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COOK COUNTY STAR

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Monday, September 15, 2008 GRAND MARAIS, MN 3,866 (137) Newspaper (W) 4A Center For Rural Affairs

Local bargains benefit community Change is hard and is often viewed with negativity and disdain. At times, those in small rural communities suffer from this type

of thinking. Today's economy is challenging the power of small rural communities to adapt and, in some cases, thrive. Along with skyrocketing gas and oilaprices, retail prices have also been rising. These price increases a n linked to the higher transportation and shipping costs involved in getting products on the shelves. We aR accustomed to paying less for items brought from great distances than what we would pay for goods produced or manufactured locally. This is no longer the case. Large retailers and even online web distributors can no longer absorb the transponation and shipping costs and are passing those on to the consumer or even the producer. Small rural communities and their residents have always had the luxury of running out of town to buy products more cheaply than can be produced locally. But with the higher cost of driving to a giant retailer and the increased price of goods to offset s h i p ping costs, local retailers in small communities may actually be ablo to wmpete. Buying locally produced food is a p t wai to begin to reverse the common practice of jumping in our vehicles and traveling miles to get items we could grow locally. Prices may still increase to reflect economic changes, but it will mean putting money in the pockets of people close to us rather than far away. This is a more sustainable approach for all of our small rural towns. The pioneering spirit relied on ingenuity and creativity to survive. We need to bring it to the surface once again for those of us who call small rural communities home. We can start by thanking those who are producing the products and spreading our money to our neighbors rather than to far flung producers. Michael L. Holron Center.for Rural Affairs Lyons. Nebraska

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TRIBUNE-SENTINEL THURSDAY WEEKLY GRANT, NE Circulation = 1738

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09/04/2008

Senator Sentiments The plight of rural America veto. Entrepreneur Program Based Nebraska Senator on the Nebraska Model Because I was born and raised in This innovative provision is the small town of McCook, Neb., I designed to help rural entreprehave never forgotten my roots. neurs and small businesses get I understand the plight of rural started and stay in business. America-the struggle for ecoIt is based on the Nebraska nomic development and providing Micro-enterprise Partnership opportunities for young people so Fund which was created in 1997 while I was still Governor. The Partnership Fund has been The population in Nebraska's very successful in both creating urban areas continues to rise new jobs and retaining existing steadily as it has for many years ones in rural areas. while the number of people living It has provided nearly 4500 in rural areas has declined. loans, totaling $6.9 million, to Figures from the U.S. Census Nebraska small businesses. Bureau show that from 1940 to It has also provided training 2000 the population of rural areas and technical assistance to 15,000 in Nebraska fell from 800,000to businesses over the last 10 years. A Job Builder During a field hearing of the The Center for Rural Affairs esSenate Agriculture Committee timated that in 2006 the program a while back, witnesses told us helped create or save 7,500 jobs at time and time again that somea cost of just $330 per job. thing needs to be done to improve This program has also allowed the economic climate in rural entrepreneurs to leverage state America before it's too late. funding with money from other sources. w rural microenterprise In the fiscal year ending in June in the farm bill which is 2006, using $447,750 state dollars, despite the President's micro programs leveraged an ad-

ditional$5.6 million. To put it simply, for every $1 of state funds, more than $12 was leveraged from other sources. Training Technical Assistance and Loans The provision creates a Rural Entrepreneur and Micro-enterprise Assistance program at the U.S. Department of Agriculture. It provides $15 million in mandatory funding over a four year period. Four million dollars will be set aside for each of the first three years and three million dollars will be available for the fourth year. Funds can be used for both lending and technical assistance. The Backbone of Rural America This legislation will help existing businesses and encourage the creation of new businesses. It is based on the premise that these smaller businesses are the backbone of our rural economy The continued success of these stores, restaurants and service providers is essential to ensuring that rural communities survive, which is essential to the future of Nebraska.

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South Benton Star-Press Blairstown,IA Circ. 1522 From Page:

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broadband access key component in community success By BRIAN DEPEW Center for Rural Affairs

Only 38 percent of rural Americans I1 have access to a high-speed internet connection. A vibrant future for rural America will require public policy that rectifies this situation. High-speed internet is revolutionizing the way we do business, and with this can come great opportunity for rural America. However, as long as millions of rural Americans are without broadband service and others are served only marginally, we will continue to fall behind in adoption of a technology that could propel us forward. Additionally, from conducting political campaigns, to issue advocacy, to holding our legislators accountable, the internet is revolutionizing politics and governing itself. If rural Americans are not able to participate at the same pp.-pp-

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rate as urban Americans, we will suffer worse policy and less government accountability to issues that matter to rural people and places. The U.S. ranks 16th worldwide for the percent of citizens that have highspeed internet access, and we pay more when we do have access. In rural areas both access and affordability are significantly worse. Finally, any broadband network must remain open to all points of view, and private providers should be prohibited from blocking or filtering traffic in any way that curtails our right to free speech. Access to high-speed internet in the 21st century is a public necessity similar to access to electricity in the 20th century. Much like the Rural Electrification Act of 1936, we need a Rural Broadband Act of 2009. Doing so is , crucial to the future of rural America The Centerfor Rural Affairs was established in 1973 as an unaffiliated nonprofit corporation under IRS code 501(c)3. The Qnter for Rural Affairs was formed by rural Nebraskans concerned about family farms and rural communities, and we work to strengthen small businesses, family farms and ranches, and rural communities.


