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MAY 2013

Trucking in China Culture Shift Kentucky Derby And They’re Off … colin cowherd hear me out www.ptcchallenge.com

DARIUS RUCKER

True Believer


COVER PHOTO: JIM WRIGHT Photo: CHRIS HOLLO

darius rucker

cover & features

contents may 2013 • volume 9 issue 5

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TRUCKING IN CHINA

Rachel Katz spent 10 months traveling with truck drivers in China and found the challenges drivers face half a world away aren’t so different from our own.

DARIUS RUCKER

The former front man of the pop group Hootie & the Blowfish started his country music career five years ago. As he readies to release his third album this month, Rucker reflects on his musical transition.

RACE MONTH: The inside TRACK

The Indy 500 happens at the end of the month, but that doesn’t keep Indianapolis from starting the celebration early with a slew of events leading up to the “Greatest Spectacle in Sports.”

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Hear Me Out

Colin Cowherd has an opinion on, well, just about everything. His daily talk show on ESPN Radio is the pulpit for his sometimes controversial but always insightful commentary on our nation’s obsession with sports.

KENTUCKY DERBY

Ask any horse enthusiast what’s the crown jewel of the sport and the Derby is the only answer. But it’s a hard, arduous and rewarding road to the starting gate of the “Greatest Two Minutes in Sports.”

Trucker Movies

Not all trucker movies are the same. From Humphrey Bogart to Sylvester Stallone, this list offers the best, well, at least some of the most interesting trucker movies ever made.

RV Journey

Submerge yourself in the Lost Sea and Chad looks up, way up, to ponder an engineering marvel. sponsored by:

Challenge Magazine’s QR Code

Download a free QR reader and scan this QR Code to get a direct link to our website where you’ll find a full electronic version of the magazine and links to our Facebook and Twitter pages.

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m a y 2 0 1 3 C H A L L E N G E 5


contents in every issue

may 2013 • volume 9 issue 5

51

TRUCKER TRAINER

53

gettin’ outdoors

54

around the track

56

driving thrU d.c.

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CHEW ON THIS

Trucking companies are always looking for healthy drivers. Bob offers some tips on selling a healthy version of you.

Brenda reminisces on her first fishing adventure and how perspectives change with time.

Claire takes us ringside, er, actually trackside during some of NASCAR’s more exciting post-race activities.

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Mike wonders where all the FMCSA success stories have gone.

Charles sees the benefits of a tortoise-like method to losing weight.

from the editor Horsing around.

letters to the editor

Readers share their thoughts and opinions on industry issues and stories from Challenge Magazine.

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SHORT RUNS

Broadening the mind with the interesting and inane.

Truck Driver Challenge

Peter Jellen, winner of the 2007 Truck Driver Challenge, shares his thoughts on life as a transport driver and how he spent his prize money.

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The Unique U.S.

America’s culinary successes must start with the burger in all its different varieties.

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sponsored by:

truckers’ corner

The creative side of truck drivers.

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Games

64

garmin gallery

Sudoku, word search and crossword puzzles. Some clues for the puzzle come from this issue of Challenge Magazine. Pictures from the road. Send in your photos and see them published in Challenge Magazine and you may be a winner.

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sponsored by:

pilot flying j stars

Drivers recognize these STAR employees who make Pilot Flying J a place you can rely on.

what’s happening

Grand opening of casual dining at Pilot

Flying J.

pilot flying j directory

The comprehensive Pilot Flying J directory lists everything from location addresses to services available.

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LOYALTY

Driver profile and new restaurant loyalty

rewards.

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may 2013 volume 9 issue 5

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horsing around by greg girard he last and only time I’ve been on a horse was during a tour in Hawaii for my honeymoon. The tour advertisement lauded a peaceful horse ride through the unique forests of Kauai, a swim at a waterfall, a relaxing lunch and an equally tranquil ride back to the ranch at the end of the day. Sounds nice, right? What they failed to mention was a horse named Tiger. For this particular tour, the guides lined us up across a picketed line of horses and, depending on the person’s weight and size, began matching each person with a horse. My very new wife was one of the first picked and she was matched with a calm, peaceful mare named Daisy. Tiger and I were the last to be matched up, and let’s just say it was a match made somewhere besides heaven. I should have known when the guide described Tiger with a little too perky “fun” while everyone else’s horse had descriptions like “sweetheart” and “gentle.” Now, I do consider myself pretty good with animals – dogs in particular really like me – so I was confident I could commune with Tiger even after the obnoxious snort he gave me before I climbed on. I figured he’d sense I was a pretty good guy, I’d whisper a few nice things in his ear and we’d get along fine. It turns out, though, that horses can be as stubborn as mules or a particular 3-year-old refusing to try a strawberry. Tiger was like the kid at school who does everything opposite of what the teacher asks just because he was trying to be “fun.” When Tiger wanted a little breakfast of fresh grass along the trail, he stopped. When he wanted a second breakfast, he stopped. When he wanted an early morning snack, a mid-morning snack, a late … well, you get the idea. Once we finally did catch up with the rest of the group, Tiger, belly full, decided it was playtime and took it upon himself to try to bite the back end of every other horse that came near him. A lot of bucking, panicked riders and rather offensive glares pointed in my direction ensued. Even my brand-new wife started pretending she didn’t know me. Back from the waterfall, Tiger and I were asked to ride away from the rest of the pack and, well, let’s just say horse and rider weren’t on speaking terms by the end of the day. He may have taken offense from some of my whisperings that can’t really be repeated. Luckily, the jockeys that ride in the Kentucky Derby have a better relationship with their horses than I had with Tiger. Jerry Seinfeld, when asked what he thought horses were thinking during the race, said, “They must get to the end and go, ‘We were just here. What’s the point of that?’” Purists, however, will say the horses know when it’s the Derby. Big hats, mint juleps and the “Call to the Post” trumpet all lead up to the “Greatest Two Minutes in Sports” (Page 39). I don’t know if Tiger is still taking tourists to that waterfall. He was old and it was a long time ago, so he might be feasting on greener pastures now. Anyway, dogs still like me. Safe driving.

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Truckers’ Corner

Accidents

Just wanted to send you a note of thanks for printing my short story in Truckers’ Corner for March. I picked up a copy yesterday and was reading during lunch when I began reading “Reflections.” OMG, I said, that’s my story. That’s my story! I was so excited. I truly enjoy reading the stories and poems each month and wanted to let you know it’s my favorite section of the magazine. Keep up the great work. We drivers appreciate it more than you know. Thanks again. Angela McPherson Atlanta

My husband has been hit twice now in parking lots of truck stops within days of each other. The first time someone had scratched the bumper of his truck and left yellow paint. The second time someone moved the mirrors and damaged the right side fender hood. Neither time did anyone stop to see if they could contact him. How hard is it to call the company and say, “I hit one of your trucks. Here’s the number of the truck’”or even go into the truck stop to have the driver paged? A little common sense can be used. Come on now, you hit a truck or you scraped a truck, don’t tell me you didn’t know you did it. If you are that close, you can see you did it and you can feel it. Too scared to own up to your actions? These drivers are like friends on the road, not enemies. Respect them. I wonder if these are new drivers on probation period or if they are illegal drivers. These trucks you damage are drivers’ homes away from home and they are expensive pieces of equipment. What if you did this and the driver was sleeping and got hurt and couldn’t get out of the truck? What then? Come on, truckers, if you hit another truck by accident don’t take off, be a man or woman, own up to it. Hit and run is a crime. It’s not just for four-wheelers, even if you’re in a truck stop parking lot. Rebecca Morrison Wildwood, Fla.

Owner-operators vs. company drivers Some people call us drivers “cowboys,” but you owner-operators are the outlaws of the profession. Very few of you pay any attention to traffic signs that tell you what lane trucks can travel in. Almost all of you ride right up on the rear of cars that you think are going too slow for you. Seems like you all have no speed limit except as fast as it goes. I can’t wait until the day the government mandates all trucks have to be governed at 65 mph. “All” means you guys, too! What then? Are you going to quit or strike? Good, it will improve the image of the professional driver if you guys aren’t out there on the road destroying the image. They should do a study and find out how many severe accidents are caused by owner-operators compared with company drivers. How are the e-logs working out for you? Poor guys, you can’t cheat them. But no doubt you found a way around them to break that law also. The day we all have to travel at 60 or 65 mph will be the day the herd is thinned out. I, for one, can’t wait for that day. Michael Rose Morristown, Pa.

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SHORT

RUNS We Asked,

You Answered! Q What is your biggest on-the-road pet peeve?

Mine would be when four-wheelers change lanes in front of you and there might be a car’s length between you and no blinker. – Peggy Ballow

Unsafe and unpredictable driving caused by drivers distracted by phones or doing something other than paying attention. I’ve seen them reading, using makeup, shaving, etc. – Barry Starr

Truck drivers not being professional. I like the idea of looking nice and representing yourself in a professional manner. – Brandon Henderson

A Closer Look: The Indy 500 With the weather calling us outdoors and maybe even a road trip or two, let’s meander to the Hoosier State, home of the Indy 500. The race, held over Memorial Day weekend, attracts more than 250,000 spectators every year, making it the largest single-day sporting event in the world. Let’s take a closer look at “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing.”

Bob tails parking in a regular stall where there is parking specifically for them. – Adrian Hoesli

“Professional” drivers who are anything but professional. – Eric Lanspa

Churchill Downs, Yankee Stadium, the Rose Bowl, the Roman Coliseum and Vatican City all can fit inside the Indianapolis Motor Speedway oval, which covers 253 acres. The first event held at the speedway was a helium gas-filled balloon competition. The initial surface, laid in March 1909, was composed of crushed stone and a tarry substance called asphaltum. Six months later, the track was resurfaced with 3.2 million paving bricks, giving it the name “The Brickyard.” The original bricks still lie at the start/finish line. When looking for a suitable location, founders of the IMS considered the resort town of  French Lick, Ind. Can you imagine watching The French Lick 500? Maybe Larry Bird can. A tradition starting in 1936, thanks to milk-loving three-time champion Louis Meyer and a clever milk industry executive, the Indianapolis 500 winner drinks milk in Victory Lane. Indy cars accelerate from 0 mph to 100 mph in 4 seconds. In 1911, Ray Harroun won with an average speed of 75 mph.

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Distracted drivers, both big rigs and fourwheelers, and drivers who pull off the shoulder from a dead stop right in front of you. It doesn’t seem to occur to them that we might not be able to change lanes or slow down fast enough to not hit them. – Christina Prentice-Duncan

Q

What is your best timesaving tip as a driver?

Post your answers on our Facebook page or send them to editor@ptcchallenge.com by May 31, 2013. All answers are subject to edits.

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By the Numbers: The Penny “See a penny, pick it up. All day long, you’ll have good luck.” May 23 is Lucky Penny Day, a day to give that lowly 1-cent piece its due. Whether you love or hate the penny, at least for now it’s here to stay.

1943

The year that the penny was made of zinc-coated steel rather than copper because of World War II metal demands.

20

Number of pennies, in millions, minted each day – about 7.4 billion annually.

66

Percent of all pennies in circulation that are somehow lost.

14

Average number of coins people carry at any given time.

220 100,000 1.26

Number of years the penny has been minted. Worth, in dollars, of the most valuable penny: the 1944 Steel Wheat Penny that bears no mint mark and was released by error into circulation. Cents it costs to produce one penny, making it cost more than its face value. Sources: International Journal of Economics and Finance, cointrackers.com, retirethepenny.org

GET HEALTHY Truck Driver Breaks Stereotypes, Dances off 100 Pounds John Drury knows a thing or two about the difficulties of driving a truck and losing weight. The 6’7” driver reached 400 pounds due to long hours behind the wheel and fast-food meals. He knew something had to change, so in late 2011 he entered a “Biggest Loser” style weight-loss competition sponsored by a local radio show and was chosen as one of the participants. For three months, he worked with a nutritionist and a personal trainer and used a gym. “I still had to do the work,” he says. “I still had to drive a truck full time, 60 to 70 hours a week.” Drury lost 54 pounds in three months, a stepping stone in his struggle with the extra weight. After the contest, Drury continued going to the gym and looked at classes to help break up the monotony. Zumba classes caught his eye. “I’ve always been a dancer at heart,” he says. “I did break dancing when I was younger. Music has always been there. I’ve always had the gift of rhythm. I don’t go out clubbing anymore. This was my way to dance still and continue my weight-loss journey.” Now Drury is a certified Zumba instructor and even quit driving for a period to start his

own Big John’s Fitness Hour. “Nothing was going to stop me,” he says. “I was that determined to pay it forward. It was a leap of faith and ultimately it didn’t work out.” He doesn’t let that get him down, though. John went back to trucking. He’s a local driver who works Monday through Friday, affording him time to teach dance fitness on the weekends. He knows firsthand the challenges over-the-road drivers face. His advice to drivers is simple. “Eat a lot of Subway and walk,” he says. “Anything is better than sitting at a dock door for six or seven hours, which I’ve done. I’d get in three or four miles while my load’s getting unloaded.” Ultimately he believes that weight loss doesn’t start with exercise. “It really comes from above the shoulders. Once they believe they can lose the weight, they will.” His journey isn’t over. With a goal weight of 260 pounds, “Big John” has 50 pounds to go. With his hard work and dedication, he should be there in no time.

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he driver, Li, had just set out from Wuhan, the capital of Hubei province in central China, when rain and slippery roads caused an accident that shattered his windshield. In order to deliver his load on time, Li covered the windshield with cardboard and resumed his journey, leaning out his window to see around the cardboard to the road ahead. Occasionally, when he needed a break from the awkward position, he pulled his head back into the cab and “relied on feel to determine the direction of driving.” He drove several hundred miles like this before police pulled him over. “The police tried to look out front through the cardboard, and they simply couldn’t see any part of the road in front of them,” China News Net reported. They required Li to have the windshield replaced at the nearest service station, which, to those familiar with the Chinese trucking industry, may be the most surprising part of this story. It’s “a rare example of road policing actually improving safety on the road,” according to Rachel Katz, who spent 10 months in 2010 and 2011 researching China’s trucking industry on a Fulbright scholarship. Katz, who studied international relations with a focus on economic development in China at Brown University, chose to study Chinese truckers because “the instability and ‘stuckness’ that characterize drivers’ lives represent similar conditions of a larger

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driving in china by: jennifer kirby

group of workers in China who run the country’s factories, construction crews and restaurants,” she says. “Getting to know truckers is a personal way to look at the lives of this large segment of China’s population.” Her original plan was to conduct her research by interviewing drivers at truck stops and shipping hubs near the city of Chengdu, the capital of Sichuan province, where she was based. It made sense on paper, but in practice presented a couple of issues. One was the language barrier – she spoke Chinese pretty well, but wasn’t totally fluent, and there were dialects and accents to contend with. Another was the fact that the drivers didn’t open up to her in that sort of setting; there was no chance to establish trust. So she shifted gears, so to speak, and got the idea to start riding along with longhaul truckers, immersing herself in their world. When Katz, who was 23 at the time, discussed it with her parents, “they were great,” she says. “They were both kind of

adventurous when they were young too, so they were nervous but supportive” of the idea. She arranged to keep the head of her program informed of her trip routes via daily texts, and she set up a Twitter account so she could tweet her whereabouts to people back home. Every detail of her first long-haul trip, a “test run” of just a couple hundred miles, was laid out before she stepped foot in the cab. Unconventional research method though it was, hitchhiking served Katz’s purposes perfectly. She found that “in terms of ethnographic research it was a dream come true. [Drivers are] stuck in a truck with you, and they’re happy because they get bored.” She also welcomed the challenge hitchhiking presented in cross-cultural relationship building. “As an American female, I am different from the trucking community in almost every way,” she says. “Asking the favor of a ride and getting to know individuals in this group [was] a test of personal diplomacy.” All told, she spent six months hitchhiking her way across and around central and southeast China in trucks, covering about m a y 2 0 1 3 C H A L L E N G E 17


8,000 miles and riding with more than 30 drivers. “Although some couldn’t understand why on earth I would want to ride along in their trucks, almost all were quick to take me on as their charge and concern themselves with the task of keeping me safe and comfortable,” she says. “Every driver I rode with insisted on buying me a meal or a snack.”

A Series of ‘Money Sinks’

Katz relates the life of a Chinese trucker to a board game, with a start, a finish and a series of “money sinks” in between. “Each trip, drivers alight with a sum of cash and strategize through the maze trying to reach the finish line with some cash still in their pockets,” she says. Most trucks in China are driven by owner-operators from rural areas who use their personal and family life savings to buy a truck. They hire a co-driver, usually someone from the same hometown, and the two alternate sleeping and driving, hauling all kinds of goods, from “steel to pineapples to pigs.” Owner-operators go home at most once or twice a month, and sometimes as little as once a year, for the Chinese New Year. Owner-operators generally find loads at local freight markets; loads are contracted on a per-trip basis. Intermediary companies “For truckers, every day is a balance between pushing the vehicle to its profithave established relationships with area fac- maximizing limit, and not pushing it so far that it breaks down permanently,” says Katz.

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tories and access to websites where the factories list goods they want to ship. Intermediaries bid on each shipment, and factories choose the lowest bid. That intermediary then posts the shipment details, typically on a chalkboard, at the freight markets, and interested truckers bid for the load. The lowest bidder gets the load, and the intermediary keeps the difference between the trucker’s bid and his own bid with the factory. Katz describes the intermediary companies as “unregulated and low-tech, some operating with no computer.” Although this “data collection center” plays an essential role in the Chinese trucking industry, intermediaries’ “privileged networks and secret price negotiations with factories allow them to squeeze the juice out of the market and leave the drivers pretty much dry,” she says.

Hurry Up and Wait

After a shipment is contracted, the loading process is slow; drivers routinely wait hours or days before leaving. Goods are often loaded by hand onto flat beds, then covered with tarps and tied with rope in a one- to two-hour process. The entire loading process involves a lot of waiting, and parking is a major, and unavoidable, expense for Chinese truckers. Once on the road, drivers are focused on avoiding another money pit: tickets. Drivers are subject to three separate policing authorities that have overlapping responsibilities but don’t coordinate among themselves. On most trips a driver pays multiple fines, out of his pocket, for overloading and other common violations. All of this contributes to China’s notoriously inefficient trucking industry – Katz once sat with drivers in a parking lot for six hours so they could go through a checkpoint after police had left – and has for the most part no positive impact on road safety. One driver told Katz, “In the U.S., you issue tickets in order to control traffic. In China, we control traffic in order to issue tickets.” She rode through a town in which the police department fined all trucks a flat rate, without an inspection or even discussion, under the assumption that there were infractions. “What if everything is legal?” Katz asked her driver. “They’ll be able to find something wrong,” he replied. Tolls, which are paid by drivers but rolled into the price of shipping, are another substantial on-the-road expense; China has two-thirds of the world’s tolled miles of road. Excessive tolls and ticketing have given rise to the practice of hiring “dailu,” locals who guide trucks through back roads to avoid checkpoints and toll roads.

A Vicious Cycle

Because they must be versatile enough to handle all kinds of cargo, altered trucks – and oversized loads – are ubiquitous, Katz says. This is hard on the trucks and makes frequent maintenance unavoidable, but, lacking the funds to invest in high-quality parts, drivers often make repairs with cheap or used ones. “Trucking is not a profession that offers much opportunity for saving and they have little or no insurance, so if the truck gets messed up, even if the driver isn’t hurt, his livelihood is in jeopardy,” Katz says. “For truckers, every day is a balance between pushing the vehicle to its profit-maximizing limit, and not pushing it so far that it breaks down permanently.” It’s uncommon for Chinese drivers to buy a second truck to grow their business. This is partly because it’s hard to save enough money to buy an additional truck, but also because drivers seem to believe that “managing a second truck will be more trouble than it’s worth.” Katz describes long-haul trucking in China as an industry in which drivers are “stuck” once they enter. “They have virtually

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no opportunities to move up or away from their position,” she says, and “among the drivers there is a general sense of helplessness.” The ones she met who had achieved some measure of success were those who had figured out how to build a life within the system. She took three trips with one man who has been driving the same route between his hometown and the city of Chengdu for more than 20 years. A dozen or so men from his hometown followed suit, driving the same route, often in caravans. Someone else from his town opened a small motel in Chengdu, where they all stay when they’re there. “They help each other with breakdowns and share cigarettes and celebrate birthdays on the road. The long waiting periods turn into card games and leisurely meals,” Katz says. “They also share connections and help each other find loads, easing slightly the stress of the near profitless industry and creating a semblance of a larger organization in this extremely fragmented industry.” Rachel Katz is writing a book about her time in China, “Long Haul China: Hitchhiking Diplomacy.” Check her blog, www.longhaulchina.com, for publication and launch updates.

Freight markets are often where Chinese owner-operators find their next job.

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by: pam windsor

fter months of hard work on his latest album, Darius Rucker says he’s so excited that he’s having a hard time waiting for its May 21 release. “I’m really proud of it,” he explains. “I think it’s the best work I’ve done and once you’ve recorded it, like it always is, it’s hard not to put it out. I just want people to hear it and see what they think.” “True Believers” marks Rucker’s third country album, one he describes as brighter and with more of a country slant. Rucker wrote or co-wrote 10 of the 12 songs on the record. One that’s not an original, a cover of Old Crow Medicine Show’s jukebox standard “Wagon Wheel,” generated significant early buzz and has been getting a lot of radio play. Lady Antebellum joins Rucker on vocals and the video features Lady A’s Charles Kelley, as well as members of A&E’s “Duck Dynasty” family, the Robertsons. Rucker says he got the idea to do “Wagon Wheel” after attending his oldest daughter’s high school talent show. “I’m sitting there and all of

A

a sudden a faculty band gets up and they’ve got a drummer and they start playing a country version of ‘Wagon Wheel.’ I thought, I remember this great, great song.” By the time they got to the chorus, he decided to record it. Rucker initially thought it would be a great song to put at the end of the album but realized “we’re going to have a monster on our hands” after Lady Antebellum added vocals. His latest album comes five years after Rucker, the former singer and lead guitarist for Hootie & the Blowfish, surprised many in Nashville and elsewhere by “going country.” Hootie & the Blowfish dominated the mid1990s pop-rock scene with a string of hits like “Hold My Hand,” “Let Her Cry” and “Only Wanna Be With You.” The four-man group met as freshmen at the University of South Carolina and later hit it big, selling more than 25 million records and capturing two Grammy Awards. For Rucker, there was no conscious decision to switch music genres – he simply wanted to cut a country album.

