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shape, but, there is a need to build a larger theatre-viewing habit among people; there is a great need for theatre of quality and excellence to be produced all over the country, even in its remote pockets. And that means there is a lot of work to do, and this is not easy. Society has to decide that art is important and then these things will happen. Right now, people who make art do it by themselves, and it is made under very difficult circumstances. I would say that human beings are social animals - you might be wrapped up in your phone but at the end of the day you still crave a little human contact, human company. I think the pleasure of watching something as a group, rather than individually, is very different. People really crave that sense of community. Secondly, I believe, a living, breathing human being on stage is a very powerful experience; you may see the most fantastic movie with the greatest special effects, but the kind of experience you get watching real-life people on stage is very unique. I think people keep coming back for that, maybe they don’t come every day, but once in a while they need that experience. I think that’s something we need to build on. That is why I say, let us not do theatre that you can see on television or in a movie; let us do the kind of theatre that you can’t see anywhere else. You’re not likely to see what you see on stage, on television. Thus, really, we need to consider that. In my opinion, this responsibility lies on theatre-artists more than anybody else. How else could we use that magic of theatre?

95 Chaicopy | Vol. III | Issue I

Profile for Chaicopy

Chaicopy Yours Truly Issue Vol. 3 March 2019  

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