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STANDARD HUMBOLDT, Nebraska

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Thursday, September 18,2008 WEEKLY 1176 21.42 sq. inches $5 2

Renewable Energy Fair At Hartington Over 500 attendees are Director. Hassebrook will renewable expected to participate in kickoff the Nebraska's first ever energy fair with a welcome Renewable Energy Fair. and comments about renewThe event, which is hosted able energy .and rural comby the Center for Rural munity development. Affairs, will be held today, "The future of our commuSeptember 18 at the Cedar nities is why many of us are County Fairgrounds in so enthusiastic about renewHartington, NE. The fair able energy. Rural America will run from 9:00 a.m. to has an asset urban America 4:00 p.m. with a lunch break lacks land. And we have at noon. A detailed schedule plenty of wind. If we build can be viewed at: http:// the renewable energy induswww.cfra.org!f~1es/~newable-try the right way, then there is real potential to creenergy-fair-f1yer.pd.f' . "Along with learning about ate economic opportunities ways to conserve energy and that bring young people and save money, the renewable young families to our small energy fair will be a great towns," said Hassebrook. opportunity for people to For more information, conlearn how rural communi- tact Martin Kleinschmit at . or ties can build on unique 402-254-6893 assets such as wind power rnartink@cfra.org. You can and biofuels to create jobs check the Center's website and economic opportunities for more details as well, that help build a better www.cfra.org or download future for everyone in our the Energy Fair Flyer at: communities," said Chuck http://www .cfra.orglfiles/reHassebrook, Center for newable-energy-fair-flyer.pdf. Rural Affairs Executive

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NEWS WEDNESDAY WEEKLY WEST POINT, NE Circulation = 2990

08/27/2008

Business Plan Basics Opportunity for' local entrepreneurs and business owners,1 The Center for Rural Affairs' chances of a ncw business surviving ~ i r a lEnterprise ' Assistance Project 1)1. five pears are lwtween 30 and 50 i AP) and Burt CountyICun~ing percent. Entreprene~~rs can greatly nty col~ununityleaders will host a five-week Business Plan Basics course beginning Monday, Sept. 8, 2008, at 6:30 p.m.. The fivr communities supporting this training are -each hosting a. night. September 8 ' the session will be held in Oakland at the Loess Hills RC&D n~eetirig room at 408 N. Oaklantl Ave. The training will continue in Lyons on Sept. 15 at the Center for Rural Affairs Meeting Room. 011 Sept. 22, the group will meet in Tekan-tith at the First National Bank Northeast in the second floor meeting room. Ban. croft will host the Sept. 29 session

increase their chances for success by irnalyzing their ideas, their markerplace and their ~nirnagement team belorr beginning. As a business owner, it's always import:tnt I to analfze whei'e.yo~~~zire;'lobk at the trends and make ;~djustments if necdcd. Burt Counly and Cuming Couitty area entl,epreneurs and business owners will have an 017portunity to ar~alyzetheir businesses andlor business ideas at a Business Plan Basics training course coming in Septentber. The Center for Kul-a1 Affairs' REAP program provides lending, training, networking, and technical nscisti~nceopport~unitiesfor startup meet in Decatur at the Catholic Cen- anti existing small businesses. ter. Each session will begin at 6:30 For tnore information, please contact Monica Braun, REAP Wo~nen's Business Center Director, n ~ b ~ a u windstream.net ~i@ or call 402-643-2673. The business planning workshop Thc RECAPW13C is funded in series will include the following part through a Coopaative Agreemain topics: h,l;irketing, Promotion1 ment with the C1.S Small Business Advertising, Financial Manage- Administr:ttion. SBA's funding is ment, Customer Relations and Coal uot an endor,sernent of any prodSetting. REAP collaborates witla ucts, opinions. or services. All SRA the University of Nebraska EDGE funded programs are extended to Program in utilizing the Nx1,evt.i the public on a nondiscriminatory Micro-Entrepreneurs curriculum basis. Reasonable accomtllodations called "Business Plan Basics". lor persons with disabilities will The success rates for small busi- be made if requested in advance. ' nesses are typically quite low. Contact Monica Braun at (402) 613-2673. -