Growing up in Charleston, S.C., he always liked country music but didn’t think about singing it until he heard Radney Foster’s “Del Rio, Texas 1959.” The opportunity presented itself during a Hootie hiatus. “It started when Hootie decided that we were going to take a break and I decided to try and do my country record. I was just going to do it in our little studio with some buddies; I wasn’t looking for a record deal because I didn’t think I could get one.” Few African-American singers have found success in country music, even fewer pop/rock crossover artists. Some time before Rucker began thinking about his country record, then Capitol Records Nashville President Mike Dungan happened to catch a Hootie & the Blowfish segment on TV. “I wasn’t a fan,” he recalls, “but I thought, that guy (Darius) feels like a country singer to me. He has such a distinctive and unique voice. And people who have worked with me know that is of premium value when I’m looking for artists, somebody who can stand out from the pack. I thought how


Photo: JIM WRIGHT


interesting it would be to make a country record with that guy.” Dungan thought about it, but didn’t follow up until he met with Rucker’s manager to discuss another client. The Darius Rucker/ country record idea came up in conversation and, as they say, the rest is history. And yet, some weren’t so sure about the decision to sign Rucker, “mainly due to the fact that he was coming from Hootie & the Blowfish,” recalls Dungan, now chairman and CEO of Universal Music Nashville. “It was met with a great deal of skepticism from my own company and within the industry. The attitude was, ‘That’s going to be a tough one, you’re going to have to prove it.’” Nashville record producer Frank Rogers, one of those who would help “prove it,” believed in Rucker as a country artist from the moment Dungan mentioned it. “I told him I absolutely get it, it makes total sense to me,” he remembers, and then he added, “You’d better call me if you make a record.” Months later, Rucker’s manager called Rogers and asked if he could get together with Rucker to “write a song or two” and see if they hit it off. “We sat down and within the first 15 minutes, it was like we were long-lost brothers,” recalls Rogers. “We were writing really good songs together and having fun. It was kind of like, yeah, this was meant to be.” Rogers, who has a strong track record producing albums for Brad Paisley, Darryl Worley, Trace Adkins and Phil Vassar, got to work on helping Rucker develop that critical first country album. With “Learn To Live” ready for release, their next big hurdle was country radio. Rucker traveled to more than 100 radio stations and knew going in it would be a tough sell. “I’m the pop guy. I’m going into your room going, ‘Play my record; if not, I understand.’ And they all played it! And when ‘Don’t Think I Don’t Think About It’ went to No. 1 I thought, ‘Oh, I’m going to be here as long as they’ll have me.’” When that first single hit the top of the charts, Rucker became the first African-American to chart a No. 1 country hit since Charley Pride’s “Night Games” in 1983. Rucker says the news that he’d crossed a racial barrier came as a surprise. “To be honest, I didn’t think about that.” And yet, he recognized the achievement as a great honor. “You realize it’s just me and Charley, that’s something to be proud of. Charley Pride is a legend and anytime I get mentioned with him, it’s a great thing.” Pride, who still draws big crowds while touring around the world some 40 years after starting out in country music, says he’s not sure why it took so long for another African-American to reach that level. But he’s happy for Rucker, noting how he recently enjoyed hearing Rucker’s version of “Wagon Wheel” on the radio. “I’m glad for his success. I’ve met him backstage at the Opry. I like his singing and I like him as a person.” Pride, also known for his standout voice, says he’s more of a singer than a writer and appreciates Rucker’s songwriting talents. “I admire guys who can write and sing their own songs.” The second and third singles from Rucker’s first album also went on to reach No. 1. The release of his second album, “Charleston, SC 1966,” two years later would lead to two more No. 1 singles. Rucker says country music has not only accepted him, but embraced him. “When I started recording my first record, I had a few guys come up to me and say, ‘I was just talking to Brad Paisley the other day and he heard some of the tracks off your record and said it’s going to be awesome.’” At the time, Rucker had met Paisley only once. “Then I talked to a few other people and they said, ‘You know, Vince Gill just heard your record and said, Wait for the Darius record.’” Rucker couldn’t believe it. “For Vince and Brad, who were

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legendary, to go out of their way to say something to people in Nashville … that’s pretty cool, because in what other kind of music is that going to happen, you know? I don’t think the Dave Matthews Band is going to tell anybody else, ‘Hey, wait until you hear the next Hootie record,’ you know? It just doesn’t work like that.” There have been many surprises along the way as well, like at the Grand Ole Opry last October. During Rucker’s performance, Brad Paisley stood up during a Q&A session. First question: “Are you still the worst poker player in the world?” The next question: “Would you like to become the newest member of the Grand Ole Opry?” Two weeks later, Rucker was inducted. “When Brad asked me to become a member, it was one of the greatest days of my musical life. That’s something I’ve been working toward and here I am, five years in, becoming a member,” he said. “It’s an awesome feeling for country music to open their arms to me and go, ‘Hey man, you’re part of us now.’” Rucker says country music fits him, allowing him to write the kinds of songs that reflect his life; songs about his wife and three children, and the kinds of everyday things we all face. “When you write country music you’ve got to write

stories. You’ve got to write stories that people can relate to, that people can go, ‘Yeah, I know exactly what you’re talking about.’” He points to his song “It Won’t Be Like This For Long” from his first album about how as parents, you have to appreciate that short period of time when kids need you – and relish the moment – despite the challenges it brings, because that time is fleeting. “You know, there’s nothing like getting a tweet from somebody you don’t know and they say, ‘My 3-year-old is teething, he’s got allergies and I’m sitting here singing, ‘It won’t be like this for long.’ That’s what the song’s about.” Despite his success, Rucker works hard to remain grounded. He grew up in Charleston, the second youngest of six children raised by a single mother who worked as a nurse. He maintains a close relationship with childhood friends like Shelton Snipe, now an attorney in Atlanta. “We’ve known each other all our lives,” says Snipe, who lived next door to Rucker. “It was the suburbs at the time but the city has grown.” Snipes and Rucker were part of a small group of kids whose families looked out for each other. “We were a group of boys, we did everything together. We played together, went to school together, went to church together,

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Photo: chris hollo

Rucker’s first country album, “Learn to Live,” debuted in 2008. His third, “True Believers,” will be released this month.

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sang together, played sports together. It was almost like the Little Rascals, I guess you would say.” Snipe says those “little rascals,” all of whom have gone on to successful careers as adults, were taught early in life, from their parents and their friends’ parents, that they could achieve anything they wanted. Rucker credits his mother, who died in 1991, with making him the man he is today. “No one believed in me more than her. My belief in myself comes from her.” Rucker also remains close to his Hootie & the Blowfish bandmates. “We’re brothers. The four of us are brothers. We play golf together all the time, our kids play together, we’re friends.” The group still plays at least four or five shows a year. Rucker still lives in his hometown, raising his family in the same area he’s lived for the past 15 years. He’s lived in other places like New York and Los Angeles and knows there’s no place else he’s supposed to be. “I try my best to be a good guy and a good person and that all comes from being from Charleston,” Rucker says about why he stays close to his roots. “I love wearing my Gamecocks hat and I love telling everybody I’m Darius Rucker from Charleston, S.C.” And Charleston loves Darius Rucker. “There’s not anybody that’s going to say anything bad about Darius Rucker,” says Ric Rush, part of WEZL Radio’s morning show. The country DJ, who has formed a friendship with Rucker, describes the singer as one of the “faces” of Charleston. “Anything that needs to be done from a charity standpoint, Darius is always doing it.” At a recent fundraiser for the Medical University of South Carolina Children’s Hospital, where Rucker and his wife are members of the board, Rucker called in some Nashville music buddies to help out. “We were able to raise over $160,000 in one night,” recalls Rush, “and those guys didn’t take a penny.”

Photo: JIM WRIGHT

Rucker became the first African-American to chart a No. 1 country hit since Charley Pride’s “Night Games” in 1983. 28 C H A L L E N G E m a y 2 0 1 3

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Hootie & the Blowfish has a longstanding Monday After The Masters Celebrity Pro-Am Golf Tournament for charity, and Rucker has also brought his well-known love of golf to country music – now hosting the Academy of Country Music Lifting Lives Celebrity Golf Classic. “He’s super-energetic and so talented,” says Jennifer Stallings, whose husband, Scott, plays in the PGA Tour. “He’s a very gracious man and gives back so much, seeing that we’ve seen him so many times in charity settings. He just seems happy to be there and to give his time.” Those who meet Rucker describe him as friendly and down to earth. Rush says Rucker often stops by and joins him and his partner on the radio show. “It’s not uncommon for him to call us after he’s been gone for a while to pop in and hang with us for awhile.” And despite his busy schedule, Rucker spends a lot of time interacting with his fans on Twitter. “I love that, when I get on my Twitter rants and I’m answering everybody’s questions and people are like, ‘Oh, that’s so cool, he answered my question.’ I’m Photo: chris hollo like, yeah, you asked!” Rucker says, laughing. Rucker was inducted into the Perhaps Rogers sums it up best, “He’s Grand Ole Opry last year, an honor the most un-rock rock star you’ll ever meet!” he says “means more to me than I As for balancing his former pop/rock star

could ever say.”

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status with his new role as a country artist, Rucker says Hootie & the Blowfish remains an important part of his life. “I know that sometime in the near future, I don’t know how near, but sometime in the future, there’s going to be another Hootie & the Blowfish record and a tour. But as soon as that tour is over, I’m going right back to country music.” For Rucker, it’s never been about the labels or the genres, it’s always been about the music. “He just wanted to do good music and be pretty successful at it,” says Snipe. “The fact that it ended up being rock music, then country music, that was kind of second place. He just did the music he wanted to do and believed in himself enough, as he always has, that he was willing to accept whatever came.” Rogers believes Rucker has paved the way for an incredible music legacy. “He’s one of the most unique voices of this halfcentury of music. It doesn’t matter what type of song he’s singing, he comes on and you know who it is.” But Rogers believes Rucker has now found where he truly belongs. “He is a Southern American artist, which you can slant toward R&B, you can slant it toward rock ’n’ roll, but it’s storytelling. He grew up singing country and telling stories with his music. He’s a natural country singer.”

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PHOTO: Russ Lake

Race Month: the inside track W

by: john close

hether it’s driving your car on or running around the most famous race track in America, piloting the Millennium Falcon from “Star Wars” into outer space, or powering a golf ball down a pristine fairway, the city of Indianapolis will be the place to do it all during the month of May. The Indianapolis 500 will again provide the exclamation point on the central Indiana city’s festivities on May 26. But even before the race begins, Indianapolis will be at full throttle with a broad menu of community events leading up to the 97th edition of “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing.” “Indianapolis is definitely the place to be in May,” says Megan Bulla, communications manager for the Indianapolis 500 Festival. “We have such a strong racing heritage here that it warrants a month-long celebration. It’s way more than just a race. Over a half-

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million people will visit Indianapolis this May – not only to see the race, but also to experience everything that we have to offer, including one of the nation’s largest festivals each year. There’s nothing like the month of May in Indianapolis. Nothing.”

Hoosier History … and the Millennium Falcon

Among the attractions in Indy that will put you into orbit is “Star Wars: Where Science Meets Imagination” at the Indiana State Museum. The exhibit, which opens May 25, explores the science fiction technologies depicted in “Star Wars” films and the real world science used to develop them. The largest traveling exhibition to ever be featured at the Indiana State Museum, the exhibit features items from all six “Star Wars”

films – including a full-sized replica of the cockpit of the Millennium Falcon from “Star Wars: Episode IV” that visitors can pilot. “The exhibit will be fun and educational for many generations of Indiana State Museum visitors,” says Traci Cromwell, director of cultural collections at the museum. “This exhibit brings the science and technology in the ‘Star Wars’ movies to Indiana, where such innovations are currently being explored at many of this state’s universities. We are excited to offer this amazing exhibit to all ‘Star Wars’ fans.” The Indiana State Museum will also feature the newly acquired Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection throughout the month of May. Hundreds of items are on display in this significant exhibit that details the lives of Abraham Lincoln’s family members from the early 19th century through the death of his last direct descendent. “The exhibit is different than most of those you see about Abraham Lincoln,” says Dale Ogden, chief curator of cultural history at the Indiana State Museum. “It’s about the people in his life – his parents, spouse and children. People know all the clichés about Lincoln, how he grew up in a log cabin and how he became president and things like that. Most don’t know about the interesting and complex people surrounding him. They all have their own story and they are detailed here in this exhibit.” Meanwhile, the “Eternal James Dean” exhibit, which looks at the Indiana-born 1950s Hollywood film actor and iconic cultural figure, is also at the museum. The exhibit features background information and rare photos of Dean as well as some of his most prized possessions, including his high school diploma. “The interesting thing about James Dean’s legacy is that he is part of our own makeup,” says Katherine Gould, assistant curator at the museum. “He represents our ideal of youth and the ability to achieve goals. He was very determined to become a professional actor. It was a great achievement to accomplish what he did given his background of growing up on a farm in Fairmont, Ind.” History buffs will also want to check out Delaware Street, where some of the most majestic, historic homes in Indianapolis are located, including the Benjamin Harrison Presidential Site. Harrison moved into the 16-room Delaware Street home in 1878 and lived there until his death in 1901.

Brickyard Foot Race

For those looking to make their own history, there’s the OneAmerica 500 Festival MiniMarathon on May 4. m a y 2 0 1 3 C H A L L E N G E 30


Now in its 37th year, The OneAmerica 500 Festival Mini-Marathon has attracted a sold-out field of 35,000 competitors for more than a decade. Expected to sell out again this year, the race is the largest annual half-marathon running event in the United States. This year’s course will include a complete lap around the famed 2.5-mile “Brickyard” oval before heading back downtown to the finish line. A party at Military Park will follow the race, featuring live music, cold beverages and food from local restaurants and specialty food vendors.

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Anyone who ever dreamed of being a racecar driver will want to attend the American Family Insurance 500 Festival Community Day at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway May 22. There, you will have the opportunity to drive your personal vehicle around the famous racing oval, compete in a fan pit stop competition, take in a vintage car show, tour team transporters, and get driver autographs. “Community Day is an excellent opportunity for people to get a behind-the-scenes look at the speedway,” says Bulla. “You really get to see what happens in the garage area in preparation for the race. We’ll also have all 33 drivers in this year’s race there to sign autographs and best of all, you can drive your car around the racetrack. It’s really a fun day for everyone.” The $10 admission charge for American Family Insurance 500 Festival Community Day also includes entrance to the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum. Originally opened in 1956 and in its current speedway infield location since 1976, the 96,000 square-foot facility features dozens of historic race cars, driver team and speedway memorabilia.

500 Festival Parade

Of all the off-track activties surrounding the Indianapolis 500, the IPL 500 Festival Parade is by far the most famous. Considered the equal of great American parades like the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day and Tournament of Roses parades, this year’s 500 Festival Parade on May 25 is expected to attract a crowd of more than 300,000 people to downtown Indianapolis.

PHOTO: 500 Festival

The 500 Festival Community Day brings families together at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. 32 C H A L L E N G E m a y 2 0 1 3

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First held in 1957, this year’s parade will be a mix of marching bands, floats, giant inflatable balloons, costumed characters, and military and public service units. A host of celebrities – including all 33 starters in the 2013 Indianapolis 500 – and the Miss 500 Festival will be part of the event. “We have people from all over the country come to watch the 500 Festival Parade,” Bulla says. “The parade starts at noon, but people get there early, hours before the event, to set up lawn chairs or to stake out some space along the streets and parks on the parade route. The parade draws a huge crowd, but we have room for everybody.”

Golfers’ Delight

PHOTO: 500 Festival

A young race fan learns what it’s like to change a tire on an Indy car at the Chase 500 Festival Kid’s Day. The largest free festival of its kind in Indiana each year, this year’s event is set for May 11.

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With nearly 40 golf courses in the Indianapolis area – 13 of them public facilities operated by the Indianapolis Parks Department – there’s also plenty of room on the links for a friendly round. Of the area’s top golf courses, the Brickyard Crossing is the most famous. Located inside and around the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Brickyard Crossing features an open-to-the-public 18-hole layout created by noted course designer Pete Dye. Voted one of the top 100 public courses in the United State by Golfweek and Golf Digest magazines, the Brickyard Crossing is a must-play for any golfer.

The Race Itself

Of course, the star of Indy’s month of May celebration is the Indianapolis 500. First held in 1911, the race is the world’s largest single-day sporting event, attracting crowds in excess of 300,000 annually. This year’s event rolls off with practice on May 11, 12 and 17, resulting in the qualifying laps on Pole Day on May 18. The rest of the 33-car field will be set on one of the most suspensefilled days of racing with “Bump Day” on Sunday, May 19. ”Carburetion Day” – the final practice prior to Sunday’s Indianapolis 500 – hits the track on May 24. Friday’s racing card will also feature the Indy Lights Freedom 100 event. On May 25, the speedway schedule will be highlighted by a free vintage racing show and veteran’s autograph sessions. Last year’s Indianapolis 500 champion, Dario Franchitti, will be looking to earn his fourth trip to victory lane when this year’s event takes the green flag on May 26 at noon Eastern Standard Time. Spectator gates open at sunrise.

INDY “FAST FACT”

Did you know that there are 20 Pilot and Flying J locations within a 100-mile radius of Indianapolis?

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PHOTOS: ESPN Images

hear me out

by: demarco williams

here have probably been hundreds of great Colin Cowherd radio rants. Few are as memorable as one from his ESPN Radio show, “The Herd with Colin Cowherd,” back in 2009. The Minnesota Twins and the Detroit Tigers had just played a dramatic one-game playoff to see who’d go on to the divisional round. Callers to the show went on and on about how well Minnesota played for being a small-market team. The s-word irks Cowherd to no end, so he went on an epic fiveminute tirade, explaining how the thriving Twin Cities should never be confused with smaller markets like Pittsburgh or Kansas City. It’s the most poetic ramble you’ve ever heard. By the time he finishes painting Minneapolis as this affluent, cultured utopia, your bags are nearly packed for the move. Now, besides the fact that he insults two

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sports-loving cities, you have to step back and understand he’s defending a place he has absolutely no vested interest in. Cowherd’s from Washington state, not Minnesota. But it’s that sort of thing that makes him such a polarizing figure in sports talk. Colin’s dedicated fans appreciate his wellrounded knowledge of the action and his unflinching candor. His equally committed detractors frown on his soap-box diatribes and over-the-top generalizations. The controversial Cowherd raised eyebrows for his seemingly insensitive comments after Washington Redskins safety Sean Taylor’s death in 2007. He upset New Orleans natives by calling the Louisiana metropolis “America’s least safe major city” in 2012. “Sports is a very emotional business,” says Cowherd, when asked about that fine line he walks on air with listeners’ feelings.

“I try to always take the emotion out of what I’m doing. It is a business. You know, my dad was an optometrist. That doesn’t mean he was emotionally, viscerally connected to everybody’s individual eyes. He looked at it as a practice. And I look at it antiseptically very much the same way. It is a job. I prepare for the job. You bring an opinion. I try to take the emotion out of it and, just from point A to point Z, deconstruct your argument or appreciate your argument.” As for some of the extra stuff that occasionally comes with Cowherd’s colorful commentary, well, “theatrically, I may overreact or embellish a little bit with my emotions, because it makes for funnier radio. But I really, generally, try not to get too emotionally involved, whether I’m right or wrong. I always tell people in this business, there really is no money in being right or wrong. The money is in being interesting or not interesting. I’ve made a lot of money in being interesting.” Folks can debate ’til the cows come home as to whether Cowherd’s opinions are just. What they can’t argue is that Colin Murray Cowherd was born to talk sports. In fact, ever since he was 7 or 8 years old, Cowherd knew the exact industry he wanted to make a career in. After studying at Eastern Washington University, Colin followed his dreams to Las Vegas, where his first break came as the radio voice of the Las Vegas Stars Minor League Baseball team. “I kind of talked my way into doing one inning of play-by-play and doing everything else shy of washing the uniforms,” he remembers. “That one inning of play-byplay became two innings and became three. But I just always sort of knew, once I heard sports radio, I knew that was the one thing I thought I could do better than most people. You know, television was about looks, and I’m not exactly George Clooney … I knew I could tell stories and be interesting and have a sharp wit and interact with callers and I knew I could do that at a really high level.” Kevin Durant drives to the hole without breaking a sweat. Tiger Woods knocks down approach shots without a blade of grass being misplaced. Colin Cowherd talks hoops, pro football and even sprinkles in some national policy without so much as a stutter. The good ones make it look ridiculously easy, too. And from stints in Vegas and Tampa to his current role with ESPN in Connecticut, Cowherd’s always gotten on the microphone and sounded composed. Most folks know nothing of the preparation that goes into the craft before the lights come up. “Like a lot of businesses that are highprofile,” the 49-year-old host adds, “be it a mayor, be it a lawyer, [being] a talk show host is mostly preparation. You know, you m a y 2 0 1 3 C H A L L E N G E 35


Cowherd talks to Osi Umenyiora of the atlanta falcons (l) during his “The Herd with Colin Cowherd” ESPN Radio Show. w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m

may see Mike Krzyzewski and the Duke Blue Devils play a couple of times a week, but you’re not there for the practices and the film study. So, my job is really no different than a mason – I’m just laying bricks every day. It’s just about work ethic. And when you’re a solo host and you don’t have a co-host, preparation is really the key. So, I spend a great deal of time researching opinions and thoughts, so when I come on the air, I’m prepared.” What, you thought heated debates about Minnesota’s sports and Roger Goodell’s decisions just sprouted arbitrarily from the top of his head? “We don’t have many rules on my show,” continues the man who took his act to TV as co-host of ESPN’s fan-fueled show, “SportsNation,” from 2009 through 2012. “One of the only rules is stay on topic …. I think one of the mistakes that a lot of sports guys do is they just open up phone calls to talk about anything. That is terrible radio. You need to control. You’re the pilot of the plane. You need to control the direction of the plane.” Prepared or not, the great ones still have to be ready to act at the drop of a hat. So, to test Cowherd’s true sports acumen, we put the contrarian to the test. Colin, who’s the athlete who left you most in awe? The die-hard football fan names NFL legends Deion Sanders and Lawrence Taylor without so much as a flinch. He then says, “Michael Jordan in his prime and LeBron James, currently in his prime. Basketball is a sport where, when you are really gifted, you are better than even the greatest players. I think Michael and LeBron, in their prime, just look different than everybody else. The game just comes easier; it’s more natural. I [also] think Mike Tyson in his early to mid-20s had such devastating knockout power that it was even intimidating to other world-class fighters. I think Tyson’s power and velocity was m a y 2 0 1 3 C H A L L E N G E 37


Cowherd covers all sports and a bit of social commentary on his show. Here he chats with Pittsburgh Steelers defensive end Brett Keisel while on location for the 2013 Super Bowl.

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probably one of the only times where I’ve seen other pro athletes intimidated.” Even when the conversation moves on to Cowherd’s private life – he and his wife own a wine store called Maximum Beverage in West Hartford – things manage to come back to sports eventually. Right in the middle of talking about summer family-trip planning, he says, “I’m watching a Deion Sanders punt return here. We were talking about Deion. As I was talking to you, I thought, ‘I want to watch a Deion Sanders punt return on YouTube.’” Colin’s probably seen Prime Time’s highlights a million times. Doesn’t matter. The man simply loves the stuff. Could probably talk about it all night, if you gave him the airspace. And that’s the passion first-time callers and long-time listeners are checking for every weekday morning and afternoon on “The Herd.” Some will be turned off by the tangents. Lots more will be tantalized from his takes. “I kind of feel like every day you’re a little bit of an artist and it’s a canvas and you’re allowed to spill some paint,” Cowherd says. “I don’t want to come in and have everything written. I like the freedom of exploring topics, the ability of sometimes being wrong, but explore why you’re in the process. I love that. I just would get very bored doing ‘SportsCenter.’”

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Photo: Churchill Downs/Reed Palmer

Kentucky Derby by: pam windsor

t is – without a doubt – the most famous horse race in the world. Last year more than 165,000 people poured into Churchill Downs to watch “the greatest two minutes in sports,” while millions more watched on TV. The race that began in 1875 grows bigger and more prestigious each year, and every thoroughbred owner, jockey and trainer looks to that first Saturday in May with the dream of one day winning it. “You’re talking about 139 years of a particular event that is actually a ritual in Kentucky,” says Hall of Fame trainer and four-time Derby winner D. Wayne Lukas. “In every place else in the world, spring is determined by the first robin, the first blooming of the pansies or the azaleas, the first warm evenings, but in Kentucky, spring is determined by the Derby. It’s not spring until they run the Derby.” The Derby kicks off the coveted Triple Crown of Racing, followed by the Preakness Stakes and then the Belmont Stakes. While there are other races, some that pay more than the Derby’s minimum guaranteed purse of $2 million, none is better known. “I’ve been on airplanes and red-eye flights,” says Hall of Fame jockey Gary Ste-

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vens, “and when the person next to you introduces themselves and finds out you’re a jockey, the first question out of their mouth is ‘Have you ever ridden in the Kentucky Derby?’”

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The Derby gets in your blood, brings tears to your eyes, and then five minutes later you’re cussing because your horse didn’t win.

