Issuu on Google+

Date: Frequency: Circulation: Clip Size: Ad Rate:

HERALD WAYNE, Nebraska

Thursday, November 27,2008 WEEKLY 1854 66.79 sq. inches $7.1 8

-. ----

,..

HERALD WAYNE, Nebraska

Date: Frequency: Clip Size: Circulation:

Ad Rate: Pagelsection: F Copylght

Thursday, November 27,2008 WEEKLY 1854 66.79 sq. inches $7.18 3A

2008 \ A l l Ri&s R l m i s d

New Connecting Nebraska awards recognize rural leadership As part of the first Governor's Conference on Rural Development held in Kearney this past week, the Partnership for Rural Nebraska and regional networks bestowed Connecting Nebraska awards to individuals, businesses and collaborative partnerships that have significantly impacted their regions this past year. The Partnership for Rural Nebraska ('PRN) is a volunteer association made up of agencies and entities whose programs and services focus on the needs and issues of rural Nebraska. The PRN also supports the work of the state's regional development networks. The following inaugural Connecting Nebraska awards were presented by PRN board members Dave Taladay with Southeast Nebraska Development District, and J i m Keeler with NMPP Energy: The "SERN" (Southeast) Award went to Southeast Nebraska Partners for Progress. After receiving a Building Economic Communities Act grant in 2006, the AuburnDeveIopment Council, River Country Economic Development Corporation, Tecumseh Economic Development, kmkbnw Project, and Southeast NebraskaEDGEcoaLitionpartnered with the University of NebraskaLincoln Kimmel Education & Research Center to examine the region's key economic issues. More than 100 city, county and civic leaders participated in a first-ever regional economic development summit. A follow-up summit drew 86. Both focused on how to best maximize regional resources to address critical regional issues. The partnership is now known as the "Southeast Nebraska Partners for Progress", and its steering committee includes representatives from Johnson, Nemaha, Otoe, Pawnee and Richardson counties.

The Northeast Award went to the Economic Developmcnt Summit Committee. W a y n ~Area Economic Development, Inc., hosted "Rural Economic Development in the 21st Century", its second Annual Economic Development Summit that drew more than 30 sponsors and exhibitors. More than 150 attendees participated in sessions for community leaders and members, business owners, bankers, industry leaders, board members, government officials, educators, agricultural producers, entrepreneurs, housing specialists, inventors and economic development professionals. The planning committee was made up of economic development professionals from throughout northeast Nebraska, including Annette Junck, Carroll Welte, Jane Armstrong, Jcryl Nelson, Lee Myers, Lisa Hurley, Loren Kucera, Mary Plettner, Mary Simmons, Nancy Braden, Nancy Schulz, Tina Welding, Della Pries, Wes Blecke, Irene Fletcher and Dave Simonsen. The purpose of the event was to promote regional collaboration and the future of economic development in the face of global competition. It was designed to convene local, regional, and state leaders, professionals, volunteers, elected officials, and the public to share experiences and forge partnerships. This event was ideally suited for the public and professionals involved in economic development, industry, city1 county/state/Federal government, education, workforce development, small business, investors, agricultural producers, entrepreneurs, and inventors. The keynote speaker for the one day event, Don Holbrook, CEcD, author of "The Little Black Book of Economic Development" nnd "Who Moved My Smoke Stack?", discussed the challenges that our

http://news.uni\ Universal Information Services , Inc. Profile: 111 - Center for Rural Affairs Recipient: John Crabtree

country faces in the battle for economic dominance in the world. The final session was a pane1 of Louis Pofahl, Representative for Congressman Jeff Fortenberry; Lt. Governor Rick Sheehy; Senator Kent Rogert; West Point Mayor Marlene Johnson who wrapped up the days topic as Bringing It Home - Rural Economic Development in the 21st Century. The Outback Award went to John Madsen. He has served as a board member, chairperson or president for more than 19 community, regional, state and national organizations during the past 30plus years. He was instrumental in creating the Outback Regional Group, a s well a s creating and designating the Central Nebraska Economic Development. District. The Central Award went to Sharon Hueftle. As executive director of the South Central Economic Development District, Hueftle works extensively with many communities in her 12-county area on a variety of economic development issues and community projects. Hueftle was instrumental in undertaking a recent regional survey that has been used to develop strategic plans for the development district, Trailblazer RC&D and South Central Nebraska RC&D. She was instrumental in the reactivation of the Central Nebraska Development Network which was inactive for about two years. The Network now holds regular meetings and has sponsored three workshops on Regional Revitalization through Community Development. The Old West Award went to Sandhills Journey Scenic Byway. The Sandhills Journey Scenic Byway involves participants and volunteers from Grand Island to Alliance. Their monthly business meetings and numerous committee meetings have led to initiating proj-

~

ects that promote rural Nebraska preliminary work on a new region- impacting the area. A Special Award went to the attractions well beyond state lines. al marketing plan. Cabela's generCurrently, the Byway is involved in osity spurred the Network to set Nebraska Department of Economic restoring a n old barn into a Byway up another meeting to complete Development to recognize dedicatthe marketing plan. The Western ed staff in Lincoln and in many Visitor and Information Center. The Western Nebraska Award Nebraska Development Network is locations across the state who have went to Cabela's, Inc. Cabela's vol- charged with identifying regional connected Nebraskans with techunteered its facility and a facil- issues as well as partnerships and nical and project assistance, and itator to the Western Nebraska networks that involve local citizens program guidance for the past 40 Development Network for a atrak- and area service provider? working years. gic planning session that included 'collaboratively to solve challenges

Page:

112

http://news.universaI-info.com Universal Information Services , Inc. Profile: 111 - Center for Rural ARilirs Recipient: John Crabtree

Page:

212


Date: Frequency: Circulation: Clip S ~ z e : Ad Rate. Pagelsection:

GAZETTE McCOOK, Nebraska

r C o w @ 2008 ' All lL@

Monday, December 8,2008 DAILY 5903 13 86 sq ~nches $10 95 0

; k?i 1. 1

L-J

, /I

-: bl lJl ;cE

,wg

1I

Rsmed

December REAP hours announced Dena Beck, central and southwest Nebraska Business SpeciaIist with the Center for RuA Affairs' Rural Enterprise Assistance Project will hold office hours in McCook on Dec. 16. Hours will be 10 a.m. until 2:45 p.m. McCook Economic Development Corp. (MEDC) will handle the appointments; (308) 345-1200. MEDC office is located at 301 Norris Avenue, Suite 200. The Center for R u r a l && Rural- &mix Project (REAP) and its services are available to rural communities across Nebraska. BEBP offers technical assistance, educational and networking opportunities, and a loan program for small businesses. BE&? is designed to assist all types of small businesses, including businesses with 5 or fewer employees, self-employed full-time, part-time, homebased, farm-based, start-up, and store-front businesses. WAP has six regionally based Business Specialists across Nebraska. These Business Specialists can get involved in assisting entrepreneurs at various stages of their business progress. MEDC is pleased to partner with REAP in order to offer an expanded list of services to businesses of all sizes.

Universal Information Services , Inc.

http://news.universaI-info.com

Profile: 111 - Center for Rural ARairs Recipient: John Crabtree

Page:

1 /I


Traer StarClipper Traer,lA Circ. 1494 From Page: 6 12/4/2008

I-

' 1 a3 - Center for RuralAffairs I

By Chuck Hassebmk, Center for Rural Affairs Barack Obama launched his campaign in Iowa with a promise to create genuine opportunity for rural people and a better future for their communities. Now President-elect Obama must appoint a Secretary of Agriculture who embraces the change needed to achieve those gods. Farm and rural policy illustrate the broken politics of Washington. The federal government spends billions subsidizing mega farms to drive smaller farms off the land and largely fails to invest in the future of rural communir ties.

'

Barack Obama proposed changing those failed policies. He proposed capping payments to mega farms and enforcing rules against unfair pricing practices by meat packers to strengthen family size farms. To revitalize rural communities, he proposed investing in small business, microenterprise development and value added agriculture. He proposed increased production of biofuels and wind energy. And he pledged support for protecting our land and water through the Conservation Stewardship Program, which rewards farmers for good practices. These reforms run head-

5

on into demands for new spending by big farm and commodity interests. The president's commitment is most critical to achieving reform, but his Secretary of Agriculture is almost as important. A secretary committed to the status quo will not help Obama achieve change. The new president should start with one simple test for those who would be Secretary of Agriculture. Have they worked for the rural agenda on which he campaigned and are they committed to advancing it when he takes office in January? CI


U

I I

I

(

NIVERSAL lnformat~onSetv~ces.Inc (402) 342-31 78

DAILY NEWS EVENlNCr NOFSOLK, NE

1

1

/

DAIL Y

Circulation = 17282

I '

I

(

I

I I

I

( I

I

I

i il! ( 1

A group that supports family farms, organic produce and humane treatment of farm anb j mals is pushing Chuck Hasse- 1 I brook of Nebraska and six ! others as contenders for U.S. : agriculture secretary. 1 Food Democracy Now has started an online petition to , urge President-elect Barack Obama to choose an agricul- 1 ture "reformist" to run the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Hassebrook is one of the . group's picks. 1 Hassebrook is executive ; director of the Center for Rural Affairs in Lyons. The center is I : a policy and research group that advocates for family I farms, small businesses and , rural communities. . Hassebrook, chairman of ! the University of Nebraska I Bpard of Regents, said he lwould "jump at the cpgortani-I ty" to beiagriculture secretary but had not been contacted by I anyone on Obama's team.

'-

;

.

t

'!

-


Information Services, Inc (402) 342-31 78

JOURNAL STAR MORNING DAILY LINCOLN, NE Circulation= 74795

1210812008

llllllllllllllllllllllIllIIIllllllll

In 201 1, popii1;itioli will need to be moved otlt of thc metropolitan distlict into the adjoining 1st District (which includes Lincoln), and then chunks of the 1st District must be shoved into western and central Nebraska's 3rd District. That's how population will be redistributed and balanced among the three districts as required by law. Because Republicans dominate the Legislature, let's assume they'll be calling the shots when the new map is created. That reality is one of the reasons Denlocrats have been so focused on forging a large enough legislative minority to sustain a filibuster, giving them enough clout to attempt to fnrce a compromise solirtion. Borrowing from recent con'versations with two Republican leaders in Omaha and Lincoln, -here's a peek ahead at some of the potential implications of 201 1 redistricting. If Republicans must shed part of Sarpy County, they may want it to be Rellevue, which leans more Dcmocratic than other areas that provide more dependably Republican votes. But consider the rarnifications of that. Bellevue is tied to Offutt Air Force Base. And the U.S. @strategic * . Cornnland at Offutt is ed to corporate Omaha. There would be resistance breaking the tie between Of~ t and t the Omaha congres-

I w Walton .

,%,

"8

.

-

*

Jo~trtlalStar StnffWrircr .-..

?

.-

,

=> ---.".A,"";";:

,,... "-;:--:.

