Issuu on Google+

UNlVERSAL

Information Services. Inc

THURSDAY LYONS, NE

WEEKLY

Circulation = 735

05/22/2008

1,; Center for Rural

iri

---'

[~rovisions *donot exceed losses . -~ - . . . ~- ., By Ellsha Greeley smith .' ,el!shasOcfra.org

: , ,

The Center for Rural Affairs opposed passage of the new farm 'billbecause it commitsthe federal government to subsidizing the bstruction of family farming !for another five years and invests ilittle in the future of rural comimunities. This is heartbreaking because ;the bill has particularly strong ;beginning farmer and rancher ;provisions. ; It would provide $15 million 'of competitive grants annually for initiatives to help beginners get 'started, give an extra two years of :payments on land enrolled in the 'conservation Reserve Program if 1-..

.~

I

mu-"

. --

'

-

Elisha Greeley Smith it is sold or rented to a beginning fanner. If funded, a pilot program would provide matching funds to beginners and a land sales program would offer loan guarantees to individuals who sell land to beginners. Finally, loans to beginners who convert to sustainable and

a- a L -

FA!*--

organii agriculture wodd be prioritized. * Despite all of these wins, the final bill failed to address the advantages the farm program gives to mega farmers. If they go on creating "paper" farms to exceed the limits, they unfairly disadvantage everyone, especially beginners. Land values and cash rents continue to be bid higher, further outweighing the benefits of any good programs. Ultimately, this destroys the ~rosperityof rural America and is simply not worth supporting. For more information visit: www.cfra.org <http://www.cfra. org .

' ;

-

7

f

1 F

'


UNIVERSAL 1,nformationServices, Inc

STANDARD THURSDAY

WEEKLY

HUMBOLDT,NE Circulation= 1 176 I

05/22/2008 - -

-

---

-_

-

-

-

A Simple Solution For A Complicated Problem nter for Rural Affairs

agriculture producon In this country is mareted as generic grain or vesCock, where the only way to compete is to produce for less. These shortterm gains are quickly lost as others learn these skills or adopt new technology. The one practice that has kept many farms solvent is increased production, but steadily increasing production means greater investmerit, an option not available to most wanting to get into agriculture. Is it possible the "get bigger or get outu philosophy is mak-

ing it impossible for young people to get in?

One option to enter agriculture is getting more per acre rather than adding more acres of production. Instead of focusing on the generic market, produce for a premium market. There is an established market today that pays a premium, not for what is produced, but for how it's produced. The organic market has been around for a long time and continues to grow at a rate of 20% per year. Craig Chase, an Iowa State ag economist, calculates a $254

annual per-acre return to management (after deducting labor and production expenses) for a four-year organic crop rotation of corn, soybeans, oats and alfalfa. At that rate, only 171 acres are needed to generate $45,000 in net income, while a non-organic cornlsoybean rotation farm with a profit of $52 per acre needs 865 acres to make the same money. Learning organic production practices is a challenge, but once mastered, these practices will continue to provide savings and premiLIms. -