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DAILY PRESS & DAKOTAN MORNING DAILY YANKTON, SD Circulation = 8212

09/26/2008

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1 Renewable Energy Fair Looks To The Future I -LISA HARE BY -.

lisa.hare@yankton.net

HARTINGTON, Neb. - Rising energy costs and the desire for alternatives to foreign-supplied fuel have spurred a heated rush toward domestic renewable energy development. But according to several experts present at , the Renewable Energy Fair held at the Cedar County fairgrounds in Hartington recently, it's more than a matter of technology. "It's ev~dentby many of the presentations here today that one of our biggest hurdles to renewable energy development is government policy," said Eva Sohl, program coordinator with the Nebraska League of

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Assoc., Husker Ag of Plainview, and several banks and businesstations, the day-long fair attracted people from across the area to hear renewable energy experts address topics such as Climate Change, the Carbon Credit Program, Federal Energy Programs, Small Scale Wind Turbines, Bio-fuels, Homebuilt solar units and photo-

Conservation Voters (NLCV) and exhibitor at the fair. A non-partisan organization, the NLCV works to elect Nebraskans who are committed to natural resource conservation. "We try to help educate the public about current policies and decisions that affect our natural resources," Sohl said. "It's events like these that get people talking and thinking (about renewablt energy)." "The goal of the fair is to provide examples of things folks can do today to reduce energy costs and give them some hint of better things to come in the future," -

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voltaic energy. "Energy drives the economy at the local, state and national level," Kleinschmit said. "Who owns the energy can influence the success of the region. The more we control our energy system the more we control our future." Speaker Kevin Kenney of Clean Energy Systems echoed that same message in his presentation on the use of "neat" ethanol - ethanol that is 95 percent alcohol and 5 percent water - as a whole fuel. "It's basically 190-proof," Kenney said. As part of his presentation, Kenney brought along a sixcylinder engine from a 1987 Ford pick-up that was burning neat ethanol as its sole fuel source throughout the duration of the fair. And, according to Kenney, every vehicle in Nebraska can and should be running on neat ethanol.

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A 6-cylinder engine from a 1987 Ford pick-up, running on "neat" ethanol (95 percent alcohoV5 percent water) was exhibited at the first Nebraska Renewable Energy Fair in Hartington last week. The event, hosted by the Center for Rural Affairs, featured numerous presentations and demonstrations by renewable energy experts from across the region.

"About 95 percent of the state's ethanol goes to California," he said. "We're letting one of our greatest resources leave the state." Kenney added that ethanol is an agriculture commodity, traded on the Chicago Board of Trade just like soybeans and corn, and should be made available at fair market price to all Nebraskans as a fuel. "Gasoline is $3.60 a gallon, ethanol is $2.30 a gallon. We produce it, we should be able to use it," he said. "We don't need to add any extra value to ethanol to use it here in the Midwest," he added. , "We just need to deploy the I equipment systems that will deal with a high oxygenatelhigh I octane fuel and optimize it for individual applications. And it's possible." According to Kenney, in order i1 for Nebraskans to realize local control and use of ethanol, there b

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I must be a combined effort toward political action and enabling technologies. Other presenters at the fair raised similar concerns about current policies that may inhibit or delay further development of 3 renewable energy production. "The more people are aware I of limiting polikies that are in place, the better chance tochange them,"said Sohl. For information on topics and speakers featured, contact Kleinschmit at (402) 254-6893 or martink@cfra.org.

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Date Locat~on Clrculatton (DMA) Type (Frequency) Page Keyword

Dispatch

Thursday September 18,2008 SLEEPY EYE MN 3,800 (200) Newspaper (W) 8C Center For Rural Affairs

Future of farming p

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HOW WIU A NEW PRESIDENT AFFECT THE MAN AND HIS FIELD BY STEVE TARTER

Perhaps no issue points to the differences between the candidates as much as the subject of ethanol. "hIcCain is death on ethanol,* soid Kcith Bolin, who raises hogs and organic eorn on his Bureau County farm in Illinois. "I'm not sure he likes the product but he hates the subsidy. He's been consistent on that," he said. Obama, on the other hand, stays true to his Illinois ruots, said Bolin, who serves as president of the American Corn Growers Association, a group formed in the 1980s that represents smaller growers around the country. "I know he's for ethanol," he

espite the continuing exodus from small-town America, rural communities may play a significant role in the 2008 presidential election. "In key states like Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia, rural issues could be very prominent," said Chuck Hassebrook, executive director of the Ru& &&s in Lyons, Neb. "Rural America could play a big role this year when it comes to key swing states," he said. There are plenty of differences between presidential candidates when it comes to wooing the farm vote, said Tom Buis, executive director of the Washington, D.C.-based National Farmers Union. 'The general perception of (Republican candidate) John McCain is that he's not farmer friendly. He never scores well on top farm issues," he said. Buis said that on the last NFU scorecard compiled between 2005 and 2006, McCain scored a zero while (Democratic candidate) Barack Obama scored loo. "A lot of people are uneasy about John McCain's view of apiculture," he said.

