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Momentum Cycle Challenge 2013 Getting more people cycling by understanding behaviour change

Evaluation report prepared by: Challenge for Change January 2014


Contents Section One - Introduction ......................................................................... 7 1.1  

Background .................................................................................. 7

1.2 Aims and objectives ....................................................................... 8   Section Two - Marketing, Promotion and Incentives....................................... 9   2.1  

Promotional materials .................................................................... 9

2.2

Website analytics ......................................................................... 11

2.3

Incentives and prizes .................................................................... 12

Section Three - Challenge Results .............................................................. 13 3.1  

Top-line Results ........................................................................... 13

Section Four - Data Collection ................................................................... 16 4.1  

Data collection ............................................................................. 16

4.2

Representative sample .................................................................. 17

Section Five - Registrations into the Challenge ............................................ 18 5.1  

Organisations............................................................................... 18

5.2

People ........................................................................................ 18

Section Six - Survey Results ..................................................................... 20 6.1   Change in general cycling behaviour ............................................... 20   6.2  

Frequency of cycling trips to work ................................................... 27

6.3

Modal shift .................................................................................. 29

Section Seven - Barriers and Motivators ..................................................... 32 7.1  

Barriers and motivators for participation in the Challenge .................. 32

7.2

Cycling confidence and bike ownership ............................................ 36

7.3

Interventions to encourage cycling.................................................. 38

7.4

Feedback on workplace cycle facilities ............................................. 40

Section Eight - Results Summary ............................................................... 42 8.1  

Aims ........................................................................................... 42

8.2

Objectives ................................................................................... 44

8.3

Summary of recommendations ....................................................... 45

Section Nine - Conclusion ......................................................................... 47 Appendix 1 – Organisation Registrations ..................................................... 48   Appendix 2 – Improvements for cyclists within the Bournemouth, Poole and Christchurch areas ................................................................................... 51  

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“Good idea as it made me get on my bike as it has been stored in my shed for months.” – Non-Cyclist

“Great initiative. Got people talking about cycling and taking action.” – Occasional Cyclist

“Thank you for organising the Challenge. It sparked up the enthusiasm in our team. It's great to see how many miles I cycled in a week or month as normally you don't realise how much it adds up.” – Regular Cyclist

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Executive Summary Outline of the Challenge Love to Ride Momentum (www.lovetoride.net/momentum) was established in early 2013 and rolls on as the online community for cyclists of all abilities in the area. Challenge for Change delivered the first Momentum Cycle Challenge on this new platform in May and June 2013. The initiative aimed to increase the number of people cycling in Bournemouth, Poole and Christchurch. This mirrored the focus of the successful large LSTF bid in Bournemouth and addressed various requirements of a broader programme of sustainable travel initiatives and infrastructure developments across the ‘Three Towns Corridor’. The behavioural change programme allowed organisations to compete against one another to see who could encourage the most staff to cycle for at least 10 minutes, during the three week Challenge period from Monday 27 May to Sunday 16 June 2013. The Challenge focused on participation and not miles to ensure a fair competition that encouraged non- and occasional cyclists, as much as regular cyclists. Try-a-bike sessions with led rides and organised group rides were offered throughout the Challenge period to provide a fun and easy way to participate. During the Challenge period, 98 organisations participated, and 1,390 people recorded over 75,028 miles via 7,092 trips. The 98 participating organisations employed between them more than 32,100 people, showing the reach of the Challenge’s marketing effort.

Evaluation of the Challenge This report details an evaluation of the Challenge. Participants were surveyed at baseline when registering into the Challenge (May 2013) and three weeks (June 2013) and three months (September 2013) after participating. The results of these surveys have been analysed. The three-week Post Challenge Survey and the three-month Post Challenge Survey both achieved the same response rate of 22%. For the purpose of this report, registrants have been placed into one of the following groups:

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• • •

Non-Cyclists - People who had either not cycled at all or only a few times in the year before the Challenge (31% of registrants). Occasional Cyclists - People who had either cycled only a few times a month or about once a week before the Challenge (22% of registrants). Regular Cyclists - People who had cycled two days or more each week before the Challenge (47% of registrants).

Top-line results The Momentum Cycle Challenge programme has successfully influenced the behaviour of the key target audiences in Bournemouth, Poole and Christchurch. The top-line results are: 1. Participation of new cyclists One of the aims of the 2013 Challenge was to encourage people who are not currently cycling to start cycling, with a specific target of encouraging 750 noncyclists to take part in the Challenge. With 534 non-cyclists registering and 387 going on to record a trip this is a good proportion of non-cyclists despite achieving less than the target. 31% of all registrants were non-cyclists. 2. Increase in cycling frequency Three months after the Challenge: • •

62% of non-cyclists at baseline reported cycling at least once a month or more often, with 41% now cycling once a week or more; 50% of those classed as occasional cyclists reported cycling two days a week or more.

3. Increase in cycling to work frequency Three months after the Challenge: • •

36% of participants who reported cycling less than two days a week to work at baseline are now cycling to work at least two days a week; 10% of participants who reported travelling to work by car at baseline had switched to cycling to work as their main mode of transport.

4. Adding value to local projects that aim to promote cycling and sustainable travel Following the Challenge, participants were given the opportunity to state an interest in cycling activities or information in a survey. Most respondents wanted information about bike maintenance (n=142), led group rides (n=70) and advanced cycle skills training (n=66). 5


Key Recommendations There is an opportunity for the local councils and their partners to continue the legacy of the Challenge by implementing the follow-up interventions, promote adult cycle training schemes and information about cycle routes directly to those who requested it; offer bike maintenance courses to benefit as wide an audience as possible; and build a relationship with the organisations that were involved in the Challenge to engage them in further cycling activities. The database of over 1,700 cyclists and 130 businesses in the area is a great resource and could be used for research purposes, to consult on plans for new infrastructure with cyclists of all abilities, to promote the annual programme of cycling events in the area and to continue to support those cyclists who have shown a change in behaviour through the Challenge by incentivising them to keep cycling. This database has already been successfully utilised to help promote other local events and ensure participation rates are good.

There is a high level of interest from Challenge Champions in continuing to Champion cycling in their workplace and explore implementing a grants scheme to help workplaces improve their facilities.

Conclusion The Momentum Cycle Challenge programme has successfully engaged a large audience of potential and existing cyclists in the area. Positive behaviour change has been measured amongst the key target groups of non- and occasional cyclists as a result of the Challenge. Continuing to attract non-cyclists into the programme would remain the key focus of a repeat Challenge, as well as attracting new organisations to take part and increasing participation within existing organisations. Delivering a 2014 Cycle Challenge will continue to increase rates in cycling and cycling to work, evident in the results obtained during 2013. The range of outcomes varied between the three main areas of Poole, Christchurch and Bournemouth. For various reasons as discussed with Dorset County Council, the take up and therefore the levels of behaviour achieved in Christchurch were not on a par with either Bournemouth or Poole. Following further discussions with each authority, it has been agreed that the 2014 programme and the footprint of Love to Ride Momentum, will now extend to Bournemouth and Poole exclusively, but not Christchurch. We look forward to building on the positive first year with an enhanced programme of activity in this area, also using the new branding, behaviour change framework and web and technology developments that are currently being rolled out. 6


Section One Introduction In May and June 2013, Challenge for Change delivered the first Momentum Cycle Challenge through the successful Bournemouth Borough Council (BBC) Local Sustainable Transport Fund bid (LSTF), and contributions from Poole Borough Council and Dorset County Council. The Challenge was a behavioural change programme, based on social marketing theory, designed to encourage more people in Chichester to cycle more often. This report provides data and feedback on the Challenge and evidence to show the outcomes of the Challenge, based on participant research.

1.1

Background

The first Momentum Cycle Challenge took place from 27 May to 16 June and successfully encouraged a total of 1,390 participants to take part. The Challenge encouraged people to experience what it was like to actually ride a bike, through events, incentives and peer encouragement. It had been extended by a week due to heavy rain and bad weather. Rides were recorded online via a dedicated Momentum Cycle Challenge website, which encouraged organisations and the individual departments within them to compete against each other to see who could encourage the most staff to cycle for at least 10 minutes. The Challenge focused on participation rather than mileage, to ensure a fair competition that engaged non- and occasional cyclists, as much as regular cyclists. It also helped to foster a sense of teamwork and a cycling culture within participating groups by motivating existing cyclists to seek out and encourage their non-cycling friends to get involved. The design of the promotional materials and website used black and white images of cyclists including bike hangers aimed at existing cyclists to encourage their non-cycling colleagues to take part, specifically in the try-a-bike sessions. Try-a-bike events were held at various workplaces to give participants the opportunity to try cycling for 10 minutes. These events also included a free bike tune up by a Dr. Bike mechanic.

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1.2

Aims and objectives

Aims The aims of the Challenge are: •

To encourage people who are not currently cycling to start cycling.

