Page 1

COOKCOUNTY

Date: Location: Circulation (DMA): Type (Frequency): Page: Keyword:

NEWSHHERALD

Friday, July 25,2008 GRAND MARAIS. MN 5,500 (137) Newspaper (W) A4 Center For Rural Affairs

1 Benefits born Vibrant Rural Areas Opinion & Letters to the Editor

Elisha Greeley Smith

We don't need to read the results from the new U.S. Census analysis to realize that many rural populations are on the decline. We can simply glance down most of our main streets and see closed businesses and dwindling inhabitants. The loss of our rural communities is not inevitable, not the result of some unseen, unstoppable force of nature. We can do better. Much is lost when a town ceases to exist; history, heritage, stewards of our natural resources, and people who produce safe food for our nation are lost. If the people that care about rural places are no longer there to take

care of the natural resources and food producing land-who will? Perhaps it will be giant corporations and outside investors who are more concerned with profits than the health of the land and the safety of the food produced on it. The vitality of America's rural areas should be a concern for everyone, not just those that reside in rural communities. All Americansrural and urban alike-benefit from vibrant rural communities and thriving family farms and ranches. Not all is doom and gloom. Some rural communities refuse to give up when the going gets tough. They work

harder, invest in their inâ‚Źrastructure, devote time and resources towards youth and entrepreneurs, and develop the assets and amenities the region provides. We all benefit when rural communities use forward thinking. For more on insuring the health and vitality of food and natural resources: www.cfra0rg. The Center for Rural Affairs was established in 1973as an unaffiliated nonprofit corporation, concerned about family farms and rival communities, and we work to strengthen small businesses, family f m and ranches, and rural communities. Contact Elisha Snuth at elishas@cfxaorg.


Dysart Reporter Dysart,lA

Circ. 703

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From Page: 5 1 7/24\2008 --

Buying local makes sense -

Center for Rural Affairs

By Mkhnel L. Hotton Center for Rural Affairs Today's economy is challenging the ability of rural communities to adapt and, in some cases, thrive. Along with skyrocketing gas and oil prices, retail prices have also been rising. These price increases are linked to the higher shipping costs involved in g e t t ~ n gproducts on the shelves. . We are accustomed to

paying less for items brought from great distances than what we would pay for goods produced or manufactured locally. This is no longer the case. Large retailers and online web distributors can no longer absorb the transportation costs and are passing those on to the consumer. Residents of rural communities usually have the luxury of going out of town to buy products more cheaply than can be pro-

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duced locally. But with the higher cost of driving to a giant retailer and the tncreased price of goods ta offset shipping costs, local retailers hn small communities may be able to compete. Buying locally produced food is a great way to begin to reverse the practice of traveling many milts to get items we could grow locally. Rices may still increase to reflect economic changes, but it will mean putting money in the,pockets of people close to us rather than far away. This is a more sustainable approach for our small towns. Fanners' market season is upon us, and we sbould take advantage of that. We can start by thanking those who produce the products and spread our money to our neighbors rather than to far-flung producers. For more information: www.cfra.org

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UNIVERSAL

lnformat~onServices, Inc

MONITOR THURSDAY WEEKLY BLOOMFIELD, NE Circulation = 1405

0711712008

lroa~ingLife Expectan- j ies for RuralWomen 1 on Bailey. jonb@cfra.org. Cen-

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advances in medical technology ve for women, we assume life xpectancies will be longer than past merations. But according to a Harvard ool of Public Health study - The ersal of Fortu~nes:Trends in County t ty an& c;dss-d6uity h40rtalityY' ties in the United States, in 1,000 mostly rural counties, life

