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[ State's doctors aging,

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likely to retire soon

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World-Herald News Servlce Affairs in Lyons said high gas A new report shows that pricesmakeshortagesofhealth Nebraska's health care work care workers even more of a Poforce is aging and that signifi- tential problem. cant percentages of doctors and pharmacists are likely to retire ' in the next decade. The report says that more than one-third of physicians in Nebraska are more than 50 : !"!ears old and are likely to retire * - in the next 10 to 15 years. More than 20 percent of acI tiyely practicing pharmacists r in the state are more than 55 ,g years old and likely to retire ' in the next 10 years, according to the report by the Center for Rural Health Research at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. The next phases of the study, which will be completed in the next 12 months, will address whether there will be enough , new workers to fill the gaps caused by retirements, said Keith Mueller, director of the research center. The aging of health care workers is occurring at the same time that the baby boom generation is aging and increasing demand for health care workers, Mueller said. l An official with another or,:ganization, the Center for Rural I

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RECORD WEDNESDAY WEEKLY CHADRON, NE

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0812712008

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dnesday, August 27,2008- Page 1 1

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Nebraska's first renewable energy fair set for Sept. 18 ;

By Center for Rural Affairs On September 18 the Center for Rural Affairs will host the first Renewable Energy Fair ever in the state of Nebraska. The Renewable Energy Fair will be held in Hartington at the

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Cedar County Fairgrounds. The event will run from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Participants can learn about small and utility-scale wind turbines, see bio-diesel being made on the grounds, hear speakers -

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discuss hybrid and electric cars, about new renewable energy learn about USDA programs on systems or exciting new techenergy efficiency and renewable nology. Often the best way to energy systems, and gain the reduce energy costs is conservaconcepts of home-built solar tion. The best energy savings are heaters and energy conservation gathered through the kilowatts programs and practices. and gallons not used. The Iowa "Many people feel like vic- Energy Center will be at the fair tims in today's high-costenergy to show how saving energy can world. The goal of this fair is to be rewarding and fun at the provide examples of things folks same time." can do today to reduce energy Other topics that will be precosts and give them some hint of sented at the Renewable Energy better things to come in the Fair include: climate change disfuture," said Martin Kleinschmit cussion, carbon credit program, of the Center for Rural Affairs. cutting crop inputs and livestock "This is not intended to be an in- feed costs, school wind projects, depth discussion of any renew- energy safety, and much more. able energy concept, but rather, "We have the desire to do a quick exposure to ideas and practices out there. The fair will feature one-hour presentations with an opportunity for one-onone discussions throughout the day." Kleinschmit continued "Energy drives the economy at the local, state and national level. Who owns the energy can I influence the success of the region. The more we control our I energy system the more we con- I trol our future. Gaining control I of our energy bill is not only

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something about energy costs. Sometimes we just need to see ideas and talk to others before we put these measures into place. The fair is designed to provide that opportunity," said Kleinschmit. "It is fitting to hold the Renewable Energy Fair in Hartington. It gives us the opportunity to re-visit the projects featured in the Small Farm Energy Project, hosted by the Center for Rural Affairs in 1978. To view a summary of that project, visit www.cfia.org." According to Kleinschmit the farmers involved in the Small Energy Project saved up to 17%

on their energy bills. And most savings could be credited to practices added or behavior changes rather than devices they made or purchased, demonstrating that knowledge is as important to technology when it comes to energy savings. The Renewable Energy Fair will provide opportunities to visit with farmers involved in the Small Farm Energy Project. For more information, contact Martin Kleinschmit at 402-2546893 or martink@cfra.org. Check the Center's website for more details as well, www.cfra.org.

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j- Renewing A Commitment To Renewable Energy: Nebraska Keeps At It

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CENTER FOR RURAL AFFAIRS FORI'HE SUN-TELEGRAPH HARTINGTON - More than