U NIVERSAL

Information Services, Inc

CEDAR CO. NEWS WEDNESDAY WEEKLY HARTINGTON, NE Circulation = 2091

05/21I2008

L

-

=-

-

125 YEARS-.!-N HARTINGTON -" -- --

-- Wednesday, May - 2 1, 2008

Hartinaton3 ~o~ulation doesnY chanae much over the vears i HARTINGTON - I~lartington'spop111:ltionhas Census Bureau. Nebraska's two largest cities stayed roughly the sarnc over the past decade, es- grew faster than the national average for cities timates froni the I1.S. Census Bureau indicate. thcir size between 1990 and 1999. In 1990, Hartingtor~hilt1 a r i estimattd poprtOn the other hand, communities with less lation of 1652. In 1999, the Census Burcau them 1,000 saw their populations decrease by estimateti Hartington's populatior~at 165 1 . The 2.4 percent in the 1990s. Cedar County seat hati a dccadc?-high of 1685 "If we don't make a fundamental change in approach, there's not going to be much left in the in 1995. Thefigt~reswerebasedo~iestirnatcsgathcrrd in farm and ranch counties across the state," said Chuck Hassebrook, programdirector ofthe 1999. The official 2000 Census - .Center for Rural Affairs in Walthill. information won't he releascd h"Iarch 20, 2000 WhiIc the trends showrural populatioris until the end of December. While Hxtillgton's popllla.. -declining, both Hassebrook and Charles Lamphear, director of the Bureau of Busition stayed rt.latively the samt:, ness and Econoniic Research a t the University n i t i sornc c~s some other Cedar C o ~ ~ n t y c c ~ r i ~ ~ n utc)ok of Nebraska-Lincoln. said it does not have to be big hits in thc 1!)90s. Lat~relsuffkrcd the biggest popul;ltio~i loss that way. demographics are such that in almost i l l the co~rrlt~-66 p ~ o p l cThr . 1990 p o p ~ ~ l ; ~ t i o ~ "The i estin~ateIn Laurel was 986 people:, wllile thr 19'39 every county we're gning to sec an increase in estimate was only 920. Rantloll111also took A big the number ofyounger, working-age population," hit, losrng 54 people in the tlrc.;~clc:.C:olt:ridgr lost Lamphear said. "There's going to be an opportunity there. 3 4 peoplt: in the 1990s. "The question is can they hold those peoplc St. Helena and Obcrt lost thr [cwt3strc:sitlcnts ant1 providt. them satisfactory jobs." of any c o n ~ r u ~ ~ n i till i cthe s C O L I I I ~t~ottr ~, t:011111111Or1 the othcr hand, the state's 15 cities with nities lost only four pcople during tilt: tltlc:i~ric. riiore tlian 10.000 people experienced an average according to tht: official c.stimatcs. Cedar Co~rnty'slosses fol1owc.d a stale-wid<: population increaseof8.7 percent. Citiesbetween trend. The report shows the stgrtc-'s p o l ~ l ~ l ; ~ t i o1,000 ~ i and 10.000 in size sawpopulationsgrowby centers, primarilv i l l eastern Net)ra.sk;~.grew 1x1 all avrrage of 2.6 percent for the decade. the 1990s. while srnallcr towns anti vi1lagc.s s;!w All cities with nlol-c than 10,000 people saw popt~lationsincreasc the past eight years, except their nt~mt)ersdwindlc. b y thc for 1I;rstings which experienced a 7.4 percent deAccording to the cstinlatcs rcl(~;~setl

C

1

cline and Beatrice which dropped 1.1 percent. Omaha'spopulation rose 8.1 percent to 386,742 fiom 1990 to 1999. Lincoln experienced even gl-eater growth, reaching 215.928 people for a jump of 12 percent. Nationwide. cities like Omaha with populations between 250,000 and 499,999 rose 4.8 percent, while those like Lincoln with between 100,000a n d 249,999 rose 8.7 percent. Omaha is the nation's 42nd largest city; Lincoln is 76th. The Census Bureau estimates are based on 1990 Census data that is updated using administrative records througli 1999. That information will be used by state lawmakers to determine political boundaries. It is expected that a reduction in population inwestern and r,entral Nebraska will result in the loss of at least one representative in the Legislature from a predominantly rural area. Where that legislative seat will be removed is almost guaranteed to result in a fight among law~~~akers. Following the 1990 census, it took a state Suprerile Court ruling and a special session to straighten out the redistricting mess. In the end Cedar County lost its District 19 seat, and the. county became part of the 18th District. The cornmun~tyw ~ t h the state's largest drop In populat~or~ for the decade was the vlllage of Lynch. It exper~enceda 25-percent decline, going from 296 people In 1990 to 221 last year.


MONITOR THURSDAY WEEKLY BLOOhPIELD, NE

'

r~rovisionsDo Not hceed elishas@cfra.org, Center -for Rurd Affairs Qe Center for Rural Affairs opposed passage of the new farm bill because it commits the federal governF ment to subsidizing the destruction o[ family farming for another five yearsl and invests . . . little . . in thqfutute o_f rur_al. . commuiiities. :-'This is heartbreaking because the bill has particularly strong beginning farmer and rancher provisions. It would provide $15 million of competitive grants annually for initiatives to help beginners get started, give an extra two years of payments on land enrolled in the Conservation Reserve a Program if it is sold or rented to a beginning farmer. If funded, a pilot proI gram would provide matching funds to beginners and a land sales program would offer loan guarantees to individuals who sell land to beginners. Finally, loans to beginners who convert, to sustainable and organic agriculture would be prioritized. Despite all of thesc wins, the final bill fai!ed to address the advantages the farm program gives to mega farmers. If they go on creating "paper" farms to i exceed the limits, they unfairly disadvantage everyone, especially beginners. Land values and cash rents continue to be bid higher, further outweighing the benefits of any good programs. Ultimately, this destroys the prosperity of rural America and is simply; not w o ~ l hsupporting. i For more information visit: fra.org . ------ --. - - -------;--* 1 - -

