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CHAD CHRISTIE PORTFOLIO


CONTENTS COVER LETTER RESUME 2

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DESIGN WORK VIRTUAL SEAQUARIUM 3 ENVIRONMENTAL + HISTORY CENTER 7 BIOZONE 11 ITALGAS CENTRO DEGLI SPORT 15 VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGICAL INSTITUTE

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OBJECTIVE

EDUCATION

CHAD CHRISTIE

A challenging full-time position as a junior architect with a collaborative practice that is dedicated to enhancing the human experience and creating a more livable world through design Cornell University, Ithaca, NY College of Architecture, Art and Planning Candidate for Bachelor of Architecture, May 2009 Cumulative GPA: 3.62 | Spring 2008 GPA: 3.94 Cornell in Rome, Architecture, Rome, Italy Study Abroad Program

2004 - Present

2007

University of Delaware, Newark, DE Coursework in English Writing and Literature Milford Senior High School, Milford, DE Cumulative GPA: 4.23

2002 - 2004

HONORS + AWARDS

Dean’s List | College of Architecture, Art and Planning Baird Prize | Architectural Design Competition Winner

2006 - 2008 2006

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

Intern Architect | NBBJ, New York, NY • Collaborated on design team for Eton Dalian Center, an 800,000 sq. meter mixeduse project in Dalian, China • Coordinated design and compilation of a three-volume 100% Design Development Book for presentation to the client • Revised and edited Design Development drawings, concept renderings for submission to Local Design Institute • Designed and built window test box for evaluating various glass types • Participated in design charettes for competition design proposals

2008

Intern Architect | Davis, Bowen & Friedel, Inc., Milford, DE • Assisted in Schematic Design and Design Development phases by creating drawings and initial renderings of concepts • Worked on construction documents and produced sets for permit • Researched products and maintained materials library • Created material samples catalogues for individual projects • Conducted field measurements, and produced as-built drawings

2005 - 2007

Carpentry Apprentice | Beracah Homes, Inc., Greenwood, DE Computer Lab Monitor | Cornell University, Ithaca, NY AutoCAD • MicroStation • SketchUp • Rhinoceros • Autodesk Maya Physical Modeling • Adobe Photoshop • Adobe Illustrator • Adobe InDesign Adobe Premiere • Adobe Flash • Microsoft Office • Hand Drafting • Sketching

2003 Present

OTHER EXPERIENCE PROFESSIONAL SKILLS PUBLISHED WORK

“BioZone” project featured in “Responsive Systems Group” DD 27: Networks and Environments - Servo, USA – Sweden

ACTIVITIES + INTERESTS

Cornell Men’s Club Lacrosse • Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity American Institute of Architecture Students • Freshman Orientation Leader

2000 - 2004

2008

6636 Griffith Lake Dr. | Milford, DE 19963 (Permanent) 122 McGraw Pl. | Ithaca, NY 14850 (Local) e: chadjchristie@gmail.com c: 302.382.9683


VIRTUAL SEAQUARIUM SITE

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BUCCOO POINT, TOBAGO STUDIO DESIGN IX DATE FALL 2008 INSTRUCTOR RICHARDSON DURATION 8 WEEKS


This project began under the direction and desire of the University of Trinidad and Tobago to establish a state of the art facility to allow the viewing of the spectacular coral reefs just off the coast of Tobago. Traditionally, one would experience the reefs first hand while snorkeling or scuba diving, yet due to the highly sensitive nature of these particular reefs and the necessity of reducing human contact with them, the idea of a virtual aquarium arose. This would not be the typical aquarium where fish and other animals are housed in tanks for visitors to view. Instead, this facility would function as a receiver of information, utilizing high definition remote video feeds, high resolution displays, and perhaps virtual reality in order to communicate the spectacle of the reef its wildlife to visitors. The complex designed as the Virtual Seaquarium took the form of a procession of sequences across Buccoo Point, a site with incredible views out towards the reefs in all directions. The idea was that as visitors made there way through the complex, the experience of the reef and the wildlife would grow more and more immersive, and at the end they would be granted the privilege of the wondrous view of the horizon. Entering the facility, the visitor walks up a ramp and into the crystalline arboretum and cafe. After being acquainted with the facility, one moves up around the perimeter of the arboretum and across into the hanging display area. In this space, the visitor circulates down a slightly chaotic arrangement of stairs as they are surrounded by layers of high resolution displays showing live video feed of the fish in the reef. Exiting this space one can enter a more personalized experience in the e-Library where personal reflection and study are the primary activities. At this time, the visitor can move laterally along a wall that cuts across the site, up an observation tower and then submerge below ground into the virtual tunnel. In this space, the occupant is surrounded by four planes of high definition imagery and video, from wall to wall, floor to ceiling. Moving out of the tunnel, the visitor emerges into the amphitheater where a final presentation is screened and then fades away as the spectacular horizon is revealed at the climax of this virtual experience.