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MONITOR TKLRSDAY WEEKLY BLOOMFIELD, NE

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benewable Energy Fair

1:7'2008Hartington, NE - On Scptcnibcr 18. the Center for Rural Affairs will ,-

host the first Renewable Energy Fair r e v e r in the state of Nehraska. The Re- . .- newable Energy Fair will be held in ~ H a r t i n g t o n ,NE at the Cedar County 5< Fairgrounds. The event will run from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Participants can learn about small and utility-scale wind turbines, see bio' diesel being made on the grounds, hear speakers discuss hybrid and electric cars, learn about USDA programs on energy efficiency and renewable energy systems, and gain the concepts of home-built solar hcaters and energy conservation programs and practices. "Many people feel like victims in today's high-cost energy world. The goal of this fair is to provide examples of things folks can do today to ! reduce energy costs and give them some hint of better things to come in therfuture," said Martin Kleinschmit of the Center for Rural Affairs. "This is .not intended to be an in-depth discus'>sionof any renewable energy concept, --but rather, a quick exposure to ideas and practices out there. The fair will, feature one-hour presentations with an! opportunity for one-on-one discussions I i th?oiighout &e day.':; .A ;.ic . ?. Kleinschmit - continued, "Energy: drives the economy at the local, state:I and national level. Who owns the en- 1 ergy can influence the success of the I region. The more we control our energy : 'system the more we control our future. Gaining control of our energy bill is not only about new renewable energy systems or exciting new technology. Often : best way to reduce energy costs is servation. The best energy savings gathered through the kilowatts and Ions not used. The Iowa Energy enter will be at the fair to show how saving energy can be rewarding and fun at the same time." Other topics that will be presented the Renewable Energy Fair include: imate change discussion, carbon edit program, cutting crop inputs and ; vestock feed costs: school wind pro- i cts,"nergy safety, and much more:,.. ,\ "We have the desire to do something about energy costs. Soinetimes we just need to see ideas and talk to 1 others before we put these measures I into place. The fair is designed tp provide that opportunity," schmit. "It is fitting to hold s,d the KleinRenewable Energy Fair in Hartington. It gives us the opportunity to re-visit the j projects featured in the Snlall Farm'i Energy Project, hosted by the Centtr i for Rural Affairs in 1978. To view a ! summary of that project, visit

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According to Kleinschmit the farms involved in the Small Energy Pro- .

t savcd up to 17% on their energy Is. And most savings could be credadded or behavior n devices they made : purchased, demonstrating that j owledge is as important to technol- 1 when it comes to energy savings. Renewable Energy Fair will proopportunities to visit with farmers $ volved in the Small Farm Energy

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For more information, contact Martin Kleinschmit at 402-254-6893 or $imartink@cfra.org. Check the Center's jwebsite for more details as well, k

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TIMES THURSDAY WEEKLY PENDER, KE

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Thursday, August 28, 2008

Loess Hills still wants survey input The Nebraska Loess Hills Reg source Conservation & Development (RC&D) Council held its August meeting recently a t the RC&D office in Oakland. The need for more survey input to complete the 2009-2014 area plan was discussed. The council urges area residents and businesses in Thurston, Burt, Cuming, Dakota, Dodge and Washington Counties to participate in the survey. For online surveys, visit nlhsurvey.com or call the council office at 685-5 175 to request a paper copy. The survey ends August 30.

The council agl-eed to host the REAP Business Plan Basics Training on Monday, Sept. 8, at 6:30 p.m. Any small business owner or those who plan to start a small business will benefit from this valuable training. Pre-registration is required. Contact Rose Jasperscn at 685-5500 or Monica Braun a t 643-2673. The council adopted a project to help the West Point theatre obtain funding to save the existing West Point city auditorium from demolition and give it a new life a s a movie theatre/performing arts theatre. It was also decided

e to tentatively s c h e d ~ ~ lanother scrap tire collection to takc place a t the fairgrounds in h-lington on Sept. 20. Watch area newspapers for more information about this collection. During the meeting. the council also discussed potential projects related to renewable e n e r a production and received information about small wind energy production in preparation for a coming educational presentation. For information about the council and its activities, membership information or volunteer opportunities, contact Kent Neuniann or Deb Ward at 685-5 175.