– Austin P. Waggoner II

Stevens won the Derby three times before retiring in 2005. He played jockey George Woolf in the movie “Seabiscuit,” and works as a racing commentator for NBC Sports and HRTV. In January, he announced a racing comeback with the hope of winning another Kentucky Derby. “Everybody wants

to feel that lightning in a bottle. You can’t really explain it unless you’ve experienced it.” Steeped in pageantry and ceremony, the Kentucky Derby is more than a sporting event, it’s a cultural phenomenon. People from all walks of life come together for a spectacular spring party that includes food, fashion, celebrity sightings and traditions from wearing a big colorful hat to sipping a mint julep to smoking a cigar. “It brings so many people together for two minutes of racing,” explains Austin P. Waggoner II. Waggoner works in the equine business and has attended the Derby 55 times. “The Derby gets in your blood, brings tears to your eyes, and then five minutes later you’re cussing because your horse didn’t win. It’s unlike anything in the world.” Many call it the “holy grail” of horse racing, in part because of all it takes to get there. The odds are tremendous. Only 20 of the nearly 30,000 thoroughbreds born every year ever make it to the starting gate of the mile-and-a-quarter race. “The Derby is restricted to 3-year-old thoroughbreds, so horses only have one chance to win it,” notes Darren Rogers, senior director for communications and media at Churchill Downs. “With other sports, you have events like the World Series, or the Super Bowl, the NBA Finals. Those are held each year and if a team makes it to the championship and falls short, they always have an opportunity for redemption. But in the Kentucky Derby, even the greatest horses only have one shot of winning.” The dream starts early for many. For jockey Calvin Borel, it began when he was a young boy in his native Louisiana. “I started riding in the bush tracks when I was 8,” he recalls. At 12, he dropped out of the eighth grade and moved in with his older brother Cecil. He began racing full-time with the help of Cecil, a thoroughbred trainer. “I dreamed of just riding in the Derby, much less winning it.” Borel has since won the Derby three times (2007, 2009 and 2010). His three wins in four years stands as a Derby record and he dreams of winning it again. “You know, everybody says, ‘Well, if I win the Derby I’ll retire,’” says Borel. “Bull----. You’ll want it back next year worse than you wanted that first one, I can tell you that.” Hence why riding in the Derby is an honor, but winning it remains the ultimate goal. Robby Albarado has ridden in it 13 times, but so far a win has eluded him. “I’ve won the World Cup, the Preakness, was second in the Belmont,” says Albarado. “But I still feel this emptiness because I haven’t won the Kentucky Derby. It’s the Super Bowl of horse racing. It’s the championship, you know?” The road to the Derby is a long and arm a y 2 0 1 3 C H A L L E N G E 39


Photos: Churchill Downs

Derby Trivia

The Kentucky Derby pays 2 million dollars guaranteed, with the winner’s share of the purse being $1.4 million dollars. The trainer and the jockey each get 10 percent of the winner’s share. Between 31,000 and 36,000 thoroughbreds are born in the U.S. each year, but only 20 make it to the Derby. The Derby is also called “The Run for the Roses” for the blanket of roses draped over the winning horse. The mint julep is the official drink of the Kentucky Derby. It’s made with Kentucky bourbon, simple syrup, ice and crushed mint. The colorful jackets, called silks, worn by the jockeys indicate who owns the horse. Eight U.S. presidents have watched the Kentucky Derby live. Richard Nixon was the only one to do so while in office. In 1889, one Derby celebrity had a notorious background. That was the year train robber Frank James, brother of famed outlaw Jesse James, showed up to watch a horse named Spokane ride to victory. The youngest jockey to win the Kentucky Derby was 15-year-old Alonzo “Lonnie” Clayton, who won aboard Azra in 1892. The Kentucky Derby is patterned after England’s Epson Derby, which was first run in 1780 and is Europe’s most prestigious race for 3-year-old horses. Only 11 horses have won the Triple Crown — the Derby, Preakness and Belmont. The last time it happened was in 1978 with a horse named Affirmed. Only three fillies (female horses) have won the Derby. They are Regrets in 1915, Genuine Risk in 1980, and Winning Colors in 1988. “My Old Kentucky Home” was first played at the Derby in 1924 and later adopted as Kentucky’s state song. It’s traditionally sung during the Derby’s post parade. Source for all trivia: The Kentucky Derby Museum and www.kentucky.com and Darren Rogers, senior director, communications and media services for Churchill Downs.

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Photo: Churchill Downs

Barry Irwin, owner of 2011 Derby winner Animal Kingdom, accepts the trophy from Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear.

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duous one, requiring hope, dedication, commitment and patience. Fans place millions of dollars in bets on Derby day, but the real gambling begins long before the race. It starts with a young horse and a buyer looking for signs of greatness. Thoroughbred trainer Gary “Red Dog” Hartlage has trained horses for 40 years. He says you always buy a 2-year-old with the hope of developing him or her into a top horse. “When you buy that baby, you’re thinking, ‘I’ve got a shot at something special.’” He also points out that when you’re looking for potential in a horse, it’s not always about how much money you spend. “Let’s face it, at the Keeneland (yearling) sale, they’ve sold horses for $1,200 that have won the Derby. You can give a million dollars for one as a baby that isn’t worth a hoot as a 3-year-old, and the other way around. You can give $5,000 and when they’re 3 years old, they can be worth $5 million. It’s a challenging game.” After choosing the horse, the work begins. David Scanlon of the Scanlon Training Center in Florida helps get those young horses ready. “It’s my job to teach them how to saddle, how to be ridden, how to learn to ride on the racetrack, how to load the starting gate, how to be a race horse,” he says. “And once you’re ready to be a race horse,

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Photo: Churchill Downs/Reed Palmer

The Kentucky Derby, also known as The Run for the Roses, is the perfect blend of Southern flair and the thrill of the race. you get shipped off to the trainer.” The legendary D. Wayne Lukas has trained thoroughbreds full-time since 1974. He’s won the Kentucky Derby four times, and at 77, continues to push for a fifth. He says while there is no easy formula for winning the Derby, a couple of factors play key roles. “Experience is paramount; there is no how-to book,” he explains. “And so the experience and background of trying it, maybe failing at it, readjusting, trying it again … I think the experience factor is so important. And then, the most important ingredient in the whole scenario is the horse. When you get the right horse, you obviously have to have him tuned to the minute on that final day, but the horse is the most important ingredient.” Still, it’s not always the best horse that wins. Everything has to come together to make it work. And every player has his or her own challenges. “The horses have a lot of pressure on them,” says Albarado. “You have to put all three years of experience with the horse into two minutes. And from the jockey’s perspective, with a field of 20 horses, strategy is important. If something happens you have to have another plan. There’s so much strategy in trying to win the race.” That’s also assuming luck is on your side. “You know, you’re only one step away, a lot of times, from (the horse) being injured, so you’ve got to be lucky, “says Hartlage. “You’ve got to hope nothing happens at the starting gate or on the van or anything. A whole lot of things work together.” But despite the odds, it’s worth it. “I’ve been to every sporting event there is, and

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there’s nothing like it,” says Scanlon, who had the privilege of walking over (just before the race) with a horse named DialedIn in 2011. “When you see a crowd and all of a sudden 160,000 people start cheering with you as you walk with a horse and they’re playing ‘My Old Kentucky Home,’ every champion jockey says they still cry.” Hartlage had his first run in the Derby in 1988 and dreams of another shot. “Just to get there was a big thrill. And now I’d like to get back there and see if I could do a little better.” As an owner, Barry Irwin, founder and CEO of Team Valor International, got his first chance in the Derby in 1997 with a horse named Captain Bodgit that finished second by a head. He was convinced he’d never have that kind of chance again. “When you have been around the block as long as I have been in racing – for 40 or 50 years – you just don’t think you could possibly be one of those guys to win,” he explains. And even when a special horse named Animal Kingdom came along in 2011, Irwin says, “I didn’t allow myself the fantasy of believing he could win.” But when the horses entered the stretch in the 2011 Derby, his wife went crazy, something he says she doesn’t do very often. He began thinking it might just be possible. “When he (Animal Kingdom) flew home like that, it just took your breath away, and so, I was like, ‘That’s him, I know it’s him, but I don’t believe it’s him.’ When he hit that wire, it was just so exhilarating!” This year’s Kentucky Derby will be held on May 4. w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m


Photo: Beitia Archives Digital Press Photos/Newscom

trucker movies

by marion kelly & robert nason

s we kick off the summer movie season, it feels appropriate to look back at some of the movies that made trucks and truck drivers the central theme. We’re not claiming these are the best truck driver movies ever made – in fact, some are downright cringe-worthy – but they all have their moments and are worth a look on these longer spring and summer nights.

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“Big Trouble in Little China” – 1986

While it bombed at the box office, this John Carpenter film grew into a cult hit. Big Trouble is a classic good-vs.-evil plot as truck driver Jack Burton (Kurt Russell) helps his friend Wang Chi rescue his fiancee from bandits and win back his stolen truck. Set in San Francisco’s Chinatown with supernatural elements, Big Trouble is rife with cheesy yet fantastic dialogue and a bunch of zany characters. It’s a film that doesn’t take itself too seriously, and we give it extra points for naming Burton’s big rig the Pork Chop Express. Carpenter later noted that the movie was originally written as a Western and instead of Burton’s big rig being stolen it was to have been a horse. Memorable quote: “This is Jack Burton in the Pork Chop Express, and I’m talkin’ to whoever’s listenin’ out there.” – Jack Burton

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“Smokey and the Bandit” – 1977

With Burt Reynolds and Jerry Reed conspiring to go “from Georgia to Texas and back in 28 hours flat with a truckload of bootleg beer,” how can you lose? Throw in a runaway bride played by Sally Fields and a cantankerous jilted would-be father-inlaw/sheriff Buford T. Justice (one of the best screen names in movie history) played by Jackie Gleeson and you’ve got 1977’s second highest grossing movie, behind only “Star Wars.” Oh, and don’t forget about the dog named Fred. Reed was originally slated to play the lead role of the Bandit until Reynolds became involved, moving Reed into the supporting role of truck driver Cledus Snow. “Smokey and the Bandit” spawned the CB radio genre, where truck drivers get into all sorts of mischief while talking CB jargon on the road. The movie also led to skyrocketing sales of the iconic Pontiac Trans-Am (four were used in the movie) and launched Burt Reynolds into A-list stardom. Quote: “It’s not where you’re going that counts, it’s who the hell’s in back of ya.” – from the movie’s trailer

“High-Ballin’” – 1978

It’s the independent drivers against the trucking boss in this Western on wheels ac-

tion film. Following his success as Cledus in “Smokey and the Bandit,” Jerry Reed steps into the shoes of Duke, an independent driver who, with the help of his friend Rane (Peter Fonda), fights off a trucking company that wants to put him out of business. It’s a good ol’ boys movie and the chemistry between Reed and Fonda is fun to watch. With a theme song written and sung by Reed, it’s worth a viewing. Oh, and if you look closely, you’ll catch that even though the movie is supposed to take place in the U.S., many of the vehicles on the road have Canada plates. The film was filmed in Ontario. Oops. Quote: Eighteen-wheel drivers “make a 900mile run in a blizzard look like a trip to church.” – Jerry Reed in the film’s trailer

“They Drive by Night” – 1940

Before uttering the now famous “Play it again, Sam” in “Casablanca,” Humphrey Bogart played Paul Fabrini, co-owner of a small trucking company with brother Joe (played by George Raft). “They Drive by Night” follows the lives of the Fabrini brothers as they struggle to remain independent truckers during the Great Depression. From trucks crashing to fighting unscrupulous shippers to romance to murder and false accusations, “They Drive by Night” has all the drama and suspense you’ll need for a night on the couch or in the cab. Quote: “You know, when I was riding that truck, I used to think I’d never get enough of staying home. I’ve got enough, all right.” – Paul Fabrini

“Over The Top” – 1987

Sylvester Stallone plays the role of the underdog well and “Over The Top” is no exception. Stallone is Lincoln Hawk, a downon-his-luck over-the-road truck driver who abandoned his family years ago. After the death of his wife, Hawk must fight his father-in-law for custody of his son. Desperate to mend fences, he takes his son on a crosscountry journey to Las Vegas, where he enters an arm-wrestling contest in the hopes of earning not just money but his son’s respect. The film has the requisite ’80s exercise montage over a Kenny Loggins song. Our favorite scene is when Hawk is lifting weights as he drives. Sure, the arm-wrestling plot is a bit corny, but the father- and-son storyline is truly the heart of the movie. Quote: “I drive truck, break arms, and arm wrestle. It’s what I love to do; it’s what I do best.” – Bob “Bull” Hurley w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m


“Black Dog” – 1998

Take an old Peterbilt, throw in a crosscountry trip carrying illegal weapons, add a side of kidnapping, blackmail and a dash of Meatloaf and you have “Black Dog.” Patrick Swayze stars in this action film as Jack Crews, an ex-felon who takes an “off the record” job from a sketchy new boss hauling toilets in order to avoid foreclosure. Crews finds out the “toilets” are in reality illegal weapons and chaos ensues. Attempted hijackings and the kidnapping of Crews’ family, all while being tailed by the FBI and ATF, keep the pace high. We have a soft spot for truck chases and “Black Dog” has them in spades. Quote: “I’m here to drive.” – Jack Crews

“Maximum Overdrive” – 1986

Photo: Album/Newscom

“maximum overdrive” – 1986

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“Maximum Overdrive” follows a group of people stranded at a truck stop as a mysterious comet passes Earth. While perhaps beautiful in the sky, there’s one problem: The comet’s tail emits a radiation that makes machines come to life … and they’re not happy. The stranded group must band together to survive attacks from some homicidal semis and mean appliances like lawn mowers and pinball machines. While

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Photo: akg-images/Newscom

“They Drive by night” –1940 shooting the film in Wilmington, N.C., the crew built the truck stop and made it look so convincing, several real truck drivers stopped in hoping for a bite to eat. Stephen King wrote the screenplay and made his directorial debut with Emilio Estevez starring. Just remember, the next time a rogue comet streaks past our planet, be nice to your machinery. Quote: Too much cursing to repeat.

“Convoy” – 1978

Based on C.W. McCall’s country song of the same title, “Convoy” follows the plight of independent driver Martin Penwald (Kris Kristofferson), with the handle “Rubber Duck,” being harassed by a blackmailing cop named Dirty Lyle (Ernest Borgnine). Events and threats escalate and Rubber Duck, tired of the cop’s abuse, gets on the radio and rallies his fellow drivers to create a convoy to evade prosecution in Dirty Lyle’s jurisdiction. The chase is on with the requisite car and tractor wrecks, bar fights and ramming barricades as the convoy grows and makes the national news. Oh, and of course Melissa, a beautiful photographer looking for

a ride to the airport (Ali MacGraw), is along for the ride. Burt Reynolds was offered the role of Rubber Duck but turned it down to play Bandit in “Smokey and the Bandit.” Quote: “Was the dark of the moon on the sixth of June / In a Kenworth pullin’ logs / Cab over Pete with a reefer on / And a Jimmy haulin’ hogs” – lyrics from the song “Convoy”

“Big Rig” – 2007

Documentary filmmakers Doug Pray and Brad Blondheim traveled 21,000 miles and through 45 states to discover the truth about America’s “working-class heroes” –over-the-road truck drivers. The filmmakers interviewed several drivers, focusing on their personal and professional lives, and the movie truly cements the idea that truck driving is more than just a profession, it’s a lifestyle. This is a film worth seeing, not only to reaffirm what those in the industry already know but to see the uniqueness of this country’s essential workforce. Quote: “Without trucks, America goes dead.” – from the documentary “Big Rig”

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on the road Photos: Courtesy of The LosT Sea

The Lost Sea

By jack markham

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n the small town of Sweetwater, Tenn., visitors come from all over to experience the Lost Sea. Hidden 140 feet beneath a mountain, the Lost Sea is located within a larger system of caves known as the Craighead Caverns. It is surrounded by clusters of natural crystals and overhanging stalactites. Open to the public since 1965, the Lost Sea is one of the most popular natural attractions in Tennessee. “The most unique thing about it all is the lake. It’s a four and a half acre underground lake,” says Lisa McClung, general manager of the Lost Sea. “You won’t see anything like this with other attractions. The Lost Sea is America’s largest underground lake. It’s not something you expect to see, so it’s really quite amazing.” This natural wonder has been explored for centuries, since the early days of the Cherokee Indians. From the entrance on the side of the mountain, the cave opens to a chain of expansive rooms. In one, known as “The Council Room,” Cherokee tools and weapons have been found. Discovered by colonists in the early 1800s, settlers would use the Craighead Caverns for food storage. Inside the cavern, the temperature does not rise above 58 degrees, ideal conditions for refrigeration. The modern discovery of the cave and lake happened in 1905 by a 13-year-old boy named Ben Sands. It wasn’t until 1915 that the caverns were made open to the public, although entertainment, not preservation, was the main focus. Visitors could shimmy on a

dance floor installed in a large room near the surface or bet on a cockfight in another. Speaking of illegal activities, bootleggers produced their hooch in various parts of the cave, an ideal hiding place for smugglers. The Lost Sea is open to visitors every day of the year, except for Christmas. Visitors tour the underground lake on a threequarter mile path, concluding with a glassbottom boat ride. Visitors may be surprised to see there is, in fact, wild life. The Lost Sea is filled with some of the biggest rainbow trout found in the Volunteer State.

For organized groups such as churches, Scouts or schools, the Lost Sea offers a oneof-a-kind Wild Cave Tour. In addition to the regular tour, visitors climb and crawl through undeveloped portions of the caverns on an overnight expedition. Visitors should keep in mind that in all the fun, muddiness is to be expected. www.thelostsea.com 140 Lost Sea Road Sweetwater, TN 37874 423-337-6616

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Humbled I

’m a retired civil engineer. As such, I was educated to understand and practice the basic principles necessary to construct a modern-day structure. I even had the privilege of designing and building a number of bridges in southern California. Many engineers consider southern California’s highways and bridges a wonder in themselves. There are many structural wonders in our world, however, that still seem to amaze even the best engineers. Structures like Machu Picchu, Stonehenge, the Great Wall of China and the great Egyptian pyramids usually are at the forefront of our wonder and amazement. It’s not only their magnitude and scale that tease the brain, but the question of why they were constructed to begin with. For me, though, one of the greatest wonders of our world lies right on our proverbial doorstep. The majesty and endurance of its design fills my head with unanswered questions, and challenges every engineering principle I was ever taught. I’m referring to our giant Sequoia redwood trees. Our RV trips to the West

always include the giant Sequoias. To me, they trump all manner of nature’s gifts. When I stand alone among these giant trees, I am truly humbled. My mind immediately goes into overdrive trying to imag-

We can send a man to the moon, but we can’t build a tree. And that’s humbling.

ine how to design, let alone build, one. What would be some of the parameters necessary to construct an object like these trees? Many are older than our oldest man-made structures and are still growing. How does one design for the forces of nature that all structures encounter, such as fire, wind, floods, earthquakes, disease

BY: CHAD BLAKE

and global warming? What kind of building material can stand up to these forces yet allow for continued growth? I have no answers to these questions. Fortunately for us, the Sequoias are still here with us, put here by some source or power that had all the answers for all the questions we have no answers for. We can send a man to the moon, but we can’t build a tree. And that’s humbling. When I stand under these natural towers that can reach over 350 feet, I think how insignificant, by comparison, I am in design and life span. It’s also why I buy nothing made of redwood. How can we put a blade of steel to one of them and in a nanosecond destroy what has taken thousands of years to create? We should never destroy one of these truly magnificent, unique, centuries-old wonders for the sake of money or building material. By all means, include the redwood forests in your RV journeys. If you let your thoughts open up to the wonder of them, I’m quite sure you will stand there, entirely humbled and positively caught up in their magic.


Free Agent Fitness Bob Perry is the chair of the American Trucking Association’s Safety Management Council’s Health & Wellness Working Group email: bob@rollingstrong.com • facebook.com/rollingstrong

t’s a great time to be a professional truck driver; it’s like being a free agent in sports. Fleets are looking for good solid drivers who are qualified and can perform. This is a time that, as they say, “the cream rises to the top.” I’m sure you have read articles in transportation publications and blogs talking about the driver shortage. A large percentage of this shortage is due to the drop in new applicants looking to enter the driving profession. A smaller percentage reflects the constant churn of drivers leaving the industry due to retirement, new regulations, health issues or realizing that trucking isn’t for them. There are still millions of drivers who have the special skills it takes to be a professional driver. Wellness professionals see many of these solid drivers having a hard time managing their personal health. Yes, much of the downfall in their health is due to the nature of the profession: long hours, time away from family, lack of convenient medical services on the road, poor food choices, and lack of knowledge on what to do. Like many Americans, there is a huge population who simply choose to ignore their health. Drivers risk not only their health, but their livelihood as well. In this day and time, so many Americans are out of work. For drivers who have the skill set, this is a great opportunity to place yourself in a solid financial position, and all you have to do is make healthy lifestyle changes. Sure, it’s not easy, but it’s doable if you apply yourself. Especially in today’s trucking industry, there are more health and

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wellness solutions on the road than ever before. In our last fitness column, we talked about cardio training and the benefits one can achieve by just starting a simple walking program. For you drivers who have emailed asking how to ramp up your workouts to the next level, here is one way. Incorporate some sort of strength training with your cardio, which will increase your overall endurance. Next time you are out walking or jogging, stop and perform a set of push-ups. Return to cardio for another three minutes. When you stop this time, place your hands close enough that your thumbs are touching and perform push-ups that will work your triceps. Do another round of cardio for three minutes. Place your hands on your hips and do a set of squats, then go back to cardio. This time when you stop you will need some sort of weight resistance in your hands, like a bottle of water, hand weights, or even a heavy tool in each hand. Stand straight with your knees relaxed and do bicep curls and continue past the curl motion into a standing shoulder press and repeat. Now back to your cardio, this time using the last three to five minutes as a cool-down and stretch period. You have just completed a full-body workout and cardio training in one. Depending on how much time you have, the workout should take only 20 minutes out of your day but will add time to your life. Take advantage of the driver “free agency” and get healthy. Take control of your health and your pocketbook. Roll strong.

by: bob perry

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column

World Event Fishing by: brenda potts

he French poet and philosopher Gaston Bachelard once said, “Even a minor event in the life of a child is an event of that child’s world and thus a world event.” I don’t know if he was inspired by a fishing trip, but he certainly could have been. We fished a lot when I was a kid. Back then, it was normal for kids to run loose in the campground, and we didn’t worry much about child abductions and such. Regular campers were like family. Recalling several of those childhood fishing trips brings back wonderful memories. One in particular resulted in one of my proudest youthful moments. I was honored to be asked to fish with one of the older gents in the campground. We set out in his old john boat to the far reaches of the little pond. I tried dutifully to follow instructions on how to catch one of the giant catfish everyone talked about. I’m quite certain I was more trouble than I was worth, but I kept trying nonetheless. If there was an underwater obstruction anywhere within 50 yards, I could find it with my hook and then pitifully ask for help. My greatest fear was that I would mess things up one too many times and be taken back to shore before catching one of the giants. My memory is a bit foggy on who made the wonderfully long cast, but it probably wasn’t me. I settled in to watch the fishing line for any sign of a hungry catfish. What happened next sounds like a fish tale, and I suppose it is. The line went tight, I jerked the pole up, set the hook and the fight was on. It felt like I was hauling a wriggling concrete block through mud,

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brush and water. There was nothing I could do to finesse the landing, other than hang on and reel. When I got the fish to the boat my patient guide reached into the water and lifted a six-pound catfish into the air. It was the biggest fish I had ever seen up close and it was all mine. We returned to shore and walked all over the campground with that fish on a stringer. People admired the fish, and my fishing abilities. I can attest that a six-pound catfish does wonders for a little kid’s selfesteem. Since then, I have caught plenty of fish, but few compared to that wondrous catfish until recently. During the youth turkey season a couple of years ago my niece, brother and I traveled to southern Illinois to hunt with the Armstrong family. They have a nice pond loaded with catfish behind their house. Since my niece had never caught a catfish we set out to check this off her young bucket list. All the kids caught plenty of fish but that big catfish eluded my niece. It began to rain and we donned coats and kept fishing. Suddenly she hooked something big. Watching her wrestle the fish ashore amid the screams, squeals, giggles and shouts of encouragement brought back memories of my first big catfish. This time the fun was ten-fold. Nothing compares to watching a kid go through this experience, knowing she will appreciate it for years to come. Looking back, I’m pretty sure the fellow camper who took time to take me fishing enjoyed the experience as much as I did. Probably even more.