500 attendees are expected to icipate in Nebraska's firstRenewable Energy Fair next - another symbol of growing omentum for alternative energy ross the Cornhusker State. he event, which is hosted by independent Center for Rural irs in Nebraska, will be held 9 . to noon Sept.18 a t the Cedar unty Fairgrounds in Hartington. "Along with learning about ways conserve energy and save money, e renewable energy fair will be a great opportunity for people to learn how rural communities can

build on unique assets such as wind power and biofuels to create jobs and economic opportunities that help build a better future for everyone in our communities," said Chuck Hassebrook, the Center for Rural Affairs executive director. Hassebrook will kick off the renewable energy fair with a welcome and comments about renewable energy and rural community development. The Center for Rural Affairs was formed by rural Nebraskans and works to strengthen small businesses, family farms and ranches, and rural communities. According to Hassebrook, renewPlease See Page 68

iilllVE W M L b klUbKbY From Page 1B able energy is a way to bring in good paying, knowledge based jobs that will help attract a new generation of families to our rural communities. The fair will show community developers how wind power, biofuels, energy efficiency and other related industries can play a crucial role development efforts. Cedar County Commissioner Marle Kraemer expressed his support for the fair by saying, "This is true economic development." Hartington Mayor Bill Yates said, "We are excited about hosting the Renewable Energy Fair in our community. I think the ideas and programs discussed will make a real difference in how we look a t renewable energy systems in the future." Participants will be able to witness a screw press making biodiesel from soybeans and other oil seeds, see small wind turbines a t work, photo voltaic units making electricity from the sunshine, home made solar collectors, and many other' methods and devices to producer energy, conserve energy and save as well as make money. Session topics include small and utility-scale wind turbines, hybrid and electric cars, homebuilt solar heaters, energy conservation programs and practices, climate change, carbon credit programs, reducing crop inputs and livestock feed costs, school wind projects and energy safety.

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ENERGIZED SEPTEMBER IS time for Nebraska's Renewable Energy Fair and for Renewable Fuels Month. Gov. Heineman, center, proclaimed the month this week at Husker Harvest Days. With him are Gregg Fujan, left, of the state Soybean Board and Jon Holzfaster of the state Corn Board. See story, Page 6B. FORTHE SUN-TELEGRAPH


NEWS-BLADE WEDNESDAY LVEEKL p BRIDGEPORT, NE

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Successful Event Making a Comeback

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By Elisha Greeley Smith Center,for Rural Affairs MarketPlace: Opening Doors to Success, the Center f?<Rural Affairs' rural entre. preneurship event, will return for 2009, thanks to hugely successful conferences and tremendous participation in 2007 and 2008. This year MarketPlace will be held at the Sandhills Convention Center in North Plane, Nebraska, on February 25,2009. Perhaps you already have a small business or have a great idea for a business, but just don't know where to start. You'll find the answer plus /j much more at Marketplace. '4 Whether you are an entrepreneur, rancher, farmer, community developer, student or teacher, Marketplace will have something for everyone. !. Paeidp~ntswill be able,-to. I(<eruse over 50 di::pl;lys in the ,+ !:Exhibit Hall, learrl ti.om other \' !ismall businesses and service !4providers, and network with iione another. ; ;1, .". Tracks are being shaped for ;entrepreneurs with ideas for ',_start-upbusinesses, established inesses, agricultural busises, youth businesses, and a cia1 track for Hispanic enreneurs with sessions coned in Spanish. There will be sessions covering techology topics, ideas for entrepreneurial comn~unities, and practical rural policy perspecjtives. .-- - ..

Maybe you have an idea for a session. Presenting at Marketplace is a great way t~ share your knowledge with colleagues and gain exposure. The 2009 conference will be an excellent opportunity for 7 people to learn how entrepreneurship and innovation can help our rural communities thrive by focusing on proven rural strategies to build assets and create economic opportunities from within. For more information contact: Joy Mar~ , call shall, ~ m @ c f h I o or (402) 614-5558. Or visit: ~w,cfi.a.or&a~_k.e_tplaceko me as Marketplace 2009 takes shap

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NEMAHA CO. HEK.4LD FRIDAY WEEKLY AUBURN, NE Circulabon = 2628

