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I would just sit back. They would just do the entire scene on their own; I would not have to do anything. Working with experienced and trained actors is like playing a beautiful instrument, you just have to put your fingers to it and the music starts. But with younger actors, it is almost physical; it’s like wrestling, so there are two extremes. At the same time, I am pretty clear on what I want. Some actors complain that I don’t give them space, but I just say “I know what I want”. S&N: These days, more and more people are taking up directing and acting. What would say to people who are taking up theatre as a career? What are your thoughts on that? SS: Well, contrary to what people think, I believe that a lot of young people do take the decision to be in theatre. That decision comes with having experienced a bit of theatre. It is very difficult to take a decision like that in abstraction. In fact, I would say, don’t do it; give yourself time, work with theatre for a bit and see whether you enjoy it. Because theatre has very peculiar demands and you really have to appreciate those. It is heroic to do theatre in today’s times, it is almost a calling, it is not a profession. And I say this, because you have to be prepared to give up a lot of things that maybe your peers or contemporaries take for granted. I think there is huge pressure from the global consumerist culture that we live in, where success is measured by your ability to buy experiences, buy material goods, buy this, that and the other. It is a completely warped system that we live in, and in a system like that, for theatre you have to be ready to say “Okay I’m prepared to be earning one-tenth of what my peers are earning.” For three years I may not earn anything, I’m not going to have a car just like that, I can’t dream of a two-bedroom house. You are throwing away a lot of what are 93 Chaicopy | Vol. III | Issue I

Profile for Chaicopy

Chaicopy Yours Truly Issue Vol. 3 March 2019  

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