sdd. Rick Tolman, executive director of the National Corn Growers Association, the St.-Louis-based group that represents many of the nation's largest growers, isn't sure where McCain is on the subject of biofuels but expects ethanol to be a campaign issue this fall. With more of the nation's corn (abaut 20 percent) now going into ethanol production, Tolman said the debate over food-versus-fuel will continue, especially if this year's hart commodity priccs vest falls ~ h o rand continue to rise. "Given the serious weather issues with this year's grain plantings, we're not of the cwsshairs yet," he said, -

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Buis said he hopes that McCain's campaign doesn't follow the line voiced in recent efforts that blame ethanol for the increases in worldfood priccs. "That's a very effective disinformation campaign," he said. *&Ifyou look behind (the campaign), you'll find Big Oil and big food processors. The farmer only gets 19.5 cents out of the U.S.food dollar. That leaves 81.5 cents going someplace else before it gets to the consun~er'sfork," said Buis. The farm bill is another point of contention between candidates. Obama was for it while McCain opposed it, traveling to Iowa to declare it a $300 billion boondoggle. But the farm bill comes up short when it colnes to funding rural de\leIopn~entefforts, said Hassebrook, who said that both Democrats and Republicans can share blame. 'Both parties have a miserable record when it comes to rural America," he said. While George Bush received a rural majority in the two previous elections. Bolin doesn't think that RlcCain can expect a free pass this time around. "Rural America has tended not to vote its pocketbook but vote for social issues like abortion and gun control. This year, I think they will vote for their financial best interests because rural America can't continue to decline." he said.


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NEWS WEDNESDAY WEEKLY WEST POINT,NE Circulation = 2990

09/03/2008 -

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Creating economic development, jobs in rural communities Because 1 was born and raised in the sm;ill town of McCook, Nebraska. I havc never forgotten lily roots. I undersiand tllc plight of rural Arnerica - the struggle for economic development ant1 orovitling oppnrrunities for young people so they don't have to move away to earn a living. in Nebraska's The ~x)~)ulntion urban areas continues to rise steadi- timated that in 2006 the program" ..ly as it has t;or inany years., ~yhilg.. bebed create or save 7,500 johs at ! the nuniberkf living in rural a cost of just $330 per job. This program has also allowedareas has declined. Figures from the U.S. Census Bureau show that entrepreneurs to leverage state 1 from 1940 to 2000 the population funding with money from other: of rural areas in Nebraska fell from sources. In the fiscal year ending! in June 2006, using $447.750 state: 800,000 to about 500.000. During i field hearing of the do1 lass. micro programs leveraged E Senate Agriculture Committee an additional $5.6 million. To put it. awhile back. witnesses told us simply, for every $ I of state funds, 1 time and time again that something more than $1 2 was leveraged from needs to be done to improve the other wurces. econoniic climate in rural America Training Technical before it's too late. That is why 1 Assistance and Loans fought hard to include new rural The provision creates a Rural microenterprise funding in the farm hill which is no\v law, despite the Entrepreneur and Micro-enterprise -Assistance program at the U.S.De' President's veto. parttilent of Agriculture. It provides $1 5 million in mandatory funding Entrepreneur Program Based over a four year period. Four milon the Nebraska Model This innovative provision is de- lion dollars will be set aside for signed to help rural entrepreneurs each of the first three years and and stnaif businesses get started and three million dollars will be availstay in hi~siness.It is based on the able for the fourth year. Funds can Nebn,\ka Micro-enterprise Past- be used for both lending and technership Funti w h ~ c hwas created in nical assistance. 1997 while I was still Governor. The Partnership Fund has been The Backbone of Rural America I This legislation will help existvery successful in both creating new jobs and retaining existing ones in ing businesses and encourage the rural areas. It has provided nearly creation of new businesses. It is based on the premise that 4500 loans, totaling $6.9 nill lion, to Nebraska small businesses. It has these smaller businesses are the backbone of our rural economy. also provided training and techni cal assistance to 15.000 businesses The continued success of these stores, restaurants and service proover the last ten years. viders is essential to ensuring that rural communities survive, which is A Job Builder The Center for Rural Affairs es- essential to the future of Nebraska. L

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WESTERN NE. OBSERVER THURSDAY WEEKLY KIbBALL, NE Circulation = 1871

09/04/2008

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CREATING JOBS & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN RURAL COMMUNITIES -$

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Because I was born and raised in the small town of McCook, Nebraska, I have never forgotten my roots. I understand the plight of rural America - the struggle for economic development and providing opportunities for young people so they don't have to move away to

told us time and time again that something needs to be done to improve the economic climate rural America before it's too late. That is why I fought hard to include new rural microenterrise funding in the farm ill which is now law, espite the President's