oppoSiTE Top RighT BoTToM RighT

Entry platform and corridor Aerial photo of Buccoo Reef Roof plan of Virtual Seaquarium on site

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Exploded Axonometric

Longitudinal Section 5

Building Plan


Top Left Top Right Middle Right

Arboretum catwalk leading into hanging display Virtual tunnel display looking out onto Buccoo Reef Amphitheater showing its multiple states

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ENVIRONMENTAL + HISTORY CENTER SANTA BARBARA, CA LEADING EDGE COMPETITION DATE SPRING 2008 ADVISOR BOHM DURATION 12 WEEKS SITE

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The design of sustainable architecture can go one of two ways: aesthetically or technically. Naturally, one must find a balance between the two in order to create great architecture with energy and environmental design in mind. For the initial design of this project, I used the concepts of natural ventilation, specifically harnessing the constant ocean breezes, to inform how I wanted to ventilate the building. The idea of lifting the building’s southern mass leading into a central courtyard allows for ventilation to both interior and exterior spaces, while visually connecting the plaza with the courtyard. The formation of the parti allowed for a greater development of the systems within it, including extensive water catchment systems, interactive educational displays, subtle ambiguity between interior and exterior spaces, responsible material choices, and daylighting strategies.

Making sustainable material choices allowed the marriage of aesthetic design to energy efficiency. In selecting materials, I aimed to make choices that were as sustainable as possible for each element of the project. From the fly-ash concrete used for the cladding, and insulation made from recycled newsprint in the wall section, to the bioremediation vegetation on the plaza level, every detail of the building and site were targeted at an overall goal of sustainability.

Bioremediation Areas

ACCESS DRIVE + DISABLED PARKING

Pedestrian Paths

The understanding of how daylight interacts with the site was crucial in the fenestration and shading design. By maintaining the desire to use extensive passive ventilation through operable windows throughout, I had to rely on the technical calculations of the sun’s position to manage its role in lighting—not heating—the spaces. Through the analysis of the sun’s position using a LOT Sun Calculator, I was able to re-angle the vertical louvers on the eastern and western facades for maximum daylight admittance in the winter, and limited admittance during the summer. The horizontal louvers and light shelves on our southern façade were also modified to facilitate the most amount of annual daylight with the least amount of heat gain. The use of reclaimed timber for the exterior louvers adds a materialistic sensitivity to the lighting of the spaces. After calculating heat gain vs. heat loss, the windows were upgraded from double-glazed to triple-glazed low-e glass. This provides a net heat gain in winter from solar radiation while operable shading devices block the sun in the summer.

Building Ground Level Entrance

ISLA VISTA SCHOOL PLAYGROUND

Chain-link Fence

FIRE LANE

Bioremediation Area

Bioremediation Area

Proposed Vernal Pool

Barn Plaza CAMINO CORTO OPEN SPACE

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oppoSiTE RighT

Living courtyard, bioremediation area for study Site plan

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TRANSVERSAL SECTION

Rooftop Sedum Plantings Over-Flow Drain 2 Drain 2 Collection Area Over-Flow Drain 1 Drain 1 Collection Area

CLASSROOM SECTION

Flow Towards Slough Water Collection Pond

Bioremediation Plantings

Top RIGHT BOTTOM Right BOTTOM LEFT

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Auditorum perspective Water flow and drainage diagram Indoor test-beds utilize water-catchment from the roof deck, and provide hands-on learning opportuni- ties. Operable windows between classroom and corridors allow effective air circulation and limit ambient noise pollution while promoting visual links to the exterior and providing daylight


CLASSROOM WALL SECTIION

EXPLODED AXONMETRIC

ROOF ASSEMBLY Wooden Planks Drainage Layer Water Resistant Barrier 3” Cellulose Insulation (Recycled Newsprint)

WALL ASSEMBLY 1/2” Drywall Airspace Vapor Barrier

Vapor Barrier 3” Fly-Ash Concrete Steel Decking Open Web Steel Joists Metal Grated Drop Ceiling

3” Cellulose Insulation (Recycled Newsprint) Steel Stud Water Resistant Barrier Airspace 1” Rigid Insulation (Expanded Perlite Organic Bonded) Airspace 1” Fly-Ash Concrete Cladding (Sub-Sand/Gravel/Stone Concrete)

