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structuring an argument in theatre. You can see how an argument is being structured. Therefore it is not just one play, or a singular narrative, or a narrative of events; it is a narrative of ideas. S&N: When you are directing actors, do you believe in employing some technique or do you encourage them to go with their instincts? Also, when there’s a particular scene that you have imagined in your mind, and it is different from what the actor perceives, do you go with what they want or feel in that moment or do you want to see your vision coming to life on stage? SS: Usually what happens is that I work with the text for at least six to seven months before starting rehearsals. This means that when I enter a rehearsal I already know exactly what I want. Then, it depends on the kind of actors I am working with. Sometimes there are actors who are experienced and have very good instincts, which I listen to very carefully. And quite often, if their instincts go along with what I have been thinking, they will be completely taken on board. But I also end up working with young actors who are not as experienced and also not trained, so I often have to construct a performance for them, in which case they are told exactly what they are supposed to do. I do not act and demonstrate what I want, I just construct a performance for them, which, perhaps, they would not have been able to do on their own, but in the process of it all, they understand how to construct a performance. As such, those are two very, very different styles of directing. I remember when I was doing Sex, Morality and Censorship, I worked with two highly experienced actors, Nagesh and Gitanjali Kulkarni, and all I had to do was to say, “Listen Nagesh and Gitanjali, this is the first moment of the scene, this is how you will be sitting,� and 92

Yours Truly

Profile for Chaicopy

Chaicopy Yours Truly Issue Vol. 3 March 2019  

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