To encourage occasional cyclists to cycle more regularly.

To encourage those who are not currently cycling to work to cycle to work.

To add value to local projects that aim to promote cycling and sustainable travel.

To provide measurable results so that stakeholders can see that the Challenge programme has made a real difference to the number of people cycling in the south east Dorset conurbation.

Objectives 1. To encourage between 60 and 80 organisations to register in the Challenge. 2. To encourage between 2,000 and 3,000 people to participate in the Challenge each year. 3. To encourage between 700 and 1,000 non-cyclists to participate in the Challenge.

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Section Two Marketing, Promotion and Incentives Mike Hicks and Neil McCain were appointed as the Challenge Managers. Their role was to encourage as many new organisations and people to take part and to support them throughout the Challenge programme.

2.1

Promotional materials

A range of promotional materials were to promote the Challenge: A4 posters, A4 business factsheets, A4 paper registration forms and A6 postcards. Different messages were used in order to target different audiences – non-cyclists and existing cyclists.

Mini flyers (to hang on bikes or inside on plants and computers) were targeted at existing cyclists:

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Printed materials were complemented by a Challenge website (Section 2.2), web banners and targeted emails to participants before, during and after the Challenge period. Some emails went to all participants, whilst others were targeted at specific groups within the database, for example: •

Emails to Workplace Champions – gave tips and ideas on how to promote the Challenge and encouraged them to become actively involved in the Challenge by organising social rides for their team.

Emails to new cyclists – focussed on the “Cycle for 10 minutes and win!” message and highlighted incentives such as the free cinema tickets and prizes.

All publicity for the Challenge took a friendly, non-lecturing approach. Instead of focusing on promoting the benefits of cycling and physical activity, it encouraged people to simply give cycling a go, have fun with their workmates and in turn discover the benefits for themselves. Publicity clearly highlighted the prizes and incentives available, which are detailed in Section 2.3.

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2.2

Website analytics

Organisations, departments and individuals were encouraged to register their involvement and record their cycling activity on the website www.momentumcyclechallenge.org.uk. The website displayed live results and enabled a quick and easy comparison of individual and team results to motivate further participation, with statistics relating to distance, trips, calories and carbon savings. The analytics statistics for the website have been recorded and analysed specifically for the month before, during and the two weeks after the Challenge period, from 27 April to 30 June 2013: • • • • • •

13,938 visits (63% from returning visitors, 37% from new visitors). 5,364 absolute unique visitors. 214 visits on average per day. 05:24 minutes spent on average on the site. 80,507 page views. 6 page views on average per visit.

Most of the traffic to the website (64%) was direct, followed by referring sites (20%) and searches (16%). Figure 1: Visits per day

27/04/2013 29/04/2013 01/05/2013 03/05/2013 05/05/2013 07/05/2013 09/05/2013 11/05/2013 13/05/2013 15/05/2013 17/05/2013 19/05/2013 21/05/2013 23/05/2013 25/05/2013 27/05/2013 29/05/2013 31/05/2013 02/06/2013 04/06/2013 06/06/2013 08/06/2013 10/06/2013 12/06/2013 14/06/2013 16/06/2013 18/06/2013 20/06/2013 22/06/2013 24/06/2013 26/06/2013 28/06/2013 30/06/2013

1000 900 800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0

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2.3

Incentives and prizes

The following competitions, incentives and prizes were used to attract the key target audiences into the Challenge: •

Team Participation Award – The top three teams in each size category that encouraged the highest proportion of staff to ride a bike for the Challenge won a Challenge certificate. The top team in each size category also won a large cake decorated with “Momentum Cycle Challenge Winners!” on it.

Cinema Tickets – 500 cinema tickets for Odeon were awarded to those who cycled for the first time in over a year for the Challenge and their encouragers, as well as those who rode a penny-farthing, a recumbent tricycle and a tandem at a try-a-bike session.

Weekly Prizes – There were three weekly prize draws, one in each week of the Challenge. These draws encouraged participants to record at least one trip a week for any purpose: for leisure or work. Prizes included a bike in each council area worth £500, a spa day for two, a private sailing lesson for two and a three course meal.

Most new cyclists - The team that encouraged the most new cyclists to log a trip during the Challenge won an introduction to climbing and abseiling course.

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Section Three Challenge Results 3.1

Top-line Results

The results from the 2013 Challenge, which relate to trips that were recorded within the three-week Challenge period, from 27 May to 16 June, are presented in the table below. Table 1: Top-line results for the 2013 Momentum Cycle Challenge Top-line results Organisations Participants Non cyclists Distance (miles) Total trips % trips for transport purposes CO2 saved (kg) Energy burnt (million kJ)

2013 98 1,390 387 75,028 7,092 65% 13,227 8.2

Table 2 (below) shows the programme top-line results as divided between the main three areas. Table 2: Top-line results in each area

Registrants Non-cyclists Distance (miles) Total trips Total trips to work Distance for transport (miles) CO2 saved (kg) Money saved in petrol*

Bournemouth 665 140 (21%) 41244 3689 2517 20758 13462 £10723

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Poole 576 190 (33%) 26956 2853 1859 13618 8799 £7009

Christchurch 62 20 (33%) 3759 248 107 1068 1227 £978


The organisations and departments which encouraged the most people to cycle for the Challenge were: Table 3: Participation Award Winners Size Category

500+

200-499

50-199

20-49

7-19

3-6

Place

Organisation

% Participation

1st

Bournemouth University

9.9%

2nd

WDS, A Xerox Company

7.1%

3rd

J.P. Morgan

6.0%

1st

CIB Banking International Tech - J.P. Morgan

20.0%

2nd

School of Health and Social Care - Bournemouth University

12.0%

3rd

Christchurch and East Dorset Partnership

10.0%

1st

Transportation Services - Borough of Poole

51.0%

2nd

The Gleam Team

34.0%

3rd

Technical Support - WDS, A Xerox Company

32.0%

1st

Dorset Prosthetic Centre - Royal Bournemouth & Christchurch Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

90.0%

2nd

Physiotherapy Outpatients - Royal Bournemouth & Christchurch Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

90.0%

3rd

Radiology - Royal Bournemouth & Christchurch Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

37.0%

1st

Sales - Oceana Hotels

78.0%

2nd

Art and Design - Bournemouth & Poole College

70.0%

3rd

Finance Dept - Ceuta Healthcare Ltd

64.0%

1st

Two Blue Hats Ltd

100%

2nd

Sport - Bournemouth & Poole College

100%

3rd

Helpline - Teachers Assurance

100%

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Events Over the course of the Challenge, 9 events took place covering both workplaces and the town centres to encourage both new and existing cyclists to take part in the Challenge, engaging more than 500 people. One large Cycling Roadshow were delivered in each of Bournemouth, Poole and Christchurch town centres, where participants were encouraged to try at least one of a range curiosity bikes including tandems, recumbent bikes and even a penny farthing. These events were largely successful in encouraging new cyclists as well as regular riders to take part and therefore register on Love to Ride.

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Section Four Data Collection The data recorded and collected as part of the Challenge was critical for analysing and evaluating the Momentum Cycle Challenge programme and understanding changes in participants’ behaviour.

4.1

Data collection

Three surveys have been completed by participants in the programme, at the start of the Challenge, three weeks and then three months after the Challenge:

Survey

N responses % response rate

Post Challenge Survey 1

Post Challenge Survey 2

(July 2013)

(Sept 2013)

1720

383

376

-

22%

22%

Baseline (Mar-June 2013)

The first Post Challenge Survey aimed to discover what perceived barriers participants had to cycling more often in the future and to explore their intended future cycling behaviour, whilst the second one explored any changes to cycling behaviour since the Challenge. Incentives were offered for each survey to encourage completion.

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4.2

Representative sample

It is important to ascertain whether the participants who responded to the Post Challenge Surveys are representative of all who took part in the Challenge. A representative sample means that the survey results can be extrapolated to represent all Challenge participants. To test whether the participants who completed the Post Challenge Surveys were representative of all participants, their cycling behaviour, gender and age have been compared against those given at baseline. Table 4: Comparison of sample

% of all Challenge registrants

% of all Post Challenge Survey 1 respondents

% of all Post Challenge Survey 2 respondents

Not at all A few times 1-3 times a month Once a week 2-3 days a week 4 or more days a week

12% 19% 12% 10% 18% 30%

12% 19% 11% 10% 17% 30%

10% 12% 12% 7% 19% 40%

Male Female

58% 42%

57% 43%

61% 39%

15 yrs or less 16-19 yrs 20-24 yrs 25-34 yrs 35-44 yrs 45-54 yrs 55-64 yrs 65 yrs or older

<1% 1% 6% 30% 28% 24% 10% 1%

<1% 1% 6% 30% 28% 24% 10% 1%

<1% 0% 4% 24% 29% 29% 13% 1%

Cycling behaviour at baseline

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Section Five Registrations into the Challenge The Challenge succeeded in attracting a wide audience of organisations and cyclists of all levels of cycling experience. Key Points â&#x20AC;˘

130 organisations registered into the Challenge, and 98 (75%) of them participated

â&#x20AC;˘

1,390 of the participants who registered to take part (81%) went on to record a trip during the Challenge.

