholic father’s temper. In an interview with David Shankbone, West described his childhood as a “horror chamber,” referring to the abuse from his father. “I was the whipping boy and [my mother] would just be reduced to tears a lot of times, and I would come in and say stuff, and I would put out little bits just to pull her out of it.”

feature Photos: Guy Viau

The Man of 1,000 Voices

by: amanda jakl

illy West’s work has brought laughter to millions of people. He is one of the busiest and most wellknown actors today, but you probably wouldn’t recognize his face. He’s the talented voice behind characters like Philip J. Fry in “Futurama,” Stimpy in “Ren and Stimpy” and the red M&M. Following in the footsteps of the iconic Mel Blanc (the original voice of Bugs Bunny and other Looney Tunes characters), West is one of the most talented voice

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actors in America today. Parents of kids in the ’90s might recognize West’s work on two popular Nickelodeon cartoons. He voiced the main character in “Doug,” a show about the predicaments of an 11-year-old, and “The Ren and Stimpy Show,” featuring a dogand-cat duo that later gained cult status. He originally voiced the simpleminded Stimpson J. Cat, but eventually took over the voice of the demented Chihuahua Ren Hoek as well.

I try with every character to make people feel like it has a beating heart, a soul and as much substance as I can give it so they act and sound as if they had a real reason to exist.

- Billy West

West’s mother eventually filed for divorce and moved him and his two brothers to Boston in the early ’60s. The move to the Northeast wasn’t easy for a sixth-grader. “It was a culture shock moving from Detroit to Boston,” he says. As much as he wanted to hang on to the Midwestern accent, the allure of the Bostonian twang proved too much. “I thought it was cool to just open your mouth and let words fall out of it like the kids in Boston.” In his early 20s, West faced his own addictions with alcohol and drugs. A series of car accidents didn’t provide a wake-up call, but failing to pay his rent did. He told Shankbone, “I finally cracked up a car and I was in for non-payment of rent and the judge says, ‘I don’t care about this nonpayment of rent thing, but you’re doing a week in Charles Street Jail for this DWI that you never answered for.’” After completing rehabilitation, West has remained clean for 26 years. West started his radio career as a regular w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m


on Boston’s WBCN morning “Charles Laquidara’s Big Mattress” show. He recalls a bit he used to do in radio. “‘This portion of our program is brought to you by the letter D, donated by the town of Medford, Mass., which no longer uses it.’ People would pronounce it ‘Meffa.’” Then from the late 1980s through the mid-1990s, West could be heard on

Howard Stern’s nationally syndicated show. His celebrity impersonations fooled quite a few people. Stern conducted many “celebrity” interviews with West. He mastered the voices of actors such as Lucille Ball, Raymond Burr and Robin Williams, television personalities Johnny Carson, Jay Leno and Kathy Lee Gifford, and singers like Elton John, Sammy Davis Jr., and Frank Sinatra. His impersonations and quick wit made him a favorite on the shock jock’s show. A salary dispute caused him to leave in 1995. Since then, West has done the occasional voice for radio shows, but has focused on voiceover work. Although a radio gig hosting his own show would seem like a natural step, West didn’t “want to showcase the works of others for a living.” West has proved that he can both imitate and create. Original characters abound for him in the “Futurama” universe. He voices the characters Philip J. Fry, Dr. Farnsworth, Dr. John A. Zoidberg and Zapp Brannigan. “I try with every character to make people feel like it has a beating heart, a soul and as much substance as I can give it,” he explains, “so they act

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West has provided the voices of Buzz, the mascot of Honey Nut Cheerios, and Popeye in Minute Maid commercials.

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In his spare time, West plays guitar and sings with his band, Billy West and the Grief Counselors. and sound as if they had a real reason to exist.” Even with all his hard work, West’s “Futurama” characters almost ceased to exist. The show originally aired on Fox from 1999-2003 before ceasing production. The show gathered a cult following when picked up for syndication by Cartoon Network until 2007 when Comedy Central agreed to produce new episodes. The show is in the middle of its seventh season, which wraps in mid-2013. And just because he works in cartoons, don’t think that West is flippant about his job. “I treat all the gigs I do really seriously, no matter what it is. I have an immigrant mentality. If I don’t do the right witty little voice that day, they’ll take away my house!” he jokes. He brings that same mentality to his commercial work as well. West is the voice of the red M&M and Buzz, the mascot of Honey Nut Cheerios. And West is quick to defend his craft from the current trend in marketing of using well-known film actors to voiceover commercials, like Tim Allen promoting Campbell’s Soups and Julia Roberts extolling the benefits of Nationwide Insurance. “It’s not about me,” he says. “[But] what about the 19-yearold firebrand that is bursting with character ideas and unique and magic vocal passion that won’t get seen because ‘Joey Bedhead’ film star thinks he’d make a great contribution to voiceover acting?” West explains the magic that voice actors bring to the craft. “To me art is about alchemy. [Voice actors] get hired to turn the lead bar on the table into gold. If there are people getting hired to bring exactly who and what they are to a character, the bar remains lead.” With more than 100 voices to his credit, West continues to bring gold to television audiences everywhere. PCM

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RV Journey

On the road

Photo: NPS

unforgettable. A visit to Depoe Bay, the “Whale Watching Capital of the Oregon Coast,” is a must. Whales can be seen from March through December. ATV enthusiasts should check out the Oregon Dunes National Recreation Area, stretching from Florence to North Bend, which offers 47 miles of sand dunes.

Loess Hills Scenic Byway, Iowa

5 Great Fall RV T rips

BY: Marion Kelly

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risp, chilly air, clear skies and colorful foliage announce the arrival of fall. To help you enjoy the best the season has to offer, we’ve put together a list of five great RV trips around the country, from the Appalachian Trail to the Pacific coast.

Adirondack Northway, New York

The Adirondack Northway, also called Interstate 87, runs through the eastern region of the Adirondacks from Albany to the Canadian border. This drive will take you within easy reach of attractions like Lake George, Lake Placid and historic Fort Ticonderoga. Along the way you’ll pass towns like Glenn Falls and Queensbury, where the Adirondack Balloon Festival takes place each fall. You can also enjoy the country’s longest hiking trail system and choose from more than 100 campgrounds.

late October. Visitors can experience Appalachian culture at the Mabry Mill at Milepost 176.2, or hike miles of trails and enjoy great fishing at Cave Mountain Lake.

Pacific Coast Highway, Oregon

The Pacific Coast Highway, known also as U.S. 101, runs the entire West Coast from Washington to California. We recommend the 363-mile section in Oregon, informally known as “The People’s Coast.” Breathtaking ocean views, historic landmarks and distinctive lighthouses make this drive

Named after a geologic formation found in the area, Loess Hills covers 220 miles of western Iowa. This drive features intense reds and bright oranges of the hardwood forests and the deep yellows of the prairies. Stop for a hike through Five Ridge Prairie State Preserve to see the natural, untouched beauty of one of the largest prairies in the U.S. that can only be accessed on foot. Fall foliage will draw your attention, but keep your eyes to the sky. October is a great time for bird watching as large birds of prey start their migration to warmer temps. Expect to see hawks, eagles, falcons and vultures that can boast wingspans of more than six feet.

Natchez Trace Parkway, Mississippi, Alabama and Tennessee

Drive through 10,000 years of history on the 444-mile Natchez Trace Parkway stretching from Mississippi to Tennessee. The maple, oak and hickory leaves are at their most brilliant mid to late October. Because of the limited traffic along the parkway, cyclists can take advantage of beautiful views and the free road biking packet provided by the National Park Service. Make sure to stop at Cypress Swamp in Mississippi for the stunning cypress trees and maybe even a gator. PCM Photo: David Putzier

Blue Ridge Parkway, Virginia and North Carolina

Sometimes called “America’s Favorite Drive,” the Blue Ridge Parkway is a 469mile National Scenic Byway that stretches from Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley to North Carolina’s Smoky Mountains. Following the Appalachian Mountain range, the parkway offers beautiful scenery. Peak time for fall foliage along the parkway is

Sweet Creek Falls near Florence, Ore., along the Pacific Coast Highway is a must-see in autumn.


RV Journey

Off the beaten path Photos: ??

Photos: Corn Palace

photos: Anna Terebelo

The Corn Palace

murals outside that attract them. The Corn Palace has a gymnasium inside and is host to basketball games, shows, concerts, exhibits and parties. In fact, it was rated as one of the top 10 places to play high school basketball in the U.S. The most popular event is the Corn Festival, held at the end of August every year, celebrating the corn harvest. It’s a huge event that features musical guests, vendors, food and rides. Acts that have performed at the Corn Festival include Willie Nelson, Brad Paisley, Lawrence Welk, even the Three Stooges. The best time to visit is when the murals are still fresh, sometime in the middle of October. Admission is free. PCM

BY: Mickalina Padilla

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riginally built in 1892 as proof of the fertile soil of South Dakota, the Corn Palace in Mitchell has grown into a kitschy tourist attraction that lures more than a half million visitors every year. With its Moorish domes and minarets, the large Corn Palace sticks out like an exotic thumb in tiny Mitchell. Nicknamed the world’s biggest birdfeeder, it is a unique building that does its job of attracting people to a tiny town. You won’t see priceless works of art inside the Corn Palace, but you will see oneof-a-kind murals on the palace. Every fall, the outside walls of the Corn Palace feature 13 murals, created entirely out of corn. Every year more than 275,000 ears of corn are grown by Wade Strand, owner of the Corn Palace, on more than 100 acres of farmland. Of all the corn that is picked, only the best is palatial bound. Corn hues include red, brown, black, blue, white, orange, calico, yellow and green, and varying shades of each give current mural artist Cherie Ramsdell plenty to work with. Ramsdell designs about 30 separate murals with the year’s chosen theme using watercolors, which are then submitted to a committee. Thirteen designs are chosen for the walls of the palace. The theme for 2012 was Saluting Youth Activities and

included murals about youth football, golf, dancing and gymnastics. This year’s theme is “We Celebrate” and will highlight several American holidays. To create the new murals, every ear of corn is cut in half and then nailed in place. The new murals are finished by Oct. 1. In the end, the careful planning and careful work create a spectacular piece of art for all to see, or feed on, in the case of the pigeons and squirrels. And it’s not just the

Driving from the east, the Corn Palace is a fun stop about 300 miles from Mount Rushmore. Nine colors of corn are used as the “paint” for each of the 13 murals.


RV Journey

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Boondocking “D oct.

2012

BY: Chad Blake

own in the Boondocks!” Remember that Billy Joe Royal song? Literally speaking, of course, boondocks means a remote, isolated country. To us RVers though, that’s music to our ears. Not many of us want to live in remote locations, nor are we capable of it. So for many RVers, a piece of remote land is often exactly what they’re looking for, at least for a little while. Some place tranquil and off the beaten path. A place to relax. Or to get a bit more specific, we’re looking for some place wild and wooded, preferably with a lake or stream. Paying for camping is nice and is usually part of our journey, but not paying for camping is also nice. Traveling in an RV is not cheap and boondocking can help defer some of the costs. While cost is certainly a factor in our decision making, we really choose boondocking because we can divorce ourselves from the hassle of check-ins, barking dogs, children running through your little patch of rented space, and other unpleasantness. After all, most RVs today are self-contained and with proper water, waste and fuel management, you can easily camp in the wilds without losing the RV’s wonderful conveniences. It’s more about becoming one with nature, at least for me. All RVers have their own idea of RV travel. And that is as it should be. But boondocking offers up some unique experiences and once you’ve found a spot on the earth with the sound of a running stream, nights as black as ink, and game cruising through

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your area, it’s hard to go back to “the wire” (campground electricity). The best places that we have found for boondocking are on Bureau of Land Management (BLM) property. Our first experience on BLM land was on a crosscountry trip. We had planned on meeting up with my wife’s sister and her husband to explore the wonders of Bryce Canyon and Zion National Parks in Utah. We chose a spot on BLM property off Highway 89 and met at an agreed-upon mile post marker. The area was within easy driving distance to both parks. We spent a week there and have never enjoyed a stay anywhere as pleasant. The absence of noisy traffic, exhaust fumes, dust and obnoxious music was pure tranquility. At night, the heavens appeared to have more stars than ever; it looked like you could just reach out and pick them out of the sky. You could see eyes reflecting off the campfire light and hear the true night sounds of wildlife milling about. We hated to leave, but our paths from there were to travel together through Capitol Reef National Park and on to Moab. Our time on that particular piece of BLM property was very special and inspired us to experience several more boondocking trips. If you choose to do some research on BLM camping, I don’t think you will be disappointed. Just obey their rules, enjoy the moment and leave it like you were never there. I know you’ll come back singing about life down in the boondocks. PCM w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m


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column

Six meals ‘fad’ by: linda mcgirr Linda McGirr is a Registered Dietitian and Certified Dietitian-Nutritionist

here are a lot of theories as to what is the best way to lose weight. It seems like there are more diet books out there than anyone could possibly count. The problem is, no one who writes a book has to prove that his or her theories are valid or that the book contains sound nutrition advice. Many “fad diets” are just that – fads. While it may be fashionable to follow the same diets as the movie stars, these fad diets may not always be the best thing for you. Let’s look at one of these theories, “six meals a day for weight management,” which has endured through the years. Have you ever heard that eating six or more meals a day can make you lose weight? This style of eating is often referred to as “grazing.” Many Americans have moved to grazing to match their on-the-go lifestyles, but eating this way is nothing new. In different parts of the world, serving small portions is common. Here we call them small plates or appetiz-

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ers. In Spain they are referred to as tapas, in Morocco as kemia, and in China, dim sum. The effect frequency of meals has on weight management has been studied for 40 years. The theory is that grazing will help regulate blood sugar, reduce food cravings and keep hunger at bay. According the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, however, there is no real weight loss advantage to eating six meals a day. There is nothing magical about eating small, more frequent meals when it comes to losing weight. The real issue is total calories per day. Most people require somewhere between 1,500-2,200 calories in a day to obtain good nutrition and maintain their weight. Research indicates that as long as you eat the correct amount of calories throughout the day, it doesn’t matter if you do it in three, four, five or six meals. The results will be the same. While grazing may not promote weight management any better than the standard w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m


three or four meals per day, it can provide an excellent opportunity to eat a healthier diet, if you plan correctly. Shifting from large meals and high-fat snacks to healthy, wellbalanced mini meals can be an effective way to reduce your calorie intake to help you to lose weight. There can also be disadvantages for some people. If you have trouble controlling how much you eat, this way of eating can backfire on you. If you choose high-calorie, highfat small meals, or low-nutrition snacks, you may be getting too many calories. Healthy grazing requires planning to control the amount you eat. If you don’t plan, it’s easy to overeat this way, since you may never really feel full. The result can be higher calorie and fat intake which can, in turn, lead to weight gain, the opposite of the desired effect. Grazing healthfully can be a challenge when you are on the road. If you’re thinking of trying it, having a plan is important. Here’s some advice on how to do it well.

Eat breakfast. Numerous studies point to the importance of breaking the overnight fast with food. Reporting in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers concluded that skipping breakfast resulted in greater consumption of calories and changes in insulin sensitivity that could lead to weight gain.

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Do a little math. Take the daily number of calories you’re aiming for and divide that by the number of meals you want to eat. Then organize yourself so that you can successfully eat six meals while staying on your calorie target. Have some strategies in your back pocket. If you decide that six small meals

are for you, try the following ideas to help keep your calories in check. • When eating out, choose simply prepared foods without sauces. • Order a salad or appetizer rather than a full meal. • If ordering a meal, take half of it to go and save it for another meal.

Plan ahead. If you have the ingredients

with you, it can be easy to eat healthy mini meals. Try the following: • A hardboiled egg, slice of whole-wheat toast and an orange (256 calories). • An apple, a slice of cheddar cheese and light popcorn (215 calories). • Grilled chicken on a mini bagel with carrot and celery sticks (218 calories). • Peanut butter on a whole-grain English muffin with a banana (227 calories). • Hummus on a mini pita pocket with lettuce and tomato (327 calories). • Half a turkey sandwich with fruit salad (199 calories).