--

,

,---, - =-

will remain 1 spotlight -

ir

1,rt's peer over the horizdl. hI(%tropolitan Omaha's 213' .essional District was the 1tt.r of the political universe Nehraska this electiorl yea: 1,er Terry won re-election:"li, his Flouse seat while Barack " Ol>ariiawon the district and=, snatched one of Nebraska's five presidential electoral votes. .I Don;t look for the 2nd Dis; trict to relinquish center stagF ... any time so%,. " N o r E w mto believe Tcrry t seek a seVenth ter6 in in what has become an increasingly con~petitivedistrict as a result of the Obama canf; paign's success in creating a EE new Democl.aticvoter registl'$ tion majority in Do~rglasCouX.?." : ,$jty'v r sm -: So you've got a built-in COX: test there. Terry nullified that ~elnoEratic surge in Douglas County this year with these numbers: Terry 112,055;Jim Esch, .-, 11 1,276. Democrats will go after h i 3 again without the advantage af *Obama on the ballot. And then in 201 1 things get= really interesting. Let's take a look at what -might lie ahead. -The 201 1 Legislature will b e called upon to draw new boundaries for Nebraska's co;: gressional districts based on population changes documented by the 2010 federal Z ..& census. Terry's 2nd District will loot different when voters go to the---

-

a

--

,

-;-

.ws

-=.. .. . . d

-

If you begin with the as- ?E sumption that Douglas County would remain intact, you conc

Continued from Page 1B And be in an enhanced posi. tion with those Omaha connections if he (or she) has statewide political ambitions. evision stations directed at 1st District voters in Bellevue and eastern Sarpy Corrnty could build name recognition in Oma. ha for a future statewide race. Of course, there are othel ways to redistrict and leave But they are complicated. SplitDouglas County andassign western portions to the 1st

;

Or attempt some intricate reconfiguring that brings bordering Washington, Saunders or Dodge counties into play? Plenty of time for the political mapmakers to mix and match. And plot political advantage. The end result is not going to substantially alter the Repuhlican advantage in the 1st or 3rd Districts, although Democrats corild gain some grorrnd in the The 2nd District is where the action will he.

A -

The intriguing political fallout from such a bold change would be its impact on the 1st District congressman. Sudden- f' ly, Jeff Fortenher~y-and his successors - would be Offutt's congressman. And that ir1evit;thly would " tie the 1st District congressman >'-to corporare Omaha. which !$ would remain intimately conaected to the Strategic Command and its spinoff defense industries. The 1st District congress3a man would become a player on a bigger stage. ~, With a larger fundraising .' base.

's

'i

L-

-

SeeWALTON,Page3B

---

--- LJ

___--___-_-_ -v-,.

-___.

Once agaln

;,i d C\t *r

as

2;

Finishing up Rob Kerrey made The As- 1 sociated Press list of possibilities for CIA director in the Ohama $ administration one day last ; week. Ch.u.cJ Hassehrnok was one of six picks for secreta? of i agriculture recommended in a : letter to Ohama signed by 90 na tional devotees of sustainahlc agriculture. Karen Ross, president of the California Association of Winegrape Growers in Sacra. ; mento, was on a similar list rec- 8 oriime%ed by California agri. cultural interests. She's a IJNI graduate. Coleen Seng was honoretl [ for a lifetime of service to he,- : communiQat a $75-a-ticket De. rnocratic fundraiser in Lincoln . last week. More than 150 contributors showed up to salutc the former 1.incoln mayor. Winter baseball mertings and free agent gambling in l a s Vegas this recession week. ah,an infrastructure stimrilrrs packagc for New York. Reach Don Walton at 473-7248 or at dwaltonQjournalstar.com.

-

-

-

-

-


1

UNIVERSAL

Information Services, Inc

DAILY NEWS EVENING NORFOLK, NE

DAILY

Circulation= 17282

12/09/2008

i'

,

Needs to follow through

1

LYONS -Barack Obama launched his campaign in Iowa with a promise to create genuine opportunity for rural people and a better futuye for their communities. Now President-elect Obama must appoint a secketary of agriculture who embraces the change needed to achieve those goals. Obama proposed capping payments to mega farms and enforcing rules against unfair pricing practices by meat packers to strengthen family size farms. To revitalize rural communities, he proposed investing in small business, microenterprise development and value added agriculture. He proposed increased production of biofuels and wind energy. And he pledged support for protecting our land and water through the Conservation Stewardship Program, which rewards farmers for good practices. The president's commitment is most critical to achieving reform, but his secretary of agriculture is almost as important. A secretary committed to the status quo will not help Obama achieve change. The new president should start with one simple test for those who would be secretary of agriculture. Have they worked for the rural agenda on which he campaigned and are they committed to advancing it when he takes office in January? CHUCK HASSEBROOK Center for Ruga~,~fRairs, "b*

BC_I".___I

-

-

----


UNIVERSAL

Information Services, Inc

WORLD-HERALD bIORNlNG DAILY OMAHA, NE Circulation= 192075

.r9

F tfi

3gr.

'B:

m:

&&

I A Y , DECEMBER 9,2008

-

-'

.

4.g

..

,

~ae34 >g:iy~?&-%i'.

>,&p*:.'

RURAL BOOM, URBAN SWOON Smaller comrnunities in Nebraska and the nation have fared better since 2000 in areas such as income, home values and ownership. -

-

Nebraska urban -a-am =aG-&o*-obf6.-

- A

conditions URBAN m2000 -

2005-'07 average

RURAL 12000

2005-'07 average

-

>

-

MedJiahome value

_

-Individduals in poverty --

,

In ~nflatlonadjusted dollars

$123,700 +$10.521 $113.179

Median household income -An inflat~on-adjusteddollars

RURAL:

J% RURAL: down

4.8%

.

. ---.

-.

-

(> ,

r$ J

0MAHA.COM

SUNRISE EDITION

Even before the recent economic tailspin. Nebraslra's urban residents 1i:i:l lost nearly 8 percent in spending power' since 2000 ali:! were trailing rural folks -4, key ezoiinniii- g r c i w k e a s . -That's according to a new Cen sus Rilreau report that offers the most accurate look at the state's communities since the 2000 Census. The strength in rural areas and the slide in cities may seem

counterintuitive given continued depopulation of rural America, said census expert David Drozd of the University of Nebraska at Omaha. But area economists point ro the recent boom 111 corn and commodity prices, a_s well as-i_nnova~ t i z a n d hkh-tech responses t o populat~ondecline., "A lot of these rural communities are getting involved in ways to diversify their economy -and they're transforming it." said Jason Henderson, an Omaha econo-

mist for the Federal Reserve Bank who specializes in agricultural trends. On the other hand, Henderson said, pockets of decay in urban citics most likely a r e pulling down overall h r ~ r t ~vaiucs, e education-and income attainment. ~ddition-&, fan~iligswithfie financial means to move to lesscongested areas on the outakiits of a big city a r e doing so. The census information released Tuesday counts people in See Incort~e:Puge 2

---=

- .-

5,

'

.