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Listen to Claire B. Lang’s radio show on Sirius XM NASCAR Radio, Channel 90. PHOTO: Jonathan Ferrey/Getty Images

trackside to ringside

by: claire b. lang

tand back, Claire,” the director of media relations for Michael Waltrip Racing, Drew Brown, warned me. “We don’t want you to get hurt … Just stand back!” Standing back, however, is not something I do well. When there’s a fight in the garage or post-race, this beat reporter somehow finds herself right in the middle of the action. Even NASCAR’s managing director of competition and Sprint Cup Series director John Darby teased me about it after the Jeff Gordon/Clint Bowyer argument in Phoenix last November. “The part about Claire that was funny,” Darby told my listeners on Sirius XM NASCAR, “was as my officials were emptying the big pile at the middle of the garage, she was at the bottom. She had her microphone out and she was takin’ interviews.” I’ve covered tons of great NASCAR fights over the years: Jeff Gordon hopping out of his car and running across the track to go at it with Jeff Burton in 2010 at Texas Motor Speedway; Michael Waltrip going after Lake Speed at Michigan in 1995; and Greg Biffle punching Jay Sauter in the 2011, just to name a few. In 2002, at the Channellock 250 in Bristol, I remember Kevin Harvick telling us he’d be waiting for Greg Biffle after the race after Biffle ran into the back of him. True to his word, I had asked my first question of Biffle on pit road and had just put my microphone out for an answer when Harvick came flying over my shoulder at Biffle’s throat. I went down to the ground that day. Friends say they saw me one moment on the big screen and then I was gone. My microphone kept rolling while throat grabbing and screaming ensued. When a fight breaks out, the first thing I notice from my position on the grid is a distinct and unique roar from the crowd. It’s so different from applause, and so deafening that it is hard to describe. Un-

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less I’m right in the middle of an altercation, I look to the Sprint Vision screen in the infield, figure out where the fight is, and run there. It’s a stampede to the argument and usually elbows are flying. I’m always worried about a broken nose, so I keep my microphone and arms around my face when I go in deep to cover a fight. I remember standing on the grid doing a post-race interview with Brad Keselowski when Joey Logano approached Denny Hamlin’s racecar after March’s Food City 500. “Who’s fighting?” Keselowski asked me. “I missed it. Damn, I missed the soap opera!” The crowd roared as we both looked up to Sprint Vision to see the teams of the No. 11 and the No. 20 arguing. “I’m watching the fight, hold on,” Keslowski instructed me. “I don’t have time to talk.” I asked Keselowski to describe what he was seeing. “I’m seeing my teammate stick up for himself and that’s a nice thing to see,” he said. I take the stance that unless a driver begins to pummel a guy, the crewmembers, who are taught to defend their driver, should let the drivers argue it out. When fists start to fly, then team members can step in. Until then, it’s every driver for himself – or herself. Yes, I think that Sprint Cup Series driver Danica Patrick could get in an altercation one day, and when she does her team owner Tony Stewart says she’s on her own. “She starts a fight, she’s going to have to handle it,” Stewart said. “Ryan (Newman) doesn’t step in if I get in a fight with somebody so I’m going to be mad if he steps in for her.” Harvick put it best after the Phoenix brouhaha. “This sport was made on fights. We should have more fights. I like fights,” he said, adding, “They’re not always fun to be in. Sometimes you wind up being on the wrong end. But fights are what make NASCAR what it is.” Indeed. So for me, elbows up and keep the microphone rolling. Stay tuned. w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m


No Success Stories? by: mike howe Follow Mike on Twitter: @TruckingDC • Like Mike on Facebook: www.facebook.com/TruckingPoliticsMore

ave you ever visited the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s (FMCSA) website? It’s easy to find, at www.fmcsa.dot.gov. If you haven’t been, I suggest taking a look. There is an abundance of safety information, guidance on rules and more. Every aspect of the website is devoted to promoting the administration’s mission of reducing crashes, injuries and fatalities involving large trucks and buses. There is one section on the FMCSA’s homepage that has caught the attention of many, including myself, called “News & Alerts.” Now, nearly every government website will have such a spot, but it is what’s in that area that raises an eyebrow for some. On any given day a visitor to the site can get some occasional safety information, but the vast majority of the “News & Alerts” items are related to FMCSA shutting down unsafe carriers or bus companies. This is good – unsafe, noncompliant operators should be shut down. That is part of the FMCSA’s mission. But where are the success stories? Where are the stories of carriers who were on the verge of being shut down, but through effort and FMCSA guidance are now operating at a safe level? Do these stories even exist? After a colleague pointed this out I decided to consult with the FMCSA, as certainly there are success stories in the industry. After much research on their part, however, the FMCSA spokesperson indicated they were not able to find any media releases about success stories. Administrator Anne Ferro spoke with me for a June 2012 Challenge Magazine feature and her answers suggested the shutdown of companies would be a focus. “We have certain authority to do things, and we are certainly asking Congress under the reauthorization bill for additional authority to improve our ability to tackle reincarnated carriers,” said Ferro. “My point internally, and the team feels this way very strongly, is that we need to press forward using all the authority we have at our disposal today to get the worst of the worst off the road. That includes the use of the imminent hazard tool, which had been available to us in the past but which we hadn’t challenged ourselves to ask under which conditions we can use it.” Ferro also testified before the Subcommit-

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tee on Highways and Transit on March 14 and again emphasized the administration’s success in shutting down carriers. In her testimony, she said, “The agency developed a strategic plan guided by a framework shaped by three core principles to raise the bar to enter the motor carrier industry; maintain high safety standards to remain in the industry; and remove high-risk carriers, drivers and service providers from operation.” That was the second paragraph of her five-page written statement. The third paragraph started by explaining how the agency had, just a couple of weeks prior, revoked operating authority of another company. Of course, her entire testimony did not focus on this aspect of what FMCSA does; it was just interesting how it was one of the first things she mentioned as a success. Let’s be honest: FMCSA has been successful at removing unsafe operators from the highway – just as they should. Highway safety data suggests there are improvements, though it is unclear as to what direct and specific impact these aggressive actions have had on the data. Maybe it’s just a perception issue. After all, perception is reality. The “tough talk” and the emphasis – almost pride – on shutting down operators are not helping to develop and foster a sense of cooperation and teamwork between government and industry. Then again, that might not be needed. The FMCSA is by definition a regulatory entity designed to ensure safety. Why should the FMCSA care about success stories? What good would come of the FMCSA highlighting success stories – whether they are stories of carriers earning the highest of safety marks or stories of carriers who have significantly improved their record? Those success stories don’t “sell.” They aren’t what government officials want to hear. The way to demonstrate something is “getting done” is to actually do something, such as shut down unsafe operators, and let the world know about it. Highlighting successes demonstrates only that the operators are doing something, which does not help the FMCSA demonstrate its value (though it would help lead to a more positive perception of the trucking industry by the rest of the motoring public). w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m


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Slow and Steady Loses Weight by: charles pope

ummer is just around the corner and with that the overwhelming message to get in shape before it gets here. Magazine covers shout “Sculpted Abs Made Easy” and ”Get Six-Pack Abs in 6 Weeks” and “Lose Your Gut in 3 Weeks.” The appeal of all of these headlines, and probably the articles if I actually read them, is the results they promise. A couple of minutes a day for a better body sounds great, but isn’t very realistic, nor does it offer a full picture of how to be healthy. We all know short-term measures don’t work, but I guess that doesn’t sell magazines. I didn’t pack on 30 pounds overnight, so getting rid of those pounds isn’t going to happen overnight either. Slow and steady wins the race. Nobody wants to be the tortoise, as evidenced by all the hare-like headlines. There’s nothing appealing about working out for 45 minutes three or four times a week. Nobody likes to cut out crispy fat-laden food. I love fried pickles as much as the next guy, but eating

them too often is just asking for trouble. For the past six months, I’ve been the tortoise. Losing weight by making small changes to my everyday life. I didn’t do anything crazy. I don’t eat as much junk food. I order a plain grilled chicken sandwich rather than the deep-fried greasy one with extra mayo. I drink more water and if I want a soda, I try to limit it to a diet one every other day. Those soda calories add up fast. Let me point out that I’m not cutting out everything, just cutting back. Better to cut back a little here and there than to make a dramatic cut. I’m more likely to stick with it. I have to admit, cutting back on the beer was the most difficult for me. After a long day on the road, I would kick back with one or two beers, and not light beer, either. Reducing my beer intake is reducing my waistline. My beer belly is on its way out; I can almost see a two-pack emerging. Do I want a six-pack? Of course, but I know I’ll have to do a lot more than cut back on adult beverages to get that. I’m guilty of picking up some of those magazines

with workouts claiming fast results. I’ve tried the workouts based on Hollywood movies and cable television shows, even those infomercial workouts they sell late at night. I can’t follow them for very long so I do what works for me. One workout might be three minutes on the bike, followed by hammer curls, burpees, squats, dumbbell chest presses and overhead lunges. After four sets of that, I’m toasted, in a good way. I sleep better and have more energy during the day. Funny you have to spend more energy to get more energy. I’m 30 pounds down and I’d like to drop 15 more. I hope to reach that goal in the next three months. Not because I couldn’t reach that goal faster, but because I know that I have to eat right and exercise regularly or it just won’t stick. There is no magic pill. Put down that doughnut and go for a walk. Nobody said it would be easy, but it really is that simple. Have a workout that works for you? Send me an email and tell me about it.

Do you have an industry issue you would like to gripe about? Send it to editor@ptcchallenge.com.


sponsored by:

Photo: Edzo’s burger shop

beef topped with red onions and tomatoes and slathered in a special sauce reminiscent of Russian dressing, sandwiched in a bun made at a local specialty bakery. It’s served with a full pound (yes, a pound) of shoestring fries, and goes well with a thick chocolate milkshake.

Hubcap Burger – Cotham’s Mercantile, Scott, Ark.

best burgers in the country by: marion kelly

hat do New Haven, Conn., Seymour, Wis., Tulsa, Okla., Hamburg, N.Y., and Athens, Texas, have in common? They all claim to be the country’s birthplace of the quintessential American food, the hamburger. Invented about 115 years ago, the hamburger is not just a delicious sandwich, it’s a symbol of American ingenuity – a quick hot meal to take on the go. The Library of Congress may side with New Haven on this topic, but that shouldn’t deter you from trying some of these tasty burgers from burger joints around the country that get it right.

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The Awful Awful Burger – The Little Nugget Diner, Reno, Nev.

In the back of The Nugget Casino is a diner that serves a little gem of culinary delight with a very misleading name. A shortened version of “Awful Big and Awful Good,” the Awful Awful burger is a half-pound of

The Hubcap Burger isn’t the size of an actual hubcap, but it’s pretty close. One pound of beef grilled topped with ooey, gooey cheese is the cornerstone menu item at this out-ofthe-way, slightly run-down hole-in-the-wall joint. Skip the so-so fries; go with the fried green tomatoes or the fried pickles instead. If you have room, try a chocolate fried pie. Hours are limited to 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Thursday, but this Americana kitchen is open until 8 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays.

The Original Burger Louis’ Lunch, New Haven, Conn.

The only location on our list that claims to be the hometown of the burger, Louis’ Lunch has been in business for 118 years. The burgers are cooked in the original 1898 vertical cast-iron grills, which fourth-generation owner Jeff Lassen says lock in the flavor by cooking both sides at the same time. Served on toast, rather than a bun, the burger can only be topped with cheese, tomato and onion, according to tradition – they’ve been known to kick you out if you ask for ketchup. Lassen says that it detracts from the taste of the beef, which is ground fresh every morning. “Do you want to taste what you’re eating

The Jucy Lucy – Matt’s Bar & Grill, Minneapolis

Two bars in Minneapolis claim ownership on the famous burger with the near-boiling cheese inside, but Matt’s Bar & Grill might take the title in this war. If you’re in doubt of the right location, their claim “If it’s spelled right, you’re in the wrong place,” will set you straight. Served with a huge portion of fries, a Jucy Lucy and a cold beer from the tap of a dive bar that hasn’t changed since 1954 is the perfect way to end the workday.

58 C H A L L E N G E m a y 2 0 1 3

Photo: Louis’ Lunch

You won’t find ketchup AT LOUIS’ LUNCH, where proprietor Jeff Lassen believes condiments cover up the flavor of the special beef blend. w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m


Griddled Burger – Edzo’s Burger Shop, Evanston, Ill.

It’s all about quality at Edzo’s. The burger joint cuts and grinds their all-American beef every morning; no frozen patties here. Choose between a thin, smashed Griddled burger or the thicker Char burger. We prefer the smashed, slightly crispy Griddled version, but you can’t go wrong either way. Sides include nine different flavors of French fries, such as the Taylor Street Fries that are smothered in Italian beef gravy and sweet and hot peppers, and hand-dipped milkshakes made on the old spindle machines for a creamier tasting treat. Hours are 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., so plan your visit accordingly.

Photo: Edzo’s burger shop

EDZO’S BURGER SHOP, Evanston, Ill. or do you want to cover it up?” One bite and you may agree when Lassen says “The proof is in the pudding.” Sides are either chips or potato salad and we’d recommend a locally made Foxon Park soda, such as the white birch, to wash it all down.

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a final touch. Served with a bottle of Rose Dom Perignon Champagne, the meal will set you back a meager $777. Hey, you’re in Vegas, live a little. The burger isn’t just a gimmick, either. The restaurant claims to make a handful of these over-the-top monstrosities every month.

777 Burger – Le Burger Brasserie, Las Vegas

If you have money burning a hole in your pocket while in Vegas, stop by the Paris Las Vegas Casino’s burger restaurant. Its signature 777 Burger created from Japaneseimported beef is layered with Maine lobster, velvety caramelized onions, creamy Brie cheese and sautéed prosciutto, and drizzled with 100-year aged balsamic vinegar as

Photo: Paris Las Vegas Casino

The impressive, and pricey, 777 burger from Le Burger Brasserie.

m a y 2 0 1 3 C H A L L E N G E 59


Have an inspiring story from the road? Maybe a poem or song? We want to share your creativity with our readers. Write down your thoughts and send it to us by mail or email (editor@ptcchallenge.com).

Submissions must be original, unpublished and created by the sender or the sender must have permission to submit. All submissions become the property of Challenge Magazine and will not be returned. Submissions may be edited and may be published or otherwise reused in any medium.

The Can’t Park, Won’t Park Poem By Chris Arbon

Can’t park, won’t park, leaves it on the pump, Just passed the test, doesn’t want a bump. Parked in line at an easy pull-through, Shady little spot with canopy too. Can’t park, won’t park, leaves it on the pump, Typical tactic for that big lump. Walking from the parking lot is just too hard, For four hundred forty pounds of human lard. Can’t park, won’t park, leaves it on the pump, Filled both tanks for a mighty sum. Presumes he’s paid rent for an hour, Gonna take his time, gonna take a shower. Can’t park, won’t park, leaves it on the pump, Urgent number two, gotta sit on my rump, But doesn’t come back when he’s been, Sits there reading Challenge magazine. Can’t park, won’t park, leaves it on the pump, Forgotten his PIN, the silly chump. It’s gonna take forever to get ‘em on the phone, Calling an office in a different time zone. Can’t park, won’t park, leaves it on the pump, It ain’t just tires that are gonna get a thump. Do unto others and avoid a death threat, Try a bit of fuel aisle etiquette.

Message in a Bottle By David Bayreuther

I long so much to have someone with which to share my soul, Not in part, but in whole. Someone who might miss me on the days that I’m gone, And easy to forgive me on days that I’m wrong. Someone that might like to take a walk in the rain And quick with comfort with nothing to gain. Someone who might like to hold my hand If for no other reason simply to show they understand. The moon offers but little light as I cast my shadow on this deserted shore. Is someone out there longing and waiting the same for their heart should hurt no more. I have set my bottle adrift, its contents sealed tight And a small sadness washes over me as I watch it go slowly and aimlessly, Like my life, forever out of sight.

60 C H A L L E N G E m a y 2 0 1 3

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48from Seed vessel ACROSS The highlighted clues come editorial content 50 Wife of a rajah 1 Grievous distress in this issue of Challenge Magazine. 52 Performance 4 Island of Denmark 3 Hatching a larva 55 Longofago 6 *GIBBS 5 Inhabitant of Yemen 56 Part of the verb "to be" 101 Providing 6 Deity Grievous distress 7 Overgrown of Denmark 57 On thewith topivy 124 Island Remarkable 8 Mouthpiece of a bridle 6 Jellen’s racing boss 58 1410Motion 9 ToConsume exist Providing picture 10 Highest mountain in Crete Remarkable 60 Kiln for drying hops 1512Room within a harem 11 Drop Motion picture 62 Haul 1614 gaseous 13 Hog sound 15Inert Room within a haremelement 14 Scanty Inert gaseous element 1716Prepare for publication 64 Admiration 15 Otherwise Prepare for publication 1817 Spoken 66 Floating platform 18 Auricular 18 Spoken 21 Give merit Not off 1919Not off 68 Posed 23 Angry Period of history 69 Malt beverage 2020 Period of history 25 Exclamation to express sorrow 21 Near to 70 Honey insect 2122Near to 27 Debutante Pelt 30 Tibetan gazelle Goad for driving cattle 71 Globe 2224 Pelt 31 Do not 26 Broad 73 Duty 2428Goad for driving cattle 32 Self-esteem Hello there 33 Ensnare Star in Orion 75 Roman capital of Palestine 2629 Broad 36 Coniferous evergreen forest 31 Fresh-water fish 77 Authenticating mark 2834Hello there 38 Mountain range Wood sorrel 41 Root of the taro Speaker 79 Willow 2935Star in Orion 43 Parody 37 Purse 80 Person who rows 3139Fresh-water fish 45 Theater district Not (prefix) 46 The ratio between Light meal 81 Collide withcircumference and diameter 3440Wood sorrel 49 Extended musicalcomposition 42 13-year-old Lost Sea explorer 82 Eccentric 3544Speaker 51 Entertain Negative vote 53 Gemstone Color 3745Purse 54 Born Neuter singular pronoun 3947 DOWN 59 Woody plant 48Not Seed (prefix) vessel 61 *WUHAN Loose outer garment Wife of meal a rajah 4050Light 1 63 Washing vessel 52 Performance 4255*SANDS 2 Single unit 65 Plural of I Long ago 67 Hatching Greek writer ofof fables Part of the verb "to be" 4456Negative vote 3 a larva 69 Extent of space On the top 4557 Color 5 Inhabitant of Yemen 70 Capital of Azerbaijan 58 Consume 4760Neuter singular pronoun 6 72 Deity Grass Kiln for drying hops

1 Capital of Hubei province 2 Single unit

73 Pair 74 Doctrine 76 Similar to 78 Prefix meaning without

APRIL CROSSWORD SOLUTION

62 Haul 64 Admiration 66 Floating platform 68 Posed 69 Malt beverage 70 Honey insect 71 Globe 73 Duty 75 Roman capital of Palestine 77 Authenticating mark 79 Willow 80 Person who rows 81 May 19 “______ Day” 82 Eccentric

G U L L I B L E A N H A N D A I R G N E E V E R N A E D D C I S E A D E B T R U R O A S L O O P L S N A P A E D A M N P G I D B I P E D

U L T I M A

L E S A H S C R E E E T W E D O T E M P A M I I S L A T I O T T S E A E I F R O S D Y A P O L Y

H I I E W I O B O E R S E P A R L E O F E A C M E

E L D A U P N N I D O T A B R B A E M M A M L I C T S R H T E O A S T O

7 Overgrown with ivy 8 Mouthpiece of a bridle 9 To exist 10 Highest mountain in Crete 11 Drop 13 Hog sound 14 Scanty 15 Otherwise 18 Auricular 21 Give merit 23 Angry 25 Exclamation to express sorrow 27 Debutante 30 Tibetan gazelle 31 Do not 32 Self-esteem 33 Ensnare 36 Coniferous evergreen forest 38 Mountain range 41 Root of the taro 43 Parody 45 Theater district 46 The ratio between circumference and diameter 49 Extended musical composition 51 Entertain 53 Gemstone 54 Born 59 Woody plant 61 Loose outer garment 63 Washing vessel 65 Plural of I 67 Greek writer of fables 69 Extent of space 70 Capital of Azerbaijan 72 Grass 73 Pair 74 Doctrine 76 Similar to 78 Prefix meaning without

W O E F U N C O H E L I U A O N N S K I H I R E O C A N O N T T R E R A N I A M A T P U L L S A T D E V O I U E S O A R S M

Y N G I B E M O V I M E D I T E R A E N G A D I G E L D O R A T O E A S A N D P I T D O I N G O P E A T A W E R A L E B E R C A E E A L K A N B U M

B S E O O R A T W I D A C E R B D S P O Y O R O A A F T E O S A R O S I P O

I F D A A L L E E A G N O D E S T A R B E A E R D D

T I M A N Y D O N T O

Answers will appear in next month’s issue and on www.ptcchallenge.com w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m

m a y 2 0 1 3 C H A L L E N G E 63


garmingallery Sky on Fire

Heidi Bowlby

Gator Spa

Mark Proffitt

Isn’t That Something

Debra Joy

Bulldog in Ice Fog honorable Frozen Sunrisemention

A Lil’ Bit Of SnowLang – Kristine Molmen Shanon

Canada Geese Sheila Mundy

Brian Stille


These are the faces of Pilot Flying J who have excelled in customer service PTC 706

Lewis Swain Tulsa, OK

A customer wrote in, “Lewis went way out of his way today to be very friendly. He does an excellent job with these showers. When I got the call that my shower was ready, he saw me coming down the hall and he directed me to the right stall, made sure I got my code in, made sure I had enough towels, and made sure to tell me to have a good day when I left. The shower was perfect. I could not ask for better.”

PTC 190

Cory Williams and Alexander Buskirk Clinton, NJ “I want to compliment Alex on how clean he kept his showers and area,” wrote a customer. “He was enthusiastic and pleasant and he needs some recognition.”

If you would like to recognize a Pilot Flying J employee who has made your visit fast, friendly or clean, or if you have any comments, please call our customer line at 1-877-866-7378


Fast, Casual Dining Nationwide! Pilot Flying J is launching a new fast, casual dining concept at select travel centers and travel plazas nationwide, the first of which opened in March at the new Pilot Travel Center in St. Marys, Ga. In addition to Pilot Flying J’s premium coffee and cappuccino selections, the new dining concept offers a variety-filled menu featuring hot soups, home-style platters, fresh-made salads and cold sandwiches, a frozen-yogurt bar, pizza, hot dogs and much more. Pilot Travel Center employee Patricia Page makes a pot of fresh premium coffee.

Professional driver Ken Szorosy sits down to enjoy a home-style platter with hearty meatloaf and a hot cup of “the best coffee on the interstate.”

Pilot Travel Center employee Erica Peacock pours a sample of hot, delicious broccoli cheddar soup from the soup bar.

CHALLENGE coupon

on the road Fax 1 page FREE! SAVE $2 with coupon and need to send a fax? Pilot offers user-friendly and convenient faxing services at many of our 300 Travel Center Locations. Stop in today!

Coupon is valid at participating PTC, L.L.C. Travel Center locations except in Canada. Void where prohibited. Not valid with any other offer. No cash value. One coupon per customer/per transaction only. Coupon valid 5/1/13 through 5/31/13.

cashier must scan item before scanning barcode

www.facebook.com/pilottravelcenters www.twitter.com/pilottravel The Pilot logo is a registered trademark of Pilot Travel Centers LLC.


earn

double driver payback points

at stores listed with a yellow tag

double myrewards points

at stores listed with a yellow tag

DEF

# Flying j dealer Pilot locations locations locations

showers

#

auto showers

S

Flying j dealer showers auto Pilot showers locations locations locations

diesel exhaust fluid

DEF

restaurants outlined in a red box do not accept FFA points

# parking

# parking

rv dump

restaurants outlined in a red box do not accept MYREWARDS points

alabama

ARIZONA (cont.)

ARKANSAS (cont.)