Having smaller meals throughout the day takes some planning ahead. • A fruit smoothie made with low-fat yogurt, berries and juice (257 calories). While eating six times a day may not give you an advantage in the weight loss department, it can be done healthfully, if you prefer to eat that way. Remember that randomly eating six times a day is not an effective approach. You must choose healthy foods in the right amounts to succeed at weight management, no matter how many times a day you choose to eat. Happy planning! PCM

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column

Big Bad Bruins by: brenda potts

y husband, Stan, recently accomplished one of his lifelong goals of tagging a monster grizzly bear. I, on the other hand, want no part of bear hunting. Hunting in bear country makes me nervous. I’ve never actually seen a bear up close in this situation, and am quite pleased about that. I have had several nerve-wracking bear encounters. Once, while Stan and I were elk hunting in New Mexico, we had to walk down off the mountain on an old logging road after dark. He can see like a cat in the darkness and I can’t see worth a hoot. I was following closely behind him when suddenly dark shapes ran across the road about 20 yards in front of us. The smell of rotting garbage wafted toward us. I asked Stan what was making the commotion. His response made the hair on the back of my neck stand up: “A black bear is chasing some elk across the road in front of us.” Now, my version of the encounter is very different from Stan’s, who has embellished the tale a bit over the years. I merely held on to the back of his coat to keep him near as we continued walking down the road. He tells the story something like this: “We saw a bear in the road and Brenda grabbed me by the back of the coat with both hands while she shoved me back and forth in front of her as if trying to feed me to the bear. I couldn’t move my arms, even if I had to shoot in selfdefense, because she had such a tight grip on me. I felt like I was in a straightjacket!” Everyone laughs as he plays up the part. On another occasion, Stan and I slept in a small spike camp at 11,000 feet so we could begin hunting elk at daybreak from a higher vantage point where elk would be com-

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ing up the mountain to bed for the day. It worked. We got after a big bull and worked toward a high bench meadow. The bull was bugling and answering Stan’s cow calls. We were hiding by a big bush and suddenly I heard a muffled woofing noise coming from the other side of the bush. I whispered to Stan, “What does a bear sound like?” He responded with instructions for me to stay put while he moved closer. Another woof. No way was I staying in the bushes with a potential bear! I quickly disobeyed his wish and became Stan’s shadow in pursuit of the elk all the way across the meadow and away from that bush. On yet another elk hunt, Stan dropped me off on an old road at a point where I could walk the 100 yards to my tree stand over a wallow. He and a buddy continued on up to higher ground where they were to spot and stalk elk for the afternoon. They were supposed to return just at dark to pick me up and drive back to our camp. They missed the “just at dark” portion of the instructions. Little did I know as I arrived at my designated spot that I would still be standing there 30 minutes later in pitch-black darkness. No moon, just a few stars. My nerves got the better of me when I heard pebbles tumble down into the road at my feet. All I could think of was to make noise so as not to surprise a wandering bear. I spent the next several minutes stomping up and down the road singing “God Bless America,” waiting to be rescued. Why that song? I have no idea. Folks love to invite me to go bear hunting. They know I will refuse. I just want them to continue hunting bears so bears will stay scared of humans. And away from me! PCM w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m


column

More than by: claire b. lang

Listen to Claire B. Lang’s “Dialed In” show on SiriusXM NASCAR Radio, Channel 90. arl Edwards, driver of the No. 99 in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series, is a big-hearted guy with tons of talent and a Midwest friendly nature. Of course, I’m not on the racetrack where he’s not likely to give up an inch of space on his way to the finish. I have a wooden box on my studio desk with business cards in it, some of which date back a ways. In that box is the Carl Edwards business card from when he was a young driver trying to find a job. I don’t recall when the card was handed to me, but it’s a collector’s item now. The card is white and glossy with a black and white photo of a young Carl Edwards on it and it reads: “If you’re looking for a driver, you’re looking for me. CARL EDWARDS, Driver” “Well you’re one of about only two or three thousand (who got one), ’cause I handed out those business cards to every single person who would take them,” Edwards tells me with a chuckle. “I’d be leaving the dirt track and see ’em laying in the dirt, you

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know, just like in the parking lot. After re-signing with Roush Fenway Racing recently to a multi-year deal, Edwards won’t need to be handing out business cards any time soon. I got to know him when he’d win Nationwide races and come in after the checkered flag on a Friday or Saturday night in studio to hang out on air. Sometimes he’d stay to anchor part of the show, taking phone calls from unsuspecting fans that were beside themselves when they called into “Dialed In” and Edwards was on the other end of the line. There was a time that “Carl Edwards, driver of the No. 99” might very well have been “Carl Edwards, long-haul driver” transporting cargo on the long and winding open highway. “I don’t know what the statute of limitations is but I did do a little bit of driving a truck. I don’t have my CDL, so I don’t know if that was legal or not,” Edwards told me with a grin. Edwards, who is one of the elite

drivers in NASCAR and can shift through road courses at 120-plus mph, admits it was not so easy driving a big rig. “I can tell you though the times that I’ve driven semi, those guys are really, really good at matching gears so the shifting is ... (difficult),” says Edwards. “There are times where I had to stop and start over from neutral to first gear because I couldn’t get it from third to fourth or fourth to fifth, so those guys, they do a really good job. “I actually studied a little bit to get my CDL,” Edwards says, “but then I found out they wouldn’t hire unless you were 25 or something and I was 21 years old. I’ve read the book and I’m somewhat familiar with what those guys have to do to get the CDL but I mean driving down the road ... I understand. I got a lot of friends that are truckers and being away from their families all the time, having the responsibility of driving down the road with thousands and thousands of pounds of cargo and being safe, I really have a lot of respect for the men and women that transfer goods all over the country via the trucks.” Mark Martin’s dad owned a trucking company and he put him behind the big wheel at a young age. Dale Earnhardt Sr. wanted to race another hauler driver from Rockingham, N.C., to Charlotte after a race and the owner had him delayed in the garage – to avoid a bumper-to-bumper big-rig race through the North Carolina hills. As you watch NASCAR races and visualize from the open highway what it would be like to be a racecar driver, you should know that these guys have a respect and fascination with what you do behind the wheel too. PCM

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column

Rough Road Ahead

by: mike howe

Follow Mike on Twitter: @TruckingDC • Like Mike on Facebook: www.facebook.com/TruckingPoliticsMore

ormer President Bill Clinton said it best when campaigning in 1991 with his slogan “It’s The Economy, Stupid.” It wasn’t really a revelation, as the economy is an issue in every presidential campaign, even in times of economic growth. And this year is no different. Both presidential candidates have devoted much of their campaign to defending and promoting their economic policies and proposals. While this is important, it’s Congress we should all be keeping a close eye on now. A policy divide of monumental proportions exists between what the Senate Democrats and the House Republicans want to do with regard to the so-called Bush tax cuts and the automatic spending cuts agreed to last year. What does this mean for the country? It means a significant – very significant – chunk of the nation’s economy will take a hit. It means $7 trillion of economic impact in the form of tax increases and spending cuts go into effect beginning in January 2013. Do you remember the budget debate from earlier this year? It’s the one where Republicans and Democrats “compromised” for the good of the country and allowed the government to stay open. Within that compromise are automatic budget cuts for 2013 in the form of $55 billion from defense spending and $55 billion in non-defense spending. For non-defense, think of items like food inspection, air travel safety and highways. Whether or not you agree with the current size of the government, imagine the impact of cutting $1.2 billion. Those dollar figures equal jobs – not only for government employees, but private contractors and more. Those employees spend money on the items your truck delivers. Could there be a ripple effect? Then, of course, there are the Bush tax cuts. These are popular fodder for all politicians, especially during an election year. They expire on Dec. 31, 2012. If left to expire, income taxes automatically rise 3 percent to

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5 percent for all tax brackets. Given the current state of the economy and all things associated with it (think fuel prices), can you afford the additional income tax? But it’s not just the income tax that is impacted. The capital gains tax rises, the child tax credit is reduced, the earned income tax credit is affected, the marriage penalty is back, the alternative minimum tax is increased, and the list goes on. Oh, and if you look at your paycheck you will always see money deducted for the Social Security tax. If the Bush tax cuts are allowed to expire the rate goes from 4.2 percent back to 6.2 percent. So why isn’t Congress working to avoid the “fiscal cliff”? Well, they are – the parties are just working in different directions. This is an election year, after all; instead of dealing with the real issues, those running for office prefer to toy with our economic future. The Republican-controlled House of Representatives passed a one-year extension of the Bush tax cuts for everyone already, but the Democrat-controlled Senate wants them extended only for those earning under $250,000. It’s time for the rhetoric to stop and solutions to be found. The reality, however, is there will be no compromise prior to the November elections and anything after that would be just short of miraculous. This is a lame-duck Congress and it is the next Congress that will be forced to compromise and climb back up the cliff (if it isn’t too late). Republicans and Democrats will ultimately find a solution, probably something similar to what they have done in the past – present a short-term (one-year) compromise bill and tell the public they are working on a long-term solution. That is what they did last time. The only difference now is this is an election year. As much as I enjoy politics, I am not convinced the U.S. economy is strong enough to participate in these games. PCM

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Ribbon Me This

purple magnetic ribbon on the back of an SUV caught my eye the other day. I’ve seen thousands of them on the road but usually in a different color. I know the yellow ribbon means you support the troops and a pink one supports breast cancer awareness, but the purple one had me stumped, so I looked it up on the Internet. Apparently, the purple ribbon is to raise awareness of animal cruelty, domestic violence, pancreatic cancer, drug overdose and the orca whale, as well as Workers’ Memorial Day. I had no idea one color could represent so many things. I wonder which one the SUV owner was supporting. Heck, maybe it was all of them. There are a whole slew of colored ribbons for causes I’ve never heard of. A zebra print ribbon supports carcinoid tumor awareness, a blue ribbon draws attention to osteogenesis

imperfecta (better known as brittle bone disease), and a green ribbon represents craniosynostosis awareness. And if those don’t convince you that there is a ribbon for everything, a teal ribbon helps celebrate National Zombie Apocalypse Awareness in May. For all of these examples, I had to look them up (and then I had to go look up the medical definitions), which got me wondering, if someone has to go look up the meaning of a ribbon, is it really having any impact? There are so many ribbons out there now that most people see one, wonder what it represents for a few seconds and then forget about it. I know I do. Many of the ribbons you can just buy at a store and while I’m sure the troops like to see the yellow ribbons supporting their sacrifice, I bet they would appreciate a phone card to call home while on deployment a whole lot more. And if both items are about the same price,

by: charles pope

which one do you think is money better spent? We all have causes that are close to our heart. My family has been affected by breast cancer and diabetes. I just think the money people spend on the ribbons could be better spent helping to find a cure for a disease. Makes you wonder if the companies that make the ribbons donate a portion of profits to the causes their ribbons are trying to raise awareness for. I’m sure there are a handful that do, but I’d be willing to bet a lot don’t. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not anti-ribbon. I had a pink breast cancer ribbon when my mom went through chemotherapy. And maybe that’s why the ribbons are so popular: They’re a reminder of our loved ones’ (or even our own) struggles and successes. I may even run out and get the teal ribbon now. After all, zombie awareness is an important cause.

Do you have an industry issue you would like to gripe about? Send it to editor@ptcchallenge.com.


Photo: Goode’s Lifetime Memories

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by: mickalina padilla

hosts, ghouls, spiders and the things that live under the bed; we all hunt for the thing that will scare the neighborhood kids when they come trick or treating. That’s just good Halloween fun. In honor of All Hallow’s Eve, we decided to highlight some of the most thrilling haunted spots in the U.S. and give ourselves (and maybe you as well) a good scare.

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West Virginia State Penitentiary

Mooresville, W.Va.

This prison housed thousands of inmates, and many met their deaths in the gallows or the electric chair. It’s no surprise then that this place is haunted by spirits from the grave. Now you can wander too, if you’re brave enough. It’s open year-round (except holidays) Tuesday through Sunday. Want to really have a scare? Try the overnight tour for $60. From 11 p.m. to 6 a.m. you’re left to your own devices in the prison. Yikes. www.wvpentours.com

Winchester Mystery House

San Jose, Calif.

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In 1884, Sarah Winchester moved from Connecticut to California and proceeded to build a home for the next 38 years. As the legend holds, Sarah was grieving from the death of her husband, manufacturer of the revolutionary Winchester repeating rifle, and her young daughter. Desperate for answers and believing she was being haunted by evil spirits, Sarah visited a medium who told her that she was being haunted by all the victims of her husband’s rifle and the only way to appease the spirits was to move west and build a house. As long as construction never stopped, the medium assured her, she would be safe from the hauntings. At the time of Sarah’s death in 1922,

the house contained 160 rooms, 2,000 doors, 10,000 windows and 47 stairways sprawled over six acres of land. The house is said to be haunted by not only the victims of the infamous rifle but also the spirits of her servants who reportedly still roam the halls. The house is a maze, with staircases leading to nowhere, countless secret rooms and doors that open to a sudden two-story drop. The house is open for tours but be careful not to wander off. You may never find your way out. www.winchestermysteryhouse.com

The Copper Queen Hotel

Bisbee, Ariz.

Next time you’re in Bisbee, try staying at the Copper Queen for a night. You might meet one of the three ghosts that haunt the hotel during your stay. Perhaps it will be the older gentleman who is usually seen with a top hat and cape, and tends to appear in doorways bringing the smell of a good cigar with him. Or maybe you’ll meet Julia, a lady of the night who fell in love with one of her clients. When he rejected her, she took her own life. More likely, though, you’ll meet the spirit of a young boy who drowned in the nearby river. He tends to be very mischievous and likes to move people’s belongings around. www.copperqueen.com

Moore House

Villisca, Iowa

On the night of June 10, 1910, eight people were murdered between midnight and 6 a.m. in the Moore House. The crime was never solved. Now, 100 years later, the house is open to the public for tours. Go in a skeptic, come out a believer. The spirits of the eight victims supposedly haunt the house, but they don’t mean any harm. It’s the spirit of the killer that you should probably avoid. www.villiscaiowa.com PCM w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m


Have an inspiring story from the road? Maybe a poem or song? We want to share your creativity with our readers. Write down your thoughts and send it to us by mail or email (editor@ptcchallenge.com).

Submissions must be original, unpublished and created by the sender or the sender must have permission to submit. All submissions become the property of Challenge Magazine and will not be returned. Submissions may be edited and may be published or otherwise reused in any medium.

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Montana Miles by: Audrey Waters

Heading south across Montana, Just eating up the miles. Guess you could say that I was born to roam. And as I look out of the window, Those memories flood my mind To the days when we called this land our home. Montana miles, makes me think of you. Montana miles, It’s all that I can do To keep from thinking of you Every day. Montana miles Just won’t take this pain away. We started out so young and free With big dreams in our hearts. Our love was shared beneath these rolling hills. Our love was strong, our life was full We thought we had it all. But Montana couldn’t break my stubborn will.

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Montana miles, makes me think of you. Montana miles, It’s all that I can do To keep from thinking of you Every day. Montana miles Just won’t take this pain away.

Montana miles, makes me think of you. Montana miles, It’s all that I can do To keep from thinking of you Every day. Montana miles Just won’t take this pain away.

Just cruising down this interstate, This tired and lonely life. I know this job has cost me precious time. I couldn’t see the pain it caused When I was not around. I wasn’t there to share this heart of mine.

There’s no sense looking backwards at things that might have been. You’re gone and I just live on with regret. I wish that I’d stayed here with you In this wind-swept grassy land, But the road just pulled me back and holds me yet. Montana miles, makes me think of you. Montana miles, It’s all that I can do To keep from thinking of you Every day. Montana miles Just won’t take this pain away. w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m


On the Road by: Tammy Adams

The wind digs his fingers deep into the rabbit’s soft fur and Gently brushes the petals of the field flowers. Rabbit do-si-dos with the sagebrush And the yellow lines of the highway disappear beneath the belly of the semi. The swan’s featherless wings are lifted in perpetual flight on the hood Of the Pete. The engine rumbles and hungrily swallows Miles of asphalt. The trailer creaks and groans, Shouldering the burden of the load. The hand of the crane lifts the cargo until the trailer is empty once again. The tractor is bathed in the wash bay, The tanks guzzle diesel until satiated. Once again, the tires caress the road, ready for a new day, a new load.

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the LIFE OF A SQUIRREL by: Rick Hardy

Squirrel on a sign post Over ten feet high How did it get there? So why did it die Gather all the nuts Always in a hurry Got to store them up Soon the snow flurry Seventeen acorns Only one peanut All stuffed in his cheeks His mouth will not shut Crossing high wires Whatever it takes Must feed his kids Can’t afford mistakes Jump through the treetops Grabbing onto sticks One little false move Fall down to the bricks Need not start to cry Please stop your weeping He worked very hard May be just sleeping

o c t o b e r 2 0 1 2 C H A L L E N G E 61


Word Search

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#20

N M S D K N O I N Y G C S X G S B W D U N D K

N M S D K A N H O PI H N U Y H G LC TS D X L G K S LB H W N D T U S N K D LK E E L L O

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6 5 1

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4 7 1

8

8 2 2

9

(c) Puzzles by Pappocom

Solution, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com. 7 1 4 6 8 5 6 9 8 4 2 3 5 2 3 7 9 1 8 4 1 9 3 6 9 3 5 2 4 7 2 7 6 1 5 8 4 5 7 3 1 2 1 8 9 5 6 4 3 6 2 8 7 9 sept12 solution

62 C H A L L E N G E o c t o b e r 2 0 1 2

3 7 6 5 8 4 9 2 1

2 1 4 7 6 9 8 3 5

9 5 8 2 1 3 6 7 4 H20

HOW TO PLAY: The Japanese puzzle “Sudoku” tests reasoning and logic. To solve the puzzle, fill in the grid above so every row, every column and every 3-block by 3-block box contains the digits 1 through 9. That means that no number is repeated in any row, column or box. No math is needed. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to equal anything else. Answers are published in the next issue of Challenge Magazine.

w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m

TRACE ADKINS MUSIC STEVE JACKS STLOU RAMS RUNNIN BACK VOTE ELECTI CONSP THEOR PLOT GHOST HAUNT BLM OFFGR BOOND FALL ROAD TRIP CORN PALAC MITCHE YELLOW RIBBON TROOP SAFETY CRENG


1

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4

11 16

18 23

19

28

29

48

38

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37 43

10

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14

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25

32

42

8

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27 31

62

13

7

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35

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22

5

79 81

82

The highlighted clues come from editorial content in this issue of Challenge Magazine.

1 Blue _____ Parkway 4 Growl 7 Gather 11 Not off 12 Colorful form of the common carp 13 Direct a gun 15 Shelter 16 Objective case of I 18 Exploit 20 Labels 21 Size of type 22 Sorrowful 24 Above 25 Malt beverage 26 Dull 28 Find the sum of 30 Adkins’ “_____ & Stories Tour” 31 Nothingness 34 Broad 35 Rope with running noose 37 Swerved 39 7th letter of the Greek alphabet 42 Falsehood 43 Alkali 45 Singles 47 Toward the top 48 Twofold 50 Ink spot 52 Performs 54 Republic in W South America 55 Catarrh 57 Playing marble 58 Agricultural implement 60 Large sea wave 62 Falls 65 Plural of I 66 Coarse file 68 British nobleman 69 North American nation 70 Exclamation of surprise 71 Powdery residue 73 Enrages 75 Associate 77 Itch 79 Interior 80 Dismal 81 Fro 82 Consumed

DOWN 1 Corn Palace artist 2 Perform 3 Oxlike African antelope 4 Depart

5 Salt of nitric acid 6 Violently intense 7 Part of the verb "to be" 8 Person to whom property is transferred 9 Not sweet 10 Sea mammals 12 Bollard 14 Part of the verb to be 17 Organ of hearing 19 Therefore 21 Trudge 23 Male ballet dancer 25 To one side 27 Passenger vehicle 29 Coloring material 32 Recline in a relaxed manner 33 I have 34 Departed 36 Helper 38 Chambers 40 All (mus.) 41 Church recess 44 Arouse 46 Long stories 49 Color of animal cruelty awareness 50 To exist 51 Stringed instrument 53 Plain surrounding Rome 56 Masculine pronoun 57 City SE of Los Angeles 59 Similar to 61 Mountain range 62 Trades 63 Hurried 64 Keyboard instrument 65 Very bad 67 At that place 69 Employs 70 Having wings 72 Hard fatty tissue 74 Cereal grass 76 Prefix meaning without 78 Objective case of we SEPTEMBER CROSSWORD SOLUTION

ACROSS

K R O Y A A M R N O W E N D D E O E E D U A S M

A F T B E R E V E N G O D A D U S O S G T E W E A R A T E R G T R E A T A N W L I S O S I T C H T M S E A R B W E O O I N N I S O G S T E R N

E S A I U H Y E E A D H I C O T S F U T R E S A

S K O L I I E U S M M I T H S I R P I A N L T

E I N P T E S E O A X E R C I T D O G A N F O E M Y E E M E G U O P

L U K E D O S E S L O S S

Answers will appear in next month’s issue and on www.ptcchallenge.com w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m

o c t o b e r 2 0 1 2 C H A L L E N G E 63


garmingallery Evil Eye

Deanna Fugate

Low Airplane George Achev

Tennessee Sunset Paul Pate

Speed Trap

Rhonda Hampton

Gallup NM Manuelito Visitor Center Jack Rivera

Skyscrapers and Pottery Chuck Garten

Wonders of the U.S. Duncan Osbourne

honorable mention A Lil’ Bit Of Snow – Kristine Molmen


• Big and loud, easy to see and hear in a truck cab • Create truck profiles to get truck specific routing • Includes NTTS Breakdown directory • Logs IFTA and hours of service • Free Lifetime Traffic1 updates • Lane assist with junction view shows you the correct lane for the next turn • Grade indicator

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www.garmin.com

©2011 Garmin Ltd. or its subsidiaries 1

Free Lifetime Traffic Updates may not be transferred to another person or another Garmin product. Lifetime traffic extends for the useful life of your Garmin traffic receiver (as long as you own a compatible Garmin GPS) or as long as Garmin receives traffic data from its traffic supplier, whichever is shorter. Traffic content not available for all areas. See www.navteq.com/rdstraffic for traffic coverage areas and www.garmin.com/traffic/fm/navteq.html for program License Agreement containing complete terms and conditions.