' * u

'

4:"

:"'.

BREAKING NLWS 24/7


i

/(

WORLD-HERALD MORNING DAILY OSIAHA, NE Circulation= 192075

12/09/2008

Encome: Rma! areas have s h o w gains since 2000 Continuedfrom Page 1 communities of less than 2,500 a s "rural" even if they a r e In incorporated areas That means thriving communities oil the fringe of Omaha. such a s M'aterloo and Valley, are coun1:td as part of the rural growth. Henderson said futurc economic growth in larger urban areas depends in part on rebuilding infrastructure a r d i n ~ proving education opportunities for the up-and-coming labor force. "Continued revitalization of downtrodden neighborhoods is going to be key tothat," he said. Nebraska wasn't alone in seeing urban declines. An Associated Press analysis of the data indicated that Ihemedian household inc:Linledropped in 77 percent of ti!:, n.ition's cities and towns. and the poverty rate increased in 70 percent of the cities and towns. Inconies dropped in the weaithicst cornmunities as well as thepoorest. Nationally, median household incomes dropped by 4.3 percent during the period, to $50.007. It's not surprising that marly communities u e r e doing better in 2000 than they were mid decade, said Scott I-lovt, senlor dlrector of consumer ecoriomlcs a t Moody's Economy com "The year ?000 was at the end of an ~ncredibleboom that lasted adecade," Hoyt said Incomes were up, unemployment was down and the dot-com bubble had not yet burst on Wall Street. IlWlUWYWl

+

-

"We just didn't have enough years of expansion" this decade. he told the AP. An analysis of Nebraska data by Drozd of the UNO Center for Public Affairs Research showed that rural areas were outperforming their urban counterparts in areas such as income and education, home values and ownership. The center compared 2000 with a thiw-year rolling average (2005-2007) that hadn't been available before now. Consider: llMedian household income in urban Nebraska did not keep pace with inflation, declining by 7.7 percent. In contrast, incomes increased by 5.3 percent in rural areas So spending power in rural Nebraska now exceeds that in urban areas by more than$1,000 per household, $47,793 versus $46,601. That's a reversal from the 2000 Census, when urban exceeded rural by more than $5,000. W Real median home values went up nearly $21,000 in rural areas, double the increase seen inurban partsof the state. The median home value remained higher in urban Nebraska: $123,700 compared with $101,100. But by p e r c e n t change, growth was three times higher in rural than urban areas. llPoverty rates diverged since the 2000 Census, when they were nearly identical in ur. b a n and rural ~ e b r a s k a While ,,,,, IUAllLIII-'"C-

-

I - ,

the rural poverty rate dropped the volatility like we had in the less than a percentage point to late 1990s and early 2000s." 8.7 percent, the urban poverty Prosperity spilled beyond the rate increased by about 2.5 per- farms, Bailey said. centage points to more than 12 "When farmers and ranchers percent. do well, they purchase new W The rate of homeowner- equipment, vehicles and genership gain in rural areas was ally spend money in rural comtwice that of urban parts. munities,'' he said. "That cerNearly 80 percent of nonvacant tainly filters down to household rural Nebraska homes were incomes." owner-occupied during Farming areas, recognizing 2005-2007, compared with less the exodus of young people, also than 65 percent in urban. had a huge push to find new Saunders and Cass Coun- ways to use and add value to agties - both part of the Omaha ricultural products, said Henmetropolitan area but both con- derson and Bailey. sidered largely rural - had the Already, though, the recesm o s t f a v o r a b l e economic sion has halved some crop changes since 2000 of the 16 prices and farmers face the ,counties with new data re- same tightened credit markets leased, Drozd said. He said they a s other businesses. had median household incomes Drozd notes that the new centhat rose faster than inflation sus report defines rural in a way since 2000. some might find non-traditional H Education g a i n s w e r e -counting places withless than greater among rural residents, 2,500 residents, even if they a r e too. In 2000, urban and rural res- incorporated in the metropoliidents age 25 and older had tan area, a s rural. Douglas nearly identical high school County, for example, is considgraduation rates. Rural resi- ered to have 2.4 percent of its dents since have advanced by 4 residents in rural areas. percentage points, compared to The census information rethe 2-percentage point gain leased Tuesday is the first deamongurbanites. tailed economic, social and .Jon Bailey, director of re- demographic information insearch a t the C , ~ t efor r Rural cluding small- and medium-size Affairs in Lyons, Neb., said ru- cities since the 2000 Census. ral gains reflect a particularly The data were collected over good last few years for farmers three years, from 2005 through - especially in higher corn 2007, providing a mid-decade prices because of more ethanol snapshot of every community production. with at least 20,000 residents. Livestock also has been fairly The data come from the Ameristable, he said.---"I haven:t.,,qee~. ..,c~Communitv.Surv,e,~ ,vm,~* . . - - - .

"

\


iI j

I

'

1

i

1

I

UNIVERSAL

lnformatlon Services, Inc

TIMES-TRIBUNE THURSDAY WEEKLY BEAVER CITY, NE Circulation = 873

11/20/2008

IlIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllll1I111 .

'

~ d oriel u classes ~ t

I

numbered month on ,Wednesdays from 5130- 9:30 p.m. in McMillen Hall, Room 20 1 with Carol Stensvad as the instructor on Jan. 14. This young driver intervention in On drivers program between the ages of 16 and 24 - the group most likely to be involved in This interactive four-h0ur program

Upcoming events at the

I Technology Center for Business

&andustry from the Mid-plains Center for Enterprise Business Buyers Workshop will be held at a later date to be I announced. This workshop is designed to help potential business owners educate themselves on the benefits and pitfalls of buying an existing business. Enjoy refreshments and a working lunch as you hear presenters from the accounting, banking, marketing, and retail professions as well as representatives from the Rural Enterprise",.Assistance Project (REAP) and McCook Economic D e v e ] o p men t Co rp0ration (MEDC). Topics covered will include business plan writing, valuation, tax benefits, loans,

1

i

.