369 BIRMINGHAM 7 S DEF 100 I-20/59/65 AL 78, Exit 123 901 Bankhead Highway West, 35204 602 BIRMINGHAM DEF 157 15 rv dump I-65 & SR 94, Exit 264 224 Daniel Payne Drive North, 35207 603 Dothan DEF 158 9 rv dump Ross Clark Hwy/Hwy 231 2190 Ross Clark Circle, 36301 604 Hope Hull 9 S DEF 127 rv dump I-65 Exit 158 900 Tyson Road, 36043 497 Lincoln DEF 80 7 I-20, Exit 165 121 Honda Drive, 35096 601 McCalla DEF 150 15 rv dump I-20/I-59 Exit 104 6098 MacAshan Dr, 35111 302 MOBILE (THEODORE) DEF 65 5 I-10 & Theodore Dawes Rd, Exit 13 6955 Theodore Dawes Road, 36582 441 PRICEVILLE 7 S DEF 90 rv dump I-65, Exit 334 3240 Point Mallard Parkway, 35603 75 SATSUMA 8 S DEF 125 I-65, Exit 19 6109 US 43 South, 36572 76 TUSCALOOSA 8 S DEF 125 I-20/59, Exit 76 4416 Skyland Boulevard East, 35405

609 Eloy DEF 350 11 rv dump I-10 Exit 208 16189 S Sunshine Blvd, 85231 610 Kingman DEF 95 11 rv dump I-40 Exit 53 3300 East Andy DeVine Ave., 86401 211 LAKE HAVASU CITY 12 S DEF 110 I-40 & AZ 95, Exit 9 14750 South Highway 95, 86404 279 NOGALES (RIO RICO) DEF 90 11 I-19 & SR 289, Exit 12 769 East Frontage Road, 85648 611 Phoenix DEF 185 15 rv dump I-10 Exit 137 6700 West Latham, 85043 328 QUARTZSITE DEF 100 4 I-10 & US 95, Exit 17 1201 West Main Street, 85359 612 Winslow DEF 250 15 rv dump I-40 Exit 255 400 Transcon Lane, 86047 505 Yuma 6 100 I-8, Exit 12 108000 North Frontage Road, 85367

429 West Memphis 11 S DEF 150 I-40, Exit 280 1100 Martin Luther King Blvd, 72301 607 West Memphis DEF 225 15 rv dump I-40 Exit 280 & I-55 Exit 4 3400 Service Loop Road, 72301

p 205-324-4532 f 205-324-5897

p 205-323-2177 f 205-323-7885

p 334-792-5152 f 334-792-5293

p 334-613-0212 f 334-613-0849

p 205-763-2225 f 205-763-2229

p 205-477-9181 f 205-477-6870

p 251-653-8834 f 251-653-9556

p 256-353-5252 f 256-353-5235

p 251-679-6260 f 251-679-6235

p 205-553-9710 f 205-553-3089

ARIZONA 459 AVONDALE 13 S DEF 145 rv dump I-10, Exit 133A 900 North 99th Avenue, 85323 180 BELLEMONT 7 S DEF 90 I-40, EXIT 185 12500 West I-40, 86015 608 Ehrenberg DEF 300 13 I-10 Exit 1 Box 801, I-10 Exit 1 S. Frontage Rd, 85334 458 ELOY 5 S DEF 145 rv dump I-10, Exit 208 619 South Sunshine Boulevard, 85231

p 623-936-0900 f 623-936-7376

p 928-773-0180 f 928-773-0205

p 928-923-9600 f 928-923-7735

p 520-466-7550 f 520-466-7575

68 C H A L L E N G E M a y 2 0 1 3

p 520-466-9204 f 520-466-9588

p 928-757-7300 f 928-757-1085

p 928-764-2410 f 928-764-2021

p 520-377-0001 f 520-377-0003

p 623-936-1118 f 623-936-3611

p 928-927-7777 f 928-927-7000

p 928-289-2081 f 928-289-3798

f 928-342-2696

ARKANSAS 118 BENTON 7 S DEF 70 I-30, Exit 121 7801 Alcoa Road, 72015 332 N. LITTLE ROCK 7 S DEF 100 I-40 & SR391 Galloway Road, Exit 161 3300 Highway 391 North, 72117 430 RUSSELLVILLE 5 S DEF 130 I-40, Exit 84 215 SR 331 North, 72802 605 Russellville DEF 165 15 rv dump I-40, Exit 84 42 Bradley Cove Road, 72801 145 SPRINGDALE DEF 33 4 US 412 & 71 Bypass 5660 West Sunset Avenue, 72762 606 Texarkana DEF 157 15 rv dump I-30 Exit 7 Rt 12 Box 254B, I30 & Hwy 108, 71854

p 501-794-5900 f 501-794-5904

p 501-945-2226 f 501-945-2282

p 479-967-7414 f 479-964-0112

p 479-890-6161 f 479-890-2639

p 479-872-6100 f 479-872-6103

p 870-774-3595 f 870-772-1006

p 870-732-1202 f 870-732-1340

p 870-735-8200 f 870-735-3300

CALIFORNIA 613 Bakersfield DEF 250 14 rv dump Hwy 99 Exit Merced Ave. 17047 Zachary Ave., 93308 282 barstow 5 S 30 I-15/40 & US 58 2591 Commerce Parkway, 92311 614 Bartsow DEF 171 15 rv dump I-15 & Lenwood Exit 2611 Fisher Boulevard, 92311 372 CASTAIC 7 S DEF 125 I-5 & Lake Hughes Exit 31642 Castaic Road, 91384 168 DUNNIGAN 10 S DEF 155 I-5, Road 8 Exit 554 30035 County Road 8, 95937 616 Frazier Park 18 285 rv dump I-5 Frazier Park Exit 205 42810 Frazier Mtn Park Road, 93243 381 HESPERIA 11 S DEF 300 I-15 & US 395 8701 Highway 395, 92345 200 KRAMER JUNCTION DEF 50 7 US 395/US 58 5725 Highway 58, 93516 617 Lodi DEF 187 15 rv dump I-5 & Hwy 12, Exit Fairfield 15100 North Thornton Road, 95242 154 LOST HILLS 7 S DEF 70 I-5 & CA 46 14808 Warren Street, 93249 365 MADERA DEF 150 11 CA-99 at Ave 18.5 22717 Avenue 18 1/2, 93637 307 N. PALM SPRINGS DEF 80 5 I-10 & Garnett & Indian Ave. 6605 N. Indian Canyon Drive, 92258

p 661-392-5300 f 661-392-5307

p 760-253-2861 f 760-253-2863

p 760-253-7043 f 760-253-7051

p 661-257-2800 f 661-257-2109

p 530-724-3060 f 530-724-3029

p 661-248-2600 f 661-248-2610

p 760-956-2844 f 760-956-1198

p 760-762-0041 f 760-762-5231

p 209-339-4066 f 209-339-4287

p 661-797-2122 f 661-797-9772

p 559-673-3878 f 559-673-7679

p 760-329-5562 f 760-329-0083

w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m


double myrewards points

at stores listed with a yellow tag

#

S

Flying j dealer showers auto Pilot showers locations locations locations

DEF

# parking

rv dump

CALIFORNIA (cont.)

FLORIDA (cont.)

FLORIDA (cont.)

343 Otay Mesa 9 S DEF 150 I-905, Exit 7, CA905 1497 Piper Ranch Rd, 92154 618 Ripon DEF 197 15 rv dump Hwy 99 Exit Jack Tone Rd 1501 North Jack Tone Road, 95366 879 Sacramento 49er Travel Plaza 12 275 I-80, Exit 85 (W. El Camino Ave) 2828 El Centro Rd, 95833 237 SALINAS DEF 75 7 US 101 & Sanborn 951 Work Street, 93901 765 Thousand Palms 9 88 rv dump I-10 Ramon Exit 72235 Varner Road, 92276 137 weed DEF 80 7 rv dump I-5, Exit 745 395 E Vista Drive, 96094

352 FT. MYERS 6 80 I-75, Luckett Rd, Exit 139 6050 Plaza Drive, 33905 90 FT. PIERCE 8 S DEF 80 I-95, Exit 129 7300 West Okeechobee Road, 34945 471 Haines City DEF 80 7 rv dump US Hwy 27 North 35647 US Hwy 27 North, 33845 91 JACKSONVILLE DEF 30 5 I-95, Exit 329 1625 County Road 210 West, 32259 374 MARIANNA 7 S 90 I-10 @ FL 71, Exit 142 2209 Highway 71, 32448 873 miami 3 65 Hwy 27 12200 NW South River Road, 33178 874 miami 2 30 US 41 & SR 997 17696 SW 8th Street, 33194 897 Miami Gardens Dades corner Plz 1 20 SR 826, Exit SR 817 16650 NW 27th Avenue, 33054 425 MIDWAY 8 S DEF 90 rv dump I-10, Exit 192 33333 Blue Star Highway, 32343 293 OCALA DEF 60 7 I-75 & FL 484, Exit 341 2020 SW 135th Street, 34476 92 OCALA 7 S DEF 130 I-75, Exit 358 4255 NW Highway 326, 34482 424 OCALA 5 S 125 I-75, Exit 358 4032 West Highway 326, 34482 94 PUNTA GORDA DEF 70 5 I-75, Exit 161 26505 Jones Loop Road, 33950 623 Quincy 15 150 rv dump I-10 Exit 192 32670 Blue Star Highway, 32343 626 St. Augustine DEF 160 9 rv dump I-95 Hwy 206 Exit 305 950 State Road 206 West, 32086 622 St. Lucie 15 156 rv dump I-95 Hwy 68 Exit 131 100 North Kings Hwy 625 Tampa 4 30 rv dump I-4 & SR 579 Exit 10 11555 East Sligh Ave.

95 WILDWOOD 5 S DEF 10 I-75, Exit 329 493 East State Route 44 96 YEEHAW JUNCTION 0 40 US 60 & FL Turnpike, Exit 193 3050 SR 60 Yeehaw Junction

p 619-661-9558 f 619-661-9814

p 209-599-4141 f 209-599-4265

p 916-927-4774 f 916-923-3677

p 831-775-0380 f 831-775-0360

p 760-343-1500 f 760-343-1330

p 530-938-9600 f 530-938-9700

COLORADO 619 Aurora DEF 149 15 rv dump I-70 Exit 285 (South) 16751 East 32nd Ave., 80011 316 DENVER 7 S DEF 100 I-70 & Steele Street, Exit 276A 4640 Steele Street, 80216 621 Limon DEF 200 2 rv dump I-70 & Exit 359 2495 Williams Ave., 80828

p 303-366-7600 f 303-367-5657

p 303-292-6303 f 303-292-3647

p 719-775-9286 f 719-775-9306

CONNecticut 255 MILFORD 12 S DEF 150 I-95, EXIT 40 433 Old Gate Lane, 06460 882 N Stonington American Auto Stop 6 119 I-95, Exit 93 273 Clarks Falls Rd, 06359

p 203-876-1266 f 203-876-9473

p 860-599-2020 f 860-599-5771

FLORIDA 87 BALDWIN DEF 50 5 I-10, Exit 343 1050 US 301 South, 32234 88 COCOA 2 I-95, Exit 201 4455 King Street, 32926 624 Dade City DEF 180 15 rv dump I-75 Exit 285 & SR52 29933 State Road 52, 33576 89 ELLENTON DEF 2 2 I-75, Exit 224 1526 51st Avenue East, 34222

w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m

p 904-266-4238 f 904-266-9820

p 321-639-0346 f 321-639-0351

p 352-588-5444 f 352-588-4629

p 941-729-6288 f 941-729-7523

p 239-693-6868 f 239-693-1253

p 772-460-0611 f 772-460-9492

p 863-421-3571 f 863-421-6032

p 904-826-3618 f 904-825-2760

p 850-482-2148 f 850-482-2136

p 305-883-1004 f 305-883-1799

p 305-553-6203 f 305-207-7967

Arline’s Big Apple Seafood Restaurant

Wingstop

p 305-623-3434 f 305-623-3439

p 850-576-3200 f 850-576-3213

p 352-347-8555 f 352-347-3082

p 352-402-9081 f 352-622-5233

p 352-867-8300 f 352-867-8448

p 941-637-3974 f 941-637-5729

p 850-574-1299 f 850-574-6546

p 904-794-0426 f 904-794-7582

p 772-461-0091 f 772-461-0291

p 813-612-9438 f 813-612-9297

restaurants outlined in a red box do not accept MYREWARDS points

p 352-748-4486 f 352-748-6095

p 407-436-1224 f 407-436-1919

GEORGIA 260 ALBANY DEF 80 5 Hwy 300 & Clark Ave 310 Cordele Road, 31705 331 ATLANTA (EAST) 7 S DEF 100 I-285 & Bouldercrest Road, Exit 51 2605 Bouldercrest, 30316 344 ATLANTA (WEST) 5 45 I-285 & South Atlanta Road, Exit 16 4600 South Atlanta Road, 30080 65 AUGUSTA 3 30 I-20, Exit 194 4091 Jimmie Dyess Parkway, 30909 144 AUGUSTA DEF 90 6  I-20, Exit 200 2975 Gun Club Road, 30907 66 BRASELTON 6 S DEF 70 I-85, Exit 129 5888 Highway 53, 30517 627 Brunswick DEF 150 15 rv dump I-95 Exit 29 2990 US Hwy 17 South, 31523 628 Carnesville DEF 190 15 rv dump I-85 Exit 160 10226 Old Federal Road, 30521 67 CARTERSVILLE 8 S DEF 100 I-75, Exit 296 968 Cassville-White Road, 30120 416 CORDELLE 10 60 rv dump I-75, Exit 101 2201 East 16 Avenue, 31015 319 DALTON 7 100 I-75/Connector 3, Exit 328 244 Connector 3 SW, 30720 421 DALTON 9 S DEF 210 rv dump I-75, Exit 326 142 Carbondale Road, 30721 68 DUBLIN DEF 20 3 I-16, Exit 51 2185 US 441, 31021 630 Jackson DEF 200 14 rv dump I-75 Exit 201 I-75 & Exit 66 Bucksnort Road, 30233 69 LAGRANGE DEF 60 3 I-85, Exit 13 1960 Whitesvillle Road, 30240

p 229-878-1355 f 229-878-1302

p 404-212-8733 f 404-212-8568

p 770-434-9949 f 770-434-8341

p 706-860-6677 f 706-869-9074

p 706-667-6557 f 706-481-9940

p 706-654-2820 f 706-654-9326

p 912-280-0006 f 912-280-9555

p 706-335-6656 f 706-335-4432

p 770-607-7835 f 770-607-7873

p 229-271-5775 f 229-271-5774

p 706-277-7934 f 706-277-3337

p 706-370-4060 f 706-370-5769

p 478-275-2143 f 478-275-0070

p 770-775-0138 f 770-775-1134

p 706-884-6318 f 706-884-1872

M a y 2 0 1 3 C H A L L E N G E 69


double myrewards points

at stores listed with a yellow tag

#

S

Flying j dealer showers auto Pilot showers locations locations locations

70 C H A L L E N G E ja n u ar y 2 0 1 2

DEF

# parking

rv dump

GEORGIA (cont.)

IDAHO

631 Lake Park DEF 200 15 rv dump I-75 Exit 2 7001 Lake Park-Bellville Rd., 31636 420 MADISON DEF 110 6 rv dump I-20, Exit 114 1881 Eatonton Road, 30650 422 NEWNAN 7 S DEF 95 I-85, Exit 41 1645 South Highway 29, 30263 71 PORT WENTWORTH 8 S DEF 125 I-95, Exit 109 7001 Highway 21, 31407 632 Resaca 15 200 rv dump I-75 Exit 320 288 Resaca Beach Blvd. NW, 30735 415 RISING FAWN DEF 150 8 I-59, Exit 4 319 Deer Head Cover Road, 30738 72 SAVANNAH 1 I-16, Exit 160 1504 Dean Forrest Road, 31408 575 St. mary’s DEF 235 12 I-95, Exit 1 491 W. St. Mary’s Street, 31558 312 TALLAPOOSA 6 S 90 I-20 & GA 100, Exit 5 882 Georgia Highway 100, 30176 417 TEMPLE DEF 140 14 rv dump I-20, Exit 19 625 Carrollton Street, 30179 634 TEMPLE 15 164 rv dump I-20 & Hwy 113 Exit 19 15 Villa Rosa Road, 30179 192 TIFTON 12 S 200 I-75, Exit 60 4431 Old Union Road, 31794 633 union point 9 189 rv dump I-20 & Exit 138 3600 Highway 77 South, 30642 73 VALDOSTA 6 S 90 I-75, Exit 11 3495 Madison Highway, 31601 398 VIENNA DEF 100 5 I-75, Exit 109 39 Victory Lane, 31092 267 WARNER ROBINS (BYRON) 11 S DEF 150 I-75, Exit 146 2965 Highway 247C, 31008 254 WILDWOOD DEF 20 3 I-24 Exit 169 650 Highway 299, 30757

777 East Boise 6 60 I-84 Exit 54 (Federal Way) 3353 Federal Way, 83705 638 Caldwell DEF 100 9 I-84 Exit 29 3512 Franklin Road, 83605 641 McCammon DEF 84 5 I-15 Exit 47 587 E. US Hwy 30, 83250 350 MOUNTAIN HOME 9 100 I-84 & US 20, Exit 95 1050 Highway 20, 83647 639 Post Falls DEF 100 8 I-90 Exit 2 N 400 Idahline Rd, 83854 640 Twin Falls DEF 100 6 I-84 Exit 173 5350 Highway 93, 83338

p 229-559-6500 f 229-559-3008 TM

p 706-343-1455 f 706-343-1033

p 770-252-3551 f 770-252-2197

p 912-964-7006 f 912-964-7808

p 706-629-1541 f 706-629-2003

p 706-462-2455 f 706-462-2702

p 912-964-5280 f 912-964-5098

p 912-882-5424 f 912-882-8867

p 770-574-9922 f 770-574-9697

p 770-562-9773 f 770-562-2269

p 770-562-4009 f 770-562-3571

p 229-382-7295 f 229-382-4910

p 706-486-4835 f 706-486-4845

p 229-244-8034 f 229-244-6020

p 229-268-1414 f 229-268-4880

p 478-956-5316 f 478-956-3726

p 706-820-7353 f 706-820-9539

restaurants outlined in a red box do not accept MYREWARDS points

rv dump

p 208-385-9745 f 208-344-3624

rv dump

p 208-453-9225 f 208-453-9409

rv dump

p 208-254-9845 f 208-254-9893

p 208-587-4465 f 208-587-3071

rv dump

p 208-773-0593 f 208-773-0404

p 208-324-3454 f 208-324-4097

ILLINOIS 642 alorton 15 202 rv dump I-255 & Exit 17A 140 Racehorse Drive, 62207 299 BLOOMINGTON 6 S DEF 160 I-55/74 & IL 9, Exit 160A 1522 West Market Street 526 Champaign road ranger DEF 150 3 I-57, Exit 240 4910 Market St 473 channahon 0 25 I-55 & Route 6, Exit 248 23841 SE Eams 378 Chicago road ranger LMTD 0 I-55 MM 288 “Stevenson Expressway” 3401 South California Avenue, 60632 368 Decatur DEF 90 7 I-72, Exit 144 (SE Quad) 4030 E. Boyd Road 523 Dixon road ranger DEF 45 5 I-88 Exit 54 1801 South Galena Ave. ,61021 313 EAST ST. LOUIS 11 S DEF 200 I 70/55 Exit 4 699 State Route 203 165 EFFINGHAM 7 S DEF 100 I-57/70, Exit 162 2500 North 3rd Street 643 Effingham DEF 180 15 rv dump I-70 & I-57, Exit 160 1701 W Evergreen / I-70 & I-57 468 Gilman DEF 80 7 I-57, Exit 283 815 Hwy 24 West, 60938

p 618-337-4579 f 618-337-4851

p 309-827-7867 f 309-827-2355

p 815-315-4991 f 217-643-7809

p 815-467-0918 f 815-467-0972

p 815-977-7020 f 773-847-1438

p 217-876-0208 f 217-876-0522

Dan’s Big Slice Pizza p 815-516-1998 f 815-284-0469

p 618-875-5800 f 618-875-4234

p 217-342-3787 f 217-342-6672

p 217-347-7161 f 217-347-5815

p 815-265-4754 f 815-265-4795

w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m


double myrewards points

at stores listed with a yellow tag

#

Flying j dealer showers auto Pilot showers locations locations locations

543 Hampshire road ranger Dan’s Big Slice Pizza DEF 30 4 I-90, Exit 43 p 815-209-9013 19 N. 681 US Hwy 20 f 847-683-7609 644 LaSalle DEF 186 15 rv dump I-80 Exit 77 p 815-220-0611 343 Civic Road f 815-220-0617 514 Lincoln Thorntons Subworks 6 100 2903 Woodlawn Road p 217-732-3915 I-55, Exit 126 f 217-732-4875 540 Loves Park road ranger 0 LTD I-90 & Riverside Blvd p 815-580-4221 7500 East Riverside Blvd, 61111 f 847-232-3058 595 marion DEF 43 5 I-57, Exit 54B p 618-993-2697 2611Vernell Road, 62959 f 618-993-8100 347 Mclean road ranger Dan’s Big Slice Pizza Dixie DEF 80 10 I-55, Exit 145 p 815-315-0774 501 South Main Street, 61754 f 309-874-2048 530 mendota road ranger DEF 25 3 I-39, Exit 72 p 815-315-4210 2705 12th Street, 61342 f 815-539-2340 326 Minonk road ranger Dan’s Big Woody’s Slice Pizza DEF 100 4 I-39, Exit 27 p 815-315-4189 1311 Carolyn Dr, 61760 f 309-432-2002 236 MINOOKA 7 S DEF 100 I-80, Exit 122 p 815-467-4416 301 Ridge Road, 60447 f 815-467-5409 39 MONEE DEF 90 5 I-57, Exit 335 p 708-534-2483 6002 Monee-Manhattan Road, 60449 f 708-534-3980 482 MT. VERNON 7 S DEF 100 I-57, Exit 95 p 618-244-1216 4610 Broadway, 62864 f 618-244-1262 520 new berlin road ranger DEF 28 3 I-72, Exit 82 p 815-209-9009 700 King Rd, 62670 534 Okawville road ranger DEF 50 2 I-64, Exit 41 p 815-656-4143 905 Hen House Rd, 62271 f 618-243-6479 515 ottawa road ranger Dan’s Big Slice Pizza DEF 22 2 I-80, Exit 93 p 815-516-0946 3041 North IL Route 71,61350 f 815-434-4081 645 Pontoon Beach DEF 185 15 rv dump I-270 & Exit 6B p 618-931-1580 1310 East Chain of Rocks Road, 62040 f 618-931-3587 541 Princeton road ranger Dan’s Big Slice Pizza DEF 250 7 I-80, Exit 56 p 815-315-4951 2835 N Main St, 61356 f 815-875-1718 539 Rochelle road ranger Dan’s Big Slice Pizza DEF 55 5 I-39, Exit 99 p 815-209-9038 890 E Hwy 38, 61068 f 815-562-6573 535 Rockford road ranger 0 LTD US 20 p 815-315-4974 4980 S Main St, 61108 f 847-232-1183 w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m

S

DEF

# parking

rv dump

restaurants outlined in a red box do not accept MYREWARDS points

ILLINOIS (cont.) 536 South Beloit road ranger DEF 75 5 I-90, Exit 1 6070 Gardner Street, 61080 646 South Beloit DEF 186 15 rv dump I-90 & HWY 75 16049 Willowbrook Road, 61080 512 Springfield road ranger DEF 25 2 I-55, Exit 90 500 Toronto Road, 62711 525 Springfield road ranger 6 80 I-55, Exit 100-A 3752 Camp Butler Rd, 62707 249 TROY 7 S DEF 135 I-55/70 & IL 162, Exit 18 820 Edwardsville Road, 62294 529 Tuscola road ranger 3 15 I-57, Exit 212 1112 East Southline Dr., 61953 537 Winnebago road ranger 0 LTD US 20, MM8 101 S. Winnebago Rd, 61088 476 woodhull DEF 80 5 I-74, Exit 32 900 Plaza Ave, 61490

Dan’s Big Slice Pizza

p 815-264-4311 f 815-389-3917

p 815-389-4760 f 815-389-4793

Dan’s Big Slice Pizza p 815-516-0863 f 217-585-1883

Dan’s Big Slice Pizza

Star 66 Café

p 815-209-9059 f 217-528-9169

p 618-667-0946 f 618-667-0966

p 815-315-4988 f 217-253-3793

Dan’s Big Slice Pizza p 815-957-4049 f 847-897-2600

p 309-334-4550 f 309-334-4556

INDIANA 444 BRAZIL 10 S DEF 55 I-70, Exit 23 4376 North SR 59, 47834 531 BRAZIL road ranger DEF 30 3 I-70, Exit 23 990 West State Rd 42, 47834 445 BURNS HARBOR 7 S DEF 115 rv dump I-94, Exit 22 243 Melton Road, 46304 247 CRAWFORDSVILLE 5 S DEF 110 I-74 & SR 32, Exit 39 4367 East State Road 32, 47933 28 DALEVILLE DEF 35 3 I-69, Exit 234 15151 Commerce Road, 47334 446 DALEVILLE DEF 125 5 I-69, Exit 234 15876 West Commerce Road, 47334 447 EVANSVILLE (HAUBSTADT) 5 S 145 rv dump I-64, Exit 25B 1042 E Warrenton Road, 47639 362 FORTVILLE (PENDLETON) 4 50 I-69, Exit 214 7455 South State Rd. 13, 46064 29 FREMONT 7 S DEF 130 I-80, Exit 144; I-69 N, Exit 157 6900 Old US 27, 46737

p 812-446-9400 f 812-446-6116

p 815-209-9052 f 812-442-5206

p 219-787-5705 f 219-787-9656

p 765-361-9603 f 765-361-9601

p 765-378-3599 f 765-378-3592

p 765-378-0246 f 765-378-4248

p 812-868-1048 f 812-868-1050

p 317-485-6211 f 317-485-4527

p 260-833-1987 f 260-833-6794

ja n u ar y 2 0 1 2 C H A L L E N G E 71


double myrewards points

at stores listed with a yellow tag

#

S

Flying j dealer showers auto Pilot showers locations locations locations

indiana (cont.) 881 Ft Wayne Ft Wayne travel plz 6 260 I-69, Exit 309A 3037 Goshen Rd, 46808 271 GARY 9 S DEF 215 I-80/94 & Burr Street, Exit 6 2501 Burr Street, 46406 30 Greenfield DEF 150 5 I-70, Exit 96 2640 North 600 West, 46140 542 Greenwood road ranger DEF 65 7 I-65, Exit 99 1615 East Main Street, 46143 647 Haubstadt DEF 145 9 rv dump I-64 & SR 41 Exit 25B Rural Route 1, Box 254A, 47639 448 HEBRON 8 S DEF 135 I-65, Exit 240 18011 Colorado Street, 46341 31 HIGHLAND 2 I-80 & 94, Exit 2 8150 Indianapolis Boulevard, 46322 318 INDIANAPOLIS 7 S DEF 90 I-465 & IN37, Exit 4 4607 South Harding Street, 46217 649 Indianapolis DEF 190 15 rv dump I-465 Exit 4 1720 West Thompson Road, 46217 546 Lake staTIon - S – road ranger 4 15 I-80, Exit 15A 2151 Ripley St., 46405 650 Lake Station DEF 375 14 rv dump I-94 & Exit 15B 1401 Ripley Street, 46405 478 LEAVENWORTH DEF 65 5 I-64, Exit 92 6921 South SR 66, 47137 652 Lebanon DEF 150 9 rv dump I-65 Exit 139 520 South State Road 39, 46052 653 Lowell DEF 375 15 Rt 2 & I-65 Exit 240 3231 East 181st Street, 46356 152 MEMPHIS DEF 70 10 I-65, Memphis Road, Exit 16 14013 Memphis Blue Lick Road, 47143 304 new haven DEF 80 9 rv dump I-469, Exit 19 Hwy 30 & Doyle Road, 46774 198 PLYMOUTH 7 S DEF 110 US 30 & US 31 10619 9A Road, 46563

The Point Restaurant

p 260-482-7814 f 260-482-7780

p 219-844-2661 f 219-844-7957

p 317-894-1910 f 317-894-3499

p 815-315-4987 f 317-881-7301

p 812-768-5304 f 812-768-9215

Pizza p 219-696-8265 f 219-696-8281

p 219-923-6405 f 219-972-4134

p 317-783-1033 f 317-783-0851

p 317-783-5543 f 317-783-5648

p 815-239-6205 f 219-962-5723

p 219-962-8502 f 219-962-3259

p 812-739-2002 f 812-739-4034 TM

p 765-483-9755 f 765-483-9762

p 219-696-6446 f 219-696-2456

p 812-294-4233 f 812-294-4237

TM

p 260-493-4035 f 260-493-4921

p 574-936-6525 f 574-936-4348

72 C H A L L E N G E M a y 2 0 1 3

DEF

# parking

rv dump

restaurants outlined in a red box do not accept MYREWARDS points

indiana (cont.)

iowa (cont.)