PTC 409

Judy Johnson Dickson, TN

A customer said, “Judy was cleaning the showers and in 35 years of driving this was the cleanest shower I have ever been in. Judy takes pride in her work and is so clean. Then she was asking if we needed anything else – towels, washcloths. She needs to be recognized for the great job she is doing. I appreciate the wonderful and clean shower I had for a change. Please let them know she is the best.”

PTC 067

Didier Murphy, John Lanzo, Doyle Gravley and Jamie King Cartersville, GA

“Doyle is one of the most courteous employees we have ever seen,” a customer said. “He seems to never have a bad day. The showers are as close to home as you can get. The store is kept very well. Me and my husband stop in there all the time.”

If you would like to recognize a Pilot Flying J employee

who has made your visit fast, friendly or clean, or if you have any comments, please call our customer line at 1-877-866-7378.

66 C H A L L E N G E o c t o b e r 2 0 1 2

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EARN

DOUBLE DRIVER PAYBACK POINTS

AT STORES LISTED WITH A YELLOW TAG

DOUBLE MYREWARDS POINTS

AT STORES LISTED WITH A YELLOW TAG

DEF

# FLYING J DEALER PILOT LOCATIONS LOCATIONS LOCATIONS

FLYING J DEALER PILOT LOCATIONS LOCATIONS LOCATIONS

SHOWERS

AUTO SHOWERS

#



SHOWERS

AUTO SHOWERS

DIESEL EXHAUST FLUID

DEF

ALABAMA

ARIZONA (CONT.)

369 BIRMINGHAM 7  DEF 100 I-20/59/65 AL 78, Exit 123 901 Bankhead Highway West, 35204 602 BIRMINGHAM DEF 157 15 RV DUMP I-65 & SR 94, Exit 264 224 Daniel Payne Drive North, 35207 603 DOTHAN DEF 158 9 RV DUMP Ross Clark Hwy/Hwy 231 2190 Ross Clark Circle, 36301 604 HOPE HULL 9  DEF 127 RV DUMP I-65 Exit 158 900 Tyson Road, 36043 497 LINCOLN DEF 80 7 I-20, Exit 165 121 Honda Drive, 35096 601 MCCALLA DEF 150 15 RV DUMP I-20/I-59 Exit 104 6098 MacAshan Dr, 35111 302 MOBILE (THEODORE) 5 65 I-10 & Theodore Dawes Rd, Exit 13 6955 Theodore Dawes Road, 36582 441 PRICEVILLE 7  DEF 90 RV DUMP I-65, Exit 334 3240 Point Mallard Parkway, 35603 75 SATSUMA 8  DEF 125 I-65, Exit 19 6109 US 43 South, 36572 76 TUSCALOOSA 8  DEF 125 I-20/59, Exit 76 4416 Skyland Boulevard East, 35405

609 ELOY DEF 350 11 RV DUMP I-10 Exit 208 16189 S Sunshine Blvd, 85231 610 KINGMAN DEF 95 11 RV DUMP I-40 Exit 53 3300 East Andy DeVine Ave., 86401 211 LAKE HAVASU CITY 12  DEF 110 I-40 & AZ 95, Exit 9 14750 South Highway 95, 86404 279 NOGALES (RIO RICO) DEF 90 11 I-19 & SR 289, Exit 12 769 East Frontage Road, 85648 611 PHOENIX DEF 185 15 RV DUMP I-10 Exit 137 6700 West Latham, 85043 328 QUARTZSITE 4 100 I-10 & US 95, Exit 17 1201 West Main Street, 85359 612 WINSLOW DEF 250 15 RV DUMP I-40 Exit 255 400 Transcon Lane, 86047 505 YUMA 6 100 I-8, Exit 12 108000 North Frontage Road, 85367

P 205-324-4532 F 205-324-5897 Hot Deli

P 205-323-2177 F 205-323-7885 Hot Deli

P 334-792-5152 F 334-792-5293 Hot Deli

P 334-613-0212 F 334-613-0849

Hot Deli

P 205-763-2225 F 205-763-2229

Hot Deli

P 205-477-9181 F 205-477-6870

P 251-653-8834 F 251-653-9556

P 256-353-5252 F 256-353-5235

P 251-679-6260 F 251-679-6235

P 205-553-9710 F 205-553-3089

ARIZONA 459 AVONDALE 13  DEF 145 RV DUMP I-10, Exit 133A 900 North 99th Avenue, 85323 180 BELLEMONT 7  DEF 90 I-40, EXIT 185 12500 West I-40, 86015 608 EHRENBERG DEF 300 13 I-10 Exit 1 Box 801, I-10 Exit 1 S. Frontage Rd, 85334 458 ELOY 5  DEF 145 RV DUMP I-10, Exit 208 619 South Sunshine Boulevard, 85231

P 623-936-0900 F 623-936-7376

P 928-773-0180 F 928-773-0205 Hot Deli

P 928-923-9600 F 928-923-7735

P 520-466-7550 F 520-466-7575

68 C H A L L E N G E O C T O B E R 2 0 1 2

PARKING

# PARKING

RV DUMP

RESTAURANTS OUTLINED IN A RED BOX DO NOT ACCEPT MYREWARDS POINTS

ARKANSAS (CONT.) Hot Deli

P 520-466-9204 F 520-466-9588 Hot Deli

P 928-757-7300 F 928-757-1085

P 928-764-2410 F 928-764-2021

P 520-377-0001 F 520-377-0003 Hot Deli

P 623-936-1118 F 623-936-3611

P 928-927-7777 F 928-927-7000 Hot Deli

P 928-289-2081 F 928-289-3798

F 928-342-2696

ARKANSAS 118 BENTON 7  DEF 70 I-30, Exit 121 7801 Alcoa Road, 72015 332 N. LITTLE ROCK 7  DEF 100 I-40 & SR391 Galloway Road, Exit 161 3300 Highway 391 North, 72117 430 RUSSELLVILLE 5  130 I-40, Exit 84 215 SR 331 North, 72802 605 RUSSELLVILLE DEF 165 15 RV DUMP I-40, Exit 84 42 Bradley Cove Road, 72801 145 SPRINGDALE DEF 75 4 US 412 & 71 Bypass 5660 West Sunset Avenue, 72762 606 TEXARKANA DEF 157 15 RV DUMP I-30 Exit 7 Rt 12 Box 254B, I30 & Hwy 108, 71854

RESTAURANTS OUTLINED IN A RED BOX DO NOT ACCEPT FFA POINTS

#

P 501-794-5900 F 501-794-5904

P 501-945-2226 F 501-945-2282

P 479-967-7414 F 479-964-0112 Hot Deli

P 479-890-6161 F 479-890-2639

P 479-872-6100 F 479-872-6103 Hot Deli

P 870-774-3595 F 870-772-1006

429 WEST MEMPHIS 11  DEF 150 I-40, Exit 280 1100 Martin Luther King Blvd, 72301 607 WEST MEMPHIS DEF 225 15 RV DUMP I-40 Exit 280 & I-55 Exit 4 3400 Service Loop Road, 72301

P 870-732-1202 F 870-732-1340 Hot Deli

P 870-735-8200 F 870-735-3300

CALIFORNIA 613 BAKERSFIELD DEF 250 14 RV DUMP Hwy 99 Exit Merced Ave. 17047 Zachary Ave., 93308 282 BARSTOW 5  30 I-15/40 & US 58 2591 Commerce Parkway, 92311 614 BARTSOW DEF 171 15 RV DUMP I-15 & Lenwood Exit 2611 Fisher Boulevard, 92311 372 CASTAIC 7  DEF 125 I-5 & Lake Hughes Exit 31642 Castaic Road, 91384 168 DUNNIGAN 11  DEF 155 I-5, Road 8 Exit 554 30035 County Road 8, 95937 616 FRAZIER PARK 18 285 RV DUMP I-5 Frazier Park Exit 205 42810 Frazier Mtn Park Road, 93243 381 HESPERIA 11  DEF 300 I-15 & US 395 8701 Highway 395, 92345 200 KRAMER JUNCTION 7 50 US 395/US 58 5725 Highway 58, 93516 617 LODI DEF 187 15 RV DUMP I-5 & Hwy 12, Exit Fairfield 15100 North Thornton Road, 95242 154 LOST HILLS 7  DEF 70 I-5 & CA 46 14808 Warren Street, 93249 365 MADERA DEF 150 11 CA-99 at Ave 18.5 22717 Avenue 18 1/2, 93637 307 N. PALM SPRINGS DEF 80 5 I-10 & Garnett & Indian Ave. 6605 N. Indian Canyon Drive, 92258

Hot Deli

P 661-392-5300 F 661-392-5307

P 760-253-2861 F 760-253-2863 Hot Deli

P 760-253-7043 F 760-253-7051

P 661-257-2800 F 661-257-2109

Hot Deli

P 530-724-3060 F 530-724-3029 Hot Deli

P 661-248-2600 F 661-248-2610

Hot Deli

P 760-956-2844 F 760-956-1198

P 760-762-0041 F 760-762-5231 Hot Deli

P 209-339-4066 F 209-339-4287

P 661-797-2122 F 661-797-9772 Hot Deli

P 559-673-3878 F 559-673-7679

P 760-329-5562 F 760-329-0083

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DOUBLE MYREWARDS POINTS

AT STORES LISTED WITH A YELLOW TAG

FLYING J DEALER PILOT LOCATIONS LOCATIONS LOCATIONS

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SHOWERS

AUTO SHOWERS

#

DEF

PARKING

RV DUMP

CALIFORNIA (CONT.)

FLORIDA (CONT.)

FLORIDA (CONT.)

343 OTAY MESA 9  DEF 150 I-905, Exit 1B, CA905 1497 Piper Ranch Rd, 92154 618 RIPON DEF 197 15 RV DUMP Hwy 99 Exit Jack Tone Rd 1501 North Jack Tone Road, 95366 879 SACRAMENTO 49ER TRAVEL PLAZA 275 12 I-80, Exit 85 (W. El Camino Ave) 2828 El Centro Rd, 95833 237 SALINAS DEF 75 7 US 101 & Sanborn 951 Work Street, 93901 765 THOUSAND PALMS 88 9 RV DUMP I-10 Ramon Exit 72235 Varner Road, 92276 137 WEED DEF 80 7 RV DUMP I-5, Exit 745 395 E Vista Drive, 96094

352 FT. MYERS 80 6 I-75, Luckett Rd, Exit 139 6050 Plaza Drive, 33905 90 FT. PIERCE 8  DEF 100 I-95, Exit 129 7300 West Okeechobee Road, 34945 471 HAINES CITY DEF 80 7 RV DUMP US Hwy 27 North 35647 US Hwy 27 North, 33845 91 JACKSONVILLE DEF 30 5 I-95, Exit 329 1625 County Road 210 West, 32259 374 MARIANNA 90 7  I-10 @ FL 71, Exit 142 2209 Highway 71, 32448 873 MIAMI 3 65 Hwy 27 12200 NW South River Road, 33178 874 MIAMI 2 30 US 41 & SR 997 17696 SW 8th Street, 33194 897 MIAMI GARDENS DADES CORNER PLZ 1 10 SR 826, Exit SR 817 16650 NW 27th Avenue, 33054 425 MIDWAY 8  DEF 90 RV DUMP I-10, Exit 192 33333 Blue Star Highway, 32343 293 OCALA 7 60 I-75 & FL 484, Exit 341 2020 SW 135th Street, 34476 92 OCALA 7  DEF 130 I-75, Exit 358 4255 NW Highway 326, 34482 424 OCALA 5  125 I-75, Exit 358 4032 West Highway 326, 34482 94 PUNTA GORDA DEF 70 5 I-75, Exit 161 26505 Jones Loop Road, 33950 623 QUINCY 15 150 RV DUMP I-10 Exit 192 32670 Blue Star Highway, 32343 626 ST. AUGUSTINE DEF 160 9 RV DUMP I-95 Hwy 206 Exit 305 950 State Road 206 West, 32086 622 ST. LUCIE 15 156 RV DUMP I-95 Hwy 68 Exit 131 100 North Kings Hwy 625 TAMPA 4 30 RV DUMP I-4 & SR 579 Exit 10 11555 East Sligh Ave.

95 WILDWOOD 5  10 I-75, Exit 329 493 East State Route 44 96 YEEHAW JUNCTION 40 0 US 60 & FL Turnpike, Exit 193 3050 SR 60 Yeehaw Junction

P 619-661-9558 F 619-661-9814

Hot Deli P 209-599-4141 F 209-599-4265

Hot Deli P 916-927-4774 F 916-923-3677

P 831-775-0380 F 831-775-0360

Hot Deli P 760-343-1500 F 760-343-1330

Hot Deli P 530-938-9600 F 530-938-9700

COLORADO 619 AURORA DEF 149 15 RV DUMP I-70 Exit 285 (South) 16751 East 32nd Ave., 80011 316 DENVER 7  DEF 100 I-70 & Steele Street, Exit 276A 4640 Steele Street, 80216 621 LIMON DEF 200 2 RV DUMP I-70 & Exit 359 2495 Williams Ave., 80828

Hot Deli P 303-366-7600 F 303-367-5657

P 303-292-6303 F 303-292-3647

Hot Deli P 719-775-9286 F 719-775-9306

CONNECTICUT 255 MILFORD 12  DEF 150 I-95, EXIT 40 433 Old Gate Lane, 06460 882 N STONINGTON AMERICAN AUTO STOP 119 6 I-95, Exit 93 273 Clarks Falls Rd, 06359

P 203-876-1266 F 203-876-9473

P 860-599-2020 F 860-599-5771

FLORIDA 87 BALDWIN DEF 50 5 I-10, Exit 343 1050 US 301 South, 32234 88 COCOA 2 I-95, Exit 201 4455 King Street, 32926 624 DADE CITY DEF 180 15 RV DUMP I-75 Exit 285 & SR52 29933 State Road 52, 33576 89 ELLENTON 2 20 I-75, Exit 224 1526 51st Avenue East, 34222

w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m

P 904-266-4238 F 904-266-9820

P 321-639-0346 F 321-639-0351

Hot Deli P 352-588-5444 F 352-588-4629

P 941-729-6288 F 941-729-7523

P 239-693-6868 F 239-693-1253

P 772-460-0611 F 772-460-9492

Hot Deli P 863-421-3571 F 863-421-6032

P 904-826-3618 F 904-825-2760

P 850-482-2148 F 850-482-2136

Hot Deli

Sunshine Deli

P 305-883-1004 F 305-883-1799

P 305-553-6203 F 305-207-7967

Arline’s Big Apple Seafood Restaurant

Wingstop

P 305-623-3434 F 305-623-3439

P 850-576-3200 F 850-576-3213

P 352-347-8555 F 352-347-3082

P 352-402-9081 F 352-622-5233

P 352-867-8300 F 352-867-8448

P 941-637-3974 F 941-637-5729

Hot Deli P 850-574-1299 F 850-574-6546 Hot Deli

P 904-794-0426 F 904-794-7582 Hot Deli

P 772-461-0091 F 772-461-0291

Hot Deli P 813-612-9438 F 813-612-9297

RESTAURANTS OUTLINED IN A RED BOX DO NOT ACCEPT MYREWARDS POINTS

P 352-748-4486 F 352-748-6095

P 407-436-1224 F 407-436-1919

GEORGIA 260 ALBANY 80 5 Hwy 300 & Clark Ave 310 Cordele Road, 31705 331 ATLANTA (EAST) 100 8  I-285 & Bouldercrest Road, Exit 51 2605 Bouldercrest, 30316 344 ATLANTA (WEST) 5 45 I-285 & South Atlanta Road, Exit 16 4600 South Atlanta Road, 30080 65 AUGUSTA 30 3 I-20, Exit 194 4091 Jimmie Dyess Parkway, 30909 144 AUGUSTA DEF 90 6 I-20, Exit 200 2975 Gun Club Road, 30907 66 BRASELTON 70 6  I-85, Exit 129 5888 Highway 53, 30517 627 BRUNSWICK DEF 150 15 RV DUMP I-95 Exit 29 2990 US Hwy 17 South, 31523 628 CARNESVILLE DEF 190 15 RV DUMP I-85 Exit 160 10226 Old Federal Road, 30521 67 CARTERSVILLE 8  DEF 100 I-75, Exit 296 968 Cassville-White Road, 30120 416 CORDELLE 10 60 RV DUMP I-75, Exit 101 2201 East 16 Avenue, 31015 319 DALTON 7 100 I-75/Connector 3, Exit 328 244 Connector 3 SW, 30720 421 DALTON 9  DEF 210 RV DUMP I-75, Exit 326 142 Carbondale Road, 30721 68 DUBLIN 3 20 I-16, Exit 51 2185 US 441, 31021 630 JACKSON DEF 200 14 RV DUMP I-75 Exit 201 I-75 & Exit 66 Bucksnort Road, 30233 69 LAGRANGE 3 60 I-85, Exit 13 1960 Whitesvillle Road, 30240

P 229-878-1355 F 229-878-1302

P 404-212-8733 F 404-212-8568

P 770-434-9949 F 770-434-8341

P 706-860-6677 F 706-869-9074

P 706-667-6557 F 706-481-9940

Hot Deli P 706-654-2820 F 706-654-9326

Hot Deli P 912-280-0006 F 912-280-9555

Hot Deli P 706-335-6656 F 706-335-4432

P 770-607-7835 F 770-607-7873

P 229-271-5775 F 229-271-5774

P 706-277-7934 F 706-277-3337

P 706-370-4060 F 706-370-5769

P 478-275-2143 F 478-275-0070

Hot Deli P 770-775-0138 F 770-775-1134

P 706-884-6318 F 706-884-1872

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 2 C H A L L E N G E 69


DOUBLE MYREWARDS POINTS

AT STORES LISTED WITH A YELLOW TAG

FLYING J DEALER PILOT LOCATIONS LOCATIONS LOCATIONS

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SHOWERS

AUTO SHOWERS

#

DEF

PARKING

GEORGIA (CONT.)