:

teaches young drivers how to take taking responsibility for their own driving behavior. For additional ' information and registration, please : contact the scheduling department of the Nebraska Safety Council at 1 (888) 704-7233, ext. 113. Pre- i registration required* Attitudinal Dynamics of 44 Driving - ADD - Defensive Driving Course is held i

/

'

market to on thk second Saturday of the customers, training, and much month. h he next session will be on more. '1 Saturdayh'Feb. 14 from 8 a.m. - 5 community Service p.m. in ~ & - m eCenter l for Business events from McCOok Community and Technology in McMillen Hall, College B Room 20 1 withi Carol Stensvad as . Alive''at25 - ~ e f e n h v eDriving the instructor. ADD impresses the be h e l * ~ ~ ~ ~ & p ~ .Continued dII on Pegello ,., .-

'I

-~

1

1 :

t

continued From Page 6

, I

participant to choose responsibility to improve self-worklself-esteem and to maintain personal and financial power through the use of good choices. For additional information and registration, please contact Nebraska Safety Council at (888), 704-7233, ext. 113. I rn .....~,.. .-.... .. ,I

R

I

I

I.*

I

.

1-


u

1

NIVERSAL Information Services.Inc

DAILY PRESS & DAKOTAN SATURDAY WEEKLY YANKTON,SD

I

1 I

I I

Circulabon = 8212

12/06/2008

; /I

-

LYONS, NE In January of 2009 a new presidential adminisI,,trationwili take over in , Washington, and health care reform is certain to be on the agenda. Access to affordable I health insurance has become a 'leading obstacle to rural small j business and family farm pros/, perity. Therefore the Center for Rural 1 I ! Affairs has launched a Rural j Health Care Reform Initiative. The ; Center has initiated an online petition to stand up for health / care reform that works for every1.11

a

I

I

I

1

$

one - including rural people, family farmers and small business owners.The signatures and comments collected from the petition will be shared with the next administration early in 2009. "Rural people are among the most ill-served by the current health care system. Issues of access, affordability, prevention and how to deal with chronic diseases are issues that fall disproportionately on rural people and rural communities. Reforming the health care system is also vital for the long-term economic and

community vitality of rural areas," said Jon Bailey, Director of the Rural Research and Analysis Program at the Center. ; "Rural people have much to offer to the health care debate, 1 and much to add to reform pro; posals. We are hoping our initiative gets rural people involved in ' a debate that will affect the future o?.all of us and our communities," added Bailey. More about health I : care reform and rural America can be found at: , http://www.cfra.org/policy/hea i lfh-care !


I uNIVERSAL

Information S e ~ i c e sInc .

i

I I

NEWS WEDNESDAY WEEKLY RAVENNA, NE Circulation= 1420

1I11212008

Guest Editorial

John Crabfree, Center for Rural Affairs

imes you eat the bear Nearly ten years ago I first wrote about the growing threat of v e r t ~ c a lintegration a n d concentration in meatpacking. Smithfield, Cargill. IBP, etc. were buying u p packin? plants and industrial hog production facilities a t a breathtaking pace. We spoke loudly and often about the need for the Justice Department to take on these mergers. We callcd on USDA to write rules that define the "unreasonable preferences" that the Packers and Stock-

yards Act prohibits a n d get busy enforcing them to prevent packers from discriminating against smaller volume fanlily farm a n d ranch livestock producers. Thousands of family farm ers and ranchers from across America joined u s in telling everyone that would listen that action was needed from USDA and Justice. A lot of people - politicians. agency officials, conlrnodity groups. etc. - told

1.11snothing would ever come of conglomerate. from acquiring [,it. And for a l011g time, noth, ing did. ' But then, in the 2008 farm bill. Congress required USDA ~writerules defining "unrea1 sonable preference" to protect family farmers a n d r a n c h 'ers a g a i n s t volulne b a s e d price discrimination. And last month the Department of Justice and 13 state Attorneys General filed suit to stop JBS, t h e Brazilian nieatpacking

1

National Beef Packmg. That deal would have given JBS, 1 Tyson and Cargill 85% of na- ' tional beef slaughter (35%for JBS alone). Those thousands of farmers and ranchers knew back then, and those that are left 1 still know today, that sometimes the bear eats you.. . and , sometimes you eat the bear. Maybe, just maybe, the tables are turning.


NEWS THURSDAY WEEKLY ORCHARD, NE

( 1

j

Circulation = 654

Alternative Option ' For Landowners I

I

j

I

!

,

cib@d~fru.or~, Center for Rural Affairs I If you have land enrolled in the 1 1 Conservation Reserve Program / I (CRP) and you are trying to decide I I what to do with it once the contract I comes to a close, consider the beilefits of transferring that land to a 1 beginning or socially disadvantaged farmer or rancher. A new federal program, the Conservation 1 Reserve Program Transition Op- 1 tion, can provide you two years of I additional CRP payments for doing 1 just that. I I With thousands of acres set to come out of the Conservation Re-

1

i

I

,

I

serve Progrzm in the next few \ years, the option provides an incen- ! ' tivs to ensure some of those acres ? ' help beginners or socially disad- \ vaitaged farmers or ranchers get a ./ start in agriculture in a conserva- j ! tion-based manner. 1 i. One year before the contract is set to expire the bzginning or socially disadvantaged farmer or !rancher is allowed to make conservation and land improvements @ / o r begin organic certification. , An approved conservation plan 1 for the land must be developed and ' implemented. The farmer or ranchIier will be provided the opportunity I to enroll the land in the Conservation Stewardship Program or the 1 Environmental Quality Incentives 1: Program. When the CRP contract ex- I pires, the landowner/contract holder must sell or provide a long-term lease of the land (with an option to purchase) to the beginning or socially disadvantaged farmer or rancher. In return. the landownerlcontract holder hill receive two additional annual rental payments. 1 For more information contact 1 your local Farm Service Agency ofice or contact Traci Bruckner at 1 tracib@cfra.org or 402-687-2103 1016. 1 ext.