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0812812008

Nebraska's First Renewable Energy : Fair Will Be Sept. 18 at Hartington i

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O n September 18, the Center for Rural Affairs will host the first Renewable Energy Fair ever in the state of Nebraska. The Renewable Energy Fair will be held in Hartington at the Cedar County Fairgrounds from 9:00 Participants can learn about small and utility-scale wind turbines, see bio-diesel being made on the grounds, .hear speakers discuss hybrid and electric cars, learn about U S D A programs on energy efficiency and renewable energy systems, and gain the concepts of home-built solar heaters and energy conservation programs and "Many people feel like victims in today's high-costenergy world. The goal of this fair is to provide examples of things folks can d o today to reduce energy costs and give them some hint of better things to come in the future." said Martin Kleinschmit of the Center for Rural Affairs. "This is not intended to be an in-depth discussion of any renewable energy concept, but rather, a quick exposure to ideas and practices out there. The fair will feature oneour presentations with an opportunity for one-on-one iscussions throughout the day." Kleinschmit continued, "Energy drives the economy at e local, state and national level. W h o owns the energy an influence the success of the region. The more we trol our energy system the more we control our future. ning control of our energy bill is not only about new newable energy systems or exciting new technology. en the best way to reduce energy costs is conservation. e best energy savings are gathered thrnnoh the kilnwatts

and gallons not used. The Iowa Energy Center will hc at the fair to show how saving energy can be rcw;lrtling ;inti fun at the sarne time." Other topics that will be presented at the Rencwablc Ellergy Fair include: climate change discussion,carbon credit program, cutting crop inputs anti livestock f'cctl costs, school wind projects, energy safety, and much nlore. "We have the desire to do sonielhing about ellcrgy costs. Someti~neswe just need to see ideas a11d !alk 10 others before we ,jut these nwxsures illto p1;tc.e. The fair is designed to provide that opportunity," said Klt*insch~nit. "It is fitting to hold the Kenewahlc Bnrrgy Fair in H a . tington. It gives us the o1,portuniiy to re-visit tltc pro.jcct:; featured in the Small Far111 Energy 1'rc;jcct. hostcr! by tllc Center for Rural Affairs in 1978. '10 view a s~inl1n;lryo!' that project, visit www.cfra.org ." According to Kleinschmit the I;uniers involvctl in tI-'e Small Energy Project saved up to l7'%, 011 tlicir crirrgy bills. And most savings could be cretlited to practices added or behavior changes rather than cleviccs tI-ley matlc or purchased, demonstrating that knowletlgc is irs i n portant to technology whet1 it comes to cncrgy savinys. The Renewable Energy Fair will provide oppol-i~rnitics to visit with farmers involved in the S111;rllFarm t<~lc~-!;y Project. For more information, contact Martin Kleinxc.h~nltat 401-254-6893 o r martink@cfra.org. Chcck the Centcs's 1 website for more dctails as well, www.cfia.org.

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BANNER-PRESS THURSDAY WEEKLY DAVID CITY, NE Circulation = 3139

08/28/2008

State's first renewable energy fair HARTINGTON - On Sept. 18,the Center for Rural Affairs will host the first Renewable Energy Fair ever in the state of Nebraska. The Renewable Energy Fair will be held in Hartington at the Cedar County Fairgrounds. The event will run from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Participants can learn about small and utility-scale wind turbines, see bio-diesel being made on the grounds, hear speakers discuss hybrid and electric cars, learn about USDA programs on energy efficiency and renewable energy systems, and gain the concepts of home-built solar heaters and energy conservation programs and practices. "Many people feel like victims in today's high-cost energy world. The goal of this fair is to provide examples of things folks can do today to reduce energy costs and give them some hint of better things to come in the future," said Martin Kleinschmit of the Center for Rural Affairs. "This is not intended to be an in-depth discussion of any renewable energy concept, but rather, a quick exposure to ideas and practices out there. The fair will feature one-hour presentations with an opportunitv for one-on-one discussioLs throughout the day.". . e-

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"Energy drives the econo- project, visit www.cfra.org," my a t the local, state and Kleinschmit said. According to Kleinschmit, national level. Who owns the energy can influence the the farmers involved in the success of the region. The Small Energy Project saved more we control our energy up to 17 percent on their system the more we control energy bills. And most savour future. Gaining control ings could be credited to of our energy bill is not only practices added or behavior about new renewable energy changes rather than devices systems or exciting new they made or purchased, . technology. Often the best demonstrating that knowl- I way to reduce energy costs is edge is as important to tech- ! conservation. The best ener- nology when it comes to savings. The gy savings are gathered energy through the kilowatts and Renewable Energy Fair will gallons not used. The Iowa provide opportunities to visit Energy Center will be at the with farmers involved in the fair to show how saving Small Farm Energy Project. energy can be rewarding For more information, and fun a t the same time." contact Kleinschmit at 402254-6893 or Kleinschmit said. Other topics include: : cli- martink@cfra.org. Check the mate change discussion, car- Center's Web site for more bon credit program, cutting details as well, www.cfra.org. The Center for Rural crop inputs and livestock feed costs, school wind proj- Affairs was established in ects, energy safety and much 1973 as an unaffiliated nonprofit corporation under IRS more. "It is fitting to hold the code 501(c)3. Renewable Energy Fair in Hartington. It gives us the opportunity to re-visit the projects featured in the Small Farm Energy Project, hosted by the Center for Rural Affairs in 1978. To view a summary of that