-

:

I +

,

=

I 1

-TT-d


UNIVERSAL

Information Services. Inc

RECORD WEDNESDAY WEEKLY CHADRON, NE Circulation = 2673

05/28/2008 -;

--.-----A .. -.

~~

----

.-

.

~-

-

-.

>-

-

-

...,,

.,:... .-

r,

-,-

.

a

-.--

We can't afford ti walkaway from rural dmeuica!I

I

t

:

By ~ k h Greeley a Smith Center for Rural Affairs

---

'.

A-

our rural communities' infrastructure deteriorates and the President Bush's proposed more it will cost in the long run. As with ~reviousbudgets. budget ., thc " for 2009 zeros out funding for 20 important rural devel- 2009 budget recommends termination of numerous federal opment programs. That is the finding of the rural developmcnt and rural Center for Rural Affairs recent- asset-building programs. Adoption of the ly published 'Rural Brief.' It's crucial for the long tenn Administration's 2009 budget health and viabilitv of rural com- would cause total rural developmunities that we create opportu- ment funding to be 72 percent nities, generate wealth and build less than its 2003 level. Sen. Tom Harkin was recently assets for individuals. but if funding for rural devd~o~ment quoted in an article by Philip keeps being neglected our rural Brasher in The Des Moincs communities will continue to Register saying "What good decline. The less we invest now does it do if wc keep giving in rural development, the more more nioney to farn~crsbut thcy

R

don't havc any towns, tlicy don't havc churches, they don't have1 hospitals, they don't have' schools, thev don't ha\/e watcr?'f Senator Harkin's analysis is more than accurate - it is a snapshot of what is already happcn- ; ing to our most rural co~nmuni-; ties. And givclj ihe rapid, decline in rui-al development funding, it's apparent the federal government is walking away; from any commitment to the ! future of our rural conini~inities' and the 60 million people who I call rural America h o m e 'To view the entire Ruralp Brief: .cfra.org/node/1172

.

1


UNIVERSAL

Information Services. Inc

BUSINESS FARMER FRIDAY WEEKLY SCOTTSBLWF, NE Circulation = 2277

0512312008

B t t . . * * . * . . . . ~ . . . . * * . * t * t

i

i

1

LINCOLN NE 68508-1226

I f

.,

I

r

2 % >

House overrides presidential veto of farm bill By Jerry Abbott Smff Wirer

President George W. Bush vetoed the 2007 farm bill on Wednesday, saying the bill subsidizes multimillionaire farmers while Americans pay higher grocery prices. Just hours after the president's veto and remarks, the House overrode the veto by a vote of 316-106. As of press

.-

time, the Senate had not voted whether to override the veto but is expected to do so. Last week the farm bill passed both houses of Congress - in the House by a 3-to-1 margin and in the Senate by a 4.401 margin. Wyoming's two U.S. senators joined 33 of the Senate's 49 Republicans to vote for the bill on Thursday. They sided with

the Democrats in opposition to Bush. The measure passed by a vote of 81-to-15 after passage in the House by 3 18-to-106 the day before. Proponents say that the bill invests in improved nutrition, conservation, renewable energy and farm programs and includes sigtllficant reforms. The bill includes a $10.3 billion increase in spending on nutri-

tion programs, including food stamps, that supporters called "historic." It also extends many existing federal subsidies that the president and other critics say are difficult to justxfy at a time of high prices for many farm commodities. All three U.S. legislators from Wyoming voted for the bill. They said it contains a number of provisions that ben-

efit Wyoming's farmers and ranchers. Sen. John Barrasso pushed for a special amendment to the bill that would promote veterinary drug research at the University of Wyoming. The amendment also includes research on sheep medicines and a brucellosis vaccine for cattle. See FARM BILL, page 2