ENTREPRENEUR The population in A PROGRAM BASED Nebraska's urban arON THE NEBRASKA NEBRASKAN'S eas continues to rise MODEL VIEW steadily as it has for This innovative Sen' many years while the provision is designed "" number of people livto help rural entrepre. neurs and small busi- ing in rural areas has --..-declined. Figures from nesses get started and :the U.S. Census Bureau show stay in business. It is based on that from 1940 to 2000 the the Nebraska Micro-enterprise population of rural areas in Partnership Fund which was Nebraska fell from 800,000 to created in 1997 while I was about 500,000. still Governor. During a field hearing of The Partnership Fund has the Senatc Agriculture Combeen very successful in both creating new jobs and retainmittee awhile back, witnesses

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ing existing ones in rural areas. It has provided nearly 4500 loans, totaling $6.9 million, to Nebraska small businesses. It has also provided training and technical assistance to 15,000 businesses over the last ten years. A JOB BUILDER The Center for Rural Affairs estimated that in 2006 the program helped create or save 7,500 jobs at a cost of just $330 per job. This program has also allowed entrepreneurs to leverage state funding with money from other sources. In the fiscal year ending in June 2006, using $447,750 state dollars, micro programs leveraged an additional $5.6 million. To put it simply, for every $1 of state funds, more than $12 was leveraged from other sources. Training Technical Assistance and Loans The provision creates a Rural

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Entrepreneur and Micro-enterprise Assistance program at the U.S. Department of Agriculture. It provides $15 million in mandatory funding over a four year period. Four million dollars will be set aside for each of the first three years and three million dollars will be available.for the fourth year. Funds can be used for both lending and technical assistance. THE BACKBONE OF RURAL AMERICA This legislation will help existing businesses and encourage the creation of new businesses. It is based on the premise that these smaller businesses are the backbone of our rural economy. The continued success of these stores, restaurants and service providers is essential to ensuring that rural communities survive, which is essential to the future of Nebraska. --

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CHIEFTAIN THURSDAY M'EEKLY TECUMSEH, NE Circulation = 1824

09/04/2008

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Creating jobs & economic development in rural communities Because I was born and raised the small town of McCook. Nebraska, I have never forgotten my roots. I understand the plight of rural America - the struggle for economic development and providing opportunities for young people so they don't have to move away to earn a living. The population in Nebraska's urban areas continues to rise steadily as it has for many years while ,the number of people living in rural areas has declined. Figures from the U.S. Census Bureau show that from 1940 to 2000 the population of rural areas in Nebraska fell from 800,000 to about 500,000. ! Durine ', a field hearing " of the SenAgriculture Committee awhile ck, witnesses told us time and e again that something needs to done to improve the economic mate in rural America before it's oo late. That is why I fought hard include new rural microenterprise nding in the farm bill which is w law, despite the President's

more than $1 2 was leveraged from other sources.

Training Technical Assistance and Loans The provision creates a Rural Entrepreneur and Micro-enterprise Assistance program .at the U.S. Department of U.S. Senator A" ~ r i c u l t u r e . Ben Nelson It provides $15 million in mandatory funding over a four year period. Four million dollars will be set aside for each ofthe first three years and three million dollars will be available for the fourtll year. Funds can be used for both lending and technical assistance. -

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The Backbone of Rural America

Entrepreneur Program ased on the Nebraska

This legislation will help existing businesses and encourage the creation of new businesses. It is based on the premise that his innovative provision is de- these smaller businesses are the ned to help rural entrepreneurs backbone of our rural economy. small businesses get started The continued success of these stay in business. It is based stores, restaurants and service he Nebraska Micro-enterprise providers is essential to ensuring rtnership Fund which was created that rural communities survive, in 1997 while I was still Governor. which is essential to the future of The Partnership Fund has been Nebraska. very successful in both creating new 06s and retaining existing ones in -rural areas. It has provided nearly I 4500 loans, totaling$6.9 million, to ! Nebraska small businesses. It has I also provided training and technical assistance to 15,000businesses over the last ten years.

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A Job Builder The Center for Rural Affairs estimated that in 2006 the program helped create or save 7,500 jobs at a cost of just $330 per job. This program has also allowed &trepreneurs to leverage state 4 funding with money from other sources. In the fiscal year ending in June 2006, using $447,750 state dollars, micro programs leveraged an additional $5.6 million. To put it simply, for every $1 of state funds,

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BLADE COLERIDGE, Nebraska

Wednesday, September 24, WEEKLY 801 sq. inches 31.06 $3.6 FYI 1

E M gives local residents plenty to think about By Deanna Anderson Colerfdge - Blade

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HARTINGTON There was no shortage of speakers or knowledge at the Nebraska Renewablz Energy Falr which was held at the Cedar County Fairgrounds Thursday. Both local speakers. a s well as those who traveled a distance, gave presentations following a welcome and introduction of the day's events. Martin Kleinschmit. Qenter for RurSAfTairs office in Hartlngton, was happy wlth the people who helped out at the F a . 'We have some of the most intelligent and interesting people here today," said Klelnschmlt . Several booths were set up where visitors could get additional information. A stop at the booth set u p by the Northeast Community College educated visitors concerning programs and on-line courses on Renewable Fuels that are available through the college. Representatiqes from Kathol Plumbing and Heating spoke of the benefits of