IDAHO (CONT.)

631 LAKE PARK DEF 200 15 RV DUMP I-75 Exit 2 7001 Lake Park-Bellville Rd., 31636 420 MADISON DEF 110 6 RV DUMP I-20, Exit 114 1881 Eatonton Road, 30650 422 NEWNAN 7  DEF 95 I-85, Exit 41 1645 South Highway 29, 30263 71 PORT WENTWORTH 8  DEF 125 I-95, Exit 109 7001 Highway 21, 31407 632 RESACA 200 15 RV DUMP I-75 Exit 320 288 Resaca Beach Blvd. NW, 30735 415 RISING FAWN DEF 150 8 I-59, Exit 4 319 Deer Head Cover Road, 30738 72 SAVANNAH 1 I-16, Exit 160 1504 Dean Forrest Road, 31408 312 TALLAPOOSA 6  90 I-20 & GA 100, Exit 5 882 Georgia Highway 100, 30176 417 TEMPLE DEF 140 14 RV DUMP I-20, Exit 19 625 Carrollton Street, 30179 634 TEMPLE 15 164 RV DUMP I-20 & Hwy 113 Exit 19 15 Villa Rosa Road, 30179 192 TIFTON 12  200 I-75, Exit 60 4431 Old Union Road, 31794 633 UNION POINT 9 189 RV DUMP I-20 & Exit 138 3600 Highway 77 South, 30642 73 VALDOSTA 90 6  I-75, Exit 11 3495 Madison Highway, 31601 398 VIENNA 5 100 I-75, Exit 109 39 Victory Lane, 31092 267 WARNER ROBINS (BYRON) 11  DEF 150 I-75, Exit 146 2965 Highway 247C, 31008 254 WILDWOOD DEF 20 3 I-24 Exit 169 650 Highway 299, 30757

Hot Deli

P 229-559-6500 F 229-559-3008 TM

P 706-343-1455 F 706-343-1033

P 770-252-3551 F 770-252-2197

P 912-964-7006 F 912-964-7808

Hot Deli P 706-629-1541 F 706-629-2003

P 706-462-2455 F 706-462-2702

P 912-964-5280 F 912-964-5098

P 770-574-9922 F 770-574-9697

P 770-562-9773 F 770-562-2269 TM

Hot Deli

P 770-562-4009 F 770-562-3571

P 229-382-7295 F 229-382-4910

Hot Deli P 706-486-4835 F 706-486-4845

P 229-244-8034 F 229-244-6020

P 229-268-1414 F 229-268-4880

P 478-956-5316 F 478-956-3726

P 706-820-7353 F 706-820-9539

IDAHO 777 EAST BOISE 6 60 I-84 Exit 54 (Federal Way) 3353 Federal Way, 83705

70 C H A L L E N G E J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 2

RV DUMP

RESTAURANTS OUTLINED IN A RED BOX DO NOT ACCEPT MYREWARDS POINTS

RV DUMP

Hot Deli P 208-385-9745 F 208-344-3624

638 CALDWELL 100 9 I-84 Exit 29 3512 Franklin Road, 83605 641 MCCAMMON DEF 84 5 I-15 Exit 47 587 E. US Hwy 30, 83250 350 MOUNTAIN HOME 100 9 I-84 & US 20, Exit 95 1050 Highway 20, 83647 639 POST FALLS DEF 100 8 I-90 Exit 2 N 400 Idahline Rd, 83854 640 TWIN FALLS 100 6 I-84 Exit 173 5350 Highway 93, 83338

Hot Deli

RV DUMP

P 208-453-9225 F 208-453-9409

Hot Deli

RV DUMP

P 208-254-9845 F 208-254-9893

P 208-587-4465 F 208-587-3071

RV DUMP

Hot Deli P 208-773-0593 F 208-773-0404

Hot Deli P 208-324-3454 F 208-324-4097

ILLINOIS 642 ALORTON 15 202 RV DUMP I-255 & Exit 17A 140 Racehorse Drive, 62207 299 BLOOMINGTON 6  DEF 160 I-55/74 & IL 9, Exit 160A 1522 West Market Street 526 CHAMPAIGN ROAD RANGER DEF 150 3 I-57, Exit 240 4910 Market St 473 CHANNAHON 25 0 I-55 & Route 6, Exit 248 23841 SE Eams 378 CHICAGO ROAD RANGER LMTD 0 I-55 MM 288 “Stevenson Expressway” 3401 South California Avenue, 60632 368 DECATUR DEF 90 7 I-72, Exit 144 (SE Quad) 4030 E. Boyd Road 523 DIXON ROAD RANGER DEF 45 2 I-88 Exit 54 1801 South Galena Ave. ,61021 313 EAST ST. LOUIS 11  DEF 200 I 70/55 Exit 4 699 State Route 203 165 EFFINGHAM 7  DEF 100 I-57/70, Exit 162 2500 North 3rd Street 643 EFFINGHAM DEF 180 15 RV DUMP I-70 & I-57, Exit 160 1701 W Evergreen / I-70 & I-57 468 GILMAN DEF 80 7 I-57, Exit 283 815 Hwy 24 West, 60938 543 HAMPSHIRE ROAD RANGER DEF 30 4 I-90, Exit 43 19 N. 681 US Hwy 20

Hot Deli P 618-337-4579 F 618-337-4851

Hot Deli P 309-827-7867 F 309-827-2355

P 815-315-4991 F 217-643-7809

P 815-467-0918 F 815-467-0972

P 815-977-7020 F 773-847-1438

P 217-876-0208 F 217-876-0522

P 815-516-1998 F 815-284-0469

P 618-875-5800 F 618-875-4234

P 217-342-3787 F 217-342-6672

Hot Deli P 217-347-7161 F 217-347-5815

P 815-265-4754 F 815-265-4795

P 815-209-9013 F 847-779-0039

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AT STORES LISTED WITH A YELLOW TAG

FLYING J DEALER PILOT LOCATIONS LOCATIONS LOCATIONS

#



SHOWERS

AUTO SHOWERS

ILLINOIS (CONT.)

ILLINOIS (CONT.)

644 LASALLE Hot Deli DEF 186 15 RV DUMP I-80 Exit 77 P 815-220-0611 343 Civic Road F 815-220-0617 514 LINCOLN THORNTONS Subworks 100 6 2903 Woodlawn Road P 217-732-3915 I-55, Exit 126 F 217-732-4875 540 LOVES PARK ROAD RANGER 0 I-90 & Riverside Blvd P 815-580-4221 7500 East Riverside Blvd, 61111 F 847-232-3058 Hot 595 MARION Deli DEF 43 5 I-57, Exit 54B P 618-993-2697 2611Vernell Road, 62959 F 618-993-8100 347 MCLEAN ROAD RANGER Dixie DEF 80 10 I-55, Exit 145 P 815-315-0774 501 South Main Street, 61754 F 309-874-2048 530 MENDOTA ROAD RANGER DEF 4 0 I-39, Exit 72 P 815-315-4210 2705 12th Street, 61342 F 815-539-2340 326 MINONK ROAD RANGER Woody’s 4 100 I-39, Exit 27 P 815-315-4189 1311 Carolyn Dr, 61760 F 309-432-2002 236 MINOOKA 7  DEF 100 I-80, Exit 122 P 815-467-4416 301 Ridge Road, 60447 F 815-467-5409 39 MONEE DEF 90 5 I-57, Exit 335 P 708-534-2483 6002 Monee-Manhattan Road, 60449 F 708-534-3980 482 MT. VERNON 7  DEF 100 I-57, Exit 95 P 618-244-1216 4610 Broadway, 62864 F 618-244-1262 534 OKAWVILLE ROAD RANGER DEF 50 0 I-64, Exit 41 P 815-656-4143 905 Hen House Rd, 62271 F 618-243-6479 515 OTTAWA ROAD RANGER DEF 22 2 I-80, Exit 93 P 815-516-0946 3041 North IL Route 71,61350 F 815-434-4081 645 PONTOON BEACH Hot Deli DEF 185 15 RV DUMP I-270 & Exit 6B P 618-931-1580 1310 East Chain of Rocks Road, 62040 F 618-931-3587 541 PRINCETON ROAD RANGER Dan’s Big Slice Pizza DEF 250 7 I-80, Exit 56 P 815-315-4951 2835 N Main St, 61356 F 815-875-1718 539 ROCHELLE ROAD RANGER DEF 55 2 I-39, Exit 99 P 815-209-9038 890 E Hwy 38, 61068 F 815-562-6573 535 ROCKFORD ROAD RANGER 0 US 20 P 815-315-4974 4980 S Main St, 61108 F 847-232-1183 536 SOUTH BELOIT ROAD RANGER Dan’s Big Beef a roo Slice Pizza DEF 75 2 I-90, Exit 1 P 815-264-4311 6070 Gardner Street, 61080 F 815-389-3917

646 SOUTH BELOIT DEF 186 15 RV DUMP I-90 & HWY 75 16049 Willowbrook Road, 61080 512 SPRINGFIELD ROAD RANGER DEF 25 2 I-55, Exit 90 500 Toronto Road, 62711 525 SPRINGFIELD ROAD RANGER 80 2 I-55, Exit 100-A 3752 Camp Butler Rd, 62707 249 TROY 7  DEF 135 I-55/70 & IL 162, Exit 18 820 Edwardsville Road, 62294 529 TUSCOLA ROAD RANGER 15 3 I-57, Exit 212 1112 East Southline Dr., 61953 537 WINNEBAGO ROAD RANGER 0 US 20, MM8 101 S. Winnebago Rd, 61088 476 WOODHULL DEF 80 5 I-74, Exit 32 900 Plaza Ave, 61490

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DEF

PARKING

RV DUMP

RESTAURANTS OUTLINED IN A RED BOX DO NOT ACCEPT MYREWARDS POINTS

P 815-389-4760 F 815-389-4793

P 815-516-0863 F 217-585-1883 Star 66 Café

P 815-209-9059 F 217-528-9169

P 618-667-0946 F 618-667-0966

P 815-315-4988 F 217-253-3793

P 815-957-4049 F 847-897-2600

Hot Deli P 309-334-4550 F 309-334-4556

INDIANA 444 BRAZIL 10  DEF 55 I-70, Exit 23 4376 North SR 59, 47834 531 BRAZIL ROAD RANGER 3  DEF 30 I-70, Exit 23 990 West State Rd 42, 47834 445 BURNS HARBOR 7  DEF 115 RV DUMP I-94, Exit 22 243 Melton Road, 46304 247 CRAWFORDSVILLE 5  DEF 110 I-74 & SR 32, Exit 39 4367 East State Road 32, 47933 28 DALEVILLE 35 3 I-69, Exit 234 15151 Commerce Road, 47334 446 DALEVILLE DEF 125 5 I-69, Exit 234 15876 West Commerce Road, 47334 447 EVANSVILLE (HAUBSTADT) 5  145 RV DUMP I-64, Exit 25B 1042 E Warrenton Road, 47639 362 FORTVILLE (PENDLETON) 4 50 I-69, Exit 214 7455 South State Rd. 13, 46064 29 FREMONT 7  DEF 130 I-80, Exit 144; I-69 N, Exit 157 6900 Old US 27, 46737 881 FT WAYNE FT WAYNE TRAVEL PLZ 6 260 I-69, Exit 309A 3037 Goshen Rd, 46808

P 812-446-9400 F 812-446-6116

P 815-209-9052 F 812-442-5206

P 219-787-5705 F 219-787-9656

P 765-361-9603 F 765-361-9601

P 765-378-3599 F 765-378-3592

P 765-378-0246 F 765-378-4248

P 812-868-1048 F 812-868-1050

P 317-485-6211 F 317-485-4527

P 260-833-1987 F 260-833-6794

The Point Restaurant

P 260-482-7814 F 206-482-7780

J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 2 C H A L L E N G E 71


DOUBLE MYREWARDS POINTS

AT STORES LISTED WITH A YELLOW TAG

FLYING J DEALER PILOT LOCATIONS LOCATIONS LOCATIONS

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SHOWERS

AUTO SHOWERS

#

DEF

PARKING

RV DUMP

RESTAURANTS OUTLINED IN A RED BOX DO NOT ACCEPT MYREWARDS POINTS

INDIANA (CONT.)

INDIANA (CONT.)

IOWA (CONT.)

Hot 271 GARY Deli 9  DEF 215 I-80/94 & Burr Street, Exit 6 P 219-844-2661 2501 Burr Street, 46406 F 219-844-7957 30 GREENFIELD 150 5 I-70, Exit 96 P 317-894-1910 2640 North 600 West, 46140 F 317-894-3499 542 GREENWOOD ROAD RANGER DEF 65 8 I-65, Exit 99 P 815-315-4987 1615 East Main Street, 46143 F 317-881-7301 647 HAUBSTADT Hot Deli DEF 145 9 RV DUMP I-64 & SR 41 Exit 25B P 812-768-5304 Rural Route 1, Box 254A, 47639 F 812-768-9215 448 HEBRON Pizza 8  DEF 135 I-65, Exit 240 P 219-696-8265 18011 Colorado Street, 46341 F 219-696-8281 31 HIGHLAND 2 I-80 & 94, Exit 2 P 219-923-6405 8150 Indianapolis Boulevard, 46322 F 219-972-4134 318 INDIANAPOLIS 7  DEF 90 I-465 & IN37, Exit 4 P 317-783-1033 4607 South Harding Street, 46217 F 317-783-0851 649 INDIANAPOLIS Hot Deli DEF 190 15 RV DUMP I-465 Exit 4 P 317-783-5543 1720 West Thompson Road, 46217 F 317-783-5648 546 LAKE STATION - S – ROAD RANGER 4 25 I-80, Exit 15A P 815-239-6205 2151 Ripley St., 46405 F 219-962-5723 650 LAKE STATION Hot Deli DEF 375 14 RV DUMP I-94 & Exit 15B P 219-962-8502 1401 Ripley Street, 46405 F 219-962-3259 478 LEAVENWORTH DEF 65 5 I-64, Exit 92 P 812-739-2002 6921 South SR 66, 47137 F 812-739-4034 652 LEBANON Hot Deli DEF 150 9 RV DUMP I-65 Exit 139 P 765-483-9755 520 South State Road 39, 46052 F 765-483-9762 653 LOWELL Hot Deli DEF 375 15 Rt 2 & I-65 Exit 240 P 219-696-6446 3231 East 181st Street, 46356 F 219-696-2456 152 MEMPHIS DEF 70 10 I-65, Memphis Road, Exit 16 P 812-294-4233 14013 Memphis Blue Lick Road, 47143 F 812-294-4237 198 PLYMOUTH 7  DEF 110 US 30 & US 31 P 574-936-6525 10619 9A Road, 46563 F 574-936-4348 34 REMINGTON DEF 75 5 I-65, Exit 201 P 219-261-3786 4154 West US Highway 24, 47977 F 219-261-3986 339 RILEYSBURG (COVINGTON) 6 50 I-74 & SR 63, Exit 4 P 765-793-7307 16502 North State Road 63, 47932 F 765-793-2155

242 SHELBYVILLE 90 7  I-74, Exit 109 1851 West 400 North 35 SOUTH BEND DEF 70 5 I-80, Exit 72 6424 West Brick Road 655 SPICELAND DEF 193 15 RV DUMP I-70 Exit 123 5300 South State Rte. 3 297 TERRE HAUTE 70 5 I-70 & IN46, Exit 11 5555 E. Margaret Avenue 36 VALPARAISO 25 3 US 30 & SR 49 4105 US 30 East 37 WHITELAND 8  DEF 110 RV DUMP I-65, Exit 95 2962 County Road 500 North 656 WHITELAND DEF 173 50 I-65 & Whiteland Road, Exit 95 4982 North 350 East

131 OSCEOLA DEF 80 5 RV DUMP I-35, Exit 34 2010 West Clay Street, 50213 238 PERCIVAL 50 7 I-29, Exit 10 2495 21st Ave., 51648 594 SIOUX CITY DEF 100 7 I-29, Exit 143 2815 Singing Hills Blvd, 51111 43 WALCOTT 8  DEF 160 I-80, Exit 284 3500 North Plainview Road, 52773 268 WALCOTT 25 3 I-80, Exit 284 2975 North Plainview Road, 52773 969 WILLIAMS FLYING J/BROADWAY 4 60 I-35 & SR 20, Exit 144 3040 220th Street, 50271

TM

72 C H A L L E N G E O C T O B E R 2 0 1 2

P 317-392-8771 F 317-392-8721

P 574-272-8212 F 574-272-9914 Hot Deli

P 765-987-1833 F 765-987-1836

P 812-877-9977 F 812-877-9978

P 219-464-1644 F 219-464-9019

Hot Deli P 317-535-7656 F 317-535-3058

P 317-535-1124

F 319-685-4575

P 641-357-3124

KENTUCKY

IOWA 913 ALTOONA BOSSELMAN DEF 350 18 I-80 & US 65, Exit 142 3231 Adventureland Drive, 50009 496 ATALISSA 45 4 I-80, Exit 265 2086 Atalissa Rd., 52720 893 AVOCA WINGS AMERICA 225 15 I-80, Exit 40 7005 N. Chestnut St, 51521 495 BROOKLYN 4  140 I-80, Exit 201 4126 Hwy 21, 52211 407 CLEAR LAKE DEF 125 6 I-35, Exit 194 2411 US Highway 18 East, 50428 329 COUNCIL BLUFFS 7  DEF 80 I-80/29, Exit 1B 2647 South 24th Street, 51501 636 DAVENPORT DEF 146 15 RV DUMP I-80 Exit 292 8200 N.W. Blvd., 52806 373 DES MOINES 17  DEF 350 I-35/80 & Douglas Ave, Ext 126 11957 Douglas Avenue, 50322 532 ELK RUN HEIGHTS ROAD RANGER DEF 100 6 I-380, Exit 68 100 Plaza Drive, 50707 637 EVANSDALE DEF 80 7 RV DUMP I-380 & Evansdale Dr. 445 Evansdale Drive, 50707