34 REMINGTON DEF 75 5 I-65, Exit 201 4154 West US Highway 24, 47977 339 RILEYSBURG (COVINGTON) DEF 50 6 I-74 & SR 63, Exit 4 16502 North State Road 63, 47932 242 SHELBYVILLE 7 S DEF 90 I-74, Exit 109 1851 West 400 North 35 SOUTH BEND DEF 70 5 I-80, Exit 72 6424 West Brick Road 655 Spiceland DEF 193 15 rv dump I-70 Exit 123 5300 South State Rte. 3 297 TERRE HAUTE DEF 70 5 I-70 & IN46, Exit 11 5555 E. Margaret Avenue 36 VALPARAISO DEF 25 3 US 30 & SR 49 4105 US 30 East 37 WHITELAND 8 S DEF 110 rv dump I-65, Exit 95 2962 County Road 500 North 656 WHITELAND DEF 173 50 I-65 & Whiteland Road, Exit 95 4982 North 350 East

532 elk run heights road ranger DEF 100 6 I-380, Exit 68 100 Plaza Drive, 50707 637 Evansdale DEF 80 7 rv dump I-380 & Evansdale Dr. 445 Evansdale Drive, 50707 131 Osceola DEF 80 5 rv dump I-35, Exit 34 2010 West Clay Street, 50213 238 Percival DEF 50 7 I-29, Exit 10 2495 210th Ave., 51648 594 Sioux city DEF 100 7 I-29, Exit 143 2815 Singing Hills Blvd, 51111 43 WALCOTT 8 S DEF 160 I-80, Exit 284 3500 North Plainview Road, 52773 268 WALCOTT 3 25 I-80, Exit 284 2975 North Plainview Road, 52773 572 williams 7 S DEF 105 rv dump I-35, and SR 20, Exit 144 3040 220th Street, 50271

p 219-261-3786 f 219-261-3986

p 765-793-7307 f 765-793-2155

p 317-392-8771 f 317-392-8721

p 574-272-8212 f 574-272-9914

p 765-987-1833 f 765-987-1836

p 812-877-9977 f 812-877-9978

p 219-464-1644 f 219-464-9019

p 317-535-7656 f 317-535-3058

p 317-535-1124

f 319-685-4575

p 641-357-3124

Kentucky

IOWA 913 ALTOONA DEF 350 18 I-80 & US 65, Exit 142 3231 Adventureland Drive, 50009 496 Atalissa 4 45 I-80, Exit 265 2086 Atalissa Rd., 52720 893 avoca wings america/Flying j 15 200 I-80, Exit 40 7005 N. Chestnut St, 51521 495 brooklyn 4 S 140 I-80, Exit 201 4126 Hwy 21, 52211 407 CLEAR LAKE DEF 125 6 I-35, Exit 194 2411 US Highway 18 East, 50428 329 COUNCIL BLUFFS 7 S DEF 80 I-80/29, Exit 1B 2647 South 24th Street, 51501 636 Davenport DEF 146 15 rv dump I-80 Exit 292 8200 N.W. Blvd., 52806 373 DES MOINES 17 S DEF 350 I-35/80 & Douglas Ave, Ext 126 11957 Douglas Avenue, 50322

p 515-967-7878 f 515-967-5726

p 563-946-3761 f 563-946-3871

p 712-343-4007 f 712-343-5026

p 319-685-4221

f 641-357-4939

p 712-322-0088 f 712-322-0236

p 563-386-7710 f 563-386-8243

p 515-276-1509

Dan’s Big Slice Pizza

p 815-315-0271 f 319-235-5237

p 319-291-7714 f 319-291-7720

p 641-342-8658 f 641-342-1782

p 712-382-2224 f 712-382-1556

p 712-258-3816 f 712-258-3320

p 563-284-4100 f 563-284-4103

p 563-284-5074 f 563-284-5076

p 515-854-9117 f 515-854-9124

KANSAS 920 colby 5 90 I-70, Exit 54 110 East Willow Street, 67701 657 Dodge City 4 62 Hwy 400 & Hwy 283 2524 E. Wyatt Earp Blvd., 67801 658 Emporia DEF 74 7 rv dump I-35 & US 50 Exit 127 4245 West Hwy 50, 66801 903 SALINA 13 140 rv dump I-70, Exit 252 1944 North 9th Street, 67401 659 Salina DEF 120 9 I-70 Exit 253 2250 North Ohio Street, 67401

f 317-535-4123

Junies Family Restaurant

356 BROOKS (SHEPHERDSVILLE) 5 100 I-65 & Brooks Rd, Exit 121 2050 East Blue Lick Road, 40165 660 catlettsburg DEF 155 9 rv dump I-64 SR 180 Exit 185 15236 State Route 180, 41129 231 CORBIN DEF 128 5 I-75 & US25E, Exit 29 249 West Cumberland Gap Prkwy, 40701

p 785-460-5832 f 785-460-5878

p 620-338-8888 f 602-338-8829 TM

p 620-343-2717 f 620-343-3692

p 785-825-6787 f 785-827-3394 TM

p 785-825-5300 f 785-452-9221

p 502-955-5049 f 502-955-9717

p 606-928-8383 f 606-928-4546

p 606-528-0631 f 606-528-1003

f 515-276-8599

w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m


double myrewards points

at stores listed with a yellow tag

#

Flying j dealer showers auto Pilot showers locations locations locations

KENTUCKY (cont.) 46 FRANKLIN 4 150 I-65, Exit 6 2929 Scottsville Road, 42134 438 FRANKLIN 8 S DEF 80 I-65, Exit 6 Highway 100 & I-65, Exit 6, 42134 661 FRANKLIN DEF 172 15 rv dump I-65 US Hwy 31 W. Exit 2 4380 Nashville Road, 42134 47 GEORGETOWN DEF 90 5 I-75, Exit 129 259 Cherry Blossom Way, 40324 353 GEORGETOWN 12 S DEF 175 I-75, Exit 129 110 Triport Road, 40324 48 GLENDALE 8 125 I-65, Exit 86 58 Glendale-Hodgenville Road, 42740 399 LEBANON JUNCTION 7 S DEF 100 I-65, Exit 105 150 Park Plaza Boulevard, 40150 240 MIDDLESBORO DEF 40 2 Rt 2, Hwy 25E 3000 US Highway 25 East, 40965 156 MORTON’S GAP 5 90 Highway 813, Exit 37 Pennyrile Parkway, Exit 37, 42440 41 MT STERLING DEF 83 7 I-64, Exit 113 3060 Owingsville Road, 40353 49 OAK GROVE 8 S 175 I-24, Exit 89 8190 Pembroke-Oak Grove Road, 42262 439 OAK GROVE 5 S DEF 125 I-24, Exit 86 12900 Fort Campbell Boulevard, 42262 662 OAK GROVE 9 130 rv dump I-24 Exit 86 18750 Herndon Oak Grove Road, 42262 358 PADUCAH DEF 65 8 I-24 & KY 305, Exit 3 5353 Cairo Road, 42001 440 PENDLETON 5 100 I-71, Exit 28 205 Pendleton Road, 40055 278 RICHWOOD (WALTON) 5 I-75/71 & KY 338, Exit 175 118 Richwood Road, 41094 321 RICHWOOD (WALTON) 3 I-75/71 & KY 338, Exit 175 11229 Frontage Road, 41094

w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m

S

p 270-586-4149 f 270-586-5171

p 270-586-9544 f 270-586-9887

p 270-586-3343 f 270-586-8984

p 502-868-7427 f 502-867-1847

p 502-863-2708 f 502-863-5012

p 270-369-7360

DEF

354 SIMPSONVILLE 7 25 I-64 & Veechdale Rd, Exit 28 819 Buck Creek Road, 40067 50 SULPHUR DEF 175 8 I-71, Exit 28 489 Pendleton Road, 40070 392 SONORA 6 S 200 I-65, Exit 81 450 East Western Avenue, 42776 663 Waddy 9 110 rv dump I-64 & HWY 395 Exit 43 1670 Waddy Road, 40076 664 Walton DEF 200 15 rv dump I-75 Exit 171 13019 Walton Verona Rd., 41094 437 WILLIAMSBURG 3 80 rv dump I-75, Exit 11 481 West Highway 92, 40769

# parking

p 502-722-5636 f 502-722-5630

p 502-743-5496 f 502-743-5228

p 270-369-7300 f 270-369-8596

p 502-829-9100 f 502-829-5600

p 859-485-4400 f 859-485-6886

p 606-549-0162 f 606-549-0166

f 270-369-6991

LOUISIANA p 502-833-2727 f 502-833-2759

p 606-248-4057 f 606-248-4674

p 270-258-5213 f 270-258-9830

p 859-497-4041 f 859-497-8709

p 270-439-1776 f 270-439-7624

p 270-439-0153 f 270-439-0765

p 270-640-7000 f 270-640-7060

p 270-443-2044 f 270-442-8538

p 502-743-5222 f 502-743-5123

p 859-485-6100 f 859-485-6113

p 859-485-1327 f 859-485-8519

274 BREAUX BRIDGE 7 S DEF 105 I-10, Exit 109 2112 Rees Street, 70517 79 DENHAM SPRINGS DEF 60 3 I-12, Exit 10 2601 South Range Avenue, 70726 665 Greenwood DEF 190 15 rv dump I-20 Exit 3 9510 Greenwood Road, 71033 300 HAMMOND DEF 60 5 I-12 Exit 40 / I-55/US 51 2111 SW Railroad Avenue, 70403 199 HAUGHTON 7 S DEF 90 I-20, Exit 33 490 North Elm Street, 71037 82 LAPLACE DEF 150 8 I-10/55, Exit 209 4301 South Main Street, 70068 335 RAYVILLE 5 85 I-20 & LA137, Exit 138 103 Grimshaw Street, 71269 428 WEST MONROE 5 100 rv dump I-20, Exit 112 300 Well Road, 71292

p 337-332-1253 f 337-332-0618

p 225-665-4151 f 225-665-4122

p 318-938-7744 f 318-938-5697

p 985-345-5476 f 985-542-5028

p 318-390-9709 f 318-390-9713

p 985-652-0531 f 985-652-4141

p 318-728-4100 f 318-728-4236

p 318-329-3590 f 318-329-3592

MARYLAND 875 Elkton 23 225 I-95, Exit 109A 221 Belle Hill Rd, 21921 408 GRANTSVILLE 7 S DEF 65 I-68, Exit 22 3000 Chesnut Ridge Road, 21536

p 443-245-4229 f 410-392-3543

p 301-895-4536 f 301-895-4548

rv dump

restaurants outlined in a red box do not accept MYREWARDS points


double myrewards points

at stores listed with a yellow tag

#

S

Flying j dealer showers auto Pilot showers locations locations locations

DEF

# parking

rv dump

restaurants outlined in a red box do not accept MYREWARDS points

maryland (cont.)

Michigan (cont.)

MISSOURI

150 HAGERSTOWN 7 S DEF 90 I-70 & MD 63, Exit 24 11633 Greencastle Pike, 21740 179 HAGERSTOWN 9 S DEF 111 I-81, Exit 5B 16921 Halfway Blvd, 21740 784 North East DEF 200 15 rv dump I-95, Exit 100 One Center Drive, 21901 290 PERRYVILLE 5 80 I-95 & MD 222, Exit 93 31 Heather Lane, 21903

895 Woodhaven Detroiter DEF 225 12 I-75, Exit 32A 21055 West Road, 48183

44 BOONVILLE 8 S DEF 150 I-70, Exit 101 1701 Ashley Road, 65233 571 CHARLESTON DEF 65 7 I-57 Exit 12 2460 E. Marshall/E US Hwy 60, 63834 385 collins 3 35 US 54 & Hwy 13 South Hwy 13 South, 64738 533 fenton road ranger DEF 25 2 I-44 W, Exit 275; I-44 E, Exit 274B 205 North Highway Dr., 63026 442 HAYTI 8 S DEF 25 rv dump I-55, Exit 19 1701 Highway 84 East, 63851 443 HIGGINSVILLE 6 S DEF 120 rv dump I-70, Exit 49 6676 Highway 13, 64037 317 JOPLIN 7 S DEF 90 rv dump I-44 & MO 43S, Exit 4 4500 Highway 43 South, 64804 669 JOPLIN DEF 160 15 I-44 U.S. 71 Exit 11A 11570 Hwy FF, 64804 768 Kansas City DEF 121 6 I-435 Front Street 1300 North Corrington Ave., 64120 252 Kearney 7 S DEF 125 I-35, Exit 26 600 West SR 92, 64060 301 MARSTON 6 70 I-55, Exit 40 917 East Elm Street, 63866 671 Matthews DEF 188 15 rv dump I-55 Exit 58 703 State Hwy 80, 63867 167 nevada DEF 45 3 US 71 & Camp Clark Road 2424 East Austin Road, 64772 208 Pacific DEF 90 7 I-44W, Exit 257; I-44E, Exit 256 1475 Thornton Street, 63069 672 Peculiar DEF 165 9 rv dump US Hwy 71 Exit J 700 J Hwy, 64078 547 st. robert road ranger DEF 75 6 I-44, Exit 163 22345 Hwy 28, 65584 673 Sullivan DEF 160 15 rv dump I-44/Hwy. 185 Exit 226 1500 AF Highway, 63080

p 301-582-9004 f 301-582-9008

p 301-582-6111 f 301-582-5004

p 410-287-7110 f 410-287-7116

p 410-642-2883 f 410-378-4941

MASSachusetts 222 STURBRIDGE 6 S DEF 250 I-84 Exit 1 400 Route 15 (Haynes Street), 01566

p 508-347-9104 f 508-347-9165

MICHIGAN 17 BATTLE CREEK 5 S DEF 25 I-94, Exit 104 15901 Eleven Mile Road, 49014 666 Benton Harbor DEF 135 6 I-94 Exit 30 1860 East Napier Ave., 49022 21 DEXTER DEF 80 3 I-94, Exit 167 750 Baker Road, 48130 296 DEXTER 5 80 I-94, Exit 167 195 Baker Road, 48130 667 Grand Ledge DEF 265 9 rv dump I-96 & Exit 90/I-69 & Exit 81 7800 West Grand River Ave., 48837 23 IONIA 4 45 I-96, Exit 67 7205 South State Road, 48846 24 MONROE 3 20 I-75, Exit 15 1100 North Dixie Highway, 48162 284 MONROE DEF 60 5 I-75, Exit 18 1200 Nadeau Road, 48161 26 OTTAWA LAKE DEF 170 8 US 23, Exit 5 6158 US 223, 49267 596 port huron DEF 65 5 I-69, Exit 196 2424 Wadhams Road, 48074 668 Saginaw 3 50 rv dump I-75 & Washington St. Exit 151 3475 East Washington, 48601

p 269-968-9949 f 269-968-9610

p 269-925-7547 f 269-925-7508

p 734-426-4618 f 734-426-7836

p 734-426-0065 f 734-426-0339

p 517-627-7504 f 517-622-4960

p 616-527-6520 f 616-527-5913

p 734-242-9650 f 734-242-6538

p 734-457-3500 f 734-457-2835

p 734-854-1772 f 734-854-6912

p 810-987-7823 f 810-987-7869

p 989-752-6350

p 734-675-0222 f 734-675-4973

MINNesota 590 alexandria DEF 50 6 I-94, Exit 100 & SR 27 3181 Evergreen Lane, 56308 521 AUSTIN 3 60 I-90, Exit 179 1509 10th Place NE #2, 55912 581 Inver Grove Heights DEF 43 5 Hwy 52 & 117 Street 11650 Courthouse Blvd, 55077 576 northfield DEF 80 6 rv dump I-35 & Hwy 19, Exit 69 8051 Bagley Avenue, 55057 134 ST. CLOUD DEF 44 4 I-94, Exit 171 (CR 75) 4231 Clearwater Road, 56301

p 320-763-9222 f 320-763-2339

Watt’s Cooking! p 507-437-6702 f 507-437-0089

p 651-438-3397 f 651-480-4800

Big Steer Restaurant

p 507-645-6082 f 507-645-6082

p 320-251-8455 f 320-251-7750

MISSISSIPPI 676 Gulfport DEF 165 15 rv dump I-10 Exit 31 9351 Canal Road, 39503 77 JACKSON 6 S DEF 120 I-55/I-20, Exit 45 2520 South Gallatin Street, 39204 388 MERIDIAN 7 S DEF 100 I-59, Exit 151 1555 Tommy Webb Drive, 39307 586 Moss Point DEF 70 7 rv dump I-10, Exit 69 6705 Hwy 63 174 NEW ALBANY DEF 90 7 US 78, Exit 64 500 State Highway 15 South, 38652 677 Olive Branch DEF 51 9 rv dump Hwy 78 and Bethel Road 4740 Bethel Road, 38654 678 Pearl DEF 175 15 rv dump I-20/I-55 Exit 47 685 Hwy 80 East, 39208 519 Senatobia kangaroo pantry 4 75 I-55, Exit 265 510 E Main Street, 38668 261 WINONA 5 S DEF 110 I-55 & Hwy. 82, Exit 185 403 SW Frontage Road, 38967

p 228-868-2711 f 228-868-3711

p 601-968-9491 f 601-968-0699

p 601-484-5106 f 601-484-7370

p 228-474-6511 f 228-474-6549

p 662-539-0222 f 662-539-0212

p 662-895-1001 f 662-895-0008

p 601-936-0190 f 601-936-0196 TM

p 662-560-1973 f 662-560-1992

p 662-283-5985 f 662-283-5906

p 660-882-9120 f 660-882-9710 TM

p 573-683-4153 f 573-683-4196

p 417-275-4796 f 417-275-4796

p 815-566-4043 f 636-326-6922

p 573-359-2007 f 573-359-2031

p 660-584-8484 f 660-584-8486

p 417-781-0255 f 417-781-0179

p 417-626-7600 f 417-626-8802

p 816-483-7600 f 816-483-1492

p 816-635-4015 f 816-635-4116

p 573-643-2320 f 573-643-2252

p 573-472-3336 f 573-471-1161

p 417-667-3271 f 417-667-4843

p 636-257-4100 f 636-257-4107

p 816-779-8000 f 816-779-4441

Dan’s Big Slice Pizza

p 815-315-4953 f 573-336-3080

p 573-860-8880 f 573-860-8892

f 989-752-6842

74 C H A L L E N G E M a y 2 0 1 3

w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m


double myrewards points

at stores listed with a yellow tag

#

S

Flying j dealer showers auto Pilot showers locations locations locations

DEF

# parking

rv dump

MISSOURI (cont.)

MONTANA (cont.)

NEW HAMPSHIRE

674 Warrenton DEF 200 14 rv dump I-70 Exit 188 24004 West Veterans Mem. Pkwy, 63383 675 Wayland DEF 99 4 rv dump Hwy 136 & Hwy 61 102 Fore Drive, 63472

911 SUPERIOR Pilot/town pump 2 8 I-90, Exit 47 403 Diamond Match Road, 59872 910 THREE FORKS Pilot/town pump DEF 90 5 Junction of I-90 & US 287, Exit 274 10800 Highway 287, 59751

896 bow 3 60 I-93, Exit 11/12C 728 SR 3A, 03304

p 636-456-2001 f 636-456-2016

p 660-754-1550 f 660-754-1556

MONTANA

NEBRASKA

968 Belgrade Pilot/broadway 3 125 I-90 Exit 298 6505 Jack Rabit Lane, 59701 915 billings Pilot/town pump DEF 150 14 I-90, Exit 455 2711 N Frontage Road, 59101 923 Billings Flying j/town pump 9 123 I-90, Exit 455 2775 Old Hardin Road, 59101 905 BONNER Pilot/town pump DEF 100 11 Junction of I-90 & Hwy 200 7985 Highway 200 East, 59851 924 Butte Flying j/town pump DEF 125 14 I-15 Exit 122 & I-90 MM220 122000 W. Browns Gulch Road; 59701 922 COLUMbia falls Pilot/town pump DEF 20 1 Hwy 2 West 6102 Hwy 2 West, 59912 906 COLUMBUS Pilot/town pump 7 150 I-90, Exit 408 602 8th Avenue North, 59019 917 GREAT FALLS Pilot/town pump DEF 100 5 Junction of I-15 & Hwy 87 3700 31st St SW, Suite 1, 59404 925 Great Falls Flying j/town pump 4 100 rv dump I-15 & 31st Street Exit 277 3715 31st St SW, 59404 964 Hardin Pilot/broadway 1 50 I-90 Exit 495 315 E 13th Street, 59034 916 LOLO Pilot/town pump 1 40 Junction of Hwy 93 & Hwy 12 11822 Highway 93 South, 59847 907 MILES CITY Pilot/town pump DEF 100 4 I-94, Exit 138 1210 South Haynes Street, 59301 914 MIssoula Flying j/town pump DEF 125 14 rv dump I-90 & MT Hwy 93, Exit 96 8475 Hwy 93 N Suite B, 59808 908 ROCKER/BUTTE Pilot/town pump DEF 195 10 I-90, Exit 122 1000 Grizzly Trail, 59701 909 SHELBY Pilot/town pump DEF 70 6 I-15, Exit 363 1350 West Roosevelt, 59474

904 BIG SPRINGS DEF 500 16 rv dump I-80, Exit 107 I-80 and Big Springs Road, 69122 901 ELM CREEK 5 75 I-80, Exit 257 5085 Buffalo Creek Road, 68836 902 GRAND ISLAND bosselman DEF 400 21 I-80, Exit 312N 3335 West Woodriver Road, 68803 686 Gretna DEF 150 15 rv dump I-80 Exit 432 15010 South State Hwy 31, 68028 687 North Platte DEF 123 9 rv dump I-80 Exit 179 3400 S. Newberry Road, 69101 912 WOOD RIVER 5 30 I-80 & Hwy 11, Exit 300 I-80 and Highway 11 and Exit 300, 68883

w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m

p 406-488-4124 f 406-388-4231

p 406-238-9823 f 406-238-9825

p 406-256-8826 f 406-256-9256

p 406-258-6588 f 406-258-6693

p 406-723-4325 f 406-723-8956

p 406-892-0747

f 406-892-0747*22

p 406-322-4833 f 406-322-5273

p 406-452-0342 f 406-452-0547

p 406-727-7945 f 406-761-2599

p 406-665-1237 f 406-665-3123

p 406-273-6666 f 406-273-3018

p 406-232-2582 f 406-232-2582

p 406-542-0400 f 406-327-0802

p 406-723-0088 f 406-723-4940

Country Skillet p 406-434-5221

p 406-822-4444 f 406-822-4444

p 406-285-3807 f 406-285-6976

p 308-889-3686 f 308-889-3352

p 308-856-4330 f 308-856-4457

p 308-382-2288 f 308-381-7464

p 402-332-4483 f 402-332-4576

p 308-532-4555 f 308-532-8077

p 308-583-2493 f 308-583-2115

NEVADA 966 Battle MTN. Flying j/broadway 9 70 I-80 Exit 231 650 W Front St., 89820 387 CARLIN 3 60 I-80/NV 278, Exit 280 791 Tenth Street, 89822 340 FERNLEY 7 S DEF 100 I-80 & US 95, Exit 46 465 Pilot Road, 89408 341 LAS VEGAS 7 S DEF 80 I-15 & Craig Rd, Exit 48 3812 East Craig Road, 89031 692 Wells DEF 200 9 rv dump I-80 & HWY 93, Exit 352 (South) 156 Hwy 93 South, 89835 147 WEST WENDOVER DEF 250 11 I-80 @ Peppermill Casino, Exit 410 1200 West Wendover Boulevard, 89883 485 Winnemucca 5 S DEF 140 I-80 & West Interchange, Exit 173 5625 I-80 W Winnemucca Exchange, 89445 770 Winnemucca 8 S 105 rv dump I-80 Exit 176 1880 West Winnemucca Blvd., 89445

p 702-635-5424 f 775-635-0371

p 775-754-6384 f 775-754-6025

p 775-575-5115 f 775-575-4619

p 702-644-1600 f 702-644-8432

p 775-752-2400 f 775-752-2406

p 775-664-3400 f 775-664-3347

p 775-625-2800 f 775-625-2814

p 775-623-0111

restaurants outlined in a red box do not accept MYREWARDS points

p 603-223-6885 f 603-223-5204

NEW JERSEY 280 BLOOMSBURY 5 S DEF 30 I-78 & NJ 173, Exit 7 979 Route 173, 08804 253 CARNEYS POINT 2 I-295 at Jersey Turnpike, Exit 2B 600 Pennsville-Auburn Road, 08069 688 Carneys Point DEF 360 16 rv dump I-295 Exit 2C 326 Slapes Corner Road, 08069 190 CLINTON 6 95 I-78, Exit 12 68 Rt. 173, 08827 210 mahwah 0 8 230 Route 17 South, 07430 880 Montague Lukoil 0 I-84, Exit 1 15 Route 23 S, 07827

p 908-479-6443 f 908-479-6394

p 856-299-5700 f 856-299-8563

p 856-351-0080 f 856-351-0293

p 908-735-7711 f 908-735-8153

p 201-529-2704 f 201-529-1784

p 973-293-3477 f 973-293-3177

NEW MEXICO 689 Albuquerque DEF 165 15 rv dump I-40 Exit 153 9911 Avalon Road NW, 87105 305 JAMESTOWN 16 S DEF 450 I-40, Exit 39 I-40, Exit 39, 87347 266 LAS CRUCES 5 40 I-10 & NM 292, Exit 139 2681 West Amador, 88005 163 LORDSBURG 7 S DEF 95 I-10 & East Motel Dr, Exit 24 1050 East Motel Drive, 88045 690 Lordsburg 9 285 rv dump I-10 Exit 24 11 Old Highway 70, 88045 691 Tucumcari DEF 136 9 rv dump I-40 & Exit 333 2021 S. Mountain Road, 88401

p 505-831-2001 f 505-833-0464

p 505-722-6655 f 505-722-2674

p 575-523-2700 f 575-525-6727

p 575-542-3100 f 575-542-3111

p

575-542-3320

f 575-542-3324

p 575-461-6590 f 575-461-3879

NEW YORK 322 KANONA DEF 70 4 I-86, Exit 37 7767 State Rt 53, 14810 394 NEWBURGH 6 S DEF 110 I-84, Exit 6 239 Route 17K, 12550

Pizza p 607-776-2012 f 607-776-4179

p 845-567-1722 f 845-567-1773

f 775-623-0120

f 406-434-7019

M a y 2 0 1 3 C H A L L E N G E 75


double myrewards points

at stores listed with a yellow tag

#

S

Flying j dealer showers auto Pilot showers locations locations locations

New York (cont.)