â&#x20AC;˘

Over 1,700 people in Bournemouth, Poole and Christchurch have now registered onto the website and engaged with the Challenge.

5.1

Organisations

130 organisations confirmed that they would take part in the 2013 Challenge. Participants in 98 of these confirmed organisations went on to record a trip (75%), therefore there were 32 organisations that registered but did not participate. Appendix 1 shows a list of all organisations registered into the Challenge.

5.2

People

The Baseline Survey for the 2013 Challenge was completed by 1,720 people, indicating that they had registered to take part. 1,390 of the participants who registered to take part (81%) went on to record a trip during the Challenge. To date, over 1,700 people in Bournemouth, Poole and Christchurch have now registered onto the Challenge website and engaged with the Challenge.

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1

Figure 2: Age and gender of registrants (N=1,668 ) Male (n=964)

Female (n=704)

20% 15% 10% 5% 0% 15 yrs or 16-19 yrs 20-24 yrs 25-34 yrs 35-44 yrs 45-54 yrs 55-64 yrs 65 yrs or less older

1

The largest groups of participants were aged 25-34 years (30%) and 3544 years (29%), followed by 45-54 years (24%).

42% of participants were female.

There were more male than female participants in all bands except in 15 years or less.

The number of males and females do not equal the total number of registrants (N=1,720) due to missing data. 2 Those who completed the Baseline Survey 19 are referred to as ‘registrants’ throughout


Section Six Survey Results The Challenge surveys presented a great opportunity to observe the behaviour of a large group of cyclists in Bournemouth, Poole and Christchurch. This information shows us how the Challenge has influenced participants’ cycling and travel-to-work behaviour. The results of the Baseline and both Post Challenge Surveys are reported in this Section2.

6.1

Change in general cycling behaviour

Key Points •

534 registrants (31%) had either cycled not at all or only a few times in the year prior to the 2013 Challenge.

Amongst non-cyclists, those who stated an intention to cycle more often after the Challenge showed an increase in reported cycling behaviour three months later (82%), whereas no increase was reported by those who stated that they would cycle about the same/less often.

41% of those classed as non-cyclists at baseline reported cycling at least once a week three months after the Challenge.

6.1.1 Cycling behaviour at Baseline Table 5: Before taking part in the Challenge, approximately how often have you ridden a bike in the last 12 months? (N=1,681)

Not at all

A few times

1-3 times a month

Once a week

2-3 days a week

4 or more days a week

9%

13%

10%

10%

21%

37%

Female (n=710)

17%

27%

14%

10%

13%

20%

All (N=1,681)

12%

19%

12%

10%

17%

30%

Gender Male (n=971)

• •

204 registrants had not cycled at all in the year prior to the Challenge. The largest group of registrants had cycled 4 or more days a week in the year before taking part in the Challenge (30% of total registrants).

2

Those who completed the Baseline Survey are referred to as ‘registrants’ throughout this report. The term ‘participants’ refers to those who went on to record a trip.

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From this data, Challenge registrants have been grouped into three broad segments based on their cycling behaviour: •

Non-Cyclists - People who had either not cycled at all (classed as ‘new cyclists’) or only a few times in the year before the Challenge.

Occasional Cyclists - People who had either cycled only a few times a month or about once a week before the Challenge.

Regular Cyclists - People who had cycled two days or more each week before the Challenge.

Figure 3: Before taking part in the Challenge, approximately how often have you ridden a bike in the last 12 months (n=1,720)?

Non-Cyclists

Occasional Cyclists

Regular Cyclists

31%

47%

22%

• 534 registrants (31%) had either cycled not at all or only a few times in the year prior to the 2013 Challenge. • In 2013, on average, Workplace Cycle Challenges in the UK attracted 31% non-cyclists and 19% occasional cyclists. The results achieved in the Momentum Cycle Challenge therefore compare very favourably and show that the programme attracted an above average proportion of the key target audience into the Challenge.

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Gender differences amongst the three segments were also looked at. Figure 4: Before taking part in the Challenge, approximately how often have 3

you ridden a bike in the last 12 months? (N=1,681 )

Male (n=971)

Female (n=710)

100% 80% 60% 40% 20%

29%

47%

59%

71%

53%

41%

0% Non-Cyclists (n=524)

â&#x20AC;˘

Occasional Cyclists (n=364)

Regular Cyclists (n=793)

The differences in gender across the audience segments followed the typical pattern found amongst cyclists: with a higher proportion of females as non-cyclists (59%) and a higher proportion of males as regular cyclists (71%).

6.1.2 Intentions to cycle after participation in the Challenge Participants were asked about their intentions to cycle after the Challenge in July 2013 - Post Challenge Survey 1. Table 6: Thinking ahead to the next 3 months, will you be riding a bike...? (n=294) More than I did in the 3 months before the Challenge

About the same as I did in the 3 months before the Challenge

Less than I did in the 3 months before the Challenge

Non- (n=67)

87%

13%

0%

Occasional (n=57)

54%

46%

0%

Regular (n=170)

31%

68%

2%

All (N=294)

48%

51%

1%

Participant Segment

â&#x20AC;˘

87% of non- and 54% of occasional cyclists stated that they intended to cycle more than they did before taking part in the Challenge.

3

This number is lower than the overall number of registrants (N=1,239) because gender data was missing for 13 registrants.

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Remarkably, 31% of regular cyclists stated an intention to cycle more than they did before the Challenge. Only 1% of participants intended to cycle less often after taking part in the Challenge.

Participants were asked to elaborate on their intentions in free text. These qualitative quotes have been combined into a word cloud, with the font size of individual words reflecting how frequently they appeared in responses. Figure 5: What is the main reason(s) that you will cycle more in the next 3 months?

“Forgot how much I enjoyed it.” - Non-cyclist “More opportunity with better weather but also got to meet people through the Cycle Challenge that want to do more cycling together.” - Occasional Cyclist “Weather is better! Challenge made me realise that I was just doing the same work-andback but never getting out to do longer rides.” - Regular Cyclist

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6.1.3 Did intentions translate into action? It is interesting to find out whether those participants who stated that they intended to cycle more often after the Challenge, actually did so. To assess this, the cycling behaviour of the key audience, non-cyclists, at three months after the Challenge was compared to their stated intentions three weeks after the Challenge. Table 7: Changes in cycling behaviour three months after participating in the Challenge, relative to cycling intention three weeks after the Challenge (n=26) – Non-cyclists only 3 Weeks Post Challenge % of Cycling baseline intention registrants (with data) More 85% About the 15% same/Less

3 Months Post Challenge Occasional Regular 1-3 Once 2-3 4 or more A few times a a days a days a times month week week week 18% 23% 5% 32% 23%

NonNot at all 0% 50%

50%

0%

0%

0%

0%

% Increased Cycling 82% 0%

Of the 26 non-cyclists who completed both the three week and three month follow-up surveys, 85% stated that they intended to cycle more often after the Challenge. 55% of them went on to cycle two or more days a week three months after the Challenge.

Amongst non-cyclists, those who stated an intention to cycle more often after the Challenge showed an increase in reported cycling behaviour three months later (82%), whereas no increase was reported by those who stated that they would cycle about the same/less often.

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6.1.4 Behaviour change three months on Changes amongst the wider group of participants who responded to Post Challenge Survey 2 (regardless of whether they responded to Post Challenge Survey 1) are shown in the table below. Table 8: Changes in cycling behaviour three months after participating in the Challenge (N=370) 3 Months Post Challenge Non-

NonOccasional

Regular

% Increased Cycling

n

Not at all

A few times

1-3 times a month

Once a week

2-3 days a week

4 or more days a week

Not at all

36

17%

31%

22%

6%

11%

14%

83%

A few times

45

4%

27%

20%

13%

20%

16%

69%

1-3 times a month

44

0%

9%

18%

30%

30%

14%

73%

Once a week

26

0%

0%

8%

31%

42%

19%

62%

2-3 days a week

72

0%

1%

4%

8%

58%

28%

28%

4 or more days a week

147

0%

0%

1%

1%

12%

86%

-

Baseline

Regular

Occasional

62% of non-cyclists at baseline reported they are now cycling once a month or more, three months after the Challenge.

41% of non-cyclists reported that they are now cycling weekly (once a week or more often) three months after the Challenge.

50% of those who were occasional cyclists at baseline reported cycling regularly three months after the Challenge.

Overall, 11% of participants were cycling less frequently three months after the Challenge, compared to 58% who were cycling more frequently4.

4

This figure excludes regular cyclists who cycled 4 or more days a week, as this is the upper limit of cycling frequency that the survey allows.