Hot Deli P 515-967-7878 F 515-967-5726

Austin Blues

P 563-946-3761 F 563-946-3871

Hot Deli P 712-343-4007 F 712-343-5026

P 319-685-4221

F 641-357-4939

P 712-322-0088 F 712-322-0236

Hot Deli P 563-386-7710 F 563-386-8243

P 515-276-1509 F 515-276-8599

Junies Family Restaurant

P 815-315-0271 F 319-235-5237

Hot Deli P 319-291-7714 F 319-291-7720

P 641-342-8658 F 641-342-1782

Hot Deli

P 712-258-3816 F 712-258-3320

Hot Deli P 563-284-4100 F 563-284-4103

P 563-284-5074 F 563-284-5076

Hot Deli P 515-854-2238 F 515-854-2239

KANSAS 920 COLBY BOSSELMAN 5 90 I-70, Exit 54 110 East Willow Street, 67701 657 DODGE CITY 4 62 Hwy 400 & Hwy 283 2524 E. Wyatt Earp Blvd., 67801 658 EMPORIA DEF 74 4 RV DUMP I-35 & US 50 Exit 127 4245 West Hwy 50, 66801 903 SALINA BOSSELMAN 140 13 RV DUMP I-70, Exit 252 1944 North 9th Street, 67401 659 SALINA DEF 120 9 I-70 Exit 253 2250 North Ohio Street, 67401

F 317-535-4123

Hot Deli

Hot Deli P 785-460-5832 F 785-460-5878

Country Market Restaurant

356 BROOKS (SHEPHERDSVILLE) 100 6 I-65 & Brooks Rd, Exit 121 2050 East Blue Lick Road, 40165 660 CATLETTSBURG DEF 155 9 RV DUMP I-64 SR 180 Exit 185 15236 State Route 180, 41129 231 CORBIN DEF 128 5 I-75 & US25E, Exit 29 249 West Cumberland Gap Prkwy, 40701 46 FRANKLIN 4 150 I-65, Exit 6 2929 Scottsville Road, 42134 438 FRANKLIN 8  DEF 80 I-65, Exit 6 Highway 100 & I-65, Exit 6, 42134

Hot Deli

P 620-338-8888 F 602-338-8829

Hot Deli

TM

P 620-343-2717 F 620-343-3692

Hot Deli P 785-825-6787 F 785-827-3394

Hot Deli

TM

P 785-825-5300 F 785-452-9221

P 502-955-5049 F 502-955-9717

Hot Deli P 606-928-8383 F 606-928-4546

P 606-528-0631 F 606-528-1003

P 270-586-4149 F 270-586-5171

P 270-586-9544 F 270-586-9887


DOUBLE MYREWARDS POINTS

AT STORES LISTED WITH A YELLOW TAG

FLYING J DEALER PILOT LOCATIONS LOCATIONS LOCATIONS

KENTUCKY (CONT.) 661 FRANKLIN DEF 172 15 RV DUMP I-65 US Hwy 31 W. Exit 2 4380 Nashville Road, 42134 47 GEORGETOWN DEF 90 5 I-75, Exit 129 259 Cherry Blossom Way, 40324 353 GEORGETOWN 175 12  I-75, Exit 129 110 Triport Road, 40324 48 GLENDALE 125 8 I-65, Exit 86 58 Glendale-Hodgenville Road, 42740 399 LEBANON JUNCTION 7  DEF 100 I-65, Exit 105 150 Park Plaza Boulevard, 40150 240 MIDDLESBORO DEF 40 2 Rt 2, Hwy 25E 3000 US Highway 25 East, 40965 156 MORTON’S GAP 5 90 Highway 813, Exit 37 Pennyrile Parkway, Exit 37, 42440 41 MT STERLING DEF 7 I-64, Exit 113 3060 Owingsville Road, 40353 49 OAK GROVE 8  175 I-24, Exit 89 8190 Pembroke-Oak Grove Road, 42262 439 OAK GROVE 5  DEF 125 I-24, Exit 86 12900 Fort Campbell Boulevard, 42262 662 OAK GROVE 9 130 RV DUMP I-24 Exit 86 18750 Herndon Oak Grove Road, 42262 358 PADUCAH 8 65 I-24 & KY 305, Exit 3 5353 Cairo Road, 42001 440 PENDLETON 100 5 I-71, Exit 28 205 Pendleton Road, 40055 278 RICHWOOD (WALTON) 5 I-75/71 & KY 338, Exit 175 118 Richwood Road, 41094 321 RICHWOOD (WALTON) 3 I-75/71 & KY 338, Exit 175 11229 Frontage Road, 41094 354 SIMPSONVILLE 7 25 I-64 & Veechdale Rd, Exit 28 819 Buck Creek Road, 40067 50 SULPHUR 8 175 I-71, Exit 28 489 Pendleton Road, 40070

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SHOWERS

AUTO SHOWERS

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DEF

PARKING

KENTUCKY (CONT.) Hot Deli P 270-586-3343 F 270-586-8984

P 502-868-7427 F 502-867-1847

P 502-863-2708 F 502-863-5012

P 270-369-7360 F 270-369-6991

P 502-833-2727 F 502-833-2759

P 606-248-4057 F 606-248-4674

P 270-258-5213 F 270-258-9830

P 859-497-4041 F 859-497-8709

P 270-439-1776 F 270-439-7624

P 270-439-0153 F 270-439-0765

P 270-640-7000 F 270-640-7060

P 270-443-2044 F 270-442-8538

P 502-743-5222

392 SONORA 200 6  I-65, Exit 81 450 East Western Avenue, 42776 663 WADDY 110 9 RV DUMP I-64 & HWY 395 Exit 43 1670 Waddy Road, 40076 664 WALTON DEF 200 15 RV DUMP I-75 Exit 171 13019 Walton Verona Rd., 41094 437 WILLIAMSBURG 80 3 RV DUMP I-75, Exit 11 481 West Highway 92, 40769

P 270-369-7300 F 270-369-8596

Hot Deli P 502-829-9100 F 502-829-5600

Hot Deli P 859-485-4400 F 859-485-6886

P 606-549-0162 F 606-549-0166

LOUISIANA 274 BREAUX BRIDGE 7  DEF 105 I-10, Exit 109 2112 Rees Street, 70517 79 DENHAM SPRINGS 3 60 I-12, Exit 10 2601 South Range Avenue, 70726 665 GREENWOOD DEF 190 15 RV DUMP I-20 Exit 3 9510 Greenwood Road, 71033 300 HAMMOND DEF 60 5 I-12 Exit 40 / I-55/US 51 2111 SW Railroad Avenue, 70403 199 HAUGHTON 7  DEF 90 I-20, Exit 33 490 North Elm Street, 71037 82 LAPLACE DEF 150 8 I-10/55, Exit 209 4301 South Main Street, 70068 335 RAYVILLE 5 85 I-20 & LA137, Exit 138 103 Grimshaw Street, 71269 428 WEST MONROE 5 100 RV DUMP I-20, Exit 112 300 Well Road, 71292

P 337-332-1253 F 337-332-0618

P 225-665-4151 F 225-665-4122

Hot Deli P 318-938-7744 F 318-938-5697

P 985-345-5476 F 985-542-5028

Hot Deli P 318-390-9709 F 318-390-9713

P 985-652-0531 F 985-652-4141

P 318-728-4100 F 318-728-4236

P 318-329-3590 F 318-329-3592

F 502-743-5123

MARYLAND P 859-485-6100 F 859-485-6113

P 859-485-1327 F 859-485-8519

P 502-722-5636 F 502-722-5630

P 502-743-5496 F 502-743-5228

875 ELKTON ELKTON TRAVEL PLZ 23 225 I-95, Exit 109A 221 Belle Hill Rd, 21921 408 GRANTSVILLE 7  DEF 65 I-68, Exit 22 3000 Chesnut Ridge Road, 21536 150 HAGERSTOWN 7  DEF 90 I-70 & MD 63, Exit 24 11633 Greencastle Pike, 21740 179 HAGERSTOWN 9  DEF 111 I-81, Exit 5B 16921 Halfway Blvd, 21740

Hot Deli P 443-245-4229 F 410-392-3543

P 301-895-4536 F 301-895-4548

P 301-582-9004 F 301-582-9008

P 301-582-6111 F 301-582-5004

RV DUMP

RESTAURANTS OUTLINED IN A RED BOX DO NOT ACCEPT MYREWARDS POINTS


DOUBLE MYREWARDS POINTS

AT STORES LISTED WITH A YELLOW TAG

FLYING J DEALER PILOT LOCATIONS LOCATIONS LOCATIONS

MARYLAND (CONT.) 784 NORTH EAST DEF 200 15 I-95, Exit 100 One Center Drive, 21901 290 PERRYVILLE 80 5 I-95 & MD 222, Exit 93 31 Heather Lane, 21903

RV DUMP

Hot Deli P 410-287-7110 F 410-287-7116

P 410-642-2883 F 410-378-4941

MASSACHUSETTS 222 STURBRIDGE 6  DEF 250 I-84 Exit 1 400 Route 15 (Haynes Street), 01566

Hot Deli P 508-347-9104 F 508-347-9165

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PARKING

RV DUMP

MINNESOTA

MISSOURI (CONT.)

590 ALEXANDRIA DEF 50 6 I-94, Exit 100 & SR 27 3181 Evergreen Lane, 56308 581 INVER GROVE HEIGHTS DEF 43 5 Hwy 52 & 117 Street 11650 Courthouse Blvd, 55077 576 NORTHFIELD DEF 80 6 RV DUMP I-35 & Hwy 19, Exit 69 8051 Bagley Avenue, 55057 134 ST. CLOUD DEF 44 4 I-94, Exit 171 (CR 75) 4231 Clearwater Road, 56301

442 HAYTI 8  DEF 25 RV DUMP I-55, Exit 19 1701 Highway 84 East, 63851 443 HIGGINSVILLE 5  DEF 120 RV DUMP I-70, Exit 49 6676 Highway 13, 64037 317 JOPLIN 7  DEF 90 RV DUMP I-44 & MO 43S, Exit 4 4500 Highway 43 South, 64804 669 JOPLIN DEF 160 15 I-44 U.S. 71 Exit 11A 11570 Hwy FF, 64804 768 KANSAS CITY DEF 121 6 I-435 Front Street 1300 North Corrington Ave., 64120 252 KEARNEY 7  DEF 125 I-35, Exit 26 600 West SR 92, 64060 301 MARSTON 6 70 I-55, Exit 40 917 East Elm Street, 63866 671 MATTHEWS DEF 188 15 RV DUMP I-55 Exit 58 703 State Hwy 80, 63867 167 NEVADA DEF 45 3 US 71 & Camp Clark Road 2424 East Austin Road, 64772 208 PACIFIC DEF 90 7 I-44W, Exit 257; I-44E, Exit 256 1475 Thornton Street, 63069 672 PECULIAR DEF 165 9 RV DUMP US Hwy 71 Exit J 700 J Hwy, 64078 547 ST. ROBERT ROAD RANGER DEF 75 6 I-44, Exit 163 22345 Hwy 28, 65584 673 SULLIVAN DEF 160 15 RV DUMP I-44/Hwy. 185 Exit 226 1500 AF Highway, 63080 674 WARRENTON DEF 200 14 RV DUMP I-70 Exit 188 #1 Camp Branch Rd, 63383 675 WAYLAND DEF 99 4 RV DUMP Hwy 136 & Hwy 61 102 Fore Drive, 63472

P 320-763-9222 F 320-763-2339

Hot Deli P 651-438-3397 F 651-480-4800

Big Steer Hot Restaurant Deli

P 507-645-6082 F 507-645-6082

P 320-251-8455 F 320-251-7750

MICHIGAN 17 BATTLE CREEK 5  DEF 25 I-94, Exit 104 15901 Eleven Mile Road, 49014 666 BENTON HARBOR DEF 135 6 I-94 Exit 30 1860 East Napier Ave., 49022 21 DEXTER DEF 80 3 I-94, Exit 167 750 Baker Road, 48130 296 DEXTER 5 80 I-94, Exit 167 195 Baker Road, 48130 667 GRAND LEDGE DEF 265 9 RV DUMP I-96 & Exit 90/I-69 & Exit 81 7800 West Grand River Ave., 48837 23 IONIA 4 45 I-96, Exit 67 7205 South State Road, 48846 24 MONROE 20 3 I-75, Exit 15 1100 North Dixie Highway, 48162 284 MONROE DEF 60 5 I-75, Exit 18 1200 Nadeau Road, 48161 26 OTTAWA LAKE DEF 170 8 US 23, Exit 5 6158 US 223, 49267 596 PORT HURON DEF 65 5 I-69, Exit 196 2424 Wadhams Road, 48074 668 SAGINAW 3 50 RV DUMP I-75 & Washington St. Exit 151 3475 East Washington, 48601 895 WOODHAVEN DETROITER DEF 225 12 I-75, Exit 32A 21055 West Road, 48183

MISSISSIPPI P 269-968-9949 F 269-968-9610

Hot Deli P 269-925-7547 F 269-925-7508

P 734-426-4618 F 734-426-7836

P 734-426-0065 F 734-426-0339

Hot Deli P 517-627-7504 F 517-622-4960

P 616-527-6520 F 616-527-5913

P 734-242-9650 F 734-242-6538

P 734-457-3500 F 734-457-2835

P 734-854-1772 F 734-854-6912

P 810-987-7823 F 810-987-7869

Hot Deli P 989-752-6350 F 989-752-6842

P 734-675-0222 F 734-675-4973

74 C H A L L E N G E O C T O B E R 2 0 1 2

RESTAURANTS OUTLINED IN A RED BOX DO NOT ACCEPT MYREWARDS POINTS

676 GULFPORT DEF 165 15 RV DUMP I-10 Exit 31 9351 Canal Road, 39503 77 JACKSON 6  DEF 120 I-55/I-20, Exit 45 2520 South Gallatin Street, 39204 388 MERIDIAN 7  DEF 100 I-59, Exit 151 1555 Tommy Webb Drive, 39307 174 NEW ALBANY DEF 90 7 US 78, Exit 64 500 State Highway 15 South, 38652 677 OLIVE BRANCH DEF 51 9 RV DUMP Hwy 78 and Bethel Road 4740 Bethel Road, 38654 678 PEARL DEF 175 15 RV DUMP I-20/I-55 Exit 47 685 Hwy 80 East, 39208 519 SENATOBIA KANGAROO PANTRY 4 75 I-55, Exit 265 510 E Main Street, 38668 261 WINONA 5  DEF 110 I-55 & Hwy. 82, Exit 185 403 SW Frontage Road, 38967

Hot Deli P 228-868-2711 F 228-868-3711

P 601-968-9491 F 601-968-0699

Hot Deli P 601-484-5106 F 601-484-7370

P 662-539-0222 F 662-539-0212

Hot Deli P 662-895-1001 F 662-895-0008

Hot Deli P 601-936-0190 F 601-936-0196 TM

P 662-560-1973 F 662-560-1992

P 662-283-5985 F 662-283-5906

MISSOURI 44 BOONVILLE 8  DEF 150 I-70, Exit 101 1701 Ashley Road, 65233 571 CHARLESTON DEF 65 7 I-57 Exit 12 2460 E. Marshall/E US Hwy 60, 63834 385 COLLINS 3 35 US 54 & Hwy 13 South Hwy 13 South, 64738 533 FENTON ROAD RANGER DEF 25 2 I-44 W, Exit 275; I-44 E, Exit 274B 205 North Highway Dr., 63026

Hot Deli P 660-882-9120 F 660-882-9710

TM

Hot Deli

P 573-682-4153 F 573-683-4196

P 417-275-4796 F 417-275-4796

P 815-566-4043 F 636-326-6922

Hot Deli P 573-359-2007 F 573-359-2031

P 660-584-8484 F 660-584-8486

P 417-781-0255 F 417-781-0179

Hot Deli P 417-626-7600 F 417-626-8802

Hot Deli P 816-483-7600 F 816-483-1492

P 816-635-4015 F 816-635-4116

P 573-643-2320 F 573-643-2252

Hot Deli P 573-472-3336 F 573-471-1161

Hot Deli P 417-667-32716 F 417-667-48431

P 636-257-4100 F 636-257-4107

Hot Deli P 816-779-8000 F 816-779-4441

P 815-315-4953 F 573-336-3080

Hot Deli P 573-860-8880 F 573-860-8892

Hot Deli P 636-456-2001 F 636-456-2016

Hot Deli P 660-754-1550 F 660-754-1556

MONTANA 968 BELGRADE PILOT/BROADWAY 3 125 I-90 Exit 298 6505 Jack Rabit Lane, 59701 915 BILLINGS PILOT/TOWN PUMP DEF 150 14 I-90, Exit 455 2711 N Frontage Road, 59101

Hot Deli P 406-488-4124 F 406-388-4231

Hot Deli P 406-238-9823 F 406-238-9825

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FLYING J DEALER PILOT LOCATIONS LOCATIONS LOCATIONS

MONTANA (CONT.) 923 BILLINGS FLYING J/TOWN PUMP 123 9 I-90, Exit 455 2775 Old Hardin Road, 59101 905 BONNER PILOT/TOWN PUMP DEF 100 11 Junction of I-90 & Hwy 200 7985 Highway 200 East, 59851 924 BUTTE FLYING J/TOWN PUMP DEF 125 14 I-15 Exit 122 & I-90 MM220 122000 W. Browns Gulch Road; 59701 922 COLUMBIA FALLS PILOT/TOWN PUMP 20 1 Hwy 2 West 6102 Hwy 2 West, 59912 906 COLUMBUS PILOT/TOWN PUMP 150 7 I-90, Exit 408 602 8th Avenue North, 59019 917 GREAT FALLS PILOT/TOWN PUMP DEF 100 5 Junction of I-15 & Hwy 87 3700 31st St SW, Suite 1, 59404 925 GREAT FALLS FLYING J/TOWN PUMP 4 100 I-15 & 31st Street Exit 277 3715 31st St SW, 59404 964 HARDIN PILOT/BROADWAY 1 50 I-90 Exit 495 315 E 13th Street, 59034 916 LOLO PILOT/TOWN PUMP 1 40 Junction of Hwy 93 & Hwy 12 11822 Highway 93 South, 59847 907 MILES CITY PILOT/TOWN PUMP DEF 100 4 I-94, Exit 138 1210 South Haynes Street, 59301 914 MISSOULA FLYING J/TOWN PUMP DEF 125 14 I-90 & MT Hwy 93, Exit 96 8475 Hwy 93 N Suite B, 59808 908 ROCKER/BUTTE PILOT/TOWN PUMP DEF 195 10 I-90, Exit 122 1000 Grizzly Trail, 59701 909 SHELBY PILOT/TOWN PUMP 70 6 I-15, Exit 363 1350 West Roosevelt, 59474 911 SUPERIOR PILOT/TOWN PUMP 2 8 I-90, Exit 47 403 Diamond Match Road, 59872 910 THREE FORKS PILOT/TOWN PUMP DEF 90 5 Junction of I-90 & US 287, Exit 274 10800 Highway 287, 59751