-

From page A- 1 "This amendment is a victory for the livestock industry in Wyoming," Barrasso said. "I am proud it has been included in this bill. The amendment is important to keep Wyoming's sheep producers competitive in the world market." Barrasso said he was also pleased with a $6.5 billion expansion of existing conservation programs. "These programs are working in Wyoming," he said. "Wyoming producers have implemented 2,881 EQUIP contracts over the past five years and protected 34,000 acres in our state through the Grassland Reserve Program." The bill includes provisions for country of origin labeling of cattle. "I support provisions that were included in the farm bill that help livestock producers and come at no expense to the U.S. Treasury," Sen. Mike Enzi said. "This bill includes sometl.lingI have been working on since I came to the Senate 11 years ago and that is language to implement mandatory country of origin labeling, often referred to as COOL. COOL provides consumers with important information about the source of food and allows our livestock producers, who produce the highest quality meats in the world, to remain competitive in a growing global market. No more excuses, no more foot dragging, the time is hot for COOL." Rep. Barbara Cubin also praised the Food and Energy Security Act of 2007 (the farm bill). "The passage of this bill ensures America will not forget the indispensable resource of our farmers," Cubin said. "Not only does this bill affirm a stable, sound agriculture policy for the U.S., it also includes a number of positive provisions for Wyoming's farmers and ranchers." More than 550 farm, specialty crop, conservation, nutrition, consumer and religious organizations supported passage of the new farm bill. "The Food, Conservation and Energy Act makes -

essential improvements in the food, farm and conscrvation programs that meet the needs of Americans in cities, suburbs and rural communities nationwide," said House Agriculture Committee chairman Collin Peterson, a Minnesota Democrat. "This bill will help worlung American families struggling with high food prices and will ensure that our farmers and ranchers can continue to provide a safe, abundant, homegrown supply of food and fiber." Despite widespread support in Congress, the White House has been critical of the 2007 farm bdl. 'The bill passed today is a farm bill in name only," said Agriculture Secretary Ed Schafer. "It does not target help for the fanners who really need it and it increases the size and cost of government while jeopardizing the future of legitimate farm programs by damaging the credibility of farm bills in general. "At a time of record setting income for farmers, it sends the wrong message to the rest of the country who are not experiencing the boom of the agriculture sector," Schafer said. "This bill is loaded with taxpayer funded pet projects at a time when Americans are struggling to buy groceries and afford gas to get to work." Two of the pet projects Schafer referred to are $170 million for the salmon fishermen on the West Coast and $250 million for a single entity land buy in Montana. The White House and many members of Congress are critical of provisions in the bill that allow subsidy payments to wealthy agriculture producers. "There is nothing wrong with helping our farmers guarantee a safe and secure food supply, but that assistance does not deserve to go to farmers who fashion diamond studded coveralls and golden pitchforks," Enzi said. "It is true that our nation's producers are facing higher costs to fill their tanks, fertilize their fields, feed their livestock and pay for their health care. However, this farm bill does not go far enough to cut the subsidies handed out to the wealthiest of farmers. "It's not just a financial travesty that these payoffs to agribusiness are in the bill, it's a policy travesty be-

cause this farm bill does have some very good policy contained within its pages," Enzi said. Sen. Chuck Hagel, R-Neb., voted against the fann bill legislation. "One of the biggest problems with this farm bill is that it still does not close the loopholes that allow big land owners and agribusinesses to abuse the farm payment program," Hagel said. "Fewer than half of America's farms benefit from our current farm policy and nearly 66 percent of farm payments go to only 10 percent of producers. It is unwise and wrong to continue these policies. The real farmers and taxpayers lose. The big guys win. "This bill continues a payment system that encourages producers to make their business decisions not on market conditions, but on what subsidies they are eligible for," Hagel said. "It will continue to distort land valuations and inflate food prices, while jeopardizing our trade agreements." Some feel that the U.S. 2007 farm bill will anger the world. They say the bill subsidizes American farmers and enables high-cost farmers and food companies to sell their products at below the cost of production and unfairly beat the products of farmers in developing nations that are not subsidized. Many developing countries around the world import artificially cheapened imported rice, wheat, corn and chicken from the U.S. and Europe. "It's no secret our current farm programs under the current law have come under enormous fire," said Deputy Agriculture Secretary Chuck Connor. "How does this bill respond? This bill responds by increasing trade-distorting supports on 17 out of the 25 of the commodities that we provide." Connor said the U.S. trade partners "are going to get incensed and we would expect them to protest in every way they can." Despite the White House's view of the 2007 farm bill, if the Senate overrides the bill as expected, the legislation will be enacted. -