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Participants were asked why they had cycled more often in the three months since the Challenge. Figure 6: What is the main reason(s) that you cycled more in the last 3 months?

“After doing the try-a-bike session, I enrolled my children into getting back on theirs as our family downtime. We bought two new children bikes and James was on his every day. Jacinta’s learning on the road for the first time. Long distance being more of the objective right now, enrolling for the first time to do a fundraising bike ride with the family in October. I bought a new bike too!!” – Non-Cyclist “The Challenge gave me the initiative to get back on my bike and remember how much I enjoy cycling. Now doing approx 30 miles a week and doing local journeys with children on bikes.” – Occasional Cyclist “Realised how much more convenient and cheaper it was for just popping into town etc.” – Regular Cyclist

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6.2

Frequency of cycling trips to work

Occasional and regular cyclists were asked how frequently they had cycled for work in the three weeks prior to completing the Baseline Survey. The same question was repeated in Post Challenge Survey 2 to assess behaviour change three months after the Challenge. Key Points Of those who reported cycling less than two days a week to work at baseline, 36% reported cycling to work regularly (at least two days a week) three months after the Challenge.

6.2.1 Trips to work Baseline Figure 7: In the last 3 weeks, about how often have you cycled to work? (N=1,142)

Occasional Cyclists (n=348)

Regular Cyclists (n=794)

70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Not at all in the Less than 1 day 1 day per week 2-3 days per last 3 weeks per week week

4 or more days per week

14% of occasional cyclists reported cycling to work two or more days a week, whilst 49% did not cycle at all to work.

Unsurprisingly, regular cyclists reported more frequent cycling trips to work than occasional cyclists, with 87% of regular cyclists cycling to work at least one day per week, compared to 33% of occasional cyclists.

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Three months on Table 9: Changes in cycling to work three months after participating in the Challenge (N=277) 3 Months Post Challenge Baseline Not at all in the last 3 weeks Less than 1 day per week 1 day per week 2-3 days per week 4 or more days per week

â&#x20AC;˘

n

Not at all in the last 3 weeks

Less than 1 day per week

1 day per week

2-3 days per week

4 or more days per week

% Increased Cycling

40

53%

18%

8%

10%

13%

48%

18

44%

0%

0%

39%

17%

56%

33

15%

9%

33%

30%

12%

42%

48

4%

2%

8%

56%

29%

29%

138

1%

1%

0%

7%

90%

-

Of those who reported cycling less than two days a week to work at baseline, 36% reported cycling to work regularly (at least two days a week) three months after the Challenge.

The cycling trips to work of non-cyclist participants were also looked at as some have reported general increases in cycling behaviour. Table 10: Changes in cycling to work amongst non-cyclists three months after participating in the Challenge (N=79) 3 Months Post Challenge

n

Not at all in the last 3 weeks

Less than 1 day per week

1 day per week

2-3 days per week

4 or more days per week

% Increased Cycling

Not at all

35

57%

14%

9%

6%

14%

43%

A few times

44

45%

16%

11%

11%

16%

55%

All NonCyclists

79

51%

15%

10%

9%

15%

49%

Baseline General Cycling Behaviour

â&#x20AC;˘

34% of non-cyclists reported cycling to work at least one day a week three months after the Challenge.

28


6.3

Modal shift

In the Baseline Survey, registrants were asked how they usually travel to work on most days. If they used more than one mode of transport, they were asked to select the one that they use to cover the longest distance. Key Points •

At baseline, non-cyclists accounted for 50% of those who drove alone to work, whilst occasional cyclists accounted for 34%, and regular cyclists for 16%.

10% of those who travelled to work mainly by car at baseline had switched to cycling to work as their main mode of transport three months after the Challenge.

Baseline Table 11: How do you usually travel to work on most days? (N=1,720)

Audience Segment

Car – drive alone

Bicycle

Car – with passengers

Walk/run

Bus

Train

Do not work

Work from home

Other

All (N=1,720)

41%

37%

8%

7%

3%

1%

1%

1%

1%

Driving in a car alone was the mostly frequently reported method of travel to work (41%), followed by bicycle (37%), car with passengers (8%), and walking or running (7%).

The figure below shows mode of travel to work for non-, occasional and regular cyclists. Figure 8: How do you usually travel to work on most days? (N=1,720)

Bicycle

Walk/run

Bus/Train

Car - drive alone

Other

100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% Non-Cyclists (n=534)

Occasional Cyclists (n=370)

29

Regular Cyclists (n=816)


Driving in a car alone was the most common modes amongst non- and occasional cyclists (66% and 64% respectively).

Non-cyclists accounted for 50% of those who drove alone to work, whilst occasional cyclists accounted for 34%, and regular cyclists for 16%.

9% of non-cyclists and 10% of occasional cyclists walk or run to work. This suggests that the dynamic nature of cycling to work is not necessarily a hindrance to this behaviour.

Cycling was by the most common mode of transport to work amongst regular cyclists (75%), and 13% of regular cyclists drove alone to work.

In the Baseline Survey, participants were asked how often they had travelled to work by car in the seven days prior to filling in the survey. The responses amongst participants have been analysed to detect any shifts in travel-to-work behaviour three months after the Challenge. Figure 9: In the last 7 days, on how many days did you travel to work by car? (Baseline Survey, N=1,720)

Non-Cyclists (n=534)

Occasional Cyclists (n=370)

Regular Cyclists (n=816)

70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 0 days

1 day

2 days

3 days

4 days

5 days

6 days

7 days

At the time of the Baseline Survey completion, over two-thirds of all nonand occasional cyclists (75% and 70% respectively) had travelled to work by car on at least three of the last seven days.

30


Three months on Table 12: Changes in car trips to work three months after participating in the Challenge (n=365) All Participants

3 Months Post Challenge - no. of days

Baseline no. of days

n

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

% Decreased Car Trips

0

162

82%

9%

2%

1%

2%

4%

0%

0%

-

1

36

42%

17%

22%

3%

11%

6%

0%

0%

42%

2

37

16%

14%

16%

22%

11%

22%

0%

0%

30%

3

21

5%

19%

19%

29%

14%

10%

0%

5%

43%

4

33

9%

18%

9%

12%

24%

27%

0%

0%

48%

5

57

7%

4%

7%

9%

14%

49%

7%

4%

40%

6

9

22%

11%

0%

11%

22%

22%

11%

0%

89%

7

10

0%

10%

20%

0%

10%

20%

20%

20%

80%

Overall, 44% of respondents were travelling to work by car less frequently three months after the Challenge, whereas 24% were commuting by car more often.

30% of respondents reported travelling to work by car by at least two fewer days three months after the Challenge.

Large modal shifts were measured by tracking the change in the main mode of transport to work from baseline to three months after the Challenge. Three months on Table 13: Modal shift from car to bike – journeys to work three months after participating in the Challenge (N=141) 3 Months Post Challenge Baseline Car - drive alone Car - share with others All Car

% Switched to cycling

n

Cycle

Car - drive alone

Car - share with others

Other

120

10%

83%

5%

3%

10%

21

10%

10%

81%

0%

10%

141

10%

72%

16%

2%

10%

10% of those who travelled to work mainly by car at baseline had switched to cycling to work as their main mode of transport three months after the Challenge.

31


Section Seven Barriers and Motivators The following results from the Baseline and both Post Challenge Surveys detail the specific barriers and motivators to cycling. This information can help inform Bournemouth and Poole councils when planning future interventions to encourage cycling in the city.

7.1

Barriers and motivators for participation in the Challenge

Key Point â&#x20AC;˘

Barriers to Champions getting colleagues involved included: lack of time or energy, distance from work and apathy.

7.1.1 Workplace Champions In the Post Challenge Survey 1, the Workplace Champions were asked for their main reasons for registering their organisation into the Challenge: Figure 10: What was the main reason that your workplace registered into the Challenge?

32


“For a little bit of fun within the business, to encourage health and fitness and raise the profile of the business.” - Non-Cyclist “As HR Officer I registered Lighthouse as it gives a positive message about cycling to work, wellbeing etc. We always enter into the Walk to Work Week challenge.” - Occasional Cyclist “Community awareness that our company takes the environment and community issues seriously.” - Regular Cyclist

The Workplace Champions were also asked what barriers they came across to getting their colleagues to take part in the Challenge. Figure 11: What do you perceive were the main barriers to getting more of your colleagues to take part?

33


98 of the Workplace or Department Champions answered an open-ended question asking them what the barriers were to getting more colleagues to take part. These barriers and the frequency with which they were mentioned are presented in Table 16 below. Table 14: Barriers to getting more participation in the Momentum Cycle Challenge (n=98 Champions)

Barrier Lack of time/energy Distance from work/Carrying items/Dropping off children Apathy Fear (for safety) Habit/routine Poor promotion/incentives Not owning a bike/requiring maintenance/equipment Lack of facilities at work Uninterested about exercise Weather Type of organisation (e.g. shift patterns/evening work/school (Challenge fell across half term)) Appearance Cycling confidence Poor cycling routes/paths Access to computer Forgot to enter miles or register

Number of times mentioned 20 15 14 14 12 11 10 7 6 6 5 4 4 4 3 3

The most frequently mentioned barriers were lack of time or energy, distance from work (including the difficulties of cycling whilst having a lot to carry or having children to drop off), and apathy.