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RV DUMP

RESTAURANTS OUTLINED IN A RED BOX DO NOT ACCEPT MYREWARDS POINTS

NEBRASKA (CONT.) Hot Deli P 406-256-8826 F 406-256-9256

Hot Deli P 406-258-6588 F 406-258-6693

Hot Deli P 406-723-4325 F 406-723-8956

Hot Deli P 406-892-0747

F 406-892-0747*22

Hot Deli P 406-322-4833 F 406-322-5273

Hot Deli P 406-452-0342 F 406-452-0547

Hot Deli P 406-727-7945 F 406-761-2599

P 406-665-1237 F 406-665-3123

Hot Deli P 406-273-6666 F 406-273-3018

Hot Deli P 406-232-2582 F 406-232-2582

Hot Deli P 406-542-0400 F 406-327-0802

Hot Deli P 406-723-0088 F 406-723-4940

Country Skillet

Hot Deli

P 406-434-5221

902 GRAND ISLAND BOSSELMAN 400 21 I-80, Exit 312N 3335 West Woodriver Road, 68803 686 GRETNA DEF 150 15 RV DUMP I-80 Exit 432 15010 South State Hwy 31, 68028 687 NORTH PLATTE DEF 123 9 RV DUMP I-80 Exit 179 3400 S. Newberry Road, 69101 912 WOOD RIVER 65 6 I-80 & Hwy 11, Exit 300 I-80 and Highway 11 and Exit 300, 68883

Hot Deli

P 308-382-2288 F 308-381-7464

Hot Deli P 402-332-4483 F 402-332-4576

Hot Deli P 308-532-4555 F 308-532-8077

P 308-583-2493 F 308-583-2115

NEVADA 966 BATTLE MTN. FLYING J/BROADWAY 70 9 I-80 Exit 231 650 W Front St., 89820 387 CARLIN 5 60 I-80/NV 278, Exit 280 791 Tenth Street, 89822 340 FERNLEY 7  DEF 100 I-80 & US 95, Exit 46 465 Pilot Road, 89408 341 LAS VEGAS 7  DEF 80 I-15 & Craig Rd, Exit 48 3812 East Craig Road, 89031 692 WELLS DEF 200 9 RV DUMP I-80 & HWY 93, Exit 352 (South) 156 Hwy 93 South, 89835 147 WEST WENDOVER DEF 250 11 I-80 @ Peppermill Casino, Exit 410 1200 West Wendover Boulevard, 89883 485 WINNEMUCCA 5  DEF 140 I-80 & West Interchange, Exit 173 5625 I-80 W Winnemucca Exchange, 89445 770 WINNEMUCCA Hot 10 105 RV DUMP Deli I-80 Exit 176 1880 West Winnemucca Blvd., 89445

Hot Deli P 702-635-5424 F 775-635-0371

P 775-754-6384 F 775-754-6025

P 775-575-5115 F 775-575-4619

P 702-644-1600 F 702-644-8432

Hot Deli P 775-752-2400 F 775-752-2406

P 775-664-3400 F 775-664-3347

P 775-625-2800 F 775-625-2814

P 775-623-0111 F 775-523-0120

F 406-434-7019

Hot Deli P 406-822-4444 F 406-822-4444

Hot Deli

NEW HAMPSHIRE 896 BOW 3 60 I-93, Exit 11/12C 728 SR 3A, 03304

P 603-223-6885 F 603-223-5204

P 406-285-3807 F 406-285-6976

NEBRASKA 904 BIG SPRINGS DEF 500 16 RV DUMP I-80, Exit 107 I-80 and Big Springs Road, 69122 901 ELM CREEK 6 75 I-80, Exit 257 5085 Buffalo Creek Road, 68836

#

P 308-889-3686 F 308-889-3352

NEW JERSEY 280 BLOOMSBURY 5  DEF 30 I-78 & NJ 173, Exit 7 979 Route 173, 08804 253 CARNEYS POINT 2 I-295 at Jersey Turnpike, Exit 2B 600 Pennsville-Auburn Road, 08069

P 908-479-6443 F 908-479-6394

P 856-299-5700 F 856-299-8563

P 308-856-4330 F 308-856-4330

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 2 C H A L L E N G E 75


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AT STORES LISTED WITH A YELLOW TAG

FLYING J DEALER PILOT LOCATIONS LOCATIONS LOCATIONS

NEW JERSEY (CONT.) 688 CARNEYS POINT DEF 360 16 RV DUMP I-295 Exit 2C 326 Slapes Corner Road, 08069 190 CLINTON 95 6 I-78, Exit 12 68 Rt. 173, 08827 210 MAHWAH 8 0 230 Route 17 South, 07430 880 MONTAGUE LUKOIL 0 I-84, Exit 1 15 Route 23 S, 07827

Hot Deli P 856-351-0080 F 856-351-0293

P 908-735-7711 F 908-735-8153

P 201-529-2704 F 201-529-1784

P 973-293-3477 F 973-293-3177

NEW MEXICO 689 ALBUQUERQUE DEF 165 15 RV DUMP I-40 Exit 153 9911 Avalon Road NW, 87105 305 JAMESTOWN 16  DEF 450 I-40, Exit 39 I-40, Exit 39, 87347 266 LAS CRUCES 5 40 I-10 & NM 292, Exit 139 2681 West Amador, 88005 163 LORDSBURG 7  DEF 95 I-10 & East Motel Dr, Exit 24 1050 East Motel Drive, 88045 690 LORDSBURG 285 9 RV DUMP I-10 Exit 24 11 Old Highway 70, 88045 691 TUCUMCARI DEF 136 9 RV DUMP I-40 & Exit 333 2021 S. Mountain Road, 88401

Hot Deli P 505-831-2001 F 505-833-0464

Hot Deli P 505-722-6655 F 505-722-2674

Hot Deli P 575-523-2700 F 575-525-6727

P 575-542-3100 F 575-542-3111

Hot Deli

575-542-3320 F 575-542-3324

P

Hot Deli P 575-461-6590 F 575-461-3879

NEW YORK 322 KANONA DEF 70 4 I-86, Exit 37 7767 State Rt 53, 14810 394 NEWBURGH 6  DEF 110 I-84, Exit 6 239 Route 17K, 12550 693 PEMBROKE DEF 150 9 RV DUMP I-90 Exit 48A 8484 Allegheny Road, 14036 494 ROTTERDAM 4 95 I-88, Exit 25 1128 Duanesburg Road, 12306 146 SCHODACK LANDING DEF 15 4 I-90, Exit 12 995 US Route 9, 12033 380 SYRACUSE (LIVERPOOL) DEF 85 5 I-81, Exit 25; I-90, Exit 36 107 Seventh North Street, 13088

Pizza P 607-776-2012 F 607-776-4179

P 845-567-1722 F 845-567-1773

Hot Deli P 585-599-4430 F 585-599-4436

P 518-356-5616 F 518-356-5634

P 518-732-7272 F 518-732-7228

P 315-424-0124 F 315-424-0126

76 C H A L L E N G E O C T O B E R 2 0 1 2

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RESTAURANTS OUTLINED IN A RED BOX DO NOT ACCEPT MYREWARDS POINTS

NORTH CAROLINA

OHIO (CONT.)

275 CHARLOTTE DEF 60 5 I-85, Exit 39; I-77, Exit 13 3807 Statesville Avenue, 28206 885 DUNN KANGAROO PANTRY 40 3 I-95, Exit 71 873 Longbranch, 28334 900 DUNN SADDLER BROS. 350 9 I-95, Exit 75 65 Sadler Rd, 28334 682 GRAHAM 251 4 RV DUMP I-85 & I-40 Exit 150 1043 Jimmie Kerr Road, 27258 56 KANNAPOLIS 55 7 I-85, Exit 63 2825 Lane Street, 28083 683 KENLY DEF 145 14 RV DUMP I-95 & Exit 106 1800 Princeton-Kenly Road, 27542 57 MEBANE 8  DEF 140 I-40/85, Exit 152 1342 Trollingwood Road, 27302 58 PLEASANT HILL 4 25 I-95, Exit 180 Route 1 - Box 202, 27866 393 WAYNESVILLE 4 60 I-40 & NC 209, Exit 24 3712 Crabtree Road, 28786

457 BEAVER DAM 10  DEF 105 I-75, Exit 135 427 East Main Street, 45808 695 BEAVER DAM DEF 150 15 RV DUMP I-75 Exit 135 420 East Main Street, 45808 696 BERKSHIRE DEF 150 15 I-71 Exit 131 7735 State Route 37, 43074 309 CALDWELL 50 5 I-77, Exit 25 44133 Fairground Road, 43724 6 CAMBRIDGE 35 3 I-70, Exit 178 61700 Southgate Road, 43725 8 CIRCLEVILLE 55 3 US 23 and Pittsburgh Road 25600 US 23, 43113 213 COLUMBUS 100 7 I-70 & Wilson Road Exit 94 3600 Interchange Road, 43204 286 EATON 5  DEF 50 I-70 & OH 127, Exit 10 6141 US 127 North, 45320 360 FINDLAY 5 80 I-75 & OH 613, Exit 164 11471 State Route 613W, 45840 9 FRANKLIN 7  DEF 200 I-75, Exit 36 6830 Franklin-Lebanon Road, 45005 285 HEBRON 9  DEF 90 I-70 & OH 37, Exit 126 10258 Lancaster Road SW, 43025 697 HUBBARD DEF 150 15 RV DUMP I-80 & Hwy 62, Exit 234B (Eastbound) 2226 North Main, 44425 698 JEFFERSONVILLE DEF 148 9 RV DUMP I-71 Exit 69 9935 SR 41, 43128 700 LAKE TOWNSHIP DEF 150 15 RV DUMP I-280 Exit 1B; I-80/90, Exit 71 26415 Warns Dr., 43551 287 LODI (BURBANK) 105 7 I-71 & OH 83, Exit 204 10048 Avon Lake Road, 44214 454 LONDON 9  DEF 125 I-70, Exit 79 1365 SR 42 NE, 43140 455 MARENGO 5 65 RV DUMP I-71, Exit 140 488 State Route 61, 43334

P 704-358-1006 F 704-358-1506 Hot Deli

P 910-892-3642 F 910-980-2364 Hot Deli

P 910-892-0106 F 910-892-2084

Hot Deli P 336-578-2427 F 336-578-0804

P 704-938-6800 F 704-938-6900

Hot Deli P 919-284-4548 F 919-284-4214

P 919-563-4999 F 919-563-4929

P 252-537-4476 F 252-537-3666

P 828-627-8611 F 828-627-9499

NORTH DAKOTA 684 BEACH 89 9 I-94 & Hwy 16 I-94 & Hwy 16, 58621 685 FARGO DEF 168 9 3150 39th Street SW, Suite A, 58104 489 GRAND FORKS 10 141 RV DUMP I-29, Exit 138 4401 32nd Avenue South, 58201

P 701-872-4737 F 701-872-4985 TM

Windbreak Saloon

P 701-282-7766 F 701-282-7259

Hot Deli P 701-746-8145 F 701-746-4342

OHIO 2 AUSTINBURG 7  DEF 150 I-90, Exit 223 2246 State Route 45, 44010 694 AUSTINBURG DEF 164 15 RV DUMP I-90 & State Rd 45, Exit 223 2349 Center Road, 44010 3 AUSTINTOWN 8  DEF 200 I-80, Exit 223 1150 North Canfield-Niles Road, 44515 4 AVON DEF 55 3 I-90, Exit 151 39115 Colorado Road, 44011

P 440-275-3303 F 440-275-3311

Hot Deli P 440-275-1515 F 440-275-3289

P 330-505-3532 F 330-505-3548

P 440-934-0110

P 419-643-6023 F 419-643-6085

Hot Deli P 419-643-8001 F 419-643-8106

Hot Deli P 740-965-9835 F 740-965-9770

P 740-732-5656 F 740-732-1404

P 740-439-0989 F 740-432-9607

P 740-420-8942 F 740-420-3972

P 614-308-9195 F 614-308-9673

P 937-456-6303 F 937-456-6497

P 419-299-3381 F 419-299-3096

P 937-746-4488 F 937-743-3006

P 740-928-5588 F 740-928-6032

Hot Deli P 330-534-3774 F 330-534-4372

Hot Deli P 740-426-9136 F 740-426-9156

Hot Deli P 419-837-2100 F 419-837-2199

P 330-948-4571 F 330-948-4575

P 614-879-4128 F 614-879-4137

P 419-253-1400 F 419-253-1402

F 440-934-1168

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AT STORES LISTED WITH A YELLOW TAG

FLYING J DEALER PILOT LOCATIONS LOCATIONS LOCATIONS

OHIO (CONT.) 699 MILLERSPORT 152 15 RV DUMP I-70 St Rd 158 Exit 122 10480 Baltimore, 43046 11 N. LIMA 5  DEF 50 I-76, Exit 232 10920 Market Street, 44452 303 NAPOLEON 75 7 Rt. 24 905 American Road, 43545 130 RICHFIELD 80 7 I-77S, Ex 146; I-77N, Ex 145; I-80, Ex 173 5219 Brecksville Road, 44286 13 SEVILLE 10  DEF 190 I-71, Exit 209 8924 Lake Road, 44273 12 STONEY RIDGE (PERRYSBURG) 5  50 I-80/90, Exit 71 3430 Libbey Road, 43551 14 SUNBURY 5 115 RV DUMP I-71, Exit 131 7680 East State Route 36, 43074 15 TOLEDO 5 70 I-75, Exit 210 5820 Hagman Road, 43612 239 UPPER SANDUSKY 5 70 St. Hwy 23 & 30 1600 W. Wyandot Avenue, 43351 16 WILMINGTON 3 20 I-71, Exit 50 5772 US 68 North, 45177 281 YOUNGSTOWN (GIRARD) 7  80 I-80 & Salt Springs Rd., Exit 226 2786 Salt Springs Road, 44420

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SHOWERS

AUTO SHOWERS

#

DEF

PARKING

OKLAHOMA (CONT.) Hot Deli P 740-964-9601 F 740-964-9611

P 330-549-9203 F 330-549-1930

P 419-599-0043 F 419-599-0051

P 330-659-2020 F 330-659-2021

703 OKLAHOMA CITY DEF 172 9 RV DUMP I-40, Exit 140 701 South Morgan Road, 73128 196 ROLAND DEF 125 7 I-40 & US 64, Exit 325 123 West Ray Fine Boulevard 705 SAYRE DEF 150 4 RV DUMP I-40 & US 283 2400 South 4th Route, 73662 706 TULSA DEF 185 9 RV DUMP I-44 & Exit 236 121 North 129 E/I-44 Exit 236, 74116

RV DUMP

RESTAURANTS OUTLINED IN A RED BOX DO NOT ACCEPT MYREWARDS POINTS

PENNSYLVANIA (CONT.) Hot Deli

TM

P 405-324-5000 F 405-324-7181

P 918-427-0895 F 918-427-0862

Hot Deli P 580-928-2216 F 580-928-2354

Hot Deli P 918-437-5477 F 918-437-5660

708 CARLISLE Hot Deli DEF 278 22 RV DUMP I-81 Exit 52/I-76 & Exit 226 P 717-243-6659 1501 Harrisburg Pike, 17013 F 717-243-2510 336 DUBOIS 100 7 I-80, Hwy 219, Exit 97 P 814-375-6046 1742 Rich Highway, 15801 F 814-375-6047 517 DUNCANNON DEF 50 6 US 22 and 322 P 717-834-3174 30 Benvenue Ave, 17020 F 717-834-5118 311 ERIE 85 5 I-90 & PA97, Exit 27 P 814-864-8536 8035 Perry Highway, 16509 F 814-866-0332 518 FRYSTOWN DEF 240 8 I-78, Exit 10 (PA 645) P 717-933-4146 2210 Camp Swatara Road, 17067 F 717-933-5008 245 HARRISBURG 3 30 I-81 & PA39, Exit 77 P 717-545-5507 7961 Linglestown Road, 17112 F 717-545-6768 298 HAZLETON (DRUMS) 5 60 I-80, Exit 256 P 570-788-3262 1114 SR 93, 18222 F 570-788-2163 1 MILL HALL 5  DEF 70 I-80, Exit 173 P 570-726-7618 5868 Nittany Valley Drive, 17751 F 570-726-5092 709 MILL HALL (LAMAR) Hot Deli DEF 155 15 RV DUMP I-80 and Exit 173 P 570-726-4080 5609 Nittany Valley Drive, 17751 F 570-726-4363 555 MILTON PENN 80 MILTON TRUCK PLAZA Penn 80 Grill 16 300 I-80, Exit 215 P 570-742-2663 1460 North Ridge Rd, 17847 F 1-877-395-0850 81 NEW CASTLE 7  DEF 90 I-79, Exit 99 P 724-368-3028 2010 New Castle Road, 16051 F 724-368-3059 710 NEW MILFORD Hot Deli DEF 125 9 RV DUMP I-81 Exit 219 P 570-465-2974 1623 Oliver Road, 18834 F 570-465-2979 522 PINE GROVE 160 3 I-81, Exit 100 P 570-345-8800 482 Suedberg Rd, 17963 F 570-345-3707 370 SCRANTON (PITTSTON) 7  DEF 80 I-81N, Exit 175; I-81 S, Exit 175B; I-476, RT 315 P 570-655-4116 417 Route 315, 18640 F 570-655-2479 620 SMITHTON Hot Deli DEF 110 7 RV DUMP I-70 & Exit 49 P 724-872-4050 122 Fitzhenry Road, 15479 F 724-872-9471 TM