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'expectancies for women are now lower -than or essentially the same as in the eaily 1980s. That means that life expcctancies for women in nearly one- i third of Amcrican counties did not : increase for the first time since 1918. The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report Growing Disparities in ife Expectancy, finds those with lower comes and less education experiencg declining or stagnant life expectan- p Most of the rural counties experincing decreases in life expectancy m 1983 to 1999 are concentrated in South, the Southern Plains, and alachia. But counties a.impro.vin life expectancy during the same e period are scattered throughout the n, including large portions of the west and Great Plains. By compari, less than two dozen rural counties mprove female life expectan1961 to 1983. studies point to a lack of aco health care services, the in! e in the uninsured and increasing me gaps as root causes that may this a long-term issue for many i s of the American population. se are major public policy chalfacing rural people and rural x e s , and must be addressed by poly makers at all levels. more information: 7-


UNIVERSAL

Information Services. Inc

NEWS WEDNESDAY UTEEKLY WEST POINT, NE Circulation = 2990

0711 612008 1

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students in grades K-6 and $2.05

This year marks the 35th year for the Center for Kural Affairs b;l.;etl in Lyons. NE'I' Radio will mark the occasion with ;I f'calure story abont the C'eater that will air Thurs~lay,J u l j 24, at 6:30 and 8:30 a.m. tillring "Morning EcIition .'. 'Thc Center Cor Rural Affairs is a private nonprofit speciali7,ing i n strengthening srnall businesses, rural commu nit it.^. ant! fzunily farms and r;itrches. Kepol-tcr Mihe Marek visits the C'enter's iiiuin office in the northeast corner of the state, and talks with current director Chuck k4;issebrook. Hassebrook has worhed ac the center since it opened in 1973 in Walthill, and has been the .director fot.,<llepast 10 years. Hassebrook talks about the C'cl~te~ 's mission, and how that mission h;~schanged over the ~ C : I I - s ;IS i!gi.i~t~itl~t.e has changcd. Marek also visits with sm;lli business owners in rural Nebraska who have been helpetl hy clie Center. An arirlici link to the story will hc on N tr'r Radio's Web site ( ~ictNch~.a~~ka.org/radio and click on Nebraska News) the day of the bmadcast. All that is needcd to listen to the report is access to the Internet and a free Windows Media Player program.


UNIVERSAL

Information Senlices, Inc

NEWS-TIMES MORNING YORK, NE ,

DAILY

Circulation = 4196

0711 612008

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Guest Opinion

ropping life expectancies for rural women By Elisha Greeley Smith Center for Rural Affa~rs

As advances in medical tcchnology improve for women. we assume life expectanciec will be longer than past geaerations. But accordir~gto a Harvard School 01' Public 1-Iealth study - The Reversal of Fortunes: Trends in County Mortality and Cross-County Mortality Disparitics in the United States, in nearly 1,000 mostly rural counties. life expectancies for women are now lower than or essentially the same as in the early 1C)ROs. That means that life gxprctancies for wornen in nearly one-third of American coun- ties did not increase for the first

time since 1918. The Congressional Budget Of't'ice (CHO) report Growing Disparities in 1 ife Expectancy, finds those with lowel. incomes and less education experiencing declining or stagnant life expectitncies. Most of the rural counties experiencing decreases in life expectancy from 1983 to 1999 are concentrated in the South, the Southern Plains. and Appalachia. But counties not impro~ingin life expectancy during the same time oeriod are scattered thronghout the nation, including large portions of the Midwest and Great Plains. By compari-

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son, less than two dozen rural counties did not improve female life expectancies from 1961 to 1983. Both studies point to a lack of access to health care services. the increase in the uninsured and increasing income gaps as root causes that may make this alongterm issue for many portions of the American population. These are major public policy challenges facing rural people and rural places, and must be addressed by policy makers at all levels. For tilore inforniatiori: 8 ~~w~~.cfia.org

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UNIVERSAL

lnformat~onS e ~ ~ c eInc s.