Other barriers included a fear of cycling on main roads, car driving habit and not enough promotion.

“I think some people thought they needed to cycle to and from work and sometimes the distance and child drop offs makes this difficult.” – Non-Cyclist “Getting organised - they'd like to cycle but they need to check their bike, work out practical questions...it's easier to get into the car.” – Occasional Cyclist “We have to use cars for work visits. Too far to cycle, haven't cycled for a long time, get too hot and sweaty. Haven't the time to change and wash when I get to work.” - Regular Cyclist

34


In Post Challenge Survey 1, Workplace and Department Champions were asked to rate how cycle friendly their workplaces were. Figure 12: How cycle-friendly would you rate your employer? (N=98)

0 - 'Not at all cycle-friendly' 0%

10% 5%

20% 29%

30%

40%

1

2 50% 34%

3 60%

4

5 - 'Very cycle-friendly' 70%

80%

90%

100%

30%

Almost two-thirds of the Champions (63%) rated their workplaces highly on being cycle friendly with a score of 4 or 5 out of 5.

The Workplace Champions were also asked how they could be better supported and what would make it easier for them to encourage colleagues to take part: • • • • • • • • • • •

Ability to log more details about a ride Bikes for hire Certificate of cycling or small award Cycle training Discounts off cycling equipment Longer lead time More prizes and more chances to win them More promotional materials, e.g. event kits, league tables, cycle maps with posters More try-a-bike sessions Promote health benefits Trophy/winners' ceremony

“More promotional literature, posters etc. People do not always have time to read all their e-mails and may skip ones they do not see as important.” “Provision or marketing of opportunities to take part in cycle training. State the health benefits i.e. ‘forget the diet - how many pounds could you lose if you cycle to work every day for one month?’.” “Cycle workshops/info stand on site here to engage with staff and allay fears, recommend routes, offer buddies for first time commuters etc. or help us organise a buddy scheme.”

35


7.2

Cycling confidence and bike ownership

In the Baseline Survey, non- and occasional cyclists were asked about their cycling confidence, whether they owned a bike and what condition it was in. Key Points •

About three-quarters of the non-cyclists reported feeling “fairly confident” (49%) or “confident” (22%) when cycling on the road.

78% of non-cyclists reported owning a bike

Figure 13: How confident do you feel when cycling on the road? (N=904)

Non-Cyclists (n=534)

Occasional Cyclists (n=370)

500 400 300 200 100 0 Confident - I'm happy Fairly confident - I Not at all confident Not confident - I to ride in traffic. prefer to ride on quiet don't like to ride on I am a learner. roads. the road.

About three-quarters of the non-cyclists reported feeling “fairly confident” (49%) or “confident” (22%) when cycling on the road. Lack of confidence is not the reason these non-cyclists were not cycling prior to the Challenge.

About a quarter of non-cyclists reported feeling “not confident” (23%) or “not at all confident” (6%) on the road. Lack of confidence was definitely a factor in these participants not cycling much prior to the Challenge.

93% of occasional cyclists reported feeling “fairly confident” or “confident”, suggesting that there is little room for further training and confidence building.

36


Figure 14: Do you own a bike? (n=904)

Yes

No

100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% Non-Cyclists (n=534)

Occasional Cyclists (n=370)

â&#x20AC;˘

78% the non-cyclists reported owning a bike. This shows that there is a relatively high bike ownership amongst this group and potential to encourage them to use their bike more often.

â&#x20AC;˘

99% of occasional cyclists reported owning their own bike.

37


7.3

Interventions to encourage cycling

In order to help understand the barriers to cycling, non- and occasional cyclists were asked what training or information they were interested in having in Post Challenge Survey 1. Key Points •

Most respondents wanted information about bike maintenance (n=142), led group rides (n=70) and advanced cycle skills training (n=66).

57% of Champions (n=55) planned to continue with championing cycling.

Figure 15: Would you be interested in any of the following? (N=196)

0

20

40

60

80

100 120 140 160

Bike maintenance course Led group bike rides Advanced cycle skills training - skills to Assistance planning a cycle route Intermediate cycle skills training - skills Beginners cycle skills training - control

Most respondents wanted information about bike maintenance (n=142), led group rides (n=70) and advanced cycle skills training (n=66).

Only 30 participants were interested in beginner or intermediate cycle skills training.

38


Participants were also asked for any ideas on specific improvements for cyclists within the Bournemouth, Poole and Christchurch areas. Suggestions were provided by 172 participants and their full responses are in Appendix 2. These will be most effectively analysed by someone with local knowledge of the area. In Post Challenge Survey 1, Champions were asked whether they or their workplace had any plans to continue championing cycling and whether they wanted more information about setting up certain events. 57% (n=55) planned to continue championing cycling; specific plans included: • • • • • • •

Cycle to work schemes General promotion of cycling to colleagues Provision of facilities CSR or Travel Plans Bike user groups or environment teams Bike rides or events at work New pool bikes

39


7.4

Feedback on workplace cycle facilities

In Post Challenge Survey 1, non-, occasional and regular cyclists were asked to rate the cycling facilities at their workplaces. Key Points •

12% of respondents had no access to showers.

Changing rooms and lockers were not available to 15% and 24% of respondents respectively.

Figure 16: Q. How would you rate the following in your workplace...?

Very Good

Good 0%

Acceptable

Poor

Very Poor

Not available

10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

Cycle Parking n=(287) Showers n=(284) Changing Rooms n=(282) Lockers n=(283)

Cycle parking was available to almost all respondents (99%) and rated as ‘good' or 'very good' by 72% of respondents.

88% of participants had access to showers, and 51% of them rated their shower facilities 'good' or 'very good.'

15% had no access to changing rooms, whilst lockers were not available to 24% of cyclists.

Changing rooms and lockers were rated 'good' or 'very good' by 39% and 32% of cyclists respectively.

40


The responses from employees at large organisations were assessed. The following two large organisations had the highest number of responses so their facilities were analysed specifically: Figure 17: J.P. Morgan

Very Good

Good

Acceptable

Poor

Very Poor

Not available

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Cycle Parking n=(55) Showers n=(55) Changing Rooms n=(55) Lockers n=(55)

Figure 18: Bournemouth University

Very Good

Good

Acceptable

Poor

Very Poor

Not available

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Cycle Parking n=(44) Showers n=(43) Changing Rooms n=(43) Lockers n=(43)

41


Section Eight Results Summary The Momentum Cycle Challenge was successful in engaging businesses and people to take part and successful in converting non-cyclists to become more frequent cyclists. The Challenge successfully influenced the behaviour of the key target groups (non- and occasional cyclists) and the aims set out at the start of the Challenge were achieved. It also exceeded the target number for registered organisations.

8.1

Aims

1. To encourage people who are not currently cycling to start cycling. â&#x20AC;˘

Intention of non-cyclists to cycle more often: 31% (n=534) of registrants reported at baseline that they had not ridden a bike or had only ridden a bike a few times in the year prior to the 2013 Challenge. Three weeks after the 2013 Challenge, 87% of these non-cyclists who completed Post Challenge Survey 1 reported that they intended to ride a bike more often after the Challenge.

â&#x20AC;˘

Non-cyclists report cycling more often: 62% of non-cyclists at baseline reported they are now cycling once a month or more, three months after the Challenge. 41% of non-cyclists reported that they are now cycling weekly (once a week or more often) three months after the Challenge.

This shows a real change in behaviour and suggests that the Challenge was effective at encouraging people to take up cycling. Overall, over half (62%) of non-cyclists who took part in the Challenge are cycling more often three months after the Challenge.

42


2. To encourage occasional cyclists to cycle more regularly. •

Occasional cyclists report intending to cycle more often: 22% of participants reported at baseline that they had cycled 1-3 times per month or once a week before the 2013 Challenge. Three weeks after the 2013 Challenge, 54% of these occasional cyclists reported that they intended to ride a bike more often after the Challenge.

Occasional cyclists report cycling more regularly: 50% of occasional cyclists reported cycling at least two days a week three months after taking part in the 2013 Challenge.

This shows real change in behaviour and suggests that the Challenge was effective at encouraging occasional cyclists to cycle more often. 3. To encourage those who are not currently cycling to work to cycle to work. •

Participants cycle more frequently: 36% of participants who reported cycling less than two days a week to work at baseline reported three months after the Challenge that they were now cycling to work at least two days a week.