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Rural political forum set for Tuesday -

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The Iowa Farmers Union .>. w ~ l hold l a rural political !"*' forurn and a discussion of agricultural policy Tuesday in Moville. Bolh events will be held at the Moville Comnlunity Ccnter. The agricultural policy discussion will take place at 0 p.m., followed by the rural political lorum at 7 p.m. John Crabtree of the Center for Rural Affairs will moderate the event, and questions can be asked by those in attendance. Those who have confir~iled to attend the event include 5th District congrcs" Iowa . sional candidate Rob Hubler,

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CED-4R CO. NEWS WEDNESDAY WEEKLY HARTINGTON, NE Circulation = 209 1

08/27/2008

"artinaton to host Nebraska3 first renewable enerav fair

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HARTINGTON - The Center for Rural Affairs will host the first Renewable Energy Fair ever a 18 in Hartington in the state of ~ 2 b r a s k Sept. at the Cedar County Fairgrounds. The event will .r u n from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. : Participants can learn about small and util1:: ity-scale wind turbines, see bio-diesel being made on the grounds, hear speakers discuss hybrid a n d electric cars, learn about USDA programs on energy efficiency and renewable energysystems, and gain the concepts ofhomebuilt solar heaters and energy conservation programs a n d practices. fiz r:c. "Many people feel like victims in today's high-cost energy world. The goal of this fair is to provide examples ofthings folks can do today to i14- . reduce energycosts and give them some hint of better things to come in the future,"said Martin Kleinschmit, Center for Rural Affairs. "This is - not intended to be a n in-depth discussion of any renewable energy concept, but rather, a quick exposure to ideas and practices out there. The fair will feature one-hour presentations I

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with an opportunity for one-on-onediscussions throughout the day. " "Energy drives the economy a t the local, state and national level," said Kleinschmit. "Who owns the energy can influence the success of the region. The more we control our energy system the more we control our future. Gaining control of our energy bill is not only about newrenewable energy systems or exciting new technology. Often the best way to reduce energy costs is conservation. The best energy savings are gathered through the kilowatts and gallons not used. The Iowa Energy Center will be at the fair to show how saving energy can be rewarding and fun at the same time." Other topics to bc presented at the Renewable Energy Fair include, climate change discussion, carbon credit program, cutting crop inputs and livestock feed costs, school wind projects, energy safety, and much more. "We have the desire to do something about energy costs. Sometimes we just need to see

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idras and talk to others before we put these measures into plate. The fair is designed to , provide that opportunity," said Kleinschmit. ! "It is fitting to hold the Renewable Energy , Fair in ~ a r t i n g t o nIt . gives u s the opportuni?y to re-visit the projpcts featured in the Small Farm Energy Project, hosted by the Center for Rural Affairs in 1978. To view a summary of , that project, visitwww.cfra.org." According to Kleinschmit t h e farmers involved in the Small Energy Project saved u p to 17 percent on their energy bills. And most savings could be credited to practices added or ' behavior changes rather than devices they niadt or purchased, demonstrating that k~iowledgr is a s important to technology when it cornrs to energy savings. The Renewable Energy Fair will provide opportunities to visit with farmers involved in the Small Fa]-ln Encrgy Project. For more information, contact Martin Klein- , : schmit at 402-254-6893 or martinkifi'cfra.org. Check the Center's wehsite for more details as ' well, www.cfra.org. ... _ B

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I Guest Opinion

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Rural broadband access key component in community success -