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using geo-thermal heating and cooling. The booth for the Carbon Credit Program supplied visitors with an on-line site to sign u p for payments one might quaYy for with rangeland management or by uslng no-till practices with crops. There are 345.000 acres ofground In Nebraska which are already enrolled in the Carbon Credit Program - an estimated $5.900.000 will be sent out to participants in 2008. The Carbon Credit Program is not a government program, but a marketbased program through debraska Farmers Union, according to John Hansen of the Nebraska Farmers Union. Cedar-KnoxPublic Power )II unioted using compact fluorescent bulbs to cut down on utility bills. They also had Information on a home efficiency checklist. Visitors found it hard to choose which workshop to attend from the variety of' presentations scheduled

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every hour, wlth a s many a s four presentations going on at the same time. "The only problem we had was that people could only be at one session at a time," sald Kleinschmit. Participants could acquire knowledge on federal energy policy programs or learn about cutting crop inputs 'and livestock feed costs. There were sessions on both Small Scale Wind Turbines as well a s Large Scale Wind Farms. Topics at the 19 presentations also Included Biofuels. Alternative Energy vehicles. Alcohol Basics. Climate Changes. PhotoVoltalc Energy along wlth Home-built Solar Units. Kleinschmit said there is already discusslon on having a Renewable Energy Fair In 2009. 'Next year, I think I would focus on a particular resource."said Kleinschmit. 'This year we had everything out there."

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BLADE COLERIDGE, Nebraska

c C M $ U 2008 \All Ri&

Wednesday, September 24, WEEKLY 801 35.08 sq. inches $3.6 1

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O r g a n k s hope Energy Fair fires up imaginations By Deanna Anderson Colerldge Blade HARTINGTON The timing toholdaRenewable Enw@ Fair ~nNebraska was r@t. Residents in Nebraska. a s well a s across the natlon, are facing higher utility bllls and seeing higher than evcr prices at gas pumps. The Nebraska Renewable Energy Fair, the first one ever heidin thestate, washostedby the Center ffJrRuralAffffairsat heCedarCoun$P*grounds Sept. 18. Close to 250 people from a s far away as Washington, Colorado. K ~ and Okla~ homa, a s well as Nebraska, showed up to learn moreabout renewable energy. Martfn Kleinschmit &om the Center for Rural Affairs Office in Hartlngton deemed the event a success. "I have had nothirlg but good comments," s a d Kleinschmit- This wasagreat time to see some new ideas. Terry Gomperl. Knox county E~~~~~~~~ thou&ttheRenewableEner@ ' Fair was a wonderful idea. "it is all about saving money," s a d Compert. "We have all the solutions - we just have It. It is the right thing to do. It Is just a matter of mind set." Bob Dickey. Laurel, agreed the Renewable EnerB Fair was a good Idea. "Hopefully,wewill be better educated on the energy crisis weare currently in."said Dickey. "The energy crisis is a real challenge for both producers and consumers. 1 would like to see an energy policy be put together for the nation." Dickey said he would like to see the U.S. become less dependant on foreign oil. Paul Spatz. Osmond, was already interested in finding ways to cut costswith fuel and other energy saving devices before attending the Fair. He drives a Honda Civic Hybrid vehicle and has been

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using the new fluorescent light bulbs to cut down on enerl2.Y use. "This is SO worthwhile. It has d l been worthwhile," said Spatz. Doug and Ja'n Thelen. Fordyce. came to the E n e r e Fair because of their interest in solar heating. They thought the Fair had some good information. "we have used solar heat for over 20years. We are looking at upgrading,. s a d Jan. Eighteen students from the Power and Trans~or~tation ~Class .at W g p e State College attended the Fair to gairi extra knowledge oirtside the classroom. Joseph Foster from Omaha said he thought attending the Renewable E n e r a Fair would help him with liis c.olleg(!c:course:. an1 ficttirig ;i lot of inful.~n;ttiorl." said Fostcr. "This is cool." ,Jesse: I:ouse(.. Cr11tr;d C ' I I ~ ,is working toward wrnilig a degrec in Industri;.~ll'c.c.11 Educ;~tion;it Waynr State College. 'This is so interctsting." s;iid I'o11sr:c. Eva Soh1 sc.1 11p;a t~cn)thfor t h Net)r;iska ~ Lcaguc: of (:onsc!rv:ition Voters 10 (!ncollragr pcoplc to know who they are voting for 111 the up-Coming olcction. "1,ook for supportc6rsa ~ i d(,;i~~cli(latcs who have a vision for rcncwaI)I(: clic?r@."Soh1 s;11t1. Solll. whcl-is-h-~rn -I,inr-nln.was imprcsscd wirh the: TIrst-cvcr Nvt)rnska Renewal.11t.Ericrgy Fair Iit.Ld in Ccsd;u County. "I[ is grc!;ll to scc SII(.II i1 hip tllr~lout.There is ;i good c.rowrl Ilrrc wht.11 you c*onsidrr it is tht. rnicidlc of thr (lily in tlie middle of' the wc~:k."s;iid

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Soh1 said slit* corll(i ylst fiscl [lie "t-ncrgv"ill tlie air on 'rl~ursday. "Tht!l.c. is ;I 1)11zzin Ihc air Iic~rcat tlir Fair." she srud.