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RECORD-NE\%'S THURSDAY WEEKLY CLEARWATER-EwING, NE Circulation= 5 17

08/28/2008

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Clearwater students who participatedin the "Makin' Money Camp held recently at Wayne State College included (front. left) Brandon Aguilar and Tony Reyes; (front, right) Martin Reyes; (back. I-r) Jose Reyes. Alex Olivan and )%lariaOrtiz.

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Five Clearwater Students Participate In MakinyMoney Camp At Wayne State

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Twenty-three students; grades 58, participated in the recent Makin' Money Camp held at Wayne State --2

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Martin Reyes, Tony Reyes, Brandon Aguilar, Alex Olivan - --

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Maria Ortiz and Jose Reyes from Clearwater were among those attending the two-day event which offered students the opportunity to learn how to be successful entrepreneurs. Other students were from Laurel, Creighton, Atkinson, Wakefield, Newman Grove, Wayne, Hartington, Emerson and Plain-view. Participants learned how to develop a business plan, borrow money from a banker and create their own billboard ads. Some also made ',:business cards and radio tapes. Each camper put together a pro- duct - a gourd birdhouse, fishing lure, nature photography note cards or bracelets and key chains 1 which they sold to Wayne Chamber of Commerce customers at the camp marketplace. After selling their wares, the students toured six entrepreneurial businesses in Wayne where the .-

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owners shared their thoughts on being the owners. They said it has to be something the person loves doing and that it takes lots of work and long hours to make it a success. - -. . The camp, held at the WSC Student Center, was funded in part by a grant from the Connie Fund Foundation. Other partners were the Northeast Nebraska RC&D. UNL Extension, the Center for Rural Affairs, Wayne State College and Wayne Area Economic Development.

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MIRROR-SUN THURSDAY WEEKLY LYONS, NE Circulation = 735

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Renewable Energy Fair 'to be held

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On September 18,2008 the Center for Rural Affairs will host the first Renewable Energy Fair ever in the state of Nebraska. The Renewable ~ n e r &Fair will be held in Hartington, NE at the Cedar County Fairgrounds. The event will run from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Participants can learn about small and utility-scale wind turbines, see bio-diesel being made on the grounds, hear speakers discuss hybrid and electric cars, learn about USDA programs on energy efficiency and renewable energy systems, and gain the concepts of home-built solar heaters and energy conserva-

tion programs and practices. "Many people feel like victims in today's high-cost energy world. The goal of this fair is to provide examples of things folks can do today to reduce energy costs and give them some hint of better things to come in the future," said Martin Kleinschmit of the Center for Rural Affairs. "This is not intended to be an in-depth discussion of any renewable energy concept, but rather, a quick exposure to ideas and practices out there. The fair will feature one-hour presentations with an opportunity for one-onone discussions throughout the day."

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ADVOCATE THURSDAY WEEKLY LAUREL, NE Circulation = 855

Hartington to host Nebraska's first renewable energy fair -

I-MRTINGTON- The Center for Rural Affairs will host tlie first Henewal)le Energy Fair ever in the state of Nebraska Sept. 18 in Ilartington at the Cedar County Fairgrounds. The event will 1-7113 Stmtn 9 a.m.-4 p.m. t>,'11 .t ~ c i p a r ~can t s learn about snlall and utililq'-scale wind turl~ines,see bio-diesel being ~,~;!tle011 t l ~ e groi~ntis.hear speakers discuss 11yt)rid and electric cars. leal-n ahout IJSDA =progr;l~r~s on enrrgy efficiency and renewable c,rlc*rgys y s t c ~ n i s:!nd . gain the conc~c.ptsoS!1or-net~uiltsolar hcaters atid energy conservation programs and pi-acticcs. "Many p e o p l ~feel like victinis in today's Thegoal oftl~isf;?iris to high-cost r~~c~~-&vworltl. of t h i ~ ~folks g s can do today to provide exnrt~l-)l(:s I-educeer~crgycwsts and give them some hint of 1 better things toc:on~i, in thefi~ture,"sai(l Martin Kleinschmit. <'iXntrrfix Rural Affairs. "'Illis is not intenc11-tlto I ) ( , a11 i~~-d~:l,th discussion of any reneu-al)l(-rric1-gv ?ionc:ept, but ratlirr, a quick exposr~r-e to idws arid practicrs out there. The fair will f c ~ i urc t on?-hour 111-eserltations '