1t

I

1,

1

1

i

I

4 '

L

J


:u

NIVERSAL

Information Services, Inc

MIRROR-SUN THURSDAY WEEKLY LYONS,NE Circulation= 735

1111312008

mergers. We called on USDA to write rules that define the Nearly ten years ago I first "unreasonab1epreferences"that wrote about the growing threat the Packers and Stockyards Act of vertical integration and prohibits andget busy enforcing concentration in meatpacking. them to prevent packers from Smithfield, Cargill, IBP, etc. discriminating agaillst smaller were buying up packing plants volume family farm and ranch and industrial hog production livestock producers facilities at a breathtaking pace. Thousands of fa ily farmWe spoke loudly and often ers and ranchers from across about the need for the Justice America joined us in telling ,Department to L t _ a k e ~ ~ n J h e s e - ~ ~ . e ~ ~ W aO~I-@~~e ~ + h ~ t - By John Crabtree Center For Rural Affairs

"

in

action was needed from USDA and Justice. A lot of people - politicians, agency officials, commodity groups, etc. - told us nothing would ever come of it. And for a long time, nothing did. But then, in the 2008 farm bill, Congress required USDA write rules defining-. "unreasonable preference" to protect family farmers and , ranchers against volume based , price discrimination. . And last I I

IL1.

A I

Y"

monththeDepartmentof Justice and 13 state Attorneys General filedsuittostopJBS,theBrazilianmeatpacking conglomerate, from acquiring National Beef Packing. That deal would have given JBS, Tyson and Cargill 85% of national beef slaughter "

'

(35% for JBS alone). Those thousands of farmers and ranchers knew back then, . and those that are left still know ' today, that sometimes the bear ' eats you ... and sometimes you eatthebear. Maybe,justmaybe, the tables are turning.

-.


~I '

1

UNlVERSAL

Information Services, Inc

EAGLE THURSDAY LQEEKLY VERDIGRE, NE Circulation = 1401

Alternative Option

I

By Traci Bruckner, ! Center foc Rural Affairs i

1

If you have land enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and you are trying to decide what to ' do with,it once the contract comes to / a close, consider the benefits of I I transferring that land to a beginning I or socially disadvantaged farmer or I rancher. A new federal program, the ' 1 Conservation Reserve Program , Transition Option, can provide you 1 two years of additional CRP payments for doing just that. With thousands of acres set to come out of the Conservation I Reserve Program in the next few years, the option provides a0 incentive to ensure some of those : acres help beginners or socially \ disadvantaged farmers or ranchers i get a start in agriculture in a ; I conservation-based manner. 1 1 One year before the contract is set i I1 to . expire the beginning or socially 1 disadvantaged farmer or rancher is allowed to make conservation and land improvements andlor begin organic certification. 1 An approved conservation plan I for the land must be developed and implemented. The farmer or rancher i will be provided the opportunity to I enroll the land in the Conservation Stewardship Program or the , Environmental Quality Incentives : Program. When the CRP contract i expires, the landowner/contract \ holder must sell or provide a longterm lease of the land (with an option ! to purchase) to the beginning or socially disadvantaged farmer or I 'rancher. In return, the landowner1 ; contract holder will receive two j additional annual rental payments. ? For more information, contact 1 your local Farm Service Agency office ; or contact Traci Bruckner at j tracib@cfra.org or 402-687-2103 ext.l, ; 1016. I

I

/

!

:

(

I

:

I

cp,,

!


iu

NIVERSAL Information Services. I nc

WORLD-HER4LD

I

MORVING OMAHA, NE

DAILY

Circulation= 192075

1211212008

,,

I I

,

,

i i iiii iii i '1 iiiii ii

.

I

ras'ian amn$ii~sLls.lic'_ fir ag s e & f ~ aI ~ ,

.L

.J

RY ROHYNNTYSVER ~ ~ , J ~ ~ , D . ~ ~STAFF E K AW L RDI T E R

A group that- supports family farms, organic produce and huInane treatment of farm animals is pustling Chuck Hassebrook of and lix others as 'On'

tenders for retary.

Food Democracy Now has

.

$

c-

I

i'l

,

.

1 , I 11'1111

11,11,1?8,,

I I I mail IIllllr I

k 11

,iij

i

!rn-.:i,+~urntn~

ul

111 111

~ ~ l 1 1 ~111. 1 11

IINII,YI

1;

small businesses and rural communities. Hassebrook said he would "jump at the opportunity" to be agriculture secretary but hadnot been contacted by anyone on Obama's transition team. Hassebrook is executive direc-I'm certainly not contor of the Center for Rural hf- sideration at this said fairs in Lyons. The center is a pol- ~ ~ ~ who ~also is ~ ,-hairb icy and research group that man of the University of Neadvocates for family farms, braskaBoardofRegents.

I

.

A

started an online petition to urge President-elect Barack Obama to choose an agriculture "reformist" to run theU.S. Department of Agriculture. Hassebrook is one of the group's picks.