Uncoated Low-E Double Pane Glass

FLOOR ASSEMBLY Marmoleum 3” Fly-Ash Concrete Steel Decking Open Web Steel Joists 1” Rigid Insulation (Expanded Perlite Organic Bonded) Vapor Barrier Airspace 1” Fly-Ash Concrete Cladding (Sub-Sand/Gravel/Stone Concrete)

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BIOZONE

SITE

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NEW HAVEN, CT STUDIO DESIGN XIII DATE SPRING 2008 INSTRUCTOR PERRY DURATION 8 WEEKS


“The Responsive Systems Group situates itself squarely in the verdant discussion of architecture and mobility, which is to say that the challenge of how a traditionally static discipline responds to a larger cultural condition of increasing movement and change. Its could be said that this challenge has been addressed extensively in recent years by contemporary forms of design methodology and issues of geometric and formal complexity, for instance, the use of dynamic modeling as a generative process for novelty in form making. But more often than not, this dynamic process still results in fundamentally static forms of two predominant schools of thought, one generating forms of geometric complexity with nothing but the appearance of fluidity and movement, the other generating forms which, in their use, contain within them the latent potential of stored motion. As a new approach to addressing how architecture might answer the question of mobility while still remaining Architecture, our research situates itself in the context of a series of architectural precedents, each of which speculate on the degree to which buildings, or at least certain building systems and components, might be capable of movement, and in the process allow for greater flexibility in response to changing programmatic and environmental forces over time.” -As featured in DD27: Networks and Environments - Servo

This project is a prototype sited in New Haven, CT, which suffered a considerable population loss in the 1990s, leading to a significant rise in vacant buildings, resulting in increased crime and drug use. In 1996 The Livable City Initiative was launched to combat these problems and create safer, more attractive neighborhoods. Ideally, playgrounds, “pocket parks,” lawns and gardens will replace dilapidated structures. This project functions as an extension of this movement by reoccupying a fantastically sculpted parking garage on Temple St. designed by Paul Rudolph, which currently sits abandoned. The interior of the garage becomes a home for a dynamic landscape of robotic farming devices that nurture hydroponic plants, which grow without soil. The robotic units also function as manipulable displays for visual media, aiming to assist the revitalization of the surrounding community through new programmatic stimuli.

oppoSiTE Top RighT BoTToM RighT

Rendering of daylight distribution system with robotic farming units, each of which incorporates heating, misting, and nutrient distribution technologies DD27 publication featuring BioZone project Rendering of manipuable digital media gallery

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PIXELATION

PERIMETER

MATERIAL

EXHIBITION CLUSTER Cluster of seven units allows for the manipulable formation of verticalsurfaces as enclosure for display

FARMING ROWS Dual rows of at least four units allow for linear circulation of thermal conditioning and irrigation systems for plant cultivation

GREEN BELT Individual recreational units fill the void between exhibition and planting configurations, serving as a buffer and transitional zone between natural (soft) and hard surfaces.

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TOP LEFT BOTTOM LEFT ABOVE

Elevation of robotic farming units Catalog of material and technological patches whose distribution allow for a range of recreational, agricultural, and infrastructural use Exploded axonometric of the various environmental and programmatic systems


TOP LEFT BOTTOM LEFT TOP RIGHT BOTTOM RIGHT

Elevation showing various positions of digital display units Axonometric showing three distribution and activation scenarios for daylight distribution, robotic farming and display units, and the material and technological patches Rendering of recreational patch Rendering of agricultural utilities on robotic farming unit

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ITALGAS CENTRO DEGLI SPORT ROMA, ITALIA STUDIO DESIGN XII DATE FALL 2007 INSTRUCTOR MULCAHY DURATION 8 WEEKS SITE

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This project aims to transform the derelict industrial zone of the Italgas complex in the Ostiense neighborhood outside the walls of Rome by revitalizing it into a thriving public park and recreational complex. The site situates itself along the Tiber River, surrounded by new efforts to create a successful university setting and facilities. This fitness center and park become a significant component in the ongoing efforts to regenerate and reoccupy the area. Taking cues from the imposing grid shifts that occur around the site, as well as the local mechanical and industrial archaeology, the project positions constructed fragments that cut through the landscape and sandwich existing relics. This design strategy creates a friction as the figures, old and new, slip and slide towards the Tiber River and back into the urban fabric. This is seen as a way to help mediate between the university development on both sides of the Italgas complex and to create a significant linkage between them. The primary building, a long tube-like structure, becomes a threshold as one moves along the circulatory wall, penetrates the tube into the fitness center, and exits back out onto the existing relic to view the soccer field. By moving linearly towards the river along the wall and then cutting laterally back across the site, one is reminded of the tracking movements characteristic of the assembly line and industrial processes that occurred on the site not so long ago. The building is clad in materials native to the site-- rusted beams, corrugated metal, and stained concrete. This is an interpretation and extrapolation of the site’s current situation as seen in the image to the right, where industrial detritus has become engulfed in a young canvas of vegetation. By harvesting the surviving structures while promoting this new idea growth and regeneration, a significant dichotomy arises between the innocence of nature and the harshness of rust and metal; clean and dirty, old and new.

