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UNIVERSAL

Information Services, I nc

DAILY NEWS EVENING NORFOLK, NE

DAILY

Circulation = 17282

08/25/2008

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An elite program LYONS -Nebraskans have many reasons to toot their own horns, &y$opm e n f P m g ~ ~ ~the'nation: s .,. -. . - ~ --

_ but now they can also claim to-have one of tKe most ,

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The Center for Rural Affairs' Rural Enterprise ~ssistanceProject (REAP) is the largest full-service microenterprise program in Nebraska and is one of the largest rural entrepreneurial development pro- ..' grams in the nation: In just the last year over 1,226people in Nebraska have received entrepreneurial assistance from REAP, including 379 Latino entrepre- --neurs. Out of those receiving assistance, 74.1 percent were low to moderate income individuals. In the last year 214 business plans have been completed, and 353 new jobs created. These jobs and businesses not only help the business owners, but generate income and new jobs for the entire cummunity. If you are thinking about starting a small business, or if you already operate a small business, REAP services could benefit you. ELISHA GREELEY SMITH '-. Center for Rural Affairs '

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American News Aberdeen,SD Circ. 17787 From Page: 4b 8/24/2008

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www.aberdeennews.com

/ Older N.D. town store 1 sells no baby diapers 1

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ZEELAND,N.D. (AP) The lone grocery store in the south-central North Dakota town of Zeeland has been selling disposable diapers. Just for adults, though. "We stock Depends, but we don't have any for babies," said Kyle Anderson, a store clerk in the McIntosh County town of about 140 people south of Bismarck. The Census Bureau said McIntosh County had the oldest population in North Dakota in 2000. Not much need for baby diapers. "They'll have to get some, now," said Rebecca Meidinger, who gave birth to her fist child, a boy, in Bismarck on Aug. 11. Meidinger's parents, Duane and Karen Tillotson, along with siblings and aunts, uncles, cousins and mostly their children dairy farmers - moved to McIntosh County from upstate New York, boosting the county population by about two dozen since 2000. S i x children have been born since that time, "and one's on the way," Meidinger said. doing our said Meidinger, a math teacher married to Neil Meidinger, who grew up in McIntosh County. Older W g their lure y o W

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ple. Some rural communities in North Dakota and other states have offered such perks as free land to try to attract young families. "There are a number of things that are being done to plug that leak," said Kim Preston, a spokeswoman for the rural advocacy group Center for Rural Affairs, based in Lyons, Neb. "There are young people who want to live in rural communities but are juqt looking for that right motivator or job. We too oftep get caught up in retention, while ignoring attraction." Surveys of rural counties in Plains states show d i s proportionate populations of people older than 50 and younger than 18, said K i q Preston, a spokeswoman for the rural advocacy group Center for Rural Affairs, based in Lyons, Neb. Many say a lack of job opportunities chases young people away, but Preston said wanderlust also is a factor. Census figures show only 99 of the Mchtosh County's 2,752 residents are under the age of 5. The Meidingers' son, Jacob, makes it an even 100. The county, with k median age of 54-13 is no* the second*1dest the state! behind Sheridan County, at 54.5, census figures show. Only H a w a s Kalaw& Counhr, with a me&an a@

of 57.1, has an older popula: tion than Sheridan and McIntosh counties, said Richard Rathge, the state Data Center director and N o r t h D a k o t a demographer. The Tillotsons fousd North Dakota on their o y . They drove through the state on vacation in the latk 1990s. Duane said he w q impressed with the Ian! and the elbow room. Census figures she; North Dakota's median age rose in 2007 to 37 years, up from 36.2 years in 2000. Nationwide, the median age 36.6, up from is 35.3 ip 2000, Rathge said. "An interesting contradiction is that in 2000, we ranked 15th oldest in the nation but we now are at 30th," Rathge said. North Dakota's small population makes its ranking volatile, he said. Of North Dakota's 639,715 residents, 17,450 are age 85 and older; Rathge said. North Dakota is tied with Florida as haw ing the country's highest proportion of residents in that age group, at 2.7 pefcent, he said. . 1 "Obviously, we're gettin'g 1 older, or let's say mork mature," Rathge said. 3 19 of our counties, t h ~ median age is growing at a pace of half year in age a year." . I

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UNIVERSAL

Information Services, Inc

BANNER-PRESS THLRSDAY WEEKLY DAVID CITY, NE Circulation = 3133

08/07/2008

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From the Ceriter

i Program will benefit entrepreneurs and small businesses The new farm bill includes the 11 Microenterprise Rural Entrepreneur and Development Program, won by Senator Ben Nelson, to help rural entrepreneurs and small businesses get started and stay in business. This innovative program will receive at least $15 million over the next four years. The program will provide rural entrepreneurs with the skills and technical and

BY Elirha ~ r e e ~ Smith, ey center for Rural ~ f f a i r s

financial assistance to start and operate rural small businesses. Entrepreneurship and assetbuilding are rural development strategies that have the potential to repopulate rural areas, create genuine opportunity for rural people, and address the continuing and growing economic disparity between rural and urban areas of the nation. Initiatives such as the Rural Entrepreneur and Microenterprise Development Program recognize the importance of entrepreneurship as a rural development strategy and provide the opportunity for rural people and .- rural -.