REPUBLICAN THURSDAY WEEKLY Ih@ERIAL, NE Circulation = 2080

0711712008

Life expectancies dropping for rural women JON BAILEY ENER FOR RURAL AFFAIRS

throughout the nation, including large portions of the Midwest and Great Plains. By comparison, less than two dozen rural counties did not improve femde life expectancies from 1961to PB3. Both studies point to a lack of accessto health care services,the increase in the uninsured and hcreasing income gaps as root causes that may make this a long-term i s ~ u eh for many portions of the American 1 population. I These are major public policy challenges facing rural people and rural places, and must be addressed by policy makers at all levels. For more information: W W W . Ci~ ~ ~ .

As advances in medical technology improve for women, we assume life expectancies will be longer than past generations. But according to a Hanard School of Public Health study - The Reversal of Fortunes: Trends in County Mortality and Cross-CountyMortality Disparities in the United States, in nearly 1,000 mostly rural counties, life expectancies for women are now lower than or essentially the same as in the : early 1980s. That means that life expectancies for women in nearly ,! one-third of American counties did ,4 not increase for the first time since !JE ' ^ 1918. The Congressional Budget Office ' (CBO) report Growing Disparities in Life Expectancy,finds those with lower incomes and less education experiencing declining or stagnant life expectancies. Most of the rural counties experiencing decreases in life expectancy from 1983 to 1999 are concentrated :d in the South, the Southern Plains, 1' and Appalachia. But counties not :<Iimproving in life expectancy during the same time period are scattered

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REPUBLICAN THURSDAY WEEKLY IMPEFUAL, NE Circulation = 2080

0711 712008 -

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,-Meexpectancies dropping for rural women JON BAILEY RURAL AFFAIRS

EMER FOR

As advances in medical technology improve for women, we assume life expectancies will be longer than past generations. But according to a Hanard School of Public Health study - The Reversal of Fortunes: Trends in County Mortality and Cross-CountyMortality Disparities in the United States, in nearly 1,000 mostly rural counties, life expectancies for women are now lower than or essentially the same as in the A early 1980s. That means that life , expectancies for women in nearly \j one-third of American counties did :t not increase for the first time since 1918. The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report Growing Disparities in Life Expectancy,finds those with lower incomes and less education experiencing declining or stagnant life expectancies. Most of the rural countiesexperiencing decreases in life expectancy from 1983 to 1999 are concentrated in the South, the Southern Plains, and Appalachia. But counties not ' ;j improving in life expectancy during iQ, the same time period are scattered C

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throughout the nation, including large portions of the Midwest and Great Plains. By comparison, less than two dozen rural counties did not improve femalelife expectancies from 1961to 1983. Both studies point to a lack of access to health care services,the increase in the uninsured and increasing income gaps as root causes that may make this a long-term issue , for many portions of the American I

These are major public policy challenges facing rural people and m a l places, and must be addressed by policy makers at all levels. For more information: w.~fra. =

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UNIVERSAL

Information Services, Inc

TIMES THURSDAY WEEKLY PENDER, NE Circulahon = 1338

I

0711712008

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Center for Rural Affairs will be featured on NET Radio The Center for Rural Affairs based in Lyons has been around for 35 years, and NET Radio will mark the occasion with a feature story about the Center that will air next Thursday, July 24, a t 6:30 a.m. and 8:30 a.m. during "Morning Edition." The Center for Rural Affairs is a private nonprofit group specializing in strengthening small businesses, rural colnmunities and family farms and ranc11t:s. Reporter Mike Marck visits the center's main office in the northeast corner of the state, and talks with current director Chuck Hassebrook. Hassebrook has worked at the center since it opened in 1973 in Walthill and has bcen the director for the past 10 years. Hassebrook talks about the center's mission, and how that mission h a s changed over the years a s agriculture has changed. Marek also visits with small business owners in rural Nebraska who have bccn helped by the Center. An audio link to thc story will be on NET Radio's website at n e t..N.-e b r q s ~ . o r g l ~ ~ the i i o _day of the broadcast. All that is needed to listen to the report is access to the lrlterrlet and a free Windows Media Player program. NET Radio is a service of NET.