P 330-769-4220 F 330-769-2202

P 419-837-5091 F 419-837-5658

P 740-965-5540 F 740-965-5641

P 419-729-3985 F 419-729-0905

P 419-294-2971 F 419-294-3101

P 937-382-0464 F 937-382-3069

P 330-530-8500 F 330-530-8318

OKLAHOMA 701 ARDMORE DEF 136 9 RV DUMP I-35 & Exit 33 2450 Cooper Drive, 73401 702 CHECOTAH 9 150 RV DUMP U.S. Hwy 69 & U.S. Hwy 266 1255 W. Gentry, 74426 556 CHOCTAW THUNDER TRAVEL PLAZA DEF 25 3 I-40, Exit 166 7501 S. Choctaw Road, 73020 704 EDMOND DEF 73 15 RV DUMP I-35 & N.E. 122nd Street 4801 NE 122 Street, 73013 259 MUSKOGEE 7  DEF 125 US 69 3006 N. 32nd Street, 74401 460 OKLAHOMA CITY 7  DEF 145 I-40, Exit 140 400 South Morgan Road, 73128

#

Hot Deli

TM

P 580-226-3833 F 580-226-3546

Hot Deli P 918-473-1243 F 918-473-1957

P 405-638-3000 F 405-638-3006 TM

P 405-475-9440 F 405-475-9435

P 918-686-7856 F 918-686-0597

P 405-440-1048 F 405-440-1093

OREGON 195 BIGGS JUNCTION 55 5 I-84 & US Hwy 97, Exit 104 91485 Biggs Rufus Highway, 97065 386 BROOKS 7  DEF 110 I-5, Exit 263 4220 Brooklake Road, 97305 391 CENTRAL POINT DEF 100 7 I-5, Exit 33 1600 East Pine Street, 97502 133 CHEMULT 4 60 US 97 341 Damon Street, 97731 504 KLAMATH FALLS DEF 50 4 RV DUMP Hwy 97 3817 N. Hwy 97, 97601 934 LAGRANDE FLYING J/BROADWAY 50 4 I-84 Exit 265 I-84 & Exit 265, 97850 232 ONTARIO DEF 105 7 I-84, Exit 376A 653 East Idaho Avenue, 97914 233 RICE HILL 10  160 I-5, Exit 148 800 John Long Road, 97462 390 STANFIELD DEF 90 9 I-84/82 & Hwy 395, Exit 188 2115 Highway 395, 97875

P 541-739-2174 F 541-739-2479

P 503-463-1114 F 503-463-0409

P 541-664-7001 F 541-664-7006

P 541-365-0991 F 541-365-0995

P 541-884-0400 F 541-884-0409

Hot Deli

Full Service Restaurant

P 541-963-9762 F 541-663-9822

P 541-889-9070 F 541-889-4117

P 541-849-2133 F 541-849-2137

P 541-449-1403 F 541-449-1430

PENNSYLVANIA 348 BENTLEYVILLE 7  90 I-70 Exit 32-B 205 Wilson Road, 15314 516 BREEZEWOOD ALL AMERICAN 12 280 I-76, Exit 161; I-70, Exit 147 167 Post House Road, 15533 707 BROOKVILLE 15 140 RV DUMP I-80 Exit 78 246 Allegheny Blvd., 15825

P 724-239-5855 F 724-239-5801 Pizza

Perkins Shop

Taco Maker

P 814-735-4076 F 814-735-4823 Hot Deli

P 814-849-2992 F 814-849-2440

Gooseberry Farms Restaurant

SOUTH CAROLINA 711 BLACKSBURG 15 200 I-85 Exit 102 1011 North Mountain Street, 29702 60 BOWMAN 8  DEF 100 I-26, Exit 159 2064 Homestead Road, 29018

Hot Deli P 864-839-5934 F 864-839-5942

P 803-829-3541 F 803-829-3352

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 2 C H A L L E N G E 77


DOUBLE MYREWARDS POINTS

AT STORES LISTED WITH A YELLOW TAG

FLYING J DEALER PILOT LOCATIONS LOCATIONS LOCATIONS

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SHOWERS

AUTO SHOWERS

DEF

# PARKING

RV DUMP

RESTAURANTS OUTLINED IN A RED BOX DO NOT ACCEPT MYREWARDS POINTS

SOUTH CAROLINA (CONT.)

SOUTH DAKOTA (CONT.)

TENNESSEE (CONT.)

346 CAMDEN (LUGOFF) 60 3  I-20 & US 601 Exit 92 522 Highway 601 South, 29078 884 CAMPOBELLO KANGAROO PANTRY 35 2 I-26, Exit 5 8998 SC Hwy 11, 29322 338 CAYCE (COLUMBIA) DEF 90 5 I-26/77 & US321, Exit 115 3008 Highway 321, 29033 61 CLINTON 40 3 I-26, Exit 52 12818 Highway 56 North, 29325 712 COLUMBIA DEF 178 15 RV DUMP I-20 Exit 70 5901 Fairfield Road, 29203 310 DUNCAN 8 70 I-85 & SC290, Exit 63 1405 East Main Street, 29334 62 FLORENCE 6 75 I-95, Exit 170 3006 North Williston Road, 29506 337 FLORENCE 5 90 I-95 & US 52, Exit 164 2015 West Lucas St., 29501 878 FLORENCE FLORENCE TRAVEL PLZ 19 235 I-95, Exit 169 3001 TV Road, 29501 453 GAFFNEY 5  DEF 100 I-85, Exit 90 909 Hyatt Street, 29341 713 LATTA DEF 200 15 RV DUMP I-95 Exit 181A 111 Mill Branch Road, 29565 63 PIEDMONT 5  DEF 90 I-85, Exit 35 110 Frontage Road, 29673 714 ROCK HILL DEF 141 9 RV DUMP I-77 & Hwy 901, Exit 73 2435 Mount Holly Road, 29730 493 ST. GEORGE DEF 118 8 RV DUMP I-95, Exit 77 113 Motel Drive, 29477 64 SUMMERVILLE 3  40 I-26, Exit 199 1521 North Main Street, 29483

918 RAPID CITY BOSSELMAN DEF 100 5 I-90, Exit 55 2783 Deadwood Ave., 57702 931 RAPID CITY FLYING J/BROADWAY 150 8 I-90 Exit 61 4200 N I-90 Service Rd Exit 61, 57701 716 SIOUX FALLS DEF 158 9 RV DUMP I-29 Exit 83 5201 Granite Lane, 57107

219 KNOXVILLE (STRAW PLAINS) Hot Deli 9  DEF 115 I-40, Exit 398 7210 Straw Plains Pike, 37914 52 LAVERGNE 25 4 I-24, Exit 64 535 Waldron Road, 37086 411 LEBANON 8  DEF 150 RV DUMP I-40, Exit 238 921 Murfreesboro, 37090 363 MEMPHIS 70 5 US 78 @ Pleasant Hill 5021 Highway 78, 38118 405 MEMPHIS 5  DEF 100 I-240, Hwy 78S 4949 Lamar Ave, 38118 404 MURFREESBORO 7  DEF 90 I-24, Exit 81 2441 S. Church St, 37127 413 NASHVILLE 2 25 Briley Pkwy, Hwy 155N, Ex 26A, Hwy 155S, Ex 26 6418 Centennial Blvd., 37209 224 ONEIDA (PIONEER) 4 85 I-75, Exit 141 304 Howard Baker Highway, 37847 149 STANTON 7 50 I-40 Exit 42 7720 Highway 222, 38069 412 WHITE PINE 9  DEF 130 RV DUMP I-81, Exit 4 3624 Roy Messer Highway, 37890

P 803-438-5175 F 803-438-3947

P 864-472-2128 F 864-472-2280

P 803-739-2921 F 803-739-4521

P 864-833-4555 F 864-833-3765

Hot Deli P 803-735-9006 F 803-735-0917

P 864-433-1221 F 864-433-1210

P 843-662-6972 F 843-662-7013

P 843-662-2646 F 843-662-2893

Hot Deli P 843-669-5736 F 843-269-2079

P 864-206-0050 F 864-206-0052

P 843-752-5047 F 843-752-7265

P 864-845-8177 F 864-845-8178

Hot Deli P 803-328-5700 F 803-909-5800

P 843-563-8989 F 843-563-8986

P 843-486-5770 F 843-486-5702

SOUTH DAKOTA 932 HERMOSA FLYING J/BROADWAY 2 25 Heartland Express Hwy 79 25 Heartland Express Hwy 79, 57744 599 MURDO DEF 50 4 RV DUMP I-90, Exit 192 601 E. Fifth Street, 57559

Hot Deli P 605-255-4555 F 605-255-4522

P 605-669-2465 F 605-669-2466

78 C H A L L E N G E O C T O B E R 2 0 1 2

P 605-348-7070 F 605-348-3438 Country Market

Hot Deli

P 605-342-5450 F 605-342-3011

Hot Deli P 605-977-1438 F 605-977-1538

TENNESSEE 481 CLEVELAND DEF 75 7 I-75, Exit 20 281 Pleasant Grove Rd, 37353 265 COOKEVILLE LMTD 1 I-40, Exit 287 1111 South Jefferson, 38501 406 CORNERSVILLE 2 20 I-65, Exit 22 9211 Lewisburg Highway, 37047 114 CROSSVILLE 7  80 I-40, Exit 320 2449 Genesis Road, 38571 226 DANDRIDGE 6 80 I-40, Exit 417 505 Patriot Drive, 37725 409 DICKSON 90 11  I-40, Exit 172 2320 Highway 46 South, 37055 720 FAIRVIEW DEF 150 9 RV DUMP I-40 & Hwy 96, Exit 182 1420 Hwy 96 North, 37062 51 GREENEVILLE 3 25 I-81 Exit 36 11190 Baileyton Road, 37745 403 HEISKELL 2 25 I-75, Exit 117 1915 East Raccoon Valley Road, 37754 53 HURRICANE MILLS 8  180 I-40, Exit 143 15559 Highway 13 South, 37078 366 JACKSON 7  DEF 95 I-40, Exit 85 32 Sand Pebble Rd., 38305 241 KNOXVILLE DEF 80 0 I-40, Exit 398; @ John Sevier 2801 East Govenor John Sevier Hwy, 37914 722 KNOXVILLE DEF 187 15 RV DUMP I-40 & I-75 Exit 369 800 Watt Road, 37932 270 KNOXVILLE (LOVELL ROAD) 5  80 I-40/75, Exit 374 314 Lovell Road, 37922

P 423-476-3892 F 423-476-5430

P 931-528-7100 F 931-528-3893

P 931-363-3290 F 931-363-8248

P 931-787-1901 F 931-787-1905

P 865-397-3547 F 865-397-3699

P 615-446-4600 F 615-446-0763

Hot Deli P 615-799-4116 F 615-799-4120

P 423-234-0414 F 423-234-0641

P 865-938-1439 F 865-938-1146

P 931-296-7180 F 931-296-7719

Hot Deli P 731-422-5545 F 731-422-5780

P 865-546-6776 F 865-546-7475

Hot Deli P 865-531-7400 F 865-531-7982

P 865-966-0445 F 865-966-2918

P 865-544-1067 F 865-544-1138

P 615-793-9856 F 615-793-9085

P 615-453-8866 F 615-453-8860

Hot Deli P 901-366-0337 F 901-366-1712

P 901-202-5520 F 901-202-5522

P 615-907-9595 F 615-907-3982

P 615-350-7225 F 615-350-7318

P 423-562-5000 F 423-566-1335

P 901-466-3535 F 901-465-7822

P 865-674-8570 F 865-674-8572

TEXAS 436 AMARILLO 5  DEF 90 RV DUMP I-40, Exit 75 715 South Lakeside Drive, 79118 723 AMARILLO DEF 200 13 RV DUMP I-40 Exit 76 9601 I-40 East Exit 76, 79118 477 ANNA DEF 100 8 1700 US Hwy 75/Hwy 75, Exit 48 714 South Central Expressway, 75409 435 ANTHONY 5  DEF 100 I-10, Exit 0 2015 Antonio Street, 79821 724 ANTHONY DEF 176 15 RV DUMP I-10 Exit 0 3001 Mountain Pass Blvd., 79821 725 BAYTOWN DEF 200 15 RV DUMP I-10 & Exit 789 Thompson Road 1876 East Freeway, 77521 740 BROOKSHIRE DEF 117 9 RV DUMP I-10, Exit 732 204 South Waller Ave., 77423

P 806-335-3323 F 806-335-2868

Hot Deli P 806-335-1475 F 806-335-1058 TM

P 972-924-2035 F 972-924-2051

P 915-886-3090 F 915-886-3404

Hot Deli P 915-886-2737 F 915-886-3522

Hot Deli P 281-424-7706 F 281-424-7730

Hot Deli P 281-934-4133 F 281-934-4153

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DOUBLE MYREWARDS POINTS

AT STORES LISTED WITH A YELLOW TAG

FLYING J DEALER PILOT LOCATIONS LOCATIONS LOCATIONS

#



SHOWERS

AUTO SHOWERS

DEF

# PARKING

RV DUMP

RESTAURANTS OUTLINED IN A RED BOX DO NOT ACCEPT MYREWARDS POINTS

TEXAS (CONT.)

TEXAS (CONT.)

UTAH (CONT.)

367 CADDO MILLS 80 6 I-30 & FM1903, Exit 87 & 88 2725 FM 1903, 75135 433 DALLAS 8  DEF 150 I-20, Exit 470 8787 South Lancaster Road, 75241 726 DALLAS DEF 150 15 RV DUMP I-20 Exit 472 7425 Bonnie View Road, 75241 727 EDINBURG DEF 200 15 RV DUMP Hwy 281 & FM 1925 1305 East Monte Cristo, 78539 728 EL PASO DEF 120 9 RV DUMP I-10 and Exit 37 1301 North Horizon Blvd., 79927 434 FORT WORTH 8  DEF 185 RV DUMP I-35, Exit 65 2400 Alliance Gateway, 76178 375 HOUSTON 7  DEF 90 I-610, Exit 24A US 90 E 4440 N. McCarty Street, 77013 729 HOUSTON DEF 233 15 RV DUMP I-45 Richie Rd, Exit 64 15919 North Freeway, 77090 234 HUNTSVILLE 6  90 I-45, Exit 118 639 State Highway 75 North, 77320 507 JARRELL 8 140 I-35 & Exit 275 11710 North Interstate 35, 76537 377 LAREDO 12  DEF 300 I-35 S, Exit 13; I-35 N, Exit 12B 1101 Uniroyal Drive, 78045 730 LAREDO DEF 191 13 RV DUMP I-35 S, Exit 13; I-35 N, Exit 12B 1011 Beltway Parkway, 78045 733 LUBBOCK 50 4 RV DUMP I-27 & 4th Street Exit 602 4th Street, 79401 257 MIDLAND 7  DEF 84 I-20, Exit 126 4015 S. FM 1788, 79706 982 MIDLAND 0 0 7700 W. I-20 7500 W. Hwy 80, 79706 983 MIDLAND 0 0 I-20, Exit 138 7800 Interstate 20 Frontage, 79706 330 NEW BRAUNFELS 7  DEF 80 I-35, Exit 184 4142 Loop 337, 78132

734 NEW CANEY Hot Deli DEF 150 9 RV DUMP US 59 & Exit 242 P 281-689-8466 23412 Hwy 242, 77357 F 281-689-8271 431 ORANGE 110 8  RV DUMP I-10, Exit 873 P 409-745-1124 2205 North Highway 62, 77630 F 409-745-3336 735 ORANGE Hot Deli DEF 150 15 RV DUMP I-10 Exit 873 P 409-883-9465 7112 I-10 West, 77630 F 409-886-8224 736 PECOS Hot Deli 200 15 RV DUMP I-20 Exit 42 P 432-445-9436 100 East Pinehurst, 79772 F 432-445-7171 432 ROBINSON 7  DEF 285 I-35, Exit 328 P 254-662-4771 8055 South I-35, 76706 F 254-662-4951 306 SAN ANTONIO 5  50 I-10 E.bound, Ex 581; I-10 W.bound, Ex 582 P 210-661-5353 5619 I-10 East, 78219 F 210-661-4660 737 SAN ANTONIO Hot Deli DEF 200 15 RV DUMP I-10 Exit 583 P 210-666-2266 1815 North Foster Road, 78244 F 210-666-2280 157 SULPHER SPRINGS 7  DEF 85 I-30, Exit 122 P 903-885-0020 1200 South Hillcrest, 75482 F 903-885-1580 738 TYE Hot Deli DEF 200 15 RV DUMP I-20 & FM 707 Exit 277 P 325-691-9974 101 North FM 707, 79563 F 325-691-5365 486 TYLER 7  DEF 85 I-20 & FM 14 P 903-593-5466 12881 FM 14A, 75706 F 903-593-3204 209 VAN HORN 7  DEF 75 I-10, Exit 140 P 432-283-8067 501 Van Horn Drive, 79855 F 432-283-8071 568 VON ORMY Hot Deli DEF 65 7 I-35, Exit 140 P 210-622-9384 14555 IH35 South, 78073 F 210-622-9302 739 WACO Hot Deli DEF 200 9 RV DUMP I-35 & New Road P 254-714-0313 2409 South New Road, 76711 F 254-714-1798 206 WEATHERFORD 7  DEF 110 I-20, Exit 406 P 817-341-4600 1201 I-20 West, 76087 F 817-341-4602 741 WICHITA FALLS Hot Deli DEF 50 3 RV DUMP US 287 & Jacksboro Highway P 940-720-0598 2311 Jacksboro Highway, 76301 F 940-720-0725