North dakota(cont.)

693 Pembroke DEF 150 9 rv dump I-90 Exit 48A 8484 Allegheny Road, 14036 494 Rotterdam DEF 95 4 I-88, Exit 25 1128 Duanesburg Road, 12306 146 SCHODACK LANDING DEF 15 4 I-90, Exit 12 995 US Route 9, 12033 380 SYRACUSE (LIVERPOOL) DEF 85 5 I-81, Exit 25; I-90, Exit 36 107 Seventh North Street, 13088

550 Minot 4 55 Hwy 2 & 52 West 3800 Hwy 2 & 52 W, 58701 589 Williston DEF 70 5

p 585-599-4430 f 585-599-4436

p 518-356-5616 f 518-356-5634

p 518-732-7272 f 518-732-7228

p 315-424-0124 f 315-424-0126

North Carolina 275 CHARLOTTE DEF 60 5 I-85, Exit 39; I-77, Exit 13 3807 Statesville Avenue, 28206 885 dunn Kangaroo Pantry 3 40 I-95, Exit 71 873 Longbranch, 28334 900 dunn Saddler bros. 9 300 I-95, Exit 75 65 Sadler Rd, 28334 682 Graham DEF 251 4 rv dump I-85 & I-40 Exit 150 1043 Jimmie Kerr Road, 27258 56 KANNAPOLIS DEF 55 7 I-85, Exit 63 2825 Lane Street, 28083 683 Kenly DEF 145 14 rv dump I-95 & Exit 106 1800 Princeton-Kenly Road, 27542 57 MEBANE 8 S DEF 140 I-40/85, Exit 152 1342 Trollingwood Road, 27302 58 PLEASANT HILL 4 25 I-95, Exit 180 Route 1 - Box 202, 27866 393 WAYNESVILLE 4 60 I-40 & NC 209, Exit 24 3712 Crabtree Road, 28786

p 704-358-1006 f 704-358-1506

p 910-892-3642 f 910-980-2364

p 910-892-0106 f 910-892-2084

p 336-578-2427 f 336-578-0804

p 704-938-6800 f 704-938-6900

p 919-284-4548 f 919-284-4214

p 919-563-4999 f 919-563-4929

p 252-537-4476 f 252-537-3666

p 828-627-8611 f 828-627-9499

North dakota 684 Beach 9 89 I-94 & Hwy 16 I-94 & Hwy 16, 58621 685 fargo DEF 168 9 3150 39th Street SW, Suite A, 58104 489 grand forks DEF 141 10 rv dump I-29, Exit 138 4401 32nd Avenue South, 58201

p 701-872-4737 f 701-872-4985

TM

Windbreak Saloon

p 701-282-7766 f 701-282-7259

p 701-746-8145 f 701-746-4342

76 C H A L L E N G E M a y 2 0 1 3

DEF

# parking

rv dump

restaurants outlined in a red box do not accept MYREWARDS points

ohio (cont.) rv dump

13553 Hwy 2, 58801

p 701-839-5061 f 701-839-3623

p 701-826-2500 f 701-826-2504

ohio 2 AUSTINBURG 7 S DEF 150 I-90, Exit 223 2246 State Route 45, 44010 694 AUSTINBURG DEF 164 15 rv dump I-90 & State Rd 45, Exit 223 2349 Center Road, 44010 3 AUSTINTOWN 8 S DEF 200 I-80, Exit 223 1150 North Canfield-Niles Road, 44515 4 AVON DEF 55 3 I-90, Exit 151 39115 Colorado Road, 44011 457 BEAVER DAM 10 S DEF 105 I-75, Exit 135 427 East Main Street, 45808 695 BEAVER DAM DEF 150 15 rv dump I-75 Exit 135 420 East Main Street, 45808 696 Berkshire DEF 150 15 I-71 Exit 131 7735 State Route 37, 43074 309 CALDWELL DEF 50 5 I-77, Exit 25 44133 Fairground Road, 43724 6 CAMBRIDGE 3 35 I-70, Exit 178 61700 Southgate Road, 43725 8 CIRCLEVILLE 3 55 US 23 and Pittsburgh Road 25600 US 23, 43113 213 COLUMBUS 7 100 I-70 & Wilson Road Exit 94 3600 Interchange Road, 43204 286 EATON 5 S DEF 50 I-70 & OH 127, Exit 10 6141 US 127 North, 45320 360 FINDLAY 5 80 I-75 & OH 613, Exit 164 11471 State Route 613W, 45840 9 FRANKLIN 7 S DEF 200 I-75, Exit 36 6830 Franklin-Lebanon Road, 45005 285 HEBRON 9 S DEF 90 I-70 & OH 37, Exit 126 10258 Lancaster Road SW, 43025

p 440-275-3303 f 440-275-3311

p 440-275-1515 f 440-275-3289

p 330-505-3532 f 330-505-3548

p 440-934-0110 f 440-934-1168

p 419-643-6023 f 419-643-6085

p 419-643-8001 f 419-643-8106

p 740-965-9835 f 740-965-9770

p 740-732-5656 f 740-732-1404

p 740-439-0989 f 740-432-9607

p 740-420-8942 f 740-420-3972

p 614-308-9195 f 614-308-9673

p 937-456-6303 f 937-456-6497

p 419-299-3381 f 419-299-3096

p 937-746-4488 f 937-743-3006

697 Hubbard DEF 150 15 rv dump I-80 & Hwy 62, Exit 234B (Eastbound) 2226 North Main, 44425 698 Jeffersonville DEF 148 9 rv dump I-71 Exit 69 9935 SR 41, 43128 700 Lake Township DEF 150 15 rv dump I-280 Exit 1B; I-80/90, Exit 71 26415 Warns Dr., 43551 287 LODI (BURBANK) 7 105 I-71 & OH 83, Exit 204 10048 Avon Lake Road, 44214 454 LONDON 9 S DEF 125 I-70, Exit 79 1365 SR 42 NE, 43140 455 MARENGO 5 65 rv dump I-71, Exit 140 488 State Route 61, 43334 699 Millersport 15 152 rv dump I-70 St Rd 158 Exit 122 10480 Baltimore, 43046 11 N. LIMA 5 S DEF 50 I-76, Exit 232 10920 Market Street, 44452 303 NAPOLEON DEF 75 7 Rt. 24 905 American Road, 43545 130 RICHFIELD 7 80 I-77S, Ex 146; I-77N, Ex 145; I-80, Ex 173 5219 Brecksville Road, 44286 13 SEVILLE 10 S DEF 190 I-71, Exit 209 8924 Lake Road, 44273 12 STONEY RIDGE (PERRYSBURG) 5 S DEF 50 I-80/90, Exit 71 3430 Libbey Road, 43551 14 SUNBURY 5 115 rv dump I-71, Exit 131 7680 East State Route 36, 43074 15 TOLEDO 5 70 I-75, Exit 210 5820 Hagman Road, 43612 239 UPPER SANDUSKY DEF 70 5 St. Hwy 23 & 30 1600 W. Wyandot Avenue, 43351 16 WILMINGTON DEF 20 3 I-71, Exit 50 5772 US 68 North, 45177 281 YOUNGSTOWN (GIRARD) 7 S DEF 80 I-80 & Salt Springs Rd., Exit 226 2786 Salt Springs Road, 44420

p 330-534-3774 f 330-534-4372

p 740-426-9136 f 740-426-9156

p 419-837-2100 f 419-837-2199

p 330-948-4571 f 330-948-4575

p 614-879-4128 f 614-879-4137

p 419-253-1400 f 419-253-1402

p 740-964-9601 f 740-964-9611

p 330-549-9203 f 330-549-1930

p 419-599-0043 f 419-599-0051

p 330-659-2020 f 330-659-2021

p 330-769-4220 f 330-769-2202

p 419-837-5091 f 419-837-5658

p 740-965-5540 f 740-965-5641

p 419-729-3985 f 419-729-0905

p 419-294-2971 f 419-294-3812

p 937-382-0464 f 937-382-3069

p 330-530-8500 f 330-530-8318

p 740-928-5588 f 740-928-6032

w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m


double myrewards points

at stores listed with a yellow tag

#

S

Flying j dealer showers auto Pilot showers locations locations locations

DEF

# parking

rv dump

restaurants outlined in a red box do not accept MYREWARDS points

Oklahoma

oregon (cont.)

Pennsylvania (cont.)

701 Ardmore DEF 136 9 rv dump I-35 & Exit 33 2450 Cooper Drive, 73401 702 Checotah DEF 150 9 rv dump U.S. Hwy 69 & U.S. Hwy 266 1255 W. Gentry, 74426 556 Choctaw Thunder Travel Plaza DEF 25 0 I-40, Exit 166 7501 S. Choctaw Road, 73020 704 Edmond DEF 73 15 rv dump I-35 & N.E. 122nd Street 4801 NE 122 Street, 73013 259 muskogee 7 S DEF 125 US 69 3006 N. 32nd Street, 74401 460 OKLAHOMA CITY 7 S DEF 145 I-40, Exit 140 400 South Morgan Road, 73128 703 OKLAHOMA CITY DEF 172 9 rv dump I-40, Exit 140 701 South Morgan Road, 73128 196 ROLAND DEF 125 7 I-40 & US 64, Exit 325 123 West Ray Fine Boulevard 705 Sayre DEF 150 4 rv dump I-40 & US 283 2400 South 4th Route, 73662 706 Tulsa DEF 185 9 rv dump I-44 & Exit 236 121 North 129 E/I-44 Exit 236, 74116

233 RICE HILL 10 S DEF 160 I-5, Exit 148 800 John Long Road, 97462 390 STANFIELD DEF 90 9 I-84/82 & Hwy 395, Exit 188 2115 Highway 395, 97875

522 Pine Grove 3 160 I-81, Exit 100 482 Suedberg Rd, 17963 370 SCRANTON (PITTSTON) 7 S DEF 80 I-81N, Exit 175; I-81 S, Exit 175B; I-476, RT 315 417 Route 315, 18640 620 Smithton DEF 110 7 rv dump I-70 & Exit 49 122 Fitzhenry Road, 15479

TM

p 580-226-3833 f 580-226-3546

p 918-473-1243 f 918-473-1957

p 405-638-3000 f 405-638-3006 TM

p 405-475-9440 f 405-475-9435

p 918-686-7856 f 918-686-0597

p 405-440-1048 f 405-440-1093 TM

p 405-324-5000 f 405-324-7181

p 918-427-0895 f 918-427-0862

p 580-928-2216 f 580-928-2354

p 918-437-5477 f 918-437-5660

p 541-849-2133 f 541-849-2137

p 541-449-1403 f 541-449-1430

Pennsylvania 348 BENTLEYVILLE 7 S DEF 90 I-70 Exit 32-B p 724-239-5855 205 Wilson Road, 15314 f 724-239-5801 516 breezewood all american Pizza Taco Perkins Shop Maker 12 280 I-76, Exit 161; I-70, Exit 147 p 814-735-4076 167 Post House Road, 15533 f 814-735-4823 707 Brookville 15 140 rv dump I-80 Exit 78 p 814-849-2992 246 Allegheny Blvd., 15825 f 814-849-2440 708 Carlisle DEF 278 22 rv dump I-81 Exit 52/I-76 & Exit 226 p 717-243-6659 1501 Harrisburg Pike, 17013 f 717-243-2510 336 DUBOIS 7 100 I-80, Hwy 219, Exit 97 p 814-375-6046 1742 Rich Highway, 15801 f 814-375-6047 517 Duncannon DEF 50 6 US 22 and 322 p 717-834-3156 30 Benvenue Ave, 17020 f 717-834-3208 311 ERIE 5 85 I-90 & PA97, Exit 27 p 814-864-8536 8035 Perry Highway, 16509 f 814-866-0332 518 Frystown DEF 240 8 I-78, Exit 10 (PA 645) p 717-933-4146 2210 Camp Swatara Road, 17067 f 717-933-5008 245 HARRISBURG 3 30 I-81 & PA39, Exit 77 p 717-545-5507 7961 Linglestown Road, 17112 f 717-545-6768 298 HAZLETON (DRUMS) 5 60 I-80, Exit 256 p 570-788-3262 1114 SR 93, 18222 f 570-788-2163 1 MILL HALL 5 S DEF 70 I-80, Exit 173 p 570-726-7618 5868 Nittany Valley Drive, 17751 f 570-726-5092 709 MILL HALL (Lamar) DEF 155 15 rv dump I-80 and Exit 173 p 570-726-4080 5609 Nittany Valley Drive, 17751 f 570-726-4363 555 Milton Penn 80 Milton Truck Plaza Penn 80 Grill 16 300 I-80, Exit 215 p 570-742-2663 1460 North Ridge Rd, 17847 f 1-877-395-0850 81 NEW CASTLE 7 S DEF 90 I-79, Exit 99 p 724-368-3028 2010 New Castle Road, 16051 f 724-368-3059 710 New Milford DEF 125 9 rv dump I-81 Exit 219 p 570-465-2974 1623 Oliver Road, 18834 f 570-465-2979 TM

oregon 195 BIGGS JUNCTION DEF 55 5 I-84 & US Hwy 97, Exit 104 91485 Biggs Rufus Highway, 97065 386 BROOKS 7 S DEF 110 I-5, Exit 263 4220 Brooklake Road, 97305 391 CENTRAL POINT DEF 100 7 I-5, Exit 33 1600 East Pine Street, 97502 133 CHEMULT 4 60 US 97 341 Damon Street, 97731 504 Klamath Falls DEF 50 4 rv dump Hwy 97 3817 N. Hwy 97, 97601 934 LaGrande Flying j/broadway 4 50 I-84 Exit 265 I-84 & Exit 265, 97850 232 ONTARIO DEF 105 7 I-84, Exit 376A 653 East Idaho Avenue, 97914 w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m

p 541-739-2174 f 541-739-2479

p 503-463-1114 f 503-463-0409

p 541-664-7001 f 541-664-7006

p 541-365-0991 f 541-365-0995

p 541-884-0400 f 541-884-0409 Full Service Restaurant

p 541-963-9762 f 541-663-9822

p 541-889-9070 f 541-889-4117

Gooseberry Farms Restaurant

p 570-345-8800 f 570-915-6278

p 570-655-4116 f 570-655-2479

p 724-872-4050 f 724-872-9471

south carolina 711 Blacksburg 15 200 I-85 Exit 102 1011 North Mountain Street, 29702 60 BOWMAN 8 S DEF 100 I-26, Exit 159 2064 Homestead Road, 29018 346 CAMDEN (LUGOFF) 3 S 60 I-20 & US 601 Exit 92 522 Highway 601 South, 29078 884 Campobello Kangaroo Pantry 2 35 I-26, Exit 5 8998 SC Hwy 11, 29322 338 CAYCE (COLUMBIA) DEF 90 5 I-26/77 & US321, Exit 115 3008 Highway 321, 29033 61 CLINTON 3 40 I-26, Exit 52 12818 Highway 56 North, 29325 712 Columbia DEF 178 15 rv dump I-20 Exit 70 5901 Fairfield Road, 29203 310 DUNCAN DEF 70 8 I-85 & SC290, Exit 63 1405 East Main Street, 29334 62 FLORENCE 6 75 I-95, Exit 170 3006 North Williston Road, 29506 337 FLORENCE 5 90 I-95 & US 52, Exit 164 2015 West Lucas St., 29501 453 GAFFNEY 5 S DEF 100 I-85, Exit 90 909 Hyatt Street, 29341 713 Latta DEF 200 15 rv dump I-95 Exit 181A 111 Mill Branch Road, 29565 63 PIEDMONT 5 S DEF 90 I-85, Exit 35 110 Frontage Road, 29673

p 864-839-5934 f 864-839-5942

p 803-829-3541 f 803-829-3352

p 803-438-5175 f 803-438-3947

p 864-472-2128 f 864-472-2280

p 803-739-2921 f 803-739-4521

p 864-833-4555 f 864-833-3765

p 803-735-9006 f 803-735-0917

p 864-433-1221 f 864-433-1210

p 843-662-6972 f 843-662-7013

p 843-662-2646 f 843-662-2893

p 864-206-0050 f 864-206-0052

p 843-752-5047 f 843-752-7265

p 864-845-8177 f 864-845-8178

M a y 2 0 1 3 C H A L L E N G E 77


double myrewards points

at stores listed with a yellow tag

#

S

Flying j dealer showers auto Pilot showers locations locations locations

DEF

# parking

rv dump

restaurants outlined in a red box do not accept MYREWARDS points

south carolina (cont.)

tennessee (cont.)

texas (cont.)

714 Rock Hill DEF 141 9 rv dump I-77 & Hwy 901, Exit 73 2435 Mount Holly Road, 29730 493 St. George DEF 118 8 rv dump I-95, Exit 77 113 Motel Drive, 29477 64 SUMMERVILLE 3 S 40 I-26, Exit 199 1521 North Main Street, 29483

403 HEISKELL DEF 25 2 I-75, Exit 117 1915 East Raccoon Valley Road, 37754 53 HURRICANE MILLS 8 S DEF 180 I-40, Exit 143 15559 Highway 13 South, 37078 366 Jackson 7 S DEF 95 I-40, Exit 85 32 Sand Pebble Rd., 38305 241 KNOXVILLE DEF 80 0 I-40, Exit 398; @ John Sevier 2801 East Govenor John Sevier Hwy, 37914 722 Knoxville DEF 187 13 rv dump I-40 & I-75 Exit 369 800 Watt Road, 37932 270 KNOXVILLE (LOVELL ROAD) 5 S DEF 80 I-40/75, Exit 374 314 Lovell Road, 37922 219 KNOXVILLE (STRAW PLAINS) 9 S DEF 115 I-40, Exit 398 7210 Straw Plains Pike, 37914 52 LAVERGNE DEF 25 4 I-24, Exit 64 535 Waldron Road, 37086 411 LEBANON 8 S DEF 150 rv dump I-40, Exit 238 921 Murfreesboro, 37090 363 MEMPHIS DEF 70 5 US 78 @ Pleasant Hill 5021 Highway 78, 38118 405 MEMPHIS 5 S DEF 100 I-240, Hwy 78S 4949 Lamar Ave, 38118 404 Murfreesboro 7 S DEF 90 I-24, Exit 81 2441 S. Church St, 37127 413 nashville 2 25 Briley Pkwy, Hwy 155N, Ex 26A, Hwy 155S, Ex 26 6418 Centennial Blvd., 37209 224 ONeiDA (PIONEER) DEF 85 4 I-75, Exit 141 304 Howard Baker Highway, 37847 149 STANTON DEF 50 7 I-40 Exit 42 7720 Highway 222, 38069 412 WHITE PINE 9 S DEF 130 rv dump I-81, Exit 4 3624 Roy Messer Highway, 37890

723 AMARILLO DEF 200 13 rv dump I-40 Exit 76 9601 I-40 East Exit 76, 79118 477 anna DEF 100 8 1700 US Hwy 75/Hwy 75, Exit 48 714 South Central Expressway, 75409 435 ANTHONY 5 S DEF 100 I-10, Exit 0 2015 Antonio Street, 79821 724 ANTHONY DEF 176 13 rv dump I-10 Exit 0 3001 Mountain Pass Blvd., 79821 725 Baytown DEF 200 15 rv dump I-10 & Exit 789 Thompson Road 1876 East Freeway, 77521 740 Brookshire DEF 117 9 rv dump I-10, Exit 732 204 South Waller Ave., 77423 367 CADDO MILLS 6 80 I-30 & FM1903, Exit 87 & 88 2725 FM 1903, 75135 433 DALLAS 8 S DEF 150 I-20, Exit 470 8787 South Lancaster Road, 75241 726 DALLAS DEF 150 15 rv dump I-20 Exit 472 7425 Bonnie View Road, 75241 727 Edinburg DEF 200 15 rv dump Hwy 281 & FM 1925 1305 East Monte Cristo, 78539 728 El Paso DEF 120 9 rv dump I-10 and Exit 37 1301 North Horizon Blvd., 79927 553 FORT Stockton 9 S DEF 100 I-10, Exit 259 2571 North Front Street, 79735 434 FORT WORTH 8 S DEF 185 rv dump I-35, Exit 65 2400 Alliance Gateway, 76178 375 HOUSTON 7 S DEF 90 I-610, Exit 24A US 90 E 4440 N. McCarty Street, 77013 729 Houston DEF 233 15 rv dump I-45 Richie Rd, Exit 64 15919 North Freeway, 77090 234 HUNTSVILLE 6 S DEF 90 I-45, Exit 118 639 State Highway 75 North, 77320 507 Jarrell 8 140 I-35 & Exit 275 11710 North Interstate 35, 76537

p 803-328-5700 f 803-909-5800

p 843-563-8989 f 843-563-8986

p 843-486-5770 f 843-486-5702

south dakota 932 Hermosa Flying j/broadway 2 25 Heartland Express Hwy 79 25 Heartland Express Hwy 79, 57744 599 murdo DEF 50 4 rv dump I-90, Exit 192 601 E. Fifth Street, 57559 918 Rapid City DEF 100 5 I-90, Exit 55 2783 Deadwood Ave., 57702 931 Rapid City Flying j/broadway 8 150 I-90 Exit 61 4200 N I-90 Service Rd Exit 61, 57701 716 Sioux Falls DEF 158 9 rv dump I-29 Exit 83 5201 Granite Lane, 57107

p 605-255-4555 f 605-255-4522

p 605-669-2465 f 605-669-2466

p 605-348-7070 f 605-348-3438 Country Market

p 605-342-5450 f 605-342-3011

p 605-977-1438 f 605-977-1538

tennessee 481 Cleveland DEF 75 7 I-75, Exit 20 281 Pleasant Grove Rd, 37353 265 COOKEVILLE LMTD 1 I-40, Exit 287 1111 South Jefferson, 38501 406 CORNERSVILLE 2 20 I-65, Exit 22 9211 Lewisburg Highway, 37047 114 CROSSVILLE 7 S 80 I-40, Exit 320 2449 Genesis Road, 38571 226 DANDRIDGE DEF 80 6 I-40, Exit 417 505 Patriot Drive, 37725 409 DICKSON 11 S 90 I-40, Exit 172 2320 Highway 46 South, 37055 720 Fairview DEF 150 9 rv dump I-40 & Hwy 96, Exit 182 1420 Hwy 96 North, 37062 51 GREENEVILLE DEF 25 3 I-81 Exit 36 11190 Baileyton Road, 37745

p 423-476-3892 f 423-476-5430

p 931-528-7100 f 931-528-3893

p 931-363-3290 f 931-363-8248

p 931-787-1901 f 931-787-1905

p 865-397-3547 f 865-397-3699

p 615-446-4600 f 615-446-0763

p 615-799-4116 f 615-799-4120

p 423-234-0414 f 423-234-0641

78 C H A L L E N G E M a y 2 0 1 3

p 865-938-1439 f 865-938-1146

p 931-296-7180 f 931-296-7719

p 731-422-5545 f 731-422-5780

p 865-546-6776 f 865-546-7475

p 865-531-7400 f 865-531-7982

p 865-966-0445 f 865-966-2918

p 865-544-1067 f 865-544-1138

p 615-793-9856 f 615-793-9085

p 615-453-8866 f 615-453-8860

p 901-366-0337 f 901-366-1712

p 901-202-5520 f 901-202-5522

p 615-907-9595 f 615-907-3982

p 615-350-7225 f 615-350-7318

p 423-562-5000 f 423-566-1335

p 901-466-3535 f 901-465-7822

p 865-674-8570 f 865-674-8572

texas 436 AMARILLO 5 S DEF 90 rv dump I-40, Exit 75 715 South Lakeside Drive, 79118

p 806-335-1475 f 806-335-1058 TM

p 972-924-2035 f 972-924-2051

p 915-886-3090 f 915-886-3404

p 915-886-2737 f 915-886-3522

p 281-424-7706 f 281-424-7730

p 281-934-4133 f 281-934-4153

p 903-527-2150 f 903-527-2103

p 972-228-2467 f 972-228-4386

p 972-225-3566 f 972-225-3681

p 956-316-0149 f 956-316-4732

p 915-852-4141 f 915-852-4101

p 817-337-5324 f 817-337-5137

p 713-675-3375 f 713-670-7629

p 281-893-0423 f 281-893-9368

p 936-291-1125 f 936-291-2421

Q Eats

p 512-746-4341

p 806-335-3323 f 806-335-2868

w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m


double myrewards points

at stores listed with a yellow tag

#

S

Flying j dealer showers auto Pilot showers locations locations locations

DEF

# parking

rv dump

restaurants outlined in a red box do not accept MYREWARDS points

texas (cont.)

texas (cont.)

utah (cont.)