UNIVERSAL

Information Sewices, I n c (402) 342-3178

GAZETTE THURSDAY WEEKLY NELSON, NE Circulation = 597

0711 712008 ~

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Buying Local Makes

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Sense BY Michael L. ~ o ~ t o i .

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Center for R u r a l Affairs Today's economyls challengins the ability o f rural communities to adapt and. in some 1 cases. thrive. Along with skyrocketing gasand o i l prices. @ retail prices have also been rising. These price i.; increases are linked to the higher shipping costs r: involved i n getting products on the shel\ts. We are accustomed to paying less for items brought from great distances than whal we would pay for goods produced or manufactured locally. This is n o longer the case. I,argc retailers and oriline ~ e .distrjbutors b can n o longer absorb the transportation costs and arc passins those on to the consumer. Residents o f rural communities u s u a l l hil\c the luxury o f going out o f t o n n to hu\ produc~s ,,more cheaply than can be produced locall!. l3u1 ; i,. , - .. . ; ; with the highcr cost ut'driving to a giant retailer and the increased price of goods to o l l i e t bshipping costs. local rct;iilers in snii~ll communities may be ahle to compcte. t Buying locally produced food is a prca! \+a! ,?,to begin t o reverse the practicc i ~ trn\eling f ;:many miles to get items \$c could grot\ locall!. 1~9Pricesmay still increase to reflect economic changes. but i t \\ill mean putting mane!. in the ; pockets o f people close to us rather than h r j airay. 'l'his is a more sustainable approach for ' fiour small towns. Farmers' tnarkct season is upon us. and t i c j$should take advantage o f that. We can s1a1.t h! thanking those \\ho produce the products and ;I spread our money to our neighbors rather than

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For more in lbrniation: u \v\\ .cfra.org

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UNIVERSAL

l nformation Services, I nc

STAR-MAIL THURSDAY WEEKLY htADISON, NE

I

Circulation = 1111

0711 712008

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COLUMN uying loca-Imakes sense BY MICHAEL L. HOLTON Center for Rural Affairs Today's economy is challenging the ability of rural communities to adapt and, in some cases, thrive. Along with skyrocketing gas and oil prices. retail prices have also been rising. These price increases are linked to the higher shipping costs involved in getting products on the shelves. We are accustolned to paying less for items brought from great distances than what we would pay for goods produced or manufactured locally. This is no longer the case. Large retailers and online web distributors can rio longer absorb the transportation costs and are passing those on to the consumer. Residents of rural communities usually have the luxury of going out of town to buy products more cheaply than can be produced locally. But with

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the higher cosf of driving t o a giant retailer and the increased price of goods to offset shipping costs. local retailers in small co~nmunitiesmay he able to compete. Buying locally produced food is a great way to begin to reverse the practice of traveling nlany miles to get items we could grow locally. Prices C5 may still increase to reflect economic changes. but if will mean putting money in the pockets of people close to us rather than far away. This is a more sustainable approach for our small towns. Farmers' market season is upon us, and we should take advantage of that. We can start by thanking those who produce the products and spread our money to our neighbors rather than to far-flung producers. For more information: www.cfra. org .

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KEITH CO. NEII'S MON .NED. WEEKLY OGALLALA, NE clrculaQon= 4005