Modal shift from car to bike: 44% of respondents reported travelling to work by car by at least two fewer days. Furthermore, 10% of participants who reported travelling to work by car at baseline had switched to cycling to work as their main mode of transport three months after the Challenge.

These results indicate that the Challenge motivated non-cycle commuters and encouraged them to cycle to work. 4. To add value to local projects that aim to promote cycling and sustainable travel. •

Interest in cycling initiatives amongst non-Champion participants: Most respondents wanted information about bike maintenance (n=142), led group rides (n=70) and advanced cycle skills training (n=66).

57% (n=55) of Champions planned to continue championing cycling at their workplaces.

These results indicate that participants want more information and training and Champions wish to continue championing cycling after the Challenge.

43


8.2

Objectives

1. To encourage between 60 and 80 organisations to register in the Challenge. â&#x20AC;˘

130 organisations participated.

registered

into

the

Challenge

and

98

2. To encourage between 2,000 and 3,000 people to participate in the Challenge each year. â&#x20AC;˘

1,720 people registered into the Challenge and 1,390 participated.

3. To encourage between 700 and 1,000 non-cyclists to participate in the Challenge. â&#x20AC;˘

387 non-cyclists Challenge.

(28%

of

participants)

44

participated

in

the


8.3

Summary of recommendations

Data on the barriers and motivators for cycling amongst key target groups can be used to design interventions to support cycling in Bournemouth, Poole and Christchurch. To maintain the momentum created by the Challenge and to further increase the frequency of cycling amongst Challenge participants, we recommend that Bournemouth Borough Council, Poole Borough Council, Dorset County Council and its partners: •

Promote adult cycle training schemes directly to those participants who requested such training and to those who reported low confidence cycling on the road.

Use the results of this report to work with organisations to improve Workplace Travel Plans and to set up events (e.g. cycle rides/routes, Dr Bike etc.) that Champions reported that they wanted to hold.

Work with participating organisations to improve facilities for cyclists, especially those where facilities were poor or absent.

Work with the organisations where Champions have indicated an interest in further championing cycling and where support has been requested.

Continue to improve the infrastructure for cyclists in the city.

Utilise the database of over 1,700 cyclists in the city to promote follow-on interventions in the city and to communicate with cyclists of all abilities.

Challenge for Change strives to improve the Challenge programme year-on year and have examined feedback from participants and stakeholders in Bournemouth, Poole and Christchurch. Given the opportunity to deliver a repeat Challenge in Bournemouth, Poole and Christchurch, Challenge for Change would aim to: •

Send out a ‘save the date’ email as soon as the Challenge dates have been confirmed so that organisations can start planning their involvement with the Challenge earlier.

Have a longer lead in time for the project so that the promotional materials can be printed ready for the start date of the Challenge Manager.

Make sure that the Challenge Manager can start work 9 weeks before the Challenge, can work the days allocated, especially 4 days a week during the Challenge period.

45


Run events in the lead up to the start of the Challenge in order to raise awareness and engage people earlier in the programme.

Run a higher profile PR campaign in the lead up to and during the Challenge to attract more people if budget allows e.g. through outdoor media, advertising and events.

Encourage the industrial estates to take part in the Challenge; design a suitable method for them to record their rides e.g. a wall chart. Run a trya-bike session at an industrial estate or business park so that several organisations can take part together.

Incentivise Champions to promote the Challenge more widely in their organisations by introducing prizes or recognition specifically for Champions, based on the participation of their team.

Introduce more results on the website to help recognise the efforts of those who encourage the most new cyclists and the Champions who are encouraging the most staff to take part e.g. Top Encouragers and Top Champions league tables.

Set up a bike loan process during the Challenge and ensure that it is clear and is promoted via all possible channels to ensure good take up e.g. website, emails, calls to Champions.

46


Section Nine Conclusion The results show that the 2013 Momentum Cycle Challenge programme has positively influenced the cycling behaviour of participants. The aims set out at the start of the Challenge were achieved. However, the targets for the numbers of individuals and non-cyclists were not met. The Challenge was successful in encouraging people who are not cycling to start cycling, encouraging occasional cyclists to cycle more regularly and encouraging people who are not currently cycling to work to cycle to work. Key outcomes recorded three months after the Challenge include: • • • • • •

62% of non-cyclists at baseline reported cycling at least once a month or more often; 41% of non-cyclists at baseline reported cycling once a week or more often; 50% of those classed as occasional cyclists reported cycling regularly; 41% of non-cyclists at baseline reporting that they were cycling to work at least one day a week; 44% of participants are driving less frequently (at least one day less); and 30% of participants are driving at least two days less.

57% of Champions are interested in continuing to champion cycling and have specific plans such as organising bike rides, taking part in events and improving facilities at work. The programme attracted a relatively high number of non-cyclists (28%, n=387 versus the aim of 700) to take part. There is now a database of over 1,700 cyclists in the area. This database is a great resource which can be utilised for research purposes, to promote the annual programme of cycling events and to continue to support those cyclists who have shown a change in behaviour through the Challenge by incentivising them to keep cycling. Attracting new organisations to take part in the Challenge and re-engaging this year’s organisations would be the key focus of the repeat Challenge, as well as continuing to attract non-cyclists. We look forward to working with Bournemouth City Council and Borough of Poole Council to deliver a second Workplace Cycle Challenge in 2014. With the various Love to Ride developments, including year round activity, new branding and behaviour change framework, we anticipate building on the solid results achieved in 2013. 47


Appendix 1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Organisation Registrations The following table details the organisations that registered into the 2013 Challenge, together with their total number of staff, and total participating staff (Ps). Table 15: Organisation Registrations (N=130) Organisation 64th Protocol Ltd A Plan Insurance Parkstone Abbey Life Assurance Company Advanced Enterprise Software Ltd Age Concern Christchurch Aldridge Brownlee Solicitors LLP Appius - your Digital Solutions team APT4L Arts University Bournemouth Astute Ltd Barclays BH Live - Bournemouth International Centre BH Live - Littledown Centre BH Live - Pelhams Park Leisure Centre BH Live - Sir David English Sports Centre BH Live - Stokewood Leisure Centre Bicycle Company Poole BOFA International Ltd Borough of Poole Bournemouth & Poole College Bournemouth 2026 Trust Bournemouth Airport Bournemouth Borough Council Bournemouth Chamber of Trade and Commerce Bournemouth Cycleworks Bournemouth NumberWorks'nWords Bournemouth School Bournemouth University Bright Blue Day Burger King Castlepoint Shopping Park Ceuta Healthcare Ltd Christchurch and East Dorset Partnership Coastline Produce Ltd Cocobolo Services Ltd Coles Miller Solicitors Continental Landscapes Ltd Crown Closures UK Curtis Turner & Drucker CYCLE PATHS Cycling Sports Group Data Track Technology Plc Dorchester County Hospital Dorset fire and rescue service Dorset HealthCare Dorset Police Druitts Solicitors ECA Architecture and Planning Everyone Active

48

Postcode

Staff

Ps

BH1 1RG BH14 0JT BH8 8ZQ BH8 8EJ BH23 1QQ BH1 3JY BH2 6EZ BH9 2jD BH12 5HH BH8 8EY BH9 2HN BH2 5BH BH7 7DX BH10 7LF BH8 9PZ BH3 7ND BH15 1AD BH17 7DX BH15 2RU BH1 3JJ BH22 8LJ BH23 6SE BH2 6EA BH10 6LB BH7 6BW BH6 3DJ BH8 9PY BH12 5BB BH15 1HA BH15 1DN BH8 9UZ BH2 6HS BH23 1AZ BH23 3PE BH14 0EA BH15 2PG Bh17 7bx BH15 4LJ BH21 1EE BH15 1TF BH12 4NU BH23 3TY DT1 2JY BH4 8EL BH1 4JQ BH15 2BP BH1 2JE BH15 1NX BH15 1TN

3 24 350 70 10 65 30 4 350 250 15 300 100 100 15 18 3 135 2400 862 3 170 3500 3 6 7 80 1400 50 10 53 91 300 140 3 110 8 130 4 7 46 69 500 3 250 1200 13 3 250

0 0 6 6 1 8 9 0 6 0 1 7 9 0 6 5 0 13 91 32 2 10 45 0 4 0 5 138 6 1 9 9 31 0 3 0 0 4 0 1 0 12 0 2 3 27 4 2 15

New Cyclists 1 0 1 4 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 15 6 0 1 5 0 0 1 0 17 1 0 0 3 4 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 8 0 0 1