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CHIEFTAIN THURSDAY WEEKLY TECUMSEH, NE Circulation= 1824

09/04/2008 -

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The answer is blowing in the wind sha Greeley Smith, .

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1'Boone Pickens' came to Nebraska last month to talk about his plan to reduce Americans dependence on foreign oil by developing wind far111sacross the plains. Boonc's plan could be a boon to rural communities. But Nebraskans nced to take wind development more seriously. Right now Nebraska ranks 21 in the nation in using wind energy with only 73 megawatts installed, but Nebraska ranks sixth in the nation in wind potential, with 868,000 megawatts /hour potential. To put i t into better perspective, Texas, the

state with the second-most wind potential has 5,3 17 megawatts installed right now. Iowa and Minnesota, both states with less wind potential than Nebraska, have nearly 1,300 megawatts of installed wind capacity each. Nebraska Public Power District has for the first time set a goal to produce more wind energy, which is a good start, but not enough. Wind can provide an enormous economic benefit, particularly to rural areas. Awind turbine factory in Pipestone, Minnesota (pop 4,000) employs 500 people and has an estimated $15 million payroll. When these wind turbines are locally owned vs. owned by outside investors, they deliver more jobs and more local area dollar impact.

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Nebraska's power system is governed by an elected board. Contact Nebraska Public Power board members or your local public power board members and urge them to increase wind power production in Nebraska. Visit http://www.nppd. cornhoard-of-directors to find your statewide representative. Attend Nebraska's first Renewable Energy Fair to learn more about what you can do: http://www. cfra.org/node/ 1324

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HERALD WEDNESDAY WEEKLY SPRINGVIEW, NE Circulation = 765

09/03/2008 i.

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SPRINGVIEW (NE) HERALD September 3,2008 Page 5

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The Answer is Blowing i n the Wind By Elisha Greeley Smith, elishas@cfra.org Center for Rural Affairs T Boone Pickens' came to Nebraska last 'month to talk about his plan to reduce Americans dependence on foreign oil by developing wind farms across the plains. Boone's plan could be a boon to rural communities. But Nebraskans need to take wind velopment more seriously. Right w Nebraska ranks 21 in the nan in using wind energy with only megawatts installed, but Nebraska ranks sixth in the nation in wind potential, with 868,000 megawatts lhour potential. To put it into better perspective, Texas, the state with the secondmost wind potential has 5,317 megawatts installed right now. Iowa and Minnesota, both states with less wind potential than Nebraska, have nearly 1.300 megawatts of installed

wind capacity each. Nebraska Public Power District has for the first time set a goal to ; produce more wind energy, which is a good start, but not enough. Wind can provide an enormous economic benefit, particularly to rural areas. A wind turbine factory in Pipestone, Minnesota (pop 4,000) i employs 500 people and has an esj timated $15 million payroll. ' When these wind turbines are locally owned vs. owned by outside investors, they deliver more jobs and more local area dollar impact. Nebraska's power system is governed Dy an elected board. Contact Nebraska Public Power board members or your local public power board members and urge them to increase wind power production in Nebraska. : Visit http:llwww.nppd.coml board-of-directors to find your statewide representative. Attend Nebraska's first Renew- able Energy Fair to learn more about what you can do: http:lh~~w.cfra.orgl I node11324 .


Belle Plaine Union Belle Plaine,lA Circ. 1324 From Page: 3 911712008

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Rural broadband access key component in community success

By BRIAN DEPEW Center for Rural Affairs Only 38 percent of rural Americans have access to a high-speed internet connection. A vibrant future for rural

.Americawill require public policy that rectifies this situation. High-speed internet is revolutionizing the way we do business, and with this can come great opportunity for rural America. However, as long as millions of rural Americans are without broadband service and others are served only marginally, we will continue to fall behind in adoption of a technology that could propel us forward. Additionally. from conducting politi-

cal campaigns, to issue advocacy, to holding our legislators accountable, the internet is revolutionizing politics and governing itself. If rural Americans are not able to participate at the same rate as urban Americans, we will suffer wnrfp nolirv nnA lpcc

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accountability to issues that matter to rural people and places. The U.S. ranks 16th worldwide for the percent of citizens that have highspeed internet access, and we pay more when we do have access. In rural areas

both access and affordability are significantly worse. Finally, any broadband network must remain open to all points of view, and private providers should be prohibited from blocking or filtering traffic in any way that curtails our right to free speech. Access to high-speed internet in the 21st century is a public necessity similar to access to electricity in the 20th century. Much like the Rural Electrification Act of 1936, we need a Rural Broadband Act of 2009: Doing so is

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crucial to the future of rural America The Cgntcrfor Rural Affairs was established in 1973 as an unafJiliated nonprofit corporation under IRS code 501(c)3. The Centerfor Rural Affairs wasformed by rural Nebraskans concerned aboutfamily farms and rural communities, and we work to strengthen small businesses,family farms and ranches, and rural communities.