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with an opportunity for one-on-one discussions throughout the day." "Energy drives the economy at the local, state and national level," said Kleinschmit. "Who owns the energy can influence the success of the region. The more we control our energy system the more we control our future. Gaining control of our energy bill is not only about new renewable energy systems or exciting new technology. Often the best way to reduce energy costs is conservation. The best energy savings are gathered through the kilowatts and gallons not used. The Iowa Energy Center will be a t the fair to show how saving energy can he rewarding and fun at the same time." Other topics to be presented at theRenewable Energy Fair include, climate change discussion, carbon credit program, cutting crop inputs and livestock feed costs, school wind projects, energy safrty, and much more. "We have the desire to do something about enrrgy costs. Sometimes we just need to see

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ideas and talk to others before we put these : measures into place. The fair is designed to ! provide that opportunity," said Kleinschmit. "It is fitting to hold the Renewable Energy i Fair in Hartington. It gives us the opportunity to re-visit the projects featured in the Small Farm Energy Project, hosted by the Center for f Rural Affairs in 1978. To view a summary of that project, visitwww.cfra.org." According to Kleinschmit the farmers involved in the Small Energy Project saved u p to 17 percent on their energy bills. Most savings could be credited to practices added or behav- j ior changes rather than devices they made or i purchased, demonstrating that knowledge is 1 important to technologywhen it comes to energy { savings. The Renewable Energy Fair will provide opportunities to visit with farmers involved in r. the Small Farm Energy Project. For more information, contact Martin Kleinschmit a t 402-254-6893 or martink@cfra.org. Check the Center's website for more details as well, www.cfra.org.


NEWS-CHRONICLE THURSDAY WEEKLY WISNER, NE Circulation = 1857

08/28/2008

~ettermentcoffee The Bar~croft Betterment coffee w a s held at the Country Pub on Wednesday morning, Aug. 13. National Bank of

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Blaine Rockelman chaired the iscussion hour. Announcement of Camron " Rrummond's benefit and raffle for Village Clerk, Jennifer Carlson, oave an update on how Pender Iso handed out rochr~rcson Business Plan Basics raining-sponsored by the Center or Rural Affairs. T h e training dates re Sept. 8, 15, 22, 29 and Oct. 6. owns hosting are Lyons, Tekamah, ancroft and Decatur. Dr. Jon Cerny reported on school: eachers report Thursday and Friday ith first day on Monday Aug. 18. 'arents for elementary students tnect Nancy Gillis gave a rundown on eihardt Day. One hundred people tended. The Centcr will host the pcnirlg cercmoriy of the 12.5'~in Janet Smith gave an update on the olf Scramble on Sept. 14 at Twin rcek.;, Pencier. More teams are, erdcd. I t is C O - C ~with prizcc, lunch i d much more. I~,:tync Matthcs acknowledged n~iifer. Sariicc and Marjorie: for tending the Wisner Chamber Plans are to have a mclodrarna in 009 at thc 1 25'h.

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INDEX WEDNESDAY WEEKLY MITCHELL, NE Circulation = 893

08/27/2008

Nebraska's First b-~enewable Energy Fair -

On September 18, 2008 tKe Center for Rural Affairs will host the first Renewable Energy Fair ever in the state of Nebraska. The Renewable Energy Fair will be held in Hartington, NE at the Cedar County Fairgrounds. The event will run from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00