Organisation

Postcode

Staff

Ps

Fitness First Front Bike Hire Georgie Porgies Buffet World Go Outdoors Grapevine Telecom Grazedean Ltd Gumbrell and Weaks Trading Halfords Hamworthy Heating Ltd Hatlapa Marine Equipment HERA Holton Homes IO Electronics Ltd J.P. Morgan Jarden Plastics Limited Jet2.Com Land and Wave Lighthouse, Poole's Centre for the Arts Lilliput Health Lotus Press Limited Lush Cosmetics LV= Martin & Company Matthew & Matthew Solicitors Mobile Media Motion Control Products Ltd Nationwide Building Society New Earth Solutions Next Nineteen48 Nurse Plus Nurturing by Nature Oceana Hotels Oceanarium Bournemouth Organix Parkeon PARKSTONE GRAMMAR SCHOOL PARKSTONE HEALTH CENTRE Patrick's Restaurant & Bar PENNY AND GILES Poole Grammar School Poole High School Poole Hospital NHS Foundation Trust Poole Housing Partnership Ltd, Poole Poole Tourism Precision Acoustics Premier Inn Primera Sports Princecroft Willis PruHealth Red Bull Red Cat Distribution Ltd Redweb RIAS & Castle Cover RIDE RNLI Rockley Park Rockley Watersports Royal Bournemouth & Christchurch Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

BH15 3BT BH2 5AA BH12 4NY BH15 1XU BH17 0RU BH11 8LL BH8 0PZ BH12 3JN BH17 0HH BH8 0BQ BH17 7BX BH1 3DH BH15 2AA BH7 7DA BH23 3PP BH23 6SE BH17 7BJ BH15 1UG BH14 8EE BH17 0RS BH17 0NF BH1 2NF BH8 8TW BH5 2JD BH23 6NW BH11 8NX BH2 6EP BH21 3BW BH15 1SP EN4 9EB BH1 3DH BH16 5SW BH1 3AF BH2 5AA BH2 5LT BH15 3SS BH17 7EP BH14 0DJ BH14 0EG BH23 3TH BH17 9JU BH15 2BW BH15 2JB BH15 2BU BH15 1HJ DT2 8QH BH15 2BD BH14 9HT BH15 2PW BH1 1JD AA1 1AA BH21 1HB BH8 8EJ BH7 7DU BH14 0JD BH15 1LE BH15 4LZ BH15 2NN

20 3 10 10 6 5 3 100 110 25 20 11 35 4000 54 20 14 38 16 3 450 1800 12 24 10 15 620 10 20 4 20 19 200 25 48 130 153 40 20 200 100 300 3000 124 12 10 20 25 110 424 10 9 60 900 3 400 20 200

4 1 1 1 3 1 1 0 9 0 1 1 1 238 2 1 1 2 0 1 1 34 1 0 1 0 22 1 0 1 1 1 7 0 8 3 22 1 1 0 3 10 74 2 3 1 1 0 2 8 2 0 5 8 0 0 1 0

New Cyclists 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 2 3 0 1 0 0 2 8 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0

BH7 7DW

3500

112

9

49


Organisation Sembcorp Bournemouth Water soutars fine meats St Edward's School St Georges Church Pre-School Subway sunseeker international Teachers Assurance Tempest Cosgrave Tesco The Bishop of Winchester Academy The Gleam Team The Haven Hotel The Tickled Pig the Village Vine The Watersports Academy The wheelie great bike store Towry Two Blue Hats Ltd Uniprint WDS, A Xerox Company Wessex Aloe Wimborne Tourist Information Centre

50

Postcode

Staff

Ps

BH11 8NX BH14 0ES BH15 3HY BH15 3EU BH4 9BB BH15 1JD BH7 7DT BH14 8QQ BH7 7DY BH8 9PW BH14 0RS BH13 7QL BH21 1NF BH14 0EF BH13 7 BH1 1RZ BH2 5QY BH15 4JS BH2 5HH BH12 5AG BH31 6PQ BH21 1HR

198 3 120 3 10 2000 145 8 3 160 95 20 10 3 10 3 21 3 5 662 10 7

16 1 25 1 1 4 23 0 1 0 32 1 1 2 0 2 3 3 1 48 0 0

New Cyclists 2 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 17 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 10 1 0


Appendix 2 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Improvements for cyclists within the Bournemouth, Poole and Christchurch areas 172 participants who completed the first post-Challenge survey gave the following suggestions on how to make improvements for cyclists within the Bournemouth, Poole and Christchurch areas. Are there any specific areas where you think improvements for cyclists are needed within the Bournemouth, Poole and Christchurch areas? Please be specific when describing a particular location. A cycle lane from Queens Park golf club to the painted roundabout as this gets jammed up at peak periods. This would avoid the need to go to the pavement or the outside of traffic. A cycle route off the busy road between train station and Bournemouth University. A direct cycle route from Ringwood to Bournemouth alongside the A338 would be a great link and may encourage people to cycle to Bournemouth from further away. A lot of the cycle lanes mysteriously end without continuity. The cycle path between Harewood Avenue and Littledown needs better signage as often it is blocked by pedestrians who are verbally aggressive of you cycling in the proper lane (school kids). Abolish being unable to ride along the promenade during the day in July & August. Access through the winter gardens in Bournemouth. Access to the train station/travel interchange. All around Bournemouth is pretty good in terms of cycle lanes. Allowing cycling through chines to access the beach. Along the promenade there is too much sand which gets on the drive chain and is difficult to steer through. Provide a new cycle route from north Bournemouth to Bournemouth Airport and Hurn Forest. An alternative road cycle route from Corfe Mullen to Ferndown/West Moors area rather than the bypass. Ashley Road is awful. Bad surface and tight lanes. Ashley Road, Parkstone is horrible for cyclists. At all sites, cycle routes need to be continuous and not suddenly leave you with nowhere left to ride. At work (RBCH hospitals) there are bike sheds but no security e.g. CCTV or guards patrolling and bike sheds have been cut open and bikes stolen! We are encouraged to cycle to work but risk having our bikes stolen, which is off-putting! Better cycle paths, maintenance workshops. Better cycle routes to allow cyclists to miss out roundabouts. Better cycling routes or paths. Better enforcement of traffic rules on cars! Better road conditions from Holdenhurst Village to Broadway Lane. Bigger bike parking shelter area by the Education Centre. Always full up with bikes. Bike lanes wherever possible plus bike friendly traffic lights and 'green' areas at traffic lights reserved for bikes - biggest common problem is people's perception of safety and how safe it is to go out on their bikes Blandford Road, Poole, under the double railway bridges. A nightmare for cyclists! Boscombe doesn't seem to have as many bicycle routes as other areas. Car free east west route from Poole to Christchurch. Changing rooms are unventilated, small and have little room to manoeuvre. In fairness they have been recently extended, but with the influx of cyclists from consolidation of a second site has negated this. Charminster Road. Christchurch towards Highcliffe and New Milton and routes from Highcliffe up towards the New Forest. Christchurch: Barrack Road and Stour Road have intermittent cycle route markings that are not joined up and ambiguous for users and pedestrians. Fountains Roundabout has no cycle markings and I would not risk cycling over it. Crossing the dual carriageway to get to the holes bay cycle path can be difficult.

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Cycle lanes along Castle Lane are not joined up and often involve joining busy road traffic. A dedicated lane along Castle Lane to Littledown and further onto Christchurch/Southbourne will encourage more cycle users. Cycle lanes that just end mid road - what's that all about? It happens all over. Punishment for cars that drive across/block cycle lanes. Cycle lanes with better separation from pedestrians. Cycle on dedicated cycle lane on pavements. Cycle path all the way up Gravel Hill. Cycle path needed on Gravel Hill from Queen Anne Drive to Dunyeats Road. The cycle path along Herbert Ave needs to be continuous - it stops where the traffic gets hazardous! Cycle paths along Old Christchurch Road, Wentworth Avenue, Beechwood Avenue, Percy Road and Owls Road (popular cycle routes), plus along Boscombe Overcliff Drive. Cycle paths along Wallisdown Road. Cycle paths in built up areas. Cycle routes finishing and back to normal roads without warning for cars to remember the cyclists are still there! Cycle routes in Bournemouth are not good: connectivity is appalling and junctions dangerous. Cycle routes should be like Amsterdam. So in terms of location, cycle routes should be installed on all Bournemouth, Poole and Christchurch Roads. Cycle routes to allow gaps from busy traffic. Cycle tracks on most paths so that we are not at risk from dangerous drivers. Cycle ways between Poole and Bournemouth / Wallisdown. Cycling away from traffic. Enforce the law regarding parking on cycle lanes / yellow lines. Driver awareness. The new (excellent) cycle gutter on the footbridge over the A338 near Holdenhurst is coming loose at the very end (hospital end). Driver training. Drivers in Bournemouth are appalling. Easy route needed into town centre from Castlepoint avoiding Charminster & main roads, Easy to say more cycle lanes, but frustratingly a lot of cycle lanes provided are still not used properly. I would certainly use them. Enforcement to stop cars parking over the cycle lane outside the Tesco Express on Sandbanks Road in Lilliput! Ensbury Park gyratory system, continuation cycle paths on Boundary Road needed to make it safer to negotiate the junction. Finish holes bay route at Upton. Dunyeats Road Broadstone - route to school. Fountain roundabout, Christchurch. Generally more cycle lanes everywhere! Generally more cycling lanes for safety all over. Generally more use of wide pavements, Talbot Avenue for example. Generally very poor cycle routes infrastructure, existing routes are fragmented, inconsistent and confusing which might result in health and safety hazards. There is great scope for improvement considering the potential of the area. Good grief - virtually everywhere!! Glenferness Ave is a good example of all that's wrong. Ostensibly a cycle lane but one which is frequently blocked by parked cars and the road surface is appallingly rough. Gravel Hill - Broadstone to Wimborne. Gravel Hill - more ‘beware cyclists’ notices. I cycle from Littledown to Bransgore and the main issue that I see is the condition of the roads. I don't think there any good locations. I feel the condition of the roads around Bournemouth are awful! There are certain roads which have been improved but Manor Road, Wimbourne Road, Poole Road into Westbourne are all shocking and make the ride uncomfortable. I live in Ringwood and work in Broadstone, so better cycle paths would be a bonus as there are sections that I consider too dangerous to cycle on. I only really cycle around Poole but do find cycle paths sometimes suddenly end and you are on the road. The path along Holes Bay Road, coming up to the bridge from Fleetsbridge, is too close to a very busy road. I think Generally we need to move away from cycle paths weaving onto paths and back onto roads. Pick a place and stick with it. Either dedicated on the path OR the road, anything else is both dangerous and confusing for pedestrians, drivers and cyclists. I think it’s good.