-

--

-

--


UNIVERSAL' Information Services, Inc "',

NEMAHA CO. HERALD FRIDAY ITTEEKL Y AUBURN, NE Circulation = 2628

I

enter for Rural Affairs Urges Farm i ill Veto; Commends Sen. Nelson or His Rural Development Efforts

1

Lyons - 'I'he Center for Rural I~fassebrook. 'Tl~eCenter also offered the folq f f a i r s ani~ouncedits opposition t o passage of the farm bill con- lowing evidence that the equally ference report a n d clic:ouraged flawed rnean:; test (AGI) proviPresident Bush to veto t l ~ ebill if s i o n s are n o m o r e effective a t it passes. denying payments t o high income "We u r g c C o n g r e s s t i : vote recipients: ! against this farm bill and we ellI ) Senator Chuck Grassley's [ courage President Busll to veto i t . analysis of U . S . Internal Revenue ; This farm bill corlirnits tllc: federal Service data revealed that'about governmtr~itto subsicliring the 40 percent of those who w o u l d , E d e s t r u c . ~ i o nof fsrnily farming for lose f a r m p a y m e n t s u n d e r the E another five years a ~ it~ invcsts d income limits are landlords who little in the futi~reol'1.~11.;13 C O I I I I ~ U - will switch t o cash rent arrange- I nities," said Chi~ch:Hussebrook, ments. T h e federal checks will Executive Director of the Centcr now be sent t o tenant farmers, but for Rural Affai~.s. high income landlords will still Hasseb~.ooksaid, "'l'hc farm bill capture them through top dollar g E2 funds just ont: ncw rural ticvelop- cash rents. ~ n e n initiative t - thc Rliritl Micro2) H i g h i n c o m e f a r m s w i l l e e~ttrepreneurAssist;lncr Program divide income between spouses a - which provides loans. training to stay below the limits. Rich anti tecl111ic;tl assistance to rural couples can put their multirnilsrtlall businesses. The Center l'or lion dollar income in one spouse's I Rural Afl'airs c o m ~ n e r ~ tSenator ls namc and the farm in the other. ie Ben Nelsort for championing the For example, Nancy Pelosi is the B:, 7 program. I t creates genuine 01)15th richest member of Congress, portunity f o r rural people and a but according to her financial dis- 7 future f o r thzir c o ~ n m u n i t i e s .It closurc reports, she'd be eligible I was only Nelson's it1si:;tence with for payments. That i s because i r Coiigression;~lleaciers that savecl most of the couple's investments : the progriim. after i t was initially arb not in her name. I dropped." 3) Large farms that approach " I h e ncw farm bill break:i faith thc income limit will get around with rur;~lAmerica and reflects it by expanding their operation a failurt: of leadership by both purchasing land and other assets I ('clngrcss and the Atlministration. to create deductions for interest, Congress psoduced only the iilu- dcpi.cci;~tionand inputs. S e c r e - i, sion of r e f o ~ . itio~provirle political tary Schafer got it right when he cover for its failure tc) acfopt real said recently that "If there is a' reform. 'The Administrat ion talked far117 in America that can't m e e t reform, while refusing to support a $500,000 hard cap, they n e e d , the one true reform on the table - new ;iccountant." ('The cap in th the Dorgan Grassley ar~iend~rrzntfinal legislation is even higher.) .. , - and refusing t o use its existing . -1 --.~. ~administrative authority t o 'close* paylalent limitation loopholes," - expl;tined-Hassebr-k. 'The Cente'r's analysis of pay-, ment recipients (www.cfrn.org/:I falsereforni) found that over 0% percent of f a r ~ n e r saf'l'ected by u the payment lin~itationprovisions in tile conference report would continue receivii~gthe sanle large direct payments by switching t o g o t h e r m e a n s o f e x c e e d i n g t h e .' paper limits o n payments. The analysis found only five farmers in seven leacling farm states (which include O K , ND, I A , C;A, KY. M N , M'T) that would face any cut in dircct p a y ~ n c t ~ under ts the . dircct attributiot~provisionls of the farm bill corrfercncc agreeinent. nc gate while Icavi n g t w o opcrl woll't keel:, t h e hogs o u t of the tro~tgli," added