'7

1111111111m

Other possible contenders: Dennis Wolff, Pennsylvania agriculture secretary; Tom Ruis, president of the National Farmers Union; former U.S. Rep. Charles Stenholm, D-Texas; U.S. Rep. John Salazar, D-Colo.; U.S. Rep. Stephanie Herseth Sandlin, D-S.D.; and former U S . R e p Jill Long ~ Thompson, ~ ~ D-Ind. k , .contact

thewriter:

444-1309, robynn.tysve@owh.com


UNIVERSAL

Information Services. Inc

NE JOURNAL LEADER THURSDAY WEEKLY PONCA, NE Circulatian= 1607

11/20/2008

Our e-mail communications with 4 Mr. Chuck Hassebrook, UNL Regent

1' 1

Some back and fo& communication with our University ---- ~ e b r a s k aRegent

3 3

We cannot have a Dean of EjuAs an aside, I have met many cation that would fit comforta%ly school superintendents who have into the far left environs'of places no idea what a syllogism is-never like Columbia (NYC) UniversiG's heard of it. When I went to school College of Education-not in Ne- we were, at the very least, exposed braska. :rto logic in freshman English Speak all you want to of "aca- courses. I have not encountered a demic freedom:' but include s h single English teacher in twentyacademic experiments in the edu- five years who has been exposed to cation college such as the ' B e this building block of reasoning. new math," "sight reading," !>d At any rate, my recommendathen the resistance to abancJon tion to you is for you to begin t k e kinds of failed methodo&- movement toward removing said gles. UNL abounds in acadeii'dc Education Dean from her post; . freedom. & and to then rkm6ve any adminis: What we had in the ~ean!Bf trators who would block the effort. Education's invitation to a kn<gn Editor. domestic terrorist was po1it31 -partisanship. . IF Dick, Thanks for your email. You might be amazed by hbii I cannot act on your recornmenmany young women graduated dation. The Dean of Education is from college who have expresccd not hired or fired by Board. We their disdain for having to put up hire and fire the President and suwith extremist professors in theTr .;pervisory authority is delegated 'classrooms just to get through col- -*from there. But t o be forthright lege and get on with their liveCfI and honest, I should tell you that have interviewed many and h i f ? though I publicly criticized the -afew of them. judgment of the Dean and her colYou might-be interested to kn@ lege in arranging the Ay res speech, how msny high school graduaC4 I would not fire hc - even if I could. have becn mathematically criF From what I have seen of her, she pled by popular teaching dogm&% has done a good job overall and included in the new math. They, shown particular commitnient to not having been exposed to r<g addressing the needs of rural com. math discipline, lament how tbi munities in teacher education. world expects more than math: I do appreciate your frank adematical estimates and appro^^ vice. But in .this case, I cannot mations. Their knowledge doesn?t comply with it. Hassebrook include rigorous math. (These are kids who came from good fanlilieg Chuck, thank you for your reply with professionals in their ranks.) 1 did not suggest that you fire anyone. Your powers are political, which means you have the power to press a point. I would suggest a public airing of the Dean's invitation. I would appreciate some specifics from you regarding the dean's "addressing the needs of rural communities," but isn't that merely changing the subject from the issue at hand? Her philosophy, partisanship, and judgement are the issue. She should be called to task and required to provide answers to the public. If her attitude is representative of the the University's Teachers College, then Nebraska, as a whole. has reason to be conceriled. . You have a good reputation and I know you would be up to the task of conducting an inquit.;: anti a henring rcgalxling th i h mattel-. $J

1 ! # 8..

- '

*

1

.. . -i -..

tj=. -

;g

e

'

'1 !

1 .''

$

:%,

*

L3


1 uNIVERSAL

Information Services, Inc

1

JOURNAL MORNWG DAILY SIOUX CITY, IA

1

1

Circulation = 48 175

" I

I

~nce&tslfrom editorials published in other Lee Enterprises newspapers.

I

I

k'

6

I ,Rdisal Nebraskans enjoy best of bargain The perception that mral Nebraska is poor, shrinking and in general decline has become so commonly accepted that the latest data from the U.S. Census Bureau came as a happy surprise. Nebraska's country cousins now are doing better economically than their urban counterparts, according to the census statistics. While there may be reason to quibble with the findings, the report is a reminder that nothing in life is static. Today's dogma becomes tomorrow.^ myth. Change is constant. Generally, the report is supported by findings of the Rural , Poll done annually by the Center for Applied Rural InnovaI tion at the University of Nebraska-~incoln.That survey reports that the proportion of rural Nebraskans who reported they were better off than the previous year has risen for the I past five years. That measure now stands at 53 percent, compared with the ( 32 percent recorded in the first Rural Poll. It should be kept in mind, however, that just as an average I temperature misleads on a region's climate, average income figures mislead on economic well-being. There is much diversity in rural Nebraska. Not all communities share equally in the new wealth. The Census Bureau counts as urban any community of more than 2,500. This means that high-income Nebraskans who choose to live just outside city limits of Omaha, Lincoln or other city are counted as rural Nebraskans. Not roo many years ago the tradeoff for living in a rural area included a willingness to accept a smaller income. For ; now, at least, rural Nebraskans seem to be getting the best of i the bargain. .

I

/

1

,

1 /

1

Lincoln (Neb.)Journal Star

I


u

1

NIVERSAL

Information S e ~ i c e sI,nc

I

INDEPENDENT htORNING DAILY GRAND ISLAND, NE

'

Circulation = 22792

I

Sarqent man wins Farm Bureau discussion meet

,

Phii ot&n of Sargent was selected as the winner of Nebraska Farm Bureau's 2008 Young Farmers and Ranchers Discussion Meet in competition Monday during the NeI braska Farm Bureau convention in Kearnep Ottun had the top score of four contestants who advanced to the final round of the contest, which is unique to Farm Bureau. Competitors in the annual contest must be prepared to speak on any of the four questions used in a given year; the selected question is announced a short time prior to the I contest round. As Nebraska Farm Bureau's winner, Ottun receives $500, an I-Purl Touch and an all-expense-paidtrip to the Ameri(' can Farm Bureau convention in San Antonia. Texas, in January to conipete on the national level. Ottun raises Angus cattle near Sargent. He is a member . of Custer County Farm Bureau. ,*---.".-----

,,

i

I\

I

'

,

_,Buuarb"Gnrr~w"---a---

-

1 :

I

!