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I think the on road cycle paths need highlighting better, perhaps like they do in London where they are coloured blue and white. http://www.streetsblog.org/wpcontent/uploads/2012/03/cyclingsuperh1.jpg I think there need to be more cycle lanes and that cars need more educating about driving alongside cyclists. I would like to see uninterrupted cycleways linking the boroughs of Poole Bournemouth and Christchurch. I also would like to see full cycle lanes on Somerford Road and Barrack Road. Improve signage on Bourne Valley route from Glenferness Ave to Canford Heath. Introduce Cycle ramp onto A31 westbound from Ham Lane to miss traffic lights, this kind of thing is often overlooked. Large roundabout near Christchurch wait rose! Cycle lanes also stop abruptly, often! Larger cycle sheds to accommodate bikes. More lockers for cyclists. Link between Creekmoor and Upton House. Linking together cycle paths/recommended cycle routes into a cohesive network. Often they just peter out! Look to develop longer distance cycling routes that lead in to the Bournemouth and Poole conurbation from the more outlying areas. Main commuter routes are very dangerous. Main issue is road quality, many routes are pot-holed or affected by tree roots - a cycle lane on Leybourne Avenue would be good. Make a better distinction between cycle lanes vs. pedestrian lanes to keep the two apart. Availability of more maps and routes across the region, with clear directions of where to go. Add a few more off-road routes i.e. Wimborne area. Making car drivers more aware of cyclists everywhere. Many more cycle lanes. Maternity shower room need to be emptied as if is full of junk. Mill Hams Lane is popular cut through but road needs sweeping. More and more dedicated cycle paths have to be a priority. More bike lanes or cycle paths alongside main roads. More changing rooms. More cycle lanes. More More More More More

cycle cycle cycle cycle cycle

lanes. lanes. lanes on busy roads. lanes on the roads everywhere! lanes please, preferably ones that don't just end and start randomly.

More More cycle More More

cycle lanes Poole to Bournemouth. cycle lanes, lanes that are next to cycle lanes to have clear walkways so they do not walk in lanes! cycle lanes. cycle parking.

More cycle paths. More cycle paths everywhere (particularly around Wimborne/Poole) especially the A350 between Sturminster Marshall and Poole. More cycle routes. More cycle stands possibly covered in town centres. More and wider cycle lanes/ specific paths such as in France. Cycle hire such as in London. More cycling pathways away from main roads. More designated cycle lanes on the Christchurch to Bournemouth roads. Improved road surfaces, especially on the Southbourne cliff top road. More designated on and off street cycle lanes. More employer support/discount schemes. More joined up cycle lanes. More on road cycle lanes. More secure bike parking in town centre & on beach front. Most town centres etc. parking isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t secure enough to consider leaving a decent bike. Needs radical rethink. I would be happy to pay / pay deposit for a caged area etc? N/A. N/A, all roads I use have cycle routes.

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N/A, I cycle in other locations N/A. Need safer on road cycling route from Poole to Bournemouth. Nil. No. No. None, as I cycle in the wider Dorset area. None I can think of. Not being allowed to cycle along prom, during commuter hours in July and August! Consider putting cycle lane along. Not enough cycle paths/ Not especially - but there should be more driver awareness campaigns so that drivers look out for and respect cyclists. Not my area. Not that I can see but as I live 58 miles away not the best person to ask! On the seafront between Boscombe Pier and Poole the path is large enough to be marked one side for cycles and one for pedestrians. Poole Asphalt on the roadsides!! Poole to Bournemouth after 4pm. Potholes in Iford Lane & Southbourne Road. Provide with tyre filtration plants. Provision for cycling along the promenade in summer months. Remark cycle lanes, a lot have been worn away by traffic. Rear of Wiltshire - better security - The gate does not automatically shut - Needs a better spring system - Additional cycle shed has not been communicated for usage? Repair of potholes. When cycle lanes are on the footways - side road traffic should always be made to give way otherwise itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just stop/start by bike and is quicker to cycle on the road. Repair the Sandbanks ferry road, from ferry to Poole bay. Access to Poole harbour beside railway from Holes Bay to Holton Heath / Wareham. Richmond Hill and Old Christchurch Road. Road are not clean where we drive the bicycles. Pieces of here bottles on road side makes cycling difficult. Road conditions are very poor. Road cycle lanes along Castle Lane East. Cycle lanes on paths are not good. Road junction improvements generally. Road surfaces poor on my route to work in Poole. Lindsay Road and Kingsbridge Road particularly. Roundabout leading to Poole Hospital next to Poole Park entrance - very dangerous when I used to cycle daily to work, I run now. Route from Oakley Hill, along Fp92 to Canford School and then through Canford Magna to Magna Road and then down Longfllet Drive to Darbys Lane north. The Stour Valley River corridor from Hengistbury Head to Wimborne Bournemouth and Poole. Safe cycle routes. Sandbanks is a very popular cycle route for people using the chain ferry to/from Studland yet the road surface is extremely poor. Sea front cycling with no restrictions (July/Aug banned 10:00-18:00...). Secure bike sheds on beachfront and town centre. Some of the cycle lanes in Wimborne Road, Poolem, have shallow potholes so care is needed on dark winter evenings. Springbourne Roundabout, Streets like Holdenhurst Road in Bournemouth need dedicated cyclist lane. The bicycle sheds are too narrow, quite difficult moving bike up and down, this is one front car park. The continued expansion of cycleways in the area would be good. The country lanes I cycle on could have some work done on them. Bockhampton Road to be precise. The cycle lane at Tesco's Castle Lane East. It starts half way along the road from the traffic lights. Lower the pavement so it can be entered from the pavement safely rather than being cut up by two lanes of traffic, The Lansdowne ASDA roundabout is not good for cyclists. Many of us use the subway which is not ideal either. The main roundabout in front of the Dolphin centre is very scary.

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The roads - Gully's could be tarmaced better. The roads are in terrible condition from Littledown to Tuckton. Lots of pot holes and heavy road wear near the kerb making cycling uncomfortable and sometimes unstable at speed. The roundabout in Christchurch city centre at the end of Barrak Road and the Christchurch bypass. The state of the roads is appalling in lots of areas and in need of improvement. More cycle lanes! The town centres are good for cyclepaths along the highways but more improvement north of the county would be good - I live in Wimborne. There have been some improvements with increased cycle lanes but more are appearing on pavements rather that an increase and improvement to the ones that are on the roads. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t feel safe travelling at speed on a pavement. There is a cycle path that runs between Portchester Boys School and JP Morgan. This really could do with more signage to show which side of the path is for cycling. Pedestrians often don't know which side to walk. Think we should have cycle tracks like we do in Scotland, where you can cycle the whole country. Town centre and surround - needs more cycle lanes and clear indications. Town centre barely has any safe bike lock up places. Traffic Lights at The Fountain roundabout Christchurch to allow safe entry onto roundabout particularly from Sopers Ln. Wallisdown Road. Wallisdown Road needs huge improvements, no cycle lanes, the road is just horrible to ride on. Herbert Avenue in general. The carriageway from Kinson to Parley Cross is terrible to ride on. Wallisdown Road. I would use the green route to the south of Wallisdown road but find the gates awkward to use! Yes, Fleetsbridge Roundabout, Poole Town Centre. Yes! In quite a lot of areas cycle lanes simply 'stop' with no indication of where to go next. Also there could be much better provision for securing bikes at key locations, rentable lockers etc.

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