E

a

8

% [

'

i

i

i

I

I


UNIVERSAL

Information Services. Inc

THE FORUM DAILY FARGO, ND Circulation = 70000

05/30/2008

1

L~armbill not good

no farm bill and one rmines family farming communities. The new

to work the loopholes. tailed analysis of the farm payment recipients th Dakota could identify

The Forum says we must mbrace this sorry legislation ecause the Southerners won't

:

Al

cept real limits. The question is, why should we accept legislation that destroys family farming? And at a time when the rural communities of the Great Plains are fighting for their surviva_lJ [whysccept a farm bill that drops $30 million annually in bs for rural development? e 20 biggest farms have ceived that much in a single ear and will again the next time y farms and rural comhave value - and I th every fiber of my they do - there comes

I

1 5

1

Chuck Hassebrook Executive director Center for Rural Affairs Lyons, Neb.

-


u

NlVERSAL

lnformatlon Services Inc

DAILY NEWS EVENING NORFOLK, NE

DAILY

Circulation = 17282

05/30/2008

Opposed passage of farm bill LYONS --- The Center for Rural Affairs opposed passage of the new 61rm bill because it commits the federal government to subsidizing the destruction of family farming for another five years and invests little in , f i e future of rural communities. This is heartbreaking because the bill has particularly strong beginning farmer and 1-ancherprovisions. It would provide $15 million in competitive grants annually for initiatives to help beginners get started and give an extra two years of payments on land enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program if it is sold or rented to a beginning farmer. I If funded, a pilot program would provide matching funds to beginners / and a land sales program would offer loan guarantees to individuals P. who sell land to beginners. Finally, loans to beginners who convert to sustainable and organic agriculture would be prioritized. -= Despite all of these wins, the final bill failed to address the advantages the farm pi-ogram gives to mega farmers. If they go on creating "paper" farms to exceed the limits, they unfairly disadvantage everyone, especially beginners. Land values and cash rents continue to be bid higher, further outweighing the benefits of any good programs. Ultinlately, this destroys the prosperity of rural America and is simply not worth supporting. ELISHA GREELEY SMITH

I ;


UNIVERSAL

Information Services. Inc (402) 342-3178

DAILY NEWS EVENING NORFOLK, NE

DAILY

Circulation= 17282

05/27/2008

'Scholar' tour hits Northeast Nebraska Special to the Dally News

While the University of Nebraska's Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources is always working to make connections throughout the state, it also wants people across the state to feel connected to it as well. That was one purpose of IANR's inaugural "Road Scholars" Tour conducted recently in Northeast Nebraska, said Debra Schroeder of West Point. About 35 IANR employees boarded a chartered bus and visited a variety of university and business sites throughout the region. The group included administrators, liaison committee member, and faculty and staff members with one to five years of university service. "The over-arching goal in this whole process was we wanted to provide opportunities for new faculty to be exposed to different areas of the state," said Schroeder, a University of NebraskaLincoln Extension educator in Cuming County. IANR is hopeful, she said, that the employees will be able to use the information they gained on the trip in their teaching, research h d extension responsibilities. In addition to helping IANR employees to learn more about the state, the trip was an effort to help Nebraskans learn more about the mission of IANR, Schroeder said. The,production of agricultural equipment was the focus of the first stop at West Point Implement and Design. Owner-manager Erv Eisenmenger demonstrated the company's major lines of equipment, including its Spread-All spreader, largely manufactured with recycled materials to spread the