oppoSiTE Top RighT BoTToM RighT

West elevation from tiber River Proposed site plan of Italgas Centro degli Sport Existing site conditions with Rome in far background

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TRANSVERSAL SECTION

LONGITUDINAL SECTION

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NOLLI MAP


Top Left Top Right Middle LEFT Middle RIGHT BOTTOM

Rendering showing upper aerobics level below skylights Rendering of primary circulation wall Northeast elevation Rendering of main entry lobby and juice bar Northwest elevation

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VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGICAL INSTITUTE SITE

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CAMBRIDGE, MA STUDIO DESIGN X DATE FALL 2006 INSTRUCTOR MULCAHY DURATION 8 WEEKS


The Vertebrate Paleontological Institute will serve Harvard University’s Museum of Comparative Zoology by exhibiting their extensive collections to the greater public. Functioning in a less formal environment than similar facilities on the campus, the project will encourage simultaneous intellectual and social interaction as one passes between the two zones of Cambridge. The site is a threshold between the academic universe of Harvard University and the commercial world of the surrounding area. It calls for a mixed-use program which will gracefully link the two sides of Cambridge. People penetrate the central wall to circulate in a secondary skin, i.e. curtain wall. The central wall divides the building into two zones for two different ways of operating, and is actually large enough to house various mechanical systems. The wall shifts on a pivot to allow a large visual portal to center itself on Winthrop Park to be viewed. The building becomes a stage for interaction and education, presenting itself to JFK Street and Winthrop Park. The park becomes an exterior room that encourages the cross-fertilization of what seems public and what seems private. The Vertebrate Paleontological Institute is composed of a structural system made primarily from concrete bearing walls and columns, glass curtain walls, and a matrix of open-web steel joists. OWSJ are left exposed to achieve a skeletal quality of structural exposure that is directly linked to the varied exhibits and collections that the museum houses. The typical building envelope employs an automated louvre system over a glass curtain wall where individual fins can be angled so that the large skeletons can be viewed from the street by looking upward and inward, while maintaining effectiveness as a sun shading device to protect the precious fossils within.

oppoSiTE Top RighT BoTToM RighT

Rendering showing primary facade looking onto park Aerial view of site context along Charles River Site plan showing related academic structures at Harvard

SItE PLAN

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FAR Left Top LEFT BOTTOM LEFT TOP RIGHT BOTTOM RIGHT

Exploded axonometric diagram showing various programmatic zones Concept diagram showing compositional ideas Elevations with shadows Sketch of large vertebrate display space Sketch of entry floor and lobby


COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN > Vertebrate Paleontological Institute COMPOSItE StRUCtURAL SYStEM

FRAMING PLANS

FRAMING PLANS 1/32"=1'

30” (deep) OWSJ 24” (deep) OWSJ

STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS OVERVIEW

12” (deep) OWSJ reinforced concrete bearing wall glass curtain wall The VPI is composed of a structural system made primary from steel column

<STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS>

SYSTEM COMPONENTS D

concrete bearing walls and columns, glass curtain walls, and a matrix of open-web steel joists. OWSJ are left exposed to achieve a skeletal quality of structural exposure that has to do with the very exhibits and collections that the museum houses.

100’

20’

Concrete bearing walls and columns are shown in black while beam and joist sizes are represented by differing line weights, with the darker lines being a a deeper joist and the lighter lines being a shallower joist.

COMPOSITE SYSTEM

112’

A eatery/lobby level

C

B large fossil exhibition level

A/B

C media/viewing level

D small rare fossil collection level

FRAMING PLANS 1/32"=1' 30” (deep) OWSJ

chad christie

24” (deep) OWSJ 12” (deep) OWSJ reinforced concrete bearing wall glass curtain wall steel column

100’

20’

112’

A eatery/lobby level

B large fossil exhibition level

C media/viewing level

D small rare fossil collection level

tRANSVERSAL SECtION 22


CHAD CHRISTIE PORTFOLIO

e: chadjchristie@gmail.com | c: 302.382.9683

Sample Portfolio  

A sample of academic work completed at Cornell University from 2006-2008

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