COOK COUNTY STAR

Date: Location: Circulation (DMA): Type (Frequency): Page: Keyword:

Monday, September 15,2008 GRAND MARAIS, MN 3,666 (137) Newspaper (W) 4A Center For Rural Affairs

Local bargains benefit community Change is hard and is often viewed with negativity and disdain. times, those in small rural communities suffer from this type of thinking. Today's economy is challenging the power of small rural communities to adapt and, in some cases, thrive. Along with skyrocketing gas and oil*prices,retail prices have also been rising. These price increases are linked to the higher transportation and shipping costs involved in getting products on the shelves. We are accustomed to paying less for items brought from great distances than what we would pay for goods produced or manufactured locally. This is no longer the case. Large retailers and even online web distributors can no longer absorb the transponation and shipping costs and are passing those on to the consumer or even the producer. Small rural communities and their residents have always had the luxury of running out of town to buy products more cheaply than can be produced locally. But with the higher cost of driving to a giant retailer and the increased price of goods to offset s h i p ping costs, local retailers in small communities may actually be ablo to compete. Buying locally produced food is a great way to begin to reverse the common practice of jumping in our vehicles and traveling miles to get items we could grow locally. Prices may still increase to reflect economic changes, but it will mean puning money in the pockets of people close to us rather than far away. This is a more sustainable approach for all of our small rural towns. The pioneering spirit relied on ingenuity and creativity to survive. We need to bring it to the surface once again for those of us who call small rural communities home. We can start by thanking those who are producing the products and spreading our money to our neighbors rather than to far flung producers. Michael L. Holron Centerfor Rural Affairs Lyons. Nebraska At


Sioux City Journal Sioux City,lA Circ. 44845 From Page:

9 911812008

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The Iowa Farmers Union will hold a rural political forum and a discussion of agricultural policy Tuesday in Moville. Both events will be held at the Moville Community Center. The agricultural policy discussion will take place at 6 p.m., followed by the rural political forum at 7 p.m. John Crabtree of the Center for Rural Affairs will m5d.Gate the event, and questions can be asked by those in attendance. Those who have confirmed to attend the event include Iowa 5th District congressional candidate Rob Hubler, statehouse candidate Lori Sokolowski and Woodbury County ofticeseekers Mike Keane. Jaclyn Smith. Mark Monson, Lany Clausen, Danny Christophers, Glenn Parrett and Dave Drew. Iowa 5th District Congress-

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'man Steve King has been invited. - Bret Hayworth L

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COLERIDGE, Nebraska

Wednesday, September WEEKLY 801 50.30 sq. inches $3.6 FYI 4

c copyright 2008\ All Rights Racrved

Benefits of solar enernv ~ i c un k nraise at Renewable Enerav Fair BYDIANNA ~DBRSON CEDARCOUNTINews

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HARTINGTON Several Cedar County residents put their stamp of approval on solar energy at the Nebraska Renewable Energy Fair. Rick Pinkelman. who lives east of Bow Valley, shared knowledge he has gained since he lolned a Small Farm Energy Pro]ect in the 70's. Pinkelman startedwith an old storm window and enough spare lumber to build the first solar collector ln the county. After hooking u p a smallfan from an old slide prolector. he became convinced that solar energy could work for him. Although Pinkelman's first project was a simple window box collector, he later constructed one of the fist malor solar innovations used by Energy Project cooperators onto an existing barn. The 17x50 foot solar collector was mounted onto the roof of an old dairy barn which was converted to a farrowing barn. "We used it to completely heat the building durlng the day-we kept It at 72 to 73 degrees," said Pinkelman. "We stored heat by using 850 onegallon milk jugs which

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were filled with a mixture of water and alcohol it worked for part of the night." Pinkelman added they did have problems wlth trying to store the heat and later discontinued using the milk Jugs due to leakage. Pinkelman also constructed a 290 square foot vertical wall collector onto his house. The heat is collected in the basement by a squlrrel cage fan which delivers heat to the furnace ductwork. "When your home has a solar collector on the side of It it isn't the most attractive," Pinkelman sald. "But the savlngs is worth it." Pinkelman was enthused about one other thing. "We are still using It that is the most exciting: Paul Phelps' home which is south of Obert was also part of the Energy Projects in the 1970's. "I wanted something that didn't look funny and something that wasn't too sophisticated." said Phelps. Phelps incorporated 170square foot of thermo pane glass on' the lower level of his ranch-style home which serves a s

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a passive solar collector during sunny days. Phelps decided to add an active vertical wall collector to the house in the fall of 1978 to help lower energy costs of their electric baseboard heating. Phelps wanted to find outjust what the collcctor would produce so hc kept detailed records. Various recordings included the time of day. wtnd direction and vclocity. intensity of solar energy, outside air temperature along with the temperature of air going into and coming out of the collector. Phelps did have one set back early in the use of the solar energy project at his home. "It snowed for a month we had no sunshine." said Phelps. "We had zero use out of the collector ." Over all Phclps is very satisfied with the long term results of solar energy. "Thirty years later we are sill pumping out Rt u's with only minor repairs." said pheips. "It is just wonderful." Claude Mathiason who lives in Hartington rilso had a few words to say about solar cnergy. "It wasn't just farmers, I am a city boy." said

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Mathiason. who had a solar collcctor which he had built. 011 display at Energy the Rc~~ewable Fair. Mathiason had built the solar collcctor while he hati been working for the Nebraska l)epmtment of Iioads. "Thc Stilk let me have thc: limo I had to find thc materials," Mathiason said. M;ltI~i;tson built two solar collcctors and used them to heat a tcn foot by ten foot office at thc old State Yard. "I hat1 two of thccollectors but one wo~lltihave done the job. They set right up ncxt to the office. 0;a s~unnyday you had lo open th(* cloor." sitit1 Mathiason. "'Slic*y wcre useti until the State solti the b~~ilcling."