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Participants can learn about small and utility-scale wind turbines, see bio-diesel being made on the grounds, hear speakers discuss hybrid and electric cars, learn about USDA programs on energy efficiency and renewable enrgy systems, and gain the oncepts of home-built solar eaters and energy conservaon programs and practices. l ' ~ a n y people feel like ms in today's high-cost gy world. The goal of this lr is to provide examples of ings folks can do today to educe energy costs and give em some hint of better things come in the future," said artin Kleinschmit of the Cenr for Rural Affairs. "This is nded to be an in-depth on of any renewable concept, but rather, a xposure to ideas and actices out there. The fair feature one-hour presentawith an opportunity for -on-one discussions ughout the day." Kleinschmit continued, ergy drives the economy at local, state and national vel. Who owns the energy an influence the success of region. The more we conour energy system the e we control our future. ing control of our energy 11 is not only about new reenergy systems or new technology. Often way to reduce energy

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costs is conservation. The besf energy savings are gathere4 through the kilowatts and gal; Ions not used. The Iowa En-' ergy Center will be at the fair to show how saving energy canbe rewarding and fun at t h e same time." Other topics that will be' presented at the Renewable Energy Fair include: climate: change discussion, carbon' credit program, cutting crop inputs and livestock feed costs, 5 school wind projects, energy safety, and much more. "We have the desire to do something about energy costs. Sometimes we just need to see ideas and talk to others before we put these measures into _-place.Th_e fair is designed to provide that opportunity," said Kleinschmit. "It is fitting to hold the Renewable Energy Fair in Hartington. It gives us the opportunity to re-visit the projects featured in the Small Farm Energy Project, hosted by the Center for Rural Affairs in 1978. To view a summary of that project, you can visit www.cfra.org." According to Kleinschmit the farmers involved in the Small Energy Project saved up . to 17% on their energy bills. $ And most savings could be # credited to practices added or '6ehavior changes rather-than , devices they made or pur-' chased, demonstrating that ! knowledge is as important to technology when it comes to energy savings. The Renewable Energy Fair will provide opportunities to visit with farmers involved in the Small Farm Energy Project. For more information, contact Martin Kleinschmit at 402-254-6893 or martink@cfka.org. Check the Center's website for more details as well, www.cfra.org.

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MIRROR-SUN THURSDAY WEEKLY LYONS, NE Circulation = 735

08/28/2008

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Despite what Kermit the gain the concepts of home-! frog says, being green can built solar heaters and energy#I be easy. conservation programs and Whether you feel like a practices. victimintoday's highenergy The fair will run from 9:00 cost world or you are looking a.m. to4:00 p.m. plans call fof for ways to go green a variety of concurand conserve, you rent sessions to be can actually take presented through- ' control and make out the day. Here's a snapa difference. How? Attend shot of a few more; topics not men-i Nebraska's first tioned above: cli- X Renewable Energy mate change dis-' Fair, on September 18, 2008 at the cussion, carbon / Cedar County Faircredit programs, 1 grounds in Hartingcutting crop inputs i ton, NE. and livestock feed Learn how to . ~ e d i aand outreach _ costs, school wind savemoney and the projects, energy environment with conserva- safety, and too many more tion, alternative fuels, and to list! This is truly a unique event r alternative practices. Hosted by the Center for to the region. Rural Affairs, the event will Through planning and prachave something for every- tice you have the power to I one. make a difference. Learn about small and utilCome learn how. ity-scale wind turbines, see For more information, con-, bio-diesel being made on the tact Martin Kleinschrnit atl grounds, hear speakers dis- (402) 254-6893 or martink@= cuss hybrid and electric cars, cfra.org. learn about USDA programs You can check the Center's on energy efficiency and re- website for more details as newable energy systems, and well, www.cfra.org.

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MONITOR THURSDAY WEEKLY BLOOMFIELD, NE ClrculaQon= 1405

08/28/2008

E It's Not Easy Being Green By Elisha Greeley Snzith. elishas@cfra.org. Center ,for Rural

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Despite what Kermit the frog says. being green can be easy. Whether you fcel like a victim in today's high energy cost world or you are looking for ways to go green and conserve, you can actually take control and make a difference. How? Attend Nebraska's first Renewable Energy Fair, on September 18, 2008 at the Cedar County Fairgrounds in Hartington, NE. Learn how to save i money and the environment with con- ' servation, alternative fuels, and altema-