07/14/2008

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R E A P business specialist to hold office hours July 22 -

p r Nancy Flock. Nebraska Hispanic

More information about REAP usiness specialist with the Center can be found a t www.cfra.org/reap r Rural AfTairs' Rural Enterprise or by calling (402) 656-3091 or (308) ssistance Project, will hold office 528-0060. hours fi-om 10 a.m. until X p.m. July To make a n appointment, contact 22 in t h e Ogallala/Keith County the Chamber of Commerce a t (308) Chamber of Commerce office. 284-4066. Flock also will conduct office Established in 1973, the Center hours on a monthly basis, provid- for Rural Affairs is a private, noning technical assistance, educa- profit organization working t o tional and networking opportuni- strengthen small businesses, famties, and a loan program for small ily farms and ranches, and rural self-employed businesses. Flock communities through action-oriprovides REAP sei-vices in Chase, ented programs addressing social, Dundy, K e i t h , Lincoln, Logan, economic a n d environmental isMcPhrrson and Perkins counties. sues. - -. REAP is designed to assist all I types of small businesses, includ- i ing businesses with five 01. fewer employees, and thosc who are selfemployed full-time, p a r t - t i m e , home-based, farm-based, start-up and store-front businesses. 9%. -

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Date: Location: Circulation (DMA): Type (Frequency): Page: Keyword:

Thursday, July 24,2008 MONTEVIDEO, MN 4.800(15) Newspaper (W) 4A Center For Rural Affairs

Stand up for rural America For decades, corporate mergers in agribusiness have proceeded, vinually unchallenged, at breakneck speed. All who live in rural America axe paying the price for inaction by USDA and the U.S. Department of Justice. Corporate consolidation and vertical integration have decimated family farmers and ranchers and destroyed their livestock markets. On March 5, JBS-S.A of Brazil announced the acquisition of National Beef, America's fourth largest beef packer, as well as the Smithfield Beef Group. If approved, the three largest packers will control 73% of U.S. beef packing, JBS will own one-third. JBS has risen meteorically to become the largest cattle feeder and beef packer in the U.S. There is no indication that the Justice Department or USDA will do anything about it. Will you? Farmers, ranchers and rural communities have lost too much of the economic benefit of raising cattle and hogs. And we will all be left to endure the environmental nightmares that accompany the industrial livestock production owned and controlled by packers. has stood with family farmers, For 35 years the -arsi ranchers and rural communities throughout rural America. We have fought for reform - competitive livestock markets, a ban on meatpacker ownership of livestock, and payment caps on f m subsidies - all to stop the corporate takeover of agriculture. Rural America's future can and should include thriving family farms and ranches and vibrant rural communities. Stand up for rural America and go to http:Nwww.cfra.orglJBS and tell the Justice Department to stop the JBS merger.


Date: Location. Circulation (DMA): Type (Frequency): Page: Keyword:

BIRD ISLAND UNION

Wednesday, July 23,2008 BIRD ISLAND, MN 575 (15) Newspaper (W) 5 Center For Rural Affairs

Rural and urban alike benefit from vibrant rural areas By Elisha Greeley Smith,elishas@cfia.org,

&n@rfy ~yral~flairs We on t need to read the results from the new U.S. Census analysis to realize that many rural populations are on the decline. We can simply glance down most of our main streets and see closed businesses and dwindling inhabitants. The loss of our rural communities is not inevitable, not the result of some unseen, unstoppable force of nature. We can do better. Much is lost when a town ceases to exist; history, heritage, stewards of our natural resources, and people who produce safe food for our nation are lost. If the people that care about rural places are no longer there to take care of the natural resources and food producing land who will? Perhaps it will be giant corporations and outside investors who are more con-

-

cerned with protits than the health of the land and the safetyofthe food produced on it. The vitality of America's rural areas should be a concern for everyone, not just those that reside in rural communities. All Americans rural and urban alike -benefit from vibrant rural communities and thriving family farms and ranches. Not all is doom and gloom. Some rural communities refuse to give up when the going gets tough. They work harder, invest in their infrastmcture, devote time and resources towards youth and entrepreneurs, and develop the assets and amenities the region provides. We all benefit when rural communities use forward thinking. For more on insuring the health and vitality of food and natural resources: m . c f r a . o ~ .