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1-ater on ivfatl~iaso~l tried using one of the collectors oil his garage t)ut thrrc. was too much sh;~dc. "If yotr C i l l l gct to thc slrrl - they will ticfinitcly work." said ;M;~thii,~~ot~. "Sol;ir c.ollcctors ilre simple - you can makc onc." ~Mathi;~sonloltl the groi~pwllo h;id assc~nl)lcdi ~ t011t~ of the. presentations a t Ihc first cwr Nebrask;~I<enc?witblc Energy Fair.

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NEWSPAPER THURSDAY - WEEKLY WAHOO,. NE

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Creating jobs important to rural development soirees. A Nebraskan's -

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Because I was horn nnd raised in [tic iall town of blc('otik. i have nevcr rgoilen my roots. I ~indcrstand the ight of rural America - the struggle or econon~icdevelopment and provid-~ p gopportunities for young pcople so :;.[they don't have 10 move away to earn a living. The 11opi.~I:1tionin Nchraska's urban areas conlinucs to rise stcndily as it has fol- tn;tnji years whrlc :Ilc &rmbcr of people living in rilral arcas has declinctl. Figures from t l ~ cU.S. ('enstis Bureau show thiit ii-cim 1940 to 2000 IIC population of rural areas in Nelsriisa fell from 800.000 to ;~bniir500.000. I)irr.ing a field hearing c:i' he Senate gricu1tt11.c('ornmiltcc ;,.: ipilc back, itncsscs told us time ancl riinc again 31 sntnetliit~~ ni'i'ds to hc one to itn.ovc the cconor~lic clirnatc in s~iral incrica bclhrc it's too !ate. That is why I fought hasti to includc ~ i c wniral microen tcr-prisc r ~ i i i d i ~ in ~ g the fan11 ill, which is now Inw, despite the I'rcsent's veto. This innovative provision is dcigi~cdto help rural entrepreneurs and

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business. 11 is based on the Nebraska Micro-enterprise Partnership Fund which was crcated in 1997 while 1 was still Cioves~ioi. 'I'he Pa~tnershipFund has been very succ~cssfulin both creating new jobs clnd retaining existing ones in rural areas. It has provided nearly 4500 loans, totaling $6.9 million, to Nebraska small businesses. I t has also provided training arid technical assistance to 15,000 businesses over the last ten years. The Center for Rural AfFdirs estjmated that in 2006 the program helped create or save 7,500 jobs at a cost of just $330 j)u.job. This program has also allowed entrepreneurs to leverage state funding with

In the fiscal money from other year ending in June 2006, using $447,750 state dollars, micro programs leveraged an additional $5.6 million. To put it simply, for every $1 of state funds, more than $12 was leveraged from other sources. The provision creates a Rural Entrepreneur and Micro-enterprise Assistance program at the U.S. Department of Agriculture. It provides $15 million in mandatory funding over a four year period. Four million dollars will be set aside for each of the first three years and three million dollars will be available for the fourth year. Funds can be used for both lending and technical assistance. This legislation will help existing businesses and encourage the creation of new businesses. It is based on the premise that these smaller businesses are the backbone of our rural economy. The continued success of thest: stores, restaurants and service providers is essential to ensuring that rural communities survive, which is essential to the future of Nebraska.

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~ h answer d is blowing\ in the win, wind power

Boone Pickens' came to Nebraska last month to talk about his plan to reduce Americans dependence on foreign oi. by developing wind farms across the plains. Boone's plan could be a boon to rural communities. But Nebraskans need to take wind development more seriously. Right now Nebraska ranks 21 in the nation in using wind ener-. gy with only 73 megawatts installed, but Nebraska ranks sixth in the nation in wind potential, with 868,000 megawatts /haur potential. To put it into better perspective, Texas, the state with the second-most wind potential has 5,317 megawatts installed right .now. Iowa and Minnesota, both states with less wind potential than Nebraska, have nearly 1,300 megawatts -of instal1,ed wind capacity each. Nebraska Public Power District has for the first time set a goal to produce more wind energy, which is a good start, but not enough. Wind can provide an enormous economic benefit, particularly to rural areas. A wind turbine factory in Pipestone, Minnesota (pop 4,000) employs 500 people and has an estimated $15 million payroll. When these wind turbines are locally owned vs, owned by outside investors, they deliver more jobs and more local area dollar impact. Nebraska's power system is governed by an elected board. Contact Nebraska publid Power board members or your local public power board members and urge them to increase wind power production in Nebraska. Visit http://www.nppd.com/ board-of-directors to find your statewide represgntative. Attend Nebraska's first Renewable Energy Fair to learn more about what you can do: http:Nwww.cfra.orglnode/1324 By Elisha Greeley Smith, elishas ..,,@cfra.org, Center for Rural Affairs .

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CFRA Clips 100108