742 LAKE POINT DEF 130 9 RV DUMP I-80 Exit 99 1605 East Saddleback Blvd., 84074 743 NEPHI 100 9 RV DUMP I-15 Exit 222 1597 South Main, 84648 772 N. SALT LAKE 42 4 I-215 & Redwood Rd, Exit 27 885 W. North Point Circle, 84054 294 OGDEN 60 5 I-15 & UT 39, Exit 344 1670 West 12th Street, 84404 744 OGDEN DEF 100 9 I-15 Exit 343 1172 West 21st Street, 84401 508 PERRY DEF 25 2 I-15 Exit 362 1674 W. 1100 S., 84302 773 RICHFIELD DEF 50 4 RV DUMP I-70 Exit 40 35 East Flying J Drive, 84701 746 SALT LAKE CITY DEF 110 9 RV DUMP I-15 & I-80 SR201, Exit 17 2025 South 900 West, 84119 510 SCIPIO 4 100 I-15, Exit 188 810 North 800 West, 84656 774 SNOWVILLE 3 50 RV DUMP I-84 Exit 7 90 South Stone Road, 84336 747 SPRINGVILLE DEF 80 8 I-15 Exit 261 1460 North 1750 West, 84663 775 ST. GEORGE DEF 60 4 I-15 Exit 4 2841 South 60 East, 84790 748 WILLARD BAY 52 4 RV DUMP I-15 Exit 357 600 West 750 North, 84340

w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m

P 903-527-2150 F 903-527-2103

P 972-228-2467 F 972-228-4386

Hot Deli P 972-225-3566 F 972-225-3681

Hot Deli P 956-316-0149 F 956-316-4732

Hot Deli P 915-852-4141 F 915-852-4101

P 817-337-5324 F 817-337-5137

P 713-675-3375 F 713-670-7629

Hot Deli P 281-893-0423 F 281-893-9368

P 936-291-1125 F 936-291-2421 Hot Deli

Q Eats

P 512-746-4341

P 956-717-5006 F 956-725-0156

Hot Deli P 956-712-3265 F 956-791-3057

Hot Deli P 806-744-0539 F 806-744-7423

P 432-563-1683 F 432-563-1748

P 877-561-8432

P 432-563-1365

P 830-629-1424 F 830-629-1254

UTAH 509 BEAVER 6 150 I-15, Exit 112 653 West 1400 North, 84713 892 GREEN RIVER WEST WINDS TRUCK STOP 5 100 I-70, Exit 164 1085 East Main St., 84525

Roberto’s Taco Shop

P 435-438-5191

West Winds Restaurant

P 435-564-3495 F 435-564-8162

Hot Deli P 801-508-7400 F 801-508-7404

Hot Deli P 435-623-2400 F 435-623-2421

Hot Deli P 801-936-1408 F 801-936-1457

P 801-731-2900 F 801-731-2380

Hot Deli P 801-399-5577 F 801-399-9353

Hot Deli P 435-723-9999

Hot Deli P 435-896-5050 F 435-896-4044

Hot Deli P 801-972-3711 F 801-972-6174

P 435-758-2345

Hot Deli P 435-872-8181 F 435-872-8171

Hot Deli P 801-489-3622 F 801-489-3059

Hot Deli P 435-674-7104 F 435-652-3627

Hot Deli P 435-723-1010 F 435-723-1044

VIRGINIA 749 CARMEL CHURCH DEF 239 15 RV DUMP I-95 Exit 104 24279 Roger Clark Blvd., 22546 256 DANVILLE 3 45 Hwy 58 & 29, Exit 104 110 River Point Drive, 24541 898 EMPORIA SADLER’S TRUCK STOP 10 250 I-95, Exit 11B 918 West Atlantic Street, 23847 750 FT. CHISWELL DEF 270 14 I-81 & I-77 Exit 80 I-81, I-77 & VA Route 52, 24360

Hot Deli P 804-448-9047 F 804-448-9805

P 434-792-1180 F 434-792-7894 Hot Deli

P 434-634-4312 F 434-634-5397

Hot Deli P 276-637-4115 F 276-637-6968

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 2 C H A L L E N G E 79


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AT STORES LISTED WITH A YELLOW TAG

FLYING J DEALER PILOT LOCATIONS LOCATIONS LOCATIONS

VIRGINIA (CONT.) 396 GREENVILLE 11  DEF 100 I-81S, Exit 213A;I-81 N, Exit 213 3541 Lee Jackson Highway, 24401 491 HARRISONBURG DEF 100 7 I-81m Exit 251, 22802 3634 North Valley Pike, 22802 384 RICHMOND 9  DEF 110 I-95 N, Exit 58; I-95 S, Exit 58B 2126 Ruffin Mill Road, 23834 876 RUTHER GLEN RUTHER GLEN TRVL PLZ DEF 250 22 I-95, Exit 104 23866 Rogers Clark Blvd, 22546 899 SOUTH HILL (BRACY) SADLER’S TRK. STP. 20 0 I-85, Exit 12A 1011 East Atlantic Street, 23970 159 TALLYSVILLE 4 60 I-64, Exit 211 6721 Emmaus Church Road 23140 258 TROUTVILLE 3 I-81, Exit 150A or B 2966 Lee Highway South, 24175 752 WINCHESTER DEF 144 15 RV DUMP I-81 Exit 323 1530 Rest Church Road, 22624 754 WYTHEVILLE 15 177 RV DUMP I-77 & I-81 Exit 77 3249 Chapman Rd, 24382

1678 Main Street #3, 98248 970 PASCO (SPOKANE) FLYING J/BROADWAY 2 75 U.S. Hwy 395 2216 E Hillsboro Road, 99301 963 SPOKANE FLYING J/BROADWAY 2 2 I-90 Exit 276 3709 S. Geiger Blvd., 99224 967 SPOKANE FLYING J/BROADWAY 7 80 I-90 Exit 286 6606 E. Broadway Ave., 99212 151 TUMWATER DEF 100 7 I-5, Exit 99 2430 93rd Avenue SW, 98512

P 540-324-0714 F 540-324-0718

P 540-434-2529 F 540-434-2076

P 804-524-9556 F 804-524-9522

Hot Deli P 804-448-8419 F 804-448-8350

Hot Deli P 434-447-4528 F 434-447-4582

P 804-966-1880

F (804) 966-1986

P 540-992-2805 F 540-992-1534

Hot Deli P 540-678-3641 F 540-678-3651

Hot Deli P 276-228-7110 F 276-228-9010

Hot Deli P 509-925-6161 F 509-925-5748

P 360-213-1822 F 360-312-1851

P 509-547-5561 F 509-547-4570

Hot Deli P 509-456-8843

Hot Deli P 509-535-3028 F 509-535-7589

P 360-754-0151 F 360-754-0159

WEST VIRGINIA 243 NITRO 6 60 I-64 & SR 25, Exit 45 4304 First Avenue, 25143



SHOWERS

AUTO SHOWERS

#

DEF

PARKING

WEST VIRGINIA (CONT.) Hot Deli

WASHINGTON 965 ELLENSBURG FLYING J/BROADWAY 100 7 I-90 Exit 109 2300 Canyon Rd., 98926 583 FERNDALE 4 25

#

P 304-755-8654 F 304-755-8655

80 C H A L L E N G E O C T O B E R 2 0 1 2

WYOMING (CONT.)

503 MORGANTOWN DEF 50 5 I-79, Exit 146 2309 Smithton Rd, 26508

Hot Deli P 304-284-8518 F 304-284-8509

WISCONSIN 289 BELOIT 5 55 I-43/90 & WI 81, Exit 185A 3001 Milwaukee Road, 53511 756 BLACK RIVER FALLS DEF 150 14 RV DUMP I-94 & Exit 116 780 State Hwy 54, 54615 528 COTTAGE GROVE ROAD RANGER DEF 50 2 I-90, Exit 147 2762 County Hwy N, 53527 544 EAST TROY ROAD RANGER 5 0 I-43, Exit 38 1946 A. Energy Drive, 53120 164 MAUSTON 7  95 I-90/94 & WI 82, Exit 69 1101 State Road 82 East, 53948 40 OAK CREEK 8  DEF 150 I-94, Exit 322 2031 West Ryan Road, 53154 538 OAKDALE ROAD RANGER DEF 100 5 I-90, Exit 48 102 E Woody, 54660 324 RACINE (FRANKSVILLE) DEF 80 5 I-94 & CR K, Exit 329 13712 Northwestern Avenue, 53126

P 608-364-3644 F 608-364-3643

Hot Deli

308 LARAMIE DEF 100 8 I-80 & Curtis St., Exit 310 1564 McCue Street, 82072 763 RAWLINS DEF 200 11 RV DUMP I-80 Exit 209 I-80 Johnson Rd., 82301 764 ROCK SPRINGS 84 8 RV DUMP I-80 Exit 104 650 Stage Coach Drive, 82901

P 307-742-6443 F 307-742-2576

Hot Deli P 307-328-0158 F 307-328-1668

Hot Deli P 307-362-4231 F 307-362-9710

P 715-284-4341 F 715-284-1551

P 815-580-4842

CANADA ALBERTA , CANADA

F 608-873-1610

813 AB-AIRDRIE 10 0

P 815-315-4979

85 East Lake Cres., T4B 2B5 792 AB-BROOKS 2 20

P 608-847-3321

1260 Cassils Road East, T1R 1B7 785 AB-CALGARY 128 9

P 414-761-0939

11511 40th Street SE, T2H 1L4 793 AB-CALGARY 2 15

F 847-232-1186

F 608-847-3316

F 414-761-0165

P 815-209-9040

4216 72 Ave SE, T2C 2C1 814 AB-CALGARY 0 0

P 262-835-2292

2525 23 ST N. E., T2E 7M1 848 AB-CALGARY 9 80

F 608-374-2001

F 262-835-2564

WYOMING 758 CASPER 45 4 RV DUMP I-25 Exit 185 41 SE Wyoming Blvd., 82609 402 CHEYENNE DEF 120 10 RV DUMP I-80, Exit 367 8020 Campstool Road, 82007 759 CHEYENNE DEF 180 16 RV DUMP I-25 Exit 7 2250 Etchepare Drive, 82007 760 COKEVILLE 4 90 RV DUMP US Hwy 30/SR 232 10501 US Hwy 30, 83114 141 EVANSTON 7  DEF 75 I-80, Exit 6 289 Bear River Drive, 82930 761 EVANSTON 9 80 I-80 Exit 3 1920 Harrison Drive, 82930 762 GILLETTE 4 50 RV DUMP I-90 & Hwy 59 1810 South Douglas Hwy, 82718

RV DUMP

RESTAURANTS OUTLINED IN A RED BOX DO NOT ACCEPT MYREWARDS POINTS

P 307-473-1750 F 307-473-1759

Hot Deli P 307-635-5744 F 307-635-5746

Hot Deli P 307-635-2918 F 307-634-2794

Hot Deli P 307-279-3050 F 307-279-3041

P 307-783-5930 F 307-783-5916

Hot Deli P 307-789-9129 F 307-789-5461

Hot Deli P 307-682-3562 F 307-682-5038

4949 Barlow Trail Se, T2B3B5 815 AB-DRAYTON VALLEY 0 0 5505 Jubilee Ave., T7A 1S3 816 AB-EDMONTON 0 0 15609 121 A. Ave, T5V 1B1 850 AB-EDMONTON 8 100 16806 118 Avenue, T5V1M8 818 AB-EDSON MOTCO 0 0 2520 - 2 Ave., T7E 1T9 819 AB-FORT MCMURRAY 0 0 345 Sakitawaw Trail, T9H 4E4 820 AB-GRANDE PRAIRIE 0 0 9212 - 108 St., T8V 4C9 845 AB-GRASSLAND 2 75 1st Ave. 1st Street, TOA 1V0

P 403-948-4193

P 403-362-5594

P 403-720-0904 F 403-720-4937

Hot Deli P 403-236-2404

P 403-250-3835 Hot Deli

J’s Wok and Grill

P 403-569-6250 F 403-235-5095

P 801-725-1370

P 708-413-9116

P 780-455-1111 F 780-482-4448

P 780-723-4744

P 780-743-3545

P 780-532-2378 Eldorado Restaurant

P 780-525-2295 F 780-525-2299

w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m


DOUBLE MYREWARDS POINTS

AT STORES LISTED WITH A YELLOW TAG

FLYING J DEALER PILOT LOCATIONS LOCATIONS LOCATIONS

ALBERTA , CANADA (CONT.) 846 AB-HANNA 100 2 Hwy 9 & Hwy 36 South, T0J 1P0 794 AB-HIGH LEVEL 25 0 10529 96 St., T0H 1Z0 817 AB-HINTON 0 0 294 Kelly Road, T7V 1H2 821 AB-LETHBRIDGE 0 0 1005 43 St, T1K 7B8 822 AB-LLOYDMINSTER 12 2 5109 63 St Ave, T9V 2E7 869 AB-NANTON 3 130 Hwy #2 2810 21st Ave., T0L 1R0 795 AB-NISKU 2 8 302 20th Avenue, T9E 7T8 796 AB-RED DEER 4 26

Cactus Corner Cafe

P 403-854-5000

Hot Deli P 780-926-2066

P 801-725-1370

P 403-328-4735

P 780-875-2990

Humpty’s Restaurant

P 403-646-2810 F 403-646-2872

Hot Deli P 780-955-3535

Hot Deli P

67th Ave. & 67 Street, T4P 1A4 826 AB-REDCLIFF 0 0 115 Lockwood St, T1A 7T9 797 AB-RYCROFT 0 8 Hwy #49 & Hwy #2 Hwy #49 & 2, Box 73, T0H 3A0 786 AB-SHERWOOD PARK 9 142 Yellowhead Hwy 16/ Broadmoor Blvd. 50 Pembina Rd., T8H 2G9 824 AB-WHITECOURT 0 0 Hwy #43 & West Mtn. Road, T7N 1S9

Hot Deli

403-346-2785

F 403-346-2852

P 403-526-2669

Hot Deli P 780-765-3740 F 780-765-3748

Hot Deli

#



SHOWERS

AUTO SHOWERS

#

DEF

PARKING

BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA (CONT.)

ONTARIO, CANADA (CONT.)

830 BC-DAWSON CREEK 0 2

807 ON-MISSISSAUGA 80 3

1725 Alaska Ave, V1G 1P5 800 BC-FORT ST JOHN 0 0 Alaska Hwy & 109 St. 9407 109th Street, V1J 6K6 847 BC-KAMLOOPS 125 5 175 Kokanee Way, V2C 6Z2 831 BC-MERRITT 0 0 1885 Cold Water Ave. 2190 Douglas Street North, V0K 2B0 832 BC-NEW WESTMINSTER 0 1 24 Braid St, V3L 3P3 801 BC-PRINCE GEORGE 3 0 4869 Continental Way, V2N 5S5 802 BC-VANCOUVER 0 0 8655 Boundary Rd & Marine Way, V5S 4H3

P 250-782-3111

P 250-785-3052

Hot Deli P 250-573-3032 F 205-573-7828

P 250-280-1555

P 604-522-6511

P 250-563-1677

P 604-454-9578

MANITOBA, CANADA 788 MB-HEADINGLEY DEF 150 9 Hwy #1 & Camp Manitou Rd. 4100 Portage Avenue, R4H 1C5 803 MB-PORTAGE LA PRAIRIE 40 0 Hwy #1 East, R1N 3B2 804 MB-WINNIPEG 0 2

P 780-416-2035 F 780-416-2084

1747 Brookside Blvd., R2C 2E8 835 MB-WINNIPEG 0 0

P 780-706-0471

131 Warman Road & HWY. #59, R2J 3R3

827 BC-ABBOTSFORD 1 0 929 Coutts Way & Sumas Way, V2S 4N2 798 BC-ANNACIS ISLAND 1 4 1291 Cliveden Ave, V5M 6G4 799 BC-CHILLIWACK 2 21 7970 Lickman Road, V2R 1A9 828 BC-CRANBROOK 0 0 2209 Theatre Road, V1C 4H4 829 BC-CRESTON 0 0 1411 Northwest Blvd, V0B 1G6 w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m

P 604-850-1594

Hot Deli P 604-521-4445

Hot Deli P 604-795-7265

P 250-426-3763

P 250-428-7131

862 ON-AYR 30 5 Hwy 401, Exit 268 2492 Cedar Creek Road, N0B 1E0 805 ON-ETOBICOKE 0 0 1765 Albion Rd & Hwy 27, M9W 5S7 806 ON-KAPUSKASING 4 40 410 Government Road E, P5N 2X7 852 ON-LANCASTER DEF 110 9 Hwy 401, Exit 814 20382 Old Hwy #2, K0C 1N0 789 ON-LONDON DEF 230 15 Hwy 401 & Highbury Ave. Exit 189 3700 Highbury Ave. South, N6N 1P3

1400 Britannia Rd, L4W 1C8 790 ON-NAPANEE DEF 165 15 401 & Cnty Rd 41 Exit 579 628 County Road #41 RR6, K7R 3L1 865 ON-PICKERING 50 9 Hwy 401 200 Clements Road, L1W 4A1 838 ON-SAULT STE MARIE 0 0 987 Great Northern Road, P6A 5K7 836 ON-SCHREIBER 0 0 Hwy # 17, P0T 2S0 837 ON-SUDBURY 0 0 17 Duhamel Road, P3E 4N1 461 ON-TILBURY DEF 150 6 Rural Route #5, Highway 401, Exit 56 19325 Essex County Road 42, N0P 2L0

P 905-564-6216

Hot Deli P 613-354-7044 F 613-354-3796 Coffee Shop

P 905-428-9700 F 905-428-9633

P 705-759-8280

P 807-824-2383

P 705-692-5447

P 519-682-1140 F 519-682-9221

QUEBEC, CANADA Hot Deli P 204-832-8952 F 204-832-9104

P 204-857-9997

P 204-633-0663

P 204-231-5485

ONTARIO, CANADA BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA

RV DUMP

RESTAURANTS OUTLINED IN A RED BOX DO NOT ACCEPT MYREWARDS POINTS

Papa Joe’s Hot Kettle P 519-624-9578 F 519-624-2587

P 416-674-8665

Hot Deli P 705-337-1333 F 705-337-1208

Hot Deli P 613-347-2221 F 613-347-1970

Hot Deli P 519-686-9154

F 519-686-8629

840 QC-BERNIERES 0 0 1196 Chemin Des Olivieres, G7A 2M6 808 QC-BERTHIERVILLE 10 1181 Ave Gilles Villeneuve, J0K 1A0 809 QC-NAPIERVILLE 10 Hwy 15 Exit 21 1 Rang St-Andre, J0J 1L0 810 QC-STE HELENE 4 10 HWY 20, Exit 152 569 Rue Principale, J0H 1M0 787 QC-VAUDREUIL-DORION DEF 109 9 Hwy 540, Exit 3 2900 Boul. De la Gare, J7V 9J5

P 418-831-3772

P 450-836-6581

P 450-245-3539 F 450-245-9642

P 450-791-2232 F 450-791-2495

Hot Deli P 450-424-1610 F 450-424-0368

SASKATCHEWAN, CANADA 811 SK-MOOSE JAW 4 20 370 North Service Rd. Hwy #11, S6H 4N9 842 SK-REGINA 3 12 1511 Ross Ave. East, S4R 1J2 791 SK-SASKATOON DEF 85 4 3850 Idylwylde Drive North, S7P 0A1 844 SK-YORKTON 2 0 Hwy #16A Bypass on York 1910 York Road West Box 794, S3N 2W8

Hot Deli P 306-693-5858

P 306-721-0070

P 306-955-6840 F 306-955-6846

P 801-726-8288

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 2 C H A L L E N G E 81


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October 2012 - Challenge Magazine