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Yankton Daily Press & Dakotan Yankton,SD Circ. 8072 From Page: 16

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haue euei ken, geflin iMo fanning seem neary impossible - especllp y for young people /criq to smite out on Mr'own, but euen for those goiq home to the f a m l ~/-m TrY'to mDRe.amvAt rs had en0q.hfor ekpdrience3pbducem Builthem 13 a way

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'ankton Daily Press & Dakotan Yankton,SD Circ. 8072 From Page: 1B 7/5/2008

~ h o u n t o p r o d u c e a mandthe An&creasingnumberdfarmerr,and o ~ ~ - o n l y d h o ~ n . ~ n farming hopdub are termrofcropinputs,oganictatesthe fertiUzer,pestidde, andteddogyfas freedomtonotonlystayaaoat~ ~ o f ~ ~ n , u s i a e m a n s e e m e a t lybuttomakemorethanincometoUn t~uessuchascroprotationand Ondartably. Woat new farmers have to be thlaL- muluresppUcatioomead. Tm're independent of a lot of illgabout~eagricultun.lfthey ,"KleinrehmitsaklWY0ucanactudon't, they're settiog themdvw up for r cheape~without mMe," said Terry Gompert,an thm!Etz&%s a huge! University of Nebsavlags. That's a huge expense Extensioneducatarfor KmxCounty, we don't have to r@â&#x201A;Źover. based in Center, and an avid advocate Another significant differfor mstahable systems, from ogMie mcebetWeenc3nnmhdand crop production to gradhhhed ltva organic farming b in the marstock. kets. Tbe demand for oganlc MartiaKleinschmft,m~trab. produds b much sitionspedallsthousedatthe w o n , Neb., &e of the Center for Rural Affairs, agrees. He's been inogarr modlty grain markets, which ic production for more than a decade d the 35yeam he's farmed in the Fodycc- havebeenveryvolatllethepast 18 months, the organic market Bow Valley,Neb., area. has continued to s aIstronglysugseJtlookingatorgan- Toaay, mcan be 1 X L " i k,"Kleiruchmltsaid After exploring $9 to $10 a bYshel, soybeans at variouswaysfor~fannersto $16 to $20, and wheat at $10 to $12With make it in conventid agriculture,the productloncastslawvthallcomrentiob numbers prove that organic is the way and w m c prices hieha to go. than P~~CB, ogaolc far* W s the only way 1 know," can be a lucrative altanathre. Kleinschmit said. ITbenisapremiuqandthatpnrnC These numbers were taken from urn is hugewhen you consider ?bat Iowa State Unhmrsi farm Income fig thing above the uredf~october2K7,whichshom extra,"Kkhrrchmltrald. e c o d that an oganlc crop farmer needs only ty mulat prlce is tradltloMUy the cost 177 acres to make at least $45,000in net of production, so then's nothing leftrofits. Compare this to the 865me over." arm a conventional producer needs to make the same amount of income. Federal mistance md o&hrm 'Chances are 1 can purchase 177 incomeisattheheartofcomntioopl acres easier than a larger farm," income. w s h o w t h q r s u r lQeinschmitsaid. With a purchase rice of $3,500p r a m , the m m e n t i o n i ~ ~V i V e L M . Ibereare~wedrswbacLsto~ acrefarmwouldnquiret3milllonin org*GanpertMid-~hab bnd imrestmentbut the par that r u p m acre fann d d only coa=&!&, oeational to if the producer is renting, the conven that tiod farm would cost $173,000and the a with w i foaank ~ prod-, organic farm would cost $35,000. andncedingtoleamdffemtmm "Ithought that was really huge," chemical rmnsgement techdques. But I(ldnschmit Mid. then~alroanincentiveforiumus Throughthedecades,prOetinam veathalfarmlnga~thenextnew t r c m d t i o n i a s t o ~ p I o d -tractors, hybrid varwies, throUghtheNaturalRwur(kmalwm Service's m&ifiedcrops,chemicals.

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