abundance of manure from.feedlots. The contingent then stopped at the Knobbe Feed Yards, owned by Harry Knobbe of West Point, which feeds about 20,000 head of cattle annually on 1,000acres. Knobbe Livestock Sales buys and sells more than 140,000 head annually from 30 different states. A DISCUSSION of agricultural issues followed at the Center for Rural Affairs in Lyons. Chuck Hassebrook, the center's executive director and chairman of the NU Board of Regents, met with the group and answered questions for about an hour about the center's program priorities. Group members visited the John G. Neihardt Center in Bancroft, where they watched a short video about the life of Neihardt, who was state poet laureate and wrote the famed book "Black Elk Speaks." The first day also included a visit to the Haskell Agricultural Laboratory east of Concord, where extension specialists talked about their research projects on such topics as conservation buffers, the effect of tillage on soil and the use of propane flaming as a weed-control tool. The second day featured a tour of the Lifelong Learning Center in Norfolk, which houses offices of the Northeast Research and Extension Center, UNL Extension ih Madison County, Northeast Community College, Wayne State College and other entities. Progressive Swine Technology in Humphrey provided a lesson in pork production. The production facility founded by Jim Pillen has 80 different sites in Nebraska and employs more than 550 people. -

-


NEWS-TIMES MORNING YORK, NE

DAILY

Circulation = 4196

05131 12008

Guest Opinion Help New Farmers Set Roots and Grow

I

By Elisha Greeley Smith 0l)portunities for beginning farmers while encouraging i CENTER FOR RURAL AFFAIRS gootl stewardship. Corn- i

piter data base miltchin& 8 Farmers arc working and consulting services I longer than ever. Accord- bring beginning farmers ing to the 2002 Agriculture and landowners together. Cenrur, the average age o f Retirement planning, farmerr is 55, and one in beginning farmer financfour is 6 5 or vldes. ing, farm business, and A s older farr~lersleave environmental assessment the land anc! the price of information is used t o iI farms c o n t i r l ~ ~ eto s sky- assirt in transferring family rocket. it's incseiisinol c Y dif- operations to a new gener- f tlclllt for ;I tle\v Crop of ati011of farmers and ranchfar-mess to set roots and ers. The Center has helped set up many different linkgrow. Farlncrs under the age ing avangemcnts between 3 5 are fast becoming rzlising and bcginriing I elidangel,ed ~ p e c i c s . The farmers and ranchers. 3 decline in )(,Ling farmel-:, The first of its kind i11 " over the prrcz~ling15 years the nation, Land Idink has has been tht, most dramatic been replicated in 20 states oi' thc last century. ijcgin- and in Japan, Australia, :rnd nil12 ('~trmers c:ul b~lcceed Canacla. The Center is a 1I with ellcouragement. leader in the National Farm financial support, ; ~ n d Transition Network. which sound planning. But the brings 2111 the linking promost critical ingreclient is grams in the nation togethinvolvement of' retiring e r to Wp~)OS!1he 1leX.t &en: falmess ;!nd rancher5 with eration of farmers andthe ncst gencnltion. ranchers. f l.'l.ie Center for Rural For marc inforniatin~~g Affair's L,anJ Link pro- and success stories call gram serves to increase (4023 687-2100.

-


UNIVERSAL

Information Services. Inc

NEMAHA CO. HERALD FRIDAY LtTEEKLY AUBURN, NE Circulation = 2628

0512212008

1111111lllllllllllllllllllllHl Ill

Provisions DO Not Exceed Losses By Elisha Greeley Smith, elishas@cfra.orq,

ICenter for ~ u r a i ~ f f a i r s The Center for Rural Affairs opposed passage of the new farm bill because it commits the feda1 government to subsidizing e destruction of family farming r another five years and invests tle in the future of rural comis heartbreaking because as particularly strong nning farmer and rancher isions. It would provide $15 ion of competitive grants nually for initiatives to help ginners get started,- give an tra two years of payments on d enrolled in the Conservation eserve Program if it is sold or rented to a beginning farmer. If funded, a pilot program would provide matching funds to beginers and a land sales program uld offer loan guarantees to ividuals who sell land to beinners. Finally, loans to beginrs who convert to sustainable d organic agriculture woulI be 11 of these wins, the failed to address the adthe farm program gives mega farmers. If they go on reating "paper" farms to exceed limits, they unfairly disadtage everyone, especially inners. Land values and cash ts continue to be bid higher, further outweighing the benefits ef any good programs. Ultimately, this destroys the prosperity of rural America and is simply not worth supporting. For more information visit: ,www.cfra.org .

,

.


cfra clippings 061208