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communities to leverage the spirit, creativity, and opportunities . entrepreneurship creates. The Center for Rural Affairs --% released an analysis last year-1-3 that found that fully funded, the program would create 2,300 t@:~Ej 4,600 jobs in rural areas and I over $8 million in new wealth in -its first year. --.--A --2 Senator Nelson deserves to be-?3 commended for his crucial role in----' creating this program. The Rural 1: Entrepreneur Microenterprise Development: 3. Program will help provide rurak? people the opportunities they-Z deserve. -

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UNIVERSAL

Information Services, Inc

MIRROR-SUN

THURSDAY LYONS, NE

WEEKLY

Circulation = 735

08/07/2008

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Rural Affairs:

Value Added is the Name of the Game The State of Nebraska is accepting applications for Value Added Agriculture -grants. he grants support projects that contribute togreater. collaborationbetween farm-' erslranchers, start-up and expansion of value-added agricultural enterprises,joint marketing of high value products, such as natural livestock, andgrowthof rural cornmunitics. All applications must be -received b-qr^n-60fi, Fiid$-& October 3, 2008. These grants are popular and competitive, with demand far outstripping available funding. Therefore, those interested should not wait to apply. Eligibleapplicantsinclude farming and ranching operations;communities,counties, agencies, and educational institutions; economic development providers and development districts; nonprofits

and resource conservation forequipmentorbuildings,and organizations; andagricultural then the match is 50%. cooperatives, associations, or The maximum award- f ed amount ~ e ~r r o i e c tis ' .. . $75,000. Increasing the value of a raw agricultural product between harvest and sale typically includes processing in $ some way such as cleaning, $ cutting, labeling, smoking, 7 drying, freezing, extracting, 2 or preserving. Marketing unique and high 3 .-- .--.-- - .. . adds valu%~~faif&-and-ranc~ quality food products ?!s$ a

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Media and Outreach

products. Many consumers are willing to pay a premium for lo- -. cally produced, high-quality, ' natural or organic products. For more information on these grants and how to apply contact Mike Heavrin, b mikeh@cfra.org , at the Cen- ; ter for Rural Affairs, 402687-2103 ext 1008, or visit: -. www.neded.org/fileslrdc/ grantsl2008/VAA%200ctob:'~ er%202008%20App.pdf ,~

marketing entities. Unlike the Federal Value Added Producer Grant Program, the state program will allow money to be used for equipment and buildings. Again, projects must be collaborativeand benefit more than one person. Applicants should match 25% of funds requested except

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UN!Vâ&#x201A;ŹmAL

I.nformation Services. Inc

TIMES THURSDAY WEEKLY hIILFORD, NE Circulation = 1173

08/06/2008 .-

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Value added is name of the game By Elisha Greeley Srnith,elishas@cfra.org,Center for Rural Affairs

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The State of Nebraska is accepting applications for Value Added Agriculture grants. The grants support projects that contribute to greater collaboration between farmers/ ranchers, start-up and expansion of value-added agricultural enterprises, joint marketing of high value products, such as ahual livestock,and g r o w t f l ~ frural communities. All applications must be received by noon, Oct. 3. These grants are popular and competitive, with demand far outstripping available funding.Therefore, those interested should not wait to apply. Eligible applicants include farming and ranching operations; communities, counties,

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Increasingthe value of a raw agencies, and educational institutions; economic devel- agricultural product between opment providers and devel- harvest and sale typically opment districts; nonprofits includes processing in some and resource conservation or- way such as cleaning, cutting, ganizations; and agricultural labeling, smoking, drying, cooperatives, associations, or freezing, extracting, or preserving. marketing entities. Marketing unique and high ,Unlike the Federal Value Added Producer Grant Pro- quality food products also gram, the state program will, adds value- to- farm -. - and - ran@ allow moneyto be Ged for-- products. Many consumers are willing equipment and buildings. Again, projects must be col- to pay a premium for locally laborative and benefit more produced, high-quality, natural or organic products. than one person. For more information on Applicants should match 25 percent of funds requested these grants and how to apexcept fore uipment orbuild- ply contact Mike Heavrin, ings, and t en the match is mikeh@dra.org,at the Center 50 percent. The maximum for Rural Affairs, 402-687-2103 * awarded amount per project ext 1008, or visit: http:/ / www. cfra.org/policy / state. f is $75,000. 3

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