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barely know Hindi, let alone Kannada. In translation, I would have loved to use, say, the Hindi in Dharwad, in Northern Karnataka. But then, there was a problem in getting the translation done in the north. Because that Hindi is Hindi, so it is a bit awkward. However, that is a given, so I’m going to have to struggle with it a bit. S&N: When you work with another playwright’s script, how much freedom do you think a director is allowed to take when it comes to that particular script, such that you can fulfil your vision and also do justice to the playwright? SS: Well, there are different views on this. For instance, the director that I worked with, Dubey, used to really go at the script, twist it and shift it around and do a lot of things with it, to the point that once, the playwright in question said that he would do his own production, so there were two productions running for the same play simultaneously, the one that Dubey did, and the one that the playwright-director did. This happened because the playwright said that that was not the play he had written. So some people can have such a reaction to taking liberties with adaptation I think most playwrights agree to some changes, I don’t think that is a problem. I believe there has to be a conversation, since most playwrights are open to the director changing things around as long as the fundamental spirit of the play is not attacked. I’m very careful while choosing a play in the first place. It is not as though you choose the play and you think, “My God, now what do I do with it, let me change this and that.” I’m quite respectful to the original script. If there is a problem I believe it is my duty to find ways around the problem. It is very easy to say “Cut this, cut that” because you can’t figure out a solution. You need to try very hard to figure 87 Chaicopy | Vol. III | Issue I

Profile for Chaicopy

Chaicopy Yours Truly Issue Vol. 3 March 2019  

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