[)1'c)pe1usforward. Additionally. tioin conducting political campaigns, to issue Only 38 percent of rirral advocacy, to holding our legislaAmericans have access to a high- tors accountable, the internet is speed intcrnct conrlcction. A revolutionizing politics and gobvibr-an1 future for nrntl A~nerica ernirlg itself: 11' rural Americans will require public policy that are not able to participate at the rectifies this situation. same rate as urban Americans. High-speed internet is revplu-- we will suffer worse policy and tionizing the way we do busi- less government accountability ness, and with this can come to issues that matter t c ~rural peogreat opportunity for rural Amer- ple and places. ica. However, as long as milliol~s 'The l!.S. rillnlis 16th worldof rural Americans are without wide for the percent of citizens broadband service and others are that have high-speed internet served only marginally. we will access. and we pay more when ,i continue to fall behind in adop- we do have access. In rural areas on of a technology that c o d d buth access and affordability are

By Elisha Greeley Smith Ce~iterfor Rural Affairs

significantly worse. Finally, any broadband network must remain open to all points of view, and private providers should be prohibited from blocking or filtering traffic in any way that curtails our right to free speech. Access to high-speed internet in the 21st century is a public necessity sinlilar to access to electricity in the 20th century. M L I Clike ~ the Rural Electrification Act of 1936, we need a Kural Broadband Act of 2009. Iloing so is crucial to the future of rural America


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receive development funds The U.S. Department of Agriculture has announced the selection of 71 recipients in 37 states and two territories to receive $22.1 million in business development loans and grants. The Center for Rural Affairs of Lyons has been selected to ' receive a $99,000 Rural Business Enterprise Grant to assist in a two-state project (Kansas and Nebraska) that will expand the focus of the center's "Marketplace: Opening Doors to Success" program which encourages the growth of small business and micro-business. Monies will be used to enqompass a broader focus that targets youth entrepreneurship and youth small business development, as well as building the awareness for youths about opportunities entrepreneurship presents. This grant is expected to assist four businesses and to create 10jobs. In Scribner, the Scribner Improvement and Industrial ' Corporation has been selected to receive a $197,200 Rural Business Enterprise Grant to improve the opportunity for businesses to relocate or start up in the Scribner Industrial Park through streets, curbs and gutting. The grant is anticipated to assist two businesses, save four jobs and to create 5 five jobs. ' $

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Date: Location: Circulation (DMA): Type (Frequency): Page: Keyword:

Thursday, September 04,2008 KIMBALL, MN 1,400 (15) Newspaper (W) 2 Center For Rural Affairs

It's not easy being green ... or is it?

I ~ t * ~ p ivliiit i t t ~ k t ~ r t i i i tt l i t s t'rox I ~ o t i ~ r ~ - l ) tsol;~r t i l t I i t * i ~ t t ' ~ i. t\ t l t l ~'II I)c.itig grcrrl c i t r ~ I I ~ tn;1.;\. i*rg\ coristv.v;~tio~i111.0g1.;1111)r ;11111 \ \ ' l ~ t * t l i~ t ~I I l't*t$l I Iikv :I vit-ti111i ~ ipr;~clicc.;. t o t I i \ ~ 'l ~i i g l ~cllcargv cost worlti ' 1 . I t t b fair w i l l r u r ~ fro111!I i1.111.10 or ~ O I I artb lookitig for \tf;iy5 t o go 4 p.111.I'l:tnsc;tIlfor;~varie~tyot'co~igrctsil ;tr1tI collst~r~vt-, yolt C i t l l act- curretit st.ssiot~sto Ilc ])rt!scritctl u;~llyt;lkc control ; ~ t l t llilakc ;Itlif- t l i r o ~ t g l ~ oIuhtr tlay. IIvrt.'s a snapI'cre'11c~'. sllot oTi1 rew rilorcstopics riot 1111-11Ilow? At tend Nchraska's first tioncd ohovc: clinl;ltc c l i i ~ ~ tlis~gc Itcncwahlc Iincrgy I:air, o n Scpt. cussion, carbon credit I)rogratiis, 18, 200tl at t h c Cedar County Fair- cutting crop inputs and livcstock grountlsin Ilartington, Neb. [,earn fccd costs, school w i n t l ~)rojccts, liow to save money a n d tllc envi- clicrgy safety, and too ulany more ronment w i t h conservation, alter- to list. This is truly a unique event nati;e fucls, a n d alter~iativcprac- to t 11c region. Through 1)lannitlg tices. arid ~ r a c t i c cyotr have the powcr Hosted by thc to makc ii difference. Conie lcarn Affairs,thc event w i l l have some- how. For niorc inforn~ation, call t h i n g for cveryonc. Learn about small ant1 i~tility-scalew i n d tilr- M a r t i n Kleinschmit at (402) 254bincs, see hio-diesel beitig made 6893 or <rt~rrrtink@cfrr.or~>. You on the grouticls, hear speakers dis- can clicck thc Ccntvr's \lreb sitc for cuss hybrid and clcctric cars, learn niclre tlctails ;hs well, <~c~cc~~c?cfin. about USDA progralils o n energy o r p efficiency and rcncwablc encrgy lilisha Grecley Snlith systcms, and gain the concepts of Cer~tcrfor Rural ~ l f f i t i r s S;I~S.