377 LAREDO 12 S DEF 300 I-35 S, Exit 13; I-35 N, Exit 12B 1101 Uniroyal Drive, 78045 730 LAREDO DEF 191 15 rv dump I-35 S, Exit 13; I-35 N, Exit 12B 1011 Beltway Parkway, 78045 733 Lubbock 4 50 rv dump I-27 & 4th Street Exit 602 4th Street, 79401 257 MIDLAND 7 S DEF 84 I-20, Exit 126 4015 S. FM 1788, 79706 982 MIDLAND 0 0 7700 W. I-20 7500 W. Hwy 80, 79706 983 MIDLAND 0 0 I-20, Exit 138 7800 Interstate 20 Frontage, 79706 330 New Braunfels 7 S DEF 80 I-35, Exit 184 4142 Loop 337, 78132 734 New Caney DEF 150 9 rv dump US 59 & Exit 242 23412 Hwy 242, 77357 431 ORANGE 8 S 110 rv dump I-10, Exit 873 2205 North Highway 62, 77630 735 ORANGE DEF 150 15 rv dump I-10 Exit 873 7112 I-10 West, 77630 736 Pecos DEF 200 15 rv dump I-20 Exit 42 100 East Pinehurst, 79772 432 ROBINSON 7 S DEF 285 I-35, Exit 328 8055 South I-35, 76706 306 SAN ANTONIO 6 S DEF 50 I-10 E.bound, Ex 581; I-10 W.bound, Ex 582 5619 I-10 East, 78219 467 SAN ANTONIO 7 S DEF 88 I-37, Exit 125 4105 S Loop 1604 E, 78264 157 SULPHUR SPRINGS 7 S DEF 85 I-30, Exit 122 1200 South Hillcrest, 75482 738 Tye DEF 200 15 rv dump I-20 & FM 707 Exit 277 101 North FM 707, 79563 486 Tyler 7 S DEF 85 I-20 & FM 14 12881 FM 14A, 75706

209 VAN HORN 7 S DEF 75 I-10, Exit 140 501 Van Horn Drive, 79855 568 VoN ormy DEF 65 7 I-35, Exit 140 14555 IH35 South, 78073 739 Waco DEF 200 9 rv dump I-35 & New Road 2409 South New Road, 76711 206 WEATHERFORD 7 S DEF 110 I-20, Exit 406 1201 I-20 West, 76087 741 Wichita Falls DEF 50 3 rv dump US 287 & Jacksboro Highway 2311 Jacksboro Highway, 76301

747 Springville DEF 80 8 I-15 Exit 261 1460 North 1750 West, 84663 775 St. George DEF 60 4 I-15 Exit 4 2841 South 60 East, 84790 748 Willard Bay 4 52 rv dump I-15 Exit 357 600 West 750 North, 84340

w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m

p 956-717-5006 f 956-717-5012

p 956-712-3265 f 956-791-3057

p 806-744-0539 f 806-744-7423

p 432-563-1683 f 432-563-1748

p 877-561-8432

p 432-563-1365

p 830-629-1424 f 830-629-1254

p 281-689-8065 f 281-689-8271

p 409-745-1124 f 409-745-3336

p 409-883-9465 f 409-886-8224

p 432-445-9436 f 432-445-7171

p 254-662-4771 f 254-662-4951

p 210-661-5353 f 210-661-4660

p 210-626-9183 f 210-626-9201

p 903-885-0020 f 903-885-1580

p 325-691-9974 f 325-691-5365

p 903-593-5466 f 903-593-3204

p 432-283-8067 f 432-283-8071

p 210-622-9384 f 210-622-9302

p 254-714-0313 f 254-714-1798

p 817-341-4600 f 817-341-4602

p 940-720-0598 f 940-720-0725

utah 509 Beaver DEF 150 6 I-15, Exit 112 653 West 1400 North, 84713 892 Green River West winds truck stop 5 100 I-70, Exit 164 1085 East Main St., 84525 742 Lake Point DEF 130 9 rv dump I-80 Exit 99 1605 East Saddleback Blvd., 84074 743 Nephi 9 100 rv dump I-15 Exit 222 1597 South Main, 84648 772 N. Salt Lake 4 42 I-215 & Redwood Rd, Exit 27 885 W. North Point Circle, 84054 294 OGDEN 5 60 I-15 & UT 39, Exit 344 1670 West 12th Street, 84404 744 OGDEN DEF 100 9 I-15 Exit 343 1172 West 21st Street, 84401 508 Perry DEF 25 2 I-15 Exit 362 1674 W. 1100 S., 84302 773 Richfield DEF 50 4 rv dump I-70 Exit 40 35 East Flying J Drive, 84701 746 Salt Lake City DEF 110 9 rv dump I-15 & I-80 SR201, Exit 17 2025 South 900 West, 84119 510 Scipio 4 100 I-15, Exit 188 810 North 800 West, 84656 774 Snowville 3 50 rv dump I-84 Exit 7 90 South Stone Road, 84336

Roberto’s Taco Shop

p 435-438-5191

West Winds Restaurant

p 435-564-3495 f 435-564-8162

p 801-508-7400 f 801-508-7404

p 435-623-2400 f 435-623-2421

p 801-936-1408 f 801-936-1457

p 801-731-2900 f 801-731-2380

p 801-399-5577 f 801-399-9353

p 435-723-9999

p 435-896-5050 f 435-896-4044

p 801-972-3711 f 801-972-6174

p 435-758-2345

p 801-489-3622 f 801-489-3059

p 435-674-7104 f 435-652-3627

p 435-723-1010 f 435-723-1044

virginia 749 Carmel Church DEF 239 15 rv dump I-95 Exit 104 24279 Roger Clark Blvd., 22546 256 DANVILLE DEF 45 3 Hwy 58 & 29, Exit 104 110 River Point Drive, 24541 898 Emporia Sadler’s Truck Stop 10 250 I-95, Exit 11B 918 West Atlantic Street, 23847 750 Ft. Chiswell DEF 270 14 I-81 & I-77 Exit 80 I-81, I-77 & VA Route 52, 24360 396 Greenville 11 S DEF 100 I-81S, Exit 213A;I-81 N, Exit 213 3541 Lee Jackson Highway, 24401 491 Harrisonburg DEF 100 7 I-81m Exit 251, 22802 3634 North Valley Pike, 22802 384 RICHMOND 9 S DEF 110 I-95 N, Exit 58; I-95 S, Exit 58B 2126 Ruffin Mill Road, 23834 876 Ruther Glen DEF 250 22 I-95, Exit 104 23866 Rogers Clark Blvd, 22546 899 South hill (Bracy) Sadler’s trk. Stp. 0 20 I-85, Exit 12A 1011 East Atlantic Street, 23970 159 TALLYSVILLE DEF 60 4 I-64, Exit 211 6721 Emmaus Church Road 23140 258 TROUTVILLE 3 I-81, Exit 150A or B 2966 Lee Highway South, 24175 752 Winchester DEF 144 15 rv dump I-81 Exit 323 1530 Rest Church Road, 22624 754 Wytheville 15 177 rv dump I-77 & I-81 Exit 77 3249 Chapman Rd, 24382

p 804-448-9047 f 804-448-9805

p 434-792-1180 f 434-792-7894

p 434-634-4312 f 434-634-5397

p 276-637-4115 f 276-637-6968

p 540-324-0714 f 540-324-0718

p 540-434-2529 f 540-434-2076

p 804-524-9556 f 804-524-9522

p 804-448-8419 f 804-448-8350

p 434-447-4528 f 434-447-4582

p 804-966-1880 f 804-966-9231

p 540-992-2805 f 540-992-1534

p 540-678-3641 f 540-678-3651

p 276-228-7110 f 276-228-9010

p 435-872-8181 f 435-872-8171

M a y 2 0 1 3 C H A L L E N G E 79


double myrewards points

at stores listed with a yellow tag

#

S

DEF

Flying j dealer showers auto Pilot showers locations locations locations

Washington

wisconsin (cont.)

965 Ellensburg Flying j/broadway 7 100 I-90 Exit 109 2300 Canyon Rd., 98926 583 Ferndale DEF 25 4

538 Oakdale road ranger DEF 100 5 I-90, Exit 48 102 E Woody, 54660 324 RACINE (FRANKSVILLE) DEF 80 5 I-94 & CR K, Exit 329 13712 Northwestern Avenue, 53126

1678 Main Street #3, 98248 970 Pasco (spokane) Flying j/broadway 2 75 U.S. Hwy 395 2216 E Hillsboro Road, 99301 963 Spokane Flying j/broadway 2 2 I-90 Exit 276 3709 S. Geiger Blvd., 99224 967 Spokane Flying j/broadway 7 80 I-90 Exit 286 6606 E. Broadway Ave., 99212 151 TUMWATER DEF 100 7 I-5, Exit 99 2430 93rd Avenue SW, 98512

p 509-925-6161 f 509-925-5748

p 360-213-1822 f 360-312-1851

p 509-547-5561 f 509-547-4570

p 509-456-8843

p 509-535-3028 f 509-535-7589

p 360-754-0151 f 360-754-0159

west virginia 474 flatwoods (sutton) DEF 55 5 I-79, Exit 67 270 Scott Fork - Bonnie Rd, 26601 243 NITRO DEF 60 6 I-64 & SR 25, Exit 45 4304 First Avenue, 25143 503 morgantown DEF 50 5 I-79, Exit 146 2309 Smithton Rd, 26508

p 304-765-9270 f 304-765-7306

p 304-755-8654 f 304-755-8655

p 304-284-8518 f 304-284-8509

wisconsin 289 BELOIT 5 55 I-43/90 & WI 81, Exit 185A 3001 Milwaukee Road, 53511 756 Black River Falls DEF 150 14 rv dump I-94 & Exit 116 780 State Hwy 54, 54615 528 Cottage Grove road ranger DEF 50 2 I-90, Exit 147 2762 County Hwy N, 53527 544 East troy road ranger 0 LTD I-43, Exit 38 1946 A. Energy Drive, 53120 470 roberts (hudson) DEF 100 9 US 65 & I-94 1191 70th Avenue, 55023 164 MAUSTON 7 S 95 I-90/94 & WI 82, Exit 69 1101 State Road 82 East, 53948 40 OAK CREEK 8 S DEF 150 I-94, Exit 322 2031 West Ryan Road, 53154

p 608-364-3644 f 608-364-3643

p 715-284-4341 f 715-284-1551

Dan’s Big Slice Pizza

# parking

rv dump

alberta , canada (cont.) Dan’s Big Slice Pizza p 815-209-9040 f 608-374-2001

p 262-835-2292 f 262-835-2564

wyoming 758 Casper 4 45 rv dump I-25 Exit 185 41 SE Wyoming Blvd., 82609 402 CHEYENNE DEF 120 10 rv dump I-80, Exit 367 8020 Campstool Road, 82007 759 CHEYENNE DEF 180 16 rv dump I-25 Exit 7 2250 Etchepare Drive, 82007 760 Cokeville 4 90 rv dump US Hwy 30/SR 232 10501 US Hwy 30, 83114 141 EVANSTON 7 S DEF 75 I-80, Exit 6 289 Bear River Drive, 82930 761 Evanston 9 80 I-80 Exit 3 1920 Harrison Drive, 82930 762 Gillette 4 50 rv dump I-90 & Hwy 59 1810 South Douglas Hwy, 82718 308 LARAMIE DEF 100 8 I-80 & Curtis St., Exit 310 1564 McCue Street, 82072 763 Rawlins DEF 200 11 rv dump I-80 Exit 209 I-80 Johnson Rd., 82301 764 Rock Springs DEF 84 8 rv dump I-80 Exit 104 650 Stage Coach Drive, 82901

p 815-315-4979 f 847-232-1186

p 715-749-4238 f 715-749-4241

p 608-847-3321 f 608-847-3316

1260 Cassils Road East, T1R 1B7 785 AB-Calgary DEF 128 9

p 414-761-0939

11511 40th Street SE, T2H 1L4

2525 23 ST N. E., T2E 7M1 848 AB-Calgary 9 80

p 307-635-5744

5505 Jubilee Ave., T7A 1S3 816 ab-Edmonton 0 0

p 307-635-2918

15609 121 A. Ave, T5V 1B1 850 ab-Edmonton 8 100

p 307-279-3050

16806 118 Avenue, T5V1M8 818 ab-Edson Motco 0 0

p 307-783-5930

2520 - 2 Ave., T7E 1T9 819 ab-Fort McMurray 0 0

p 307-789-9129

345 Sakitawaw Trail, T9H 4E4 820 ab-Grande Prairie 0 0

p 307-682-3562

9212 - 108 St., T8V 4C9 845 ab-Grassland 2 75

p 307-742-6443

1st Ave. 1st Street, TOA 1V0 846 ab-Hanna 2 100

p 307-328-0158

Hwy 9 & Hwy 36 South, T0J 1P0 794 AB-High Level 0 25

p 307-362-4231

10529 96 St., T0H 1Z0 817 ab-Hinton 0 0

f 307-473-1759

f 307-635-5746

f 307-634-2794

f 307-279-3041

f 307-783-5916

f 307-789-5461

f 307-682-5038

f 307-742-2576

f 307-328-1668

f 307-362-9710

294 Kelly Road, T7V 1H2 821 ab-Lethbridge 0 20 1005 43 St, T1K 7B8 822 ab-Lloydminster 1 12

alberta , canada

85 East Lake Cres., T4B 2B5 792 AB-BROOKS 2 20

4216 72 Ave SE, T2C 2C1 814 AB-Calgary 0 0

p 307-473-1750

canada 813 ab-Airdrie 0 10

793 AB-Calgary 2 15

4949 Barlow Trail Se, T2B3B5 815 ab-Drayton Valley 0 0

p 815-580-4842 f 608-873-1610

restaurants outlined in a red box do not accept MYREWARDS points

p 403-948-4193

p 403-362-5594

p 403-720-0904 f 403-720-4937

5109 63 St Ave, T9V 2E7 869 AB-nanton 3 130 Hwy #2 2810 21st Ave., T0L 1R0 795 Ab-Nisku 2 8 302 20th Avenue, T9E 7T8

p 403-236-2404

p 403-250-3835 J’s Wok and Grill

p 403-273-4949 f 403-273-0628

p 801-725-1370

p 708-413-9116

p 780-455-1111 f 780-482-4448

p 780-743-3545

p 780-532-2378 Eldorado Restaurant

p 780-525-2295 f 780-525-2299

Cactus Corner Cafe

p 403-854-5000

p 780-926-2066

p 801-725-1370

p 403-328-4735

p 780-875-2990

Humpty’s Restaurant

p 403-646-2810 f 403-646-2872

p 780-955-3535

f 414-761-0165

80 C H A L L E N G E m a y 2 0 1 3

w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m


double myrewards points

at stores listed with a yellow tag

#

S

Flying j dealer showers auto Pilot showers locations locations locations

DEF

# parking

rv dump

restaurants outlined in a red box do not accept MYREWARDS points

alberta , canada (cont.)

British columbia, canada (cont.)

ontario, canada (cont.)

796 AB-Red Deer 4 26

802 BC-Vancouver 0 0

461 ON-TILBURY DEF 150 6 Rural Route #5, Highway 401, Exit 56 19325 Essex County Road 42, N0P 2L0

p

67th Ave. & 67 Street, T4P 1A4 826 ab-Redcliff 1 0 115 Lockwood St, T1A 7T9 797 Ab-Rycroft 0 8 Hwy #49 & Hwy #2 Hwy #49 & 2, Box 73, T0H 3A0 786 AB-Sherwood Park DEF 142 9 Yellowhead Hwy 16/ Broadmoor Blvd. 50 Pembina Rd., T8H 2G9 824 ab-Whitecourt 0 10 Hwy #43 & West Mtn. Road, T7N 1S9

403-346-2785

f 403-346-2852

p 403-526-2669

p 780-765-3740 f 780-765-3748

929 Coutts Way & Sumas Way, V2S 4N2 798 BC-Annacis Island 1 4 1291 Cliveden Ave, V5M 6G4 799 BC-Chilliwack 2 21 7970 Lickman Road, V2R 1A9 828 bc-Cranbrook 0 0 2209 Theatre Road, V1C 4H4 829 bc-Creston 0 0 1411 Northwest Blvd, V0B 1G6 830 bc-Dawson Creek 0 0 1725 Alaska Ave, V1G 1P5 861 bc-HOPE 4 S DEF 50 Hwy 1, Exit 168 63100 Flood Hope Road, VOX 1L2 800 bc-Fort St John 0 0 Alaska Hwy & 109 St. 9407 109th Street, V1J 6K6 847 bc-Kamloops 5 125 175 Kokanee Way, V2C 6Z2 831 bc-Merritt 0 0 1885 Cold Water Ave. 2190 Douglas Street North, V0K 2B0 832 bc-New Westminster 0 0 24 Braid St, V3L 3P3 801 BC-Prince George 3 0 4869 Continental Way, V2N 5S5 w w w. p t c c h a l l e n g e . c o m

Quebec, canada

788 MB-Headingley DEF 150 9 Hwy #1 & Camp Manitou Rd. 4100 Portage Avenue, R4H 1C5 803 MB-Portage La Prairie 0 40

840 QC-Bernieres 0 0

Hwy #1 East, R1N 3B2 804 MB-Winnipeg 2 0

p 780-706-0471

1747 Brookside Blvd., R2C 2E8 835 MB-Winnipeg 0 0

f 780-416-2084

131 Warman Road & HWY. #59, R2J 3R3 p 604-850-1594

p 604-521-4445

862 ON-Ayr 5 30 Hwy 401, Exit 268 2492 Cedar Creek Road, N0B 1E0 805 ON-Etobicoke 0 0 1765 Albion Rd & Hwy 27, M9W 5S7 806 ON-Kapuskasing 4 40

p 250-426-3763

410 Government Road E, P5N 2X7 852 ON-lancaster DEF 110 9 Hwy 401, Exit 814 20382 Old Hwy #2, K0C 1N0 789 ON-London DEF 230 16 Hwy 401 & Highbury Ave. Exit 189 3700 Highbury Ave. South, N6N 1P3 807 ON-Mississauga DEF 50 3

p 250-782-3111

p 604-886-6815 f 604-886-6821

p 250-785-3052

p 250-573-3032 f 205-573-7828

p 204-832-8952 f 204-832-9104

p 204-857-9997

p 204-633-0663

p 204-231-5485

ontario, canada

p 604-795-7265

p 250-428-7131

p 604-454-9578

manitoba, canada

p 780-416-2035

British columbia, canada 827 bc-Abbotsford 1 10

8655 Boundary Rd & Marine Way, V5S 4H3

1400 Britannia Rd, L4W 1C8 790 ON-Napanee DEF 165 15 401 & Cnty Rd 41 Exit 579 628 County Road #41 RR6, K7R 3L1 865 on-Pickering 9 150 Hwy 401 2000 Clements Road, L1W 4A1 838 on-Sault Ste Marie 0 0

p 250-280-1555

987 Great Northern Road, P6A 5K7 836 on-Schreiber 0 0

p 604-522-6511

Hwy # 17, P0T 2S0 837 on-Sudbury 0 0

p 250-563-1677

17 Duhamel Road, P3E 4N1

1196 Chemin Des Olivieres, G7A 2M6 808 QC-Berthierville 10 1181 Ave Gilles Villeneuve, J0K 1A0 809 QC-Napierville 10 Hwy 15 Exit 21 1 Rang St-Andre, J0J 1L0 810 QC-Ste Helene 4 10 HWY 20, Exit 152 569 Rue Principale, J0H 1M0

p 519-682-1140 f 519-682-9221

p 418-831-3772

p 450-836-6581

p 450-245-3539 f 450-245-9642

p 450-791-2232 f 450-791-2495

Saskatchewan, canada Papa Joe’s Hot Kettle p 519-624-9578 f 519-624-2587

p 416-674-8665

p 705-337-1333 f 705-337-1208

p 613-347-2221 f 613-347-1970

811 SK-Moose Jaw DEF 20 5 370 North Service Rd. Hwy #11, S6H 4N9 842 sk-Regina 3 12 1511 Ross Ave. East, S4R 1J2 791 SK-Saskatoon DEF 85 4 3850 Idylwylde Drive North, S7P 0A1 844 sk-Yorkton 0 0 Hwy #16A Bypass on York 1910 York Road West Box 794, S3N 2W8

p 306-693-5858

p 306-721-0070

p 306-955-6840 f 306-955-6846

p 801-726-8288

p 519-686-9154

f 519-686-8629

p 905-564-6216

p 613-354-7044 f 613-354-3796 Coffee Shop

p 905-428-9700 f 905-428-9633

p 705-759-8280

p 807-824-2383

p 705-692-5447

m a y 2 0 1 3 C H A L L E N G E 81


EARN CASH DISCOUNTS ON EVERY RESTAURANT PURCHASE WITH YOUR MYREWARDS CARD*

*Valid and Redeemable at Participating Pilot and Flying J Restaurants only. Some Limitations Apply. See Restaurant Cashier for Details.

The Pilot logo is a registered trademark of Pilot Travel Centers LLC.

Customer PROFILE:

Rick Stearns ’m a company driver. I drive for Long Haul Trucking located in Albertville, Minn. We are a flatbed carrier and we haul mostly everything that requires a flatbed. I live in Brooklyn, N.Y. and I run all 48 states. I normally run the upper Midwest to the Northeast and then back to the Midwest. My girlfriend Aida and I have two wonderful children together, an 18-month old and a newborn. I also have three children Andrew, 23, John, 22, and Elizabeth, 21, that all live in Florida. I always use my MyRewards card. I have used the rewards card for as long as I can remember. I use my points for showers, coffee and most importantly wi-fi. I love the fact that you can use your points for basically anything. What a great program.

I

Interested in being our Customer Profile of the Month? If you’re a MyRewards card member who loves the Pilot Flying J loyalty program, we want to hear from you! Contact us at editor@ptcchallenge.com with Customer Profile in the subject line. You could be our next featured driver!

MyRewards.pilotflyingj.com


May 2013 - Challenge Magazine  

Challenge Magazine is a monthly lifestyle publication for the open road traveler. Each month, the magazine offers diverse editorial content...

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