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Hosted by the Center for Rural Affairs, the event will have something for everyone. Learn about small and utility-scale wind turbines, see bio-diesel being made on the grounds, hear speakers discuss hybrid and electric cars, learn about USDA programs on energy efficiency and renewable energy systems, and gain the concepts of home-built solar heaters and energy conservation programs and practices. The fair will run from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Plans call for a variety of sessions to be presented throughout the day. Here's a snapshot of a few more topics not mentioned above: climate change discussion, carbon credit programs, cutting crop inputs and livestock feed costs, school wind projects, energy safety, and too many more to list! This is truly a unique event to the region. Through planning and practice you have the powcr to make a difference. Come learn how. For more information, contact Martin Kleinschmit at (402) 254-6893 or martink@cfra.org. You can check the Center's website for more details as well, www.cfra.org. . -- ,. ~

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UNIVERSAL

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MONITOR WEEKLY BLOOMFIELD, NE

THURSDAY

Circulation = 1405

0812812008

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Successful Event Making:t

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By Elisha Grccley ~mith.! elishas@cfra.org, Center for Rural Affairs 13 . I. .Marketplace: Opening Doors to, r for Rural Affairs'.: d neurship event, will return, anks to hugely successfi~l and tremendous participa-! 008. This year ~ a r - I eld at the Sandhills,.t r in North Platte,; Nebraska, on February 25.2009. I Perhaps you already have a srnall ' business or have a great idea for a business. but just don't know where to start. You'll find the answer plus much morc , at Marketplace. Whether you are an entrcprencur ' ! rancher, farmer, community developer, 1 student or teacher, Marketplace will \ have something for everyone. ! Participants will be able to peruse over 50 displays in the Exhibit Hall, i learn from other small businesses and and network with

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Tracks are being shaped for entrepreneurs with ideas for start-up businesses, established businesses, agricultural businesses, youth businesses, and a special track for Hispanic entrepreneurs with sessions conducted in Spanish. There will also be sessions covering technology topics, ideas for entre- \ preneurial communities, and practical t rural policy perspectives. Maybc you have an idea for a session. Presenting at MarketPlacc is a I great way to share your knowledge with colleagues and gain exposure. The 2009 conference will be an excellent opportunity for people to learn how entrepreneurship and innovation can help our rural communities thrive by focusing on proven rural strategies to build assets $4 c r a t e eco_nomic; opportunities from witf,irr: .:. "2: , 1 :. )

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For more information contact: Joy I Marshall, joym@cfra.org, or call (402) j Or visit: i www.cfra.org/marketplacelhome as : Marketplace 2009 takes shape.


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COOKComm

Date Locat~on C~rculatlon(DMA) Type (Frequency) Page Keyword

NEWS~HERALD

Fr~daySeptember 12 2008 GRAND MARAIS M N 5 500 (1 37) Newspaper (W) A4 Center For Rural Affa~rs

As I See It Rural Broadband Access Key Component L Community Success By Brian Depew, Centerfor Rural Affairs nly 3% percent of rural Americans have access to a highspeed internet c0nnection.A vibrant future for rural America will require public policy that rectifies this situation. High-speed internet is revolutionizing the way we do business, and with this can come great opportunity for rural America. However, as long as millions of rural Americans are without broadband service and others are served only marginally, we will continue to fall behind in adoption of a technology that could propel us forward.

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Additionally, from conducting political campaigns, to issue advocacy, to holding our legislators accountable, the internet is revolutionizing politics and governing itself. If rural Americans are not able to participate at the same rate as urban Americans, we will suffer worse policy and less govctnment accountability to issues that matter to rural people and places. The U.S. mnks 16th worldwide for the percent of citizens that have high-speed internet access, and we pay more when we do have access. In rural areas both access and affordability are signiClcantly worse. Finally,

any broadband network must remain open to all points of view, and private providers should be prohibited from blocking or hltering traffic in any way that curtails ' our right to free speech. Access to high-speed internet in the 21st century is a public necessity similar to access to electricity in the 20th ccnt,ury. Much like the Rural EIecVification Act of 1936.we need a Rural Broadband Act of 2009. Doing so is crucial to the future of rural America (Contact Brian Depew at The Centerfor Rural Affairs, briand@cJia.org.)


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