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08/20/2008

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Program will benefit small 1 businesses, entrepreneurs

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Py Elisha Gveeley Slr~ith,Cerzter for Rural Affairs The new farm bill includes the Rural Entre- trepreneur and Microenterprise Development preneur and Micrornterprise Development Program recognize the importance of entreProgram, won by Senator Ben Nelson, to help prcneurship as a rural development strategy rural entrepreneurs and small businesses gc.t and provide the opportunity for rural people and rural communities to leverage the spirit, started and stay in busintlss. This il~novativeptoglanl will rcceivc at creativjty, and opportunities entrepreneurleast $15 ~nillioliover the next four years. The ship creates. The Center for Rural Affairs released an program will provide rural entrepreneurs with the skills and technical and financial as- analysis last year that found that fully fundsistance to start and operate rural small busi- ed, the program would create 2,300 to 4,600 jobs in rural areas and over $8 million in new nesses. Entrepreneurship Bnd asset-building are wcalth in its first year. Scnator Nelson deserves to be commended rural dcvelopnrent stratrgies that have thc potential to repopulate rural areas, create for his crucial role in creating this program. genuine opportunity for rural people, arid The Rural Entrepreneur and Microenterprise address the continuing and growing econom- Development Program will help provide ruic disparity between rural and urban areac of ral people the opportunities they deserve. the nation. Initiatives such as the Rural En-

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ILeadership in

Rural America ...;.. eeds Diverse Skill Set -

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world he is looked on as cautious. Michael Scott Karuovich. a certi- This is a positive way of describing fied professional speaker from his leadership skills. l n rural me; Michigan, sums up clearly what it ica and elsewhere, caution often takes to be a leader in rural America. tempers the exuberant enthusiasm of We need diversity of strengths and the scarecrow and helps Dorothy skills and teamwork to be effective with dangers they encounter along decision makers. He uses the charac- the yellow brick road. ters in the Wizard of Oz to demonThe Wizard represents people strate what is needed for an effective who enter our communities and tell us how they are going to make us a Dorothy displays many of the great community. Like the wizard, skills prevalent in rural communi- these resource providers often come ties. It wasn't until a crisis, the tor- up empty in their promises. We need to create and control nado, came to Dorothy that she exhibited her fairness, kindness, and the destiny of our communities. That firm resolve. Her determination doesn't mean we can't search for came from what she was missing - help, but we need to be aware that her home in Kansas. She clearly saw rural development is a long-term er goal and what was needed to get process and must come from the er and the group to reach that goal. inside out. We must look to the reThe scarecrow tries for the brain sources available with firm resolve so desperately seeks, but what he (Dorothy), risk (scarecrow), calculaks makes him even stronger as a tion (tin man) and caution (cowardly ader. If the scarecrow had a brain, lion). I agree with Michael Karpovich's e wouldn't be as creative and carefree. Entrepreneurs associate with view of the Wizard o f 0 z and how it the scarecrow. They don't always shows leadership in the 21st century. listen to what can't be done, and so No longer is leadership a solitary we have many of our greatest inven- position. The Wizard of Oz characterizes the type of team we all need tions and innovations. What the tin man lacks in having to put together. The Center for Rural Affairs is + a heart actually allows him to make " the tough decisions. Karpovich engaged in leadership development points out that every group needs the throughout northeast Nebraska. The tin man. When the tough decisions analogy of the Wizard of Oz will need to be made, you need to be strengthen the conviction rural lead""heartless" but fair. ers need as they search for a better The cowardly lion shows his future for rural America. cowardice at every turn. In our

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