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have to face that problem, which has its own consequences and I choose to live with them instead of catering to content that I don’t believe in. In terms of feedback, I believe in being open. It helps to look at your work from different points of view. I like to share my thoughts as I’m making a work, just to help push the process ahead and keep the momentum going. It might be helpful to build a healthy appetite for critique; it can keep you on your toes. T&T: What drew you to film as the medium for storytelling? We noticed that you also often use poetry, still images, music and ambient sounds to accentuate the narrative - how do you ensure that all these elements merge seamlessly in your finished work? PC: They all have to be related or in some way connected to the main idea of the film. They have to be strings that draw out the idea throughout the film. That is the only way things can merge. And, actually, even if the seams show - which I prefer because then you can make out the different components - it is okay with me. I don’t focus on trying to make things look and feel seamless, in fact I think I try the opposite. To create aberrations in those aspects of cinema which suspend your reality. I want to remind you of your reality, want you to engage with it, want you to approach the work with it, interpret your reality in relation to someone else’s and see what looks different. It is exactly all these varied elements of poetry, music, sounds and drawing that drew me to film. It’s a kind of refraction. Film or cinema or moving image, when looked at as a material resource, can do that to the experience of living in time. It is beautiful what one can do, say and change with it. 71 Chaicopy | Vol. III | Issue I

Profile for Chaicopy

Chaicopy Yours Truly Issue Vol. 3 March 2019  

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