:, I

! *


1

!

u

NIVERSAL

l nformation Services- , Inr (402) 342-3178

INDEPENDENT MORNINcf DAILY B U N D ISLAND, NE Circulation = 32792

12/14/2008

LINCOLN (AP)-University of Nebraska regent Chuck Hassebrook has applied to be the next U.S. agriculture secretary Hassebrook said he fled a job application with President-elect Barack Obama's team on Thursday "I've spent 30 years of my life working to trv to create a better future &t in &a1 America," the 53-year-old said. "If I had the chance (to be secretary), I would jump at it. It's an opportunity to make a real dserence in creating a better future." Hassebmk said he was invited to Washington, D.C., earlier this week by Obama's transition team for a discussion about agriculture

and ruraldevelop ment. That prompted him to apply, although Hassebrook said he hasn't been interviewed for the job. "I don't know that I'm being seriously consid- Chuck ered," he said. Hassebrook Five people are already rumored to be in the running for agriculture secretary They are: Pennsylvania agriculture secretary Dennis Wolff;Tom Buis, president of National Farmers Union; former Rep. Charles Stenholm of Texas; Rep. Stepha-

nie Herseth Sandlin of South Dakota; and former Rep. Jill Long Thompson of Indiana. Hassebmk, of Lyons, is among six people suggested for appointment by Food Deniocracy Now, a grass-rootsorganizationthat supports sustainable,organic andfamily farms. The group said it wants the next secretary to have grass-roots experience"in promoting sustainable agriculture to create a prosperous future for rural America and a healthy future for all of America's citizens." Hassebrook has been a regent for District 3, which covers 15counties in northeast Nebraska, since 1994.

, He's also executive director of qhe Center for Rural Affairs, a grass-roots nonprofit that advoq t e s for rural communities.He's a graduate of UNL Hassebrook and his wife have two children. ',The current U.S. agriculture se&etary is former North Dakota goyernor Ed Schafer,who was appointed by President Bush to replak Mike Johanns last fall. Johanns,a formerNebraska governor; stepped down to run for U.S. Senate. He was appointed in 2005. In addition to Johanns, three other Nebraskans have held the post: Clayton Yeutter, 1989-91;Clifford Qardin, 1969-71;and J. Sterling Morton, 1893-97.


I

u

NIVERSAL

I I

Information Serv~ces.Inc

WORLD-HER4LD hlORNING DAILY OMAHA, NE Circulation = 192075

I

1211212008

as 'secretay oaEr-~ o o ,

I

1

/

,

,

'

I

I

As Barack Obama ponders whom to pick as agriculture secretary, he should reframe the question. What he needs is actually a bold reformer ina position renamed "secretary of food." A Department of Agriculture made sense 100 years ago, when 35 percent of ~ m e r i c a nens gaged in farming. But today, '$ ! fewer than 2 \ ." percent a r e ,"6,'$e' '_ farmers. In contrast, 100 percent of us I

I

I

eat

Nicholas D.

I

: '

1

I

,

i

I

i

1

,

,

Re a the depart\'c,u. )'or/;T!vr.s -_____ ment would signal that Obarna seeks to move away from o bankrupt structure of factory farming that squanders energy, exacerbates climate change and makes Americans unhealthy - all while costing taxpayers billions of dollars. "We're subsidizing the least healthy calories in the supermarket - high-fructose corn syrup and hydrogenated soy oil -and we're doing very little for farmers trying to grow real food," notes Michael Pollan, author of "The Omnivore's Dilemma" and "In Defense of Food." The USDA - and the agriculture committees in Congress tradi.:ionally have been handed over to industrial farming interests by both parties alike. The farmlobby uses that perch toinflict unhealthy food on American children in schoollunchprograms, worsening our national

I b

'

1-

-

1

N

crisis with diabetes and obesity. sidize bacon? The need for change is inBut let's be clear. The problem isn't farmers. It's the farm creasingly obvious, for health, lobby - hijacked by industrial climate and even humanitarian operators - and a bipartisan reasons. California voters last 'month passed a landmark refertradition of kowtowing toit. I grew up on a farm in Yam- -endurn (over the farm lobby's hill, Ore., where my family grew furious protests) that requires cherries and timber and raised factory farms to give minimum sheep and, at times, small num- amounts of space to poultry and livestock. bers of cattle, hogsand geese. An online petition at http:// Yet the USDA doesn't support rural towns like Yamhill: it bol- www.fooddem0cracynow.org sters industrial operations with calls for a reformist pick for aglobbying clout. Family farms riculture secretary - and have to sell out to larger opera- , names six terrific candidates, such a s Chuck Hassebrook, a retors, undermining small towns. One measure of the absurdity former in Nebraska at the Cenof the system: Every year you, ter forRuralAffairsinLyons. the American taxpayer, send The most powerful signal me a check for $588in exchange Obama could send would be to for me not growing crops on name a reformer to a renamed timberland I own in Oregon, (I position. A former Secretary of forward the money to a charity.) agriculture, John Block, said That's right: The USDA pays a ,publicly the other day that the New York journalist not to grow agencJr should be renamed "the cropsina forest in Oregon. i.9epartment of Food, AgriculModern confinement opera- tureandFOrestry." Another, Ann Veneman, told tions are less like farms than meat assembly lines. They are m e that she believes it should be dazzlingly efficient in some renamed, "Department of Food ways, but they use vast amounts and Agriculture." I'd prefer to of grain, as well as low-level See simply "Department of antibiotics to reduce infections. Food,'' giving primacy to Amer~h~ result is a public health ica's 300 million eaters. threat from antibiotic-resistant , AS Pollan told me: "Even if you don't think agriculture is a infections. An industrial farm with 5,000 high priority, given all the other hogs produces as much waste as problems we we're a town with 20,000 people. But going to make progress On the while the town is required to i ~ ~ u e ~ o b a m a c a m p a i g n e d o n have a sewage system, the in- health care, climate change and energy independence - unless dustrial farm isn't. One study suggests that these wereformagriculture." YOU' move, Mr. Presidentlarge operations receive, in effect, a $24 subsidy for each hog contact the writer: raised. We face an obesity crisis and a budget crisis, and we sub- http://ww.nytimes;com/gs~emailus.html

'

,

t

.-

"

I


CFRA 121808 news clips