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hl;IRROR-SUN THURSDAY

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LYONS, NE Circulation = 735

0511 512008 8

Center h r Rural Affairs

Vetothis farm bill

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By Elisha Greeley Smlth

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In a couple of days a farm bill will likely pass in Congress. There are some wins such as funding for beginning farmers, oney for arural microenterprise Elisha Greeley Smlth ram, and money for the Conation Stewardship Program. magnitude of those victories is not We're grateful for those anywhere close to the magnitude vestments, and they will do of the opportunities squandered. ome real good if this farm bill If this bill hits the President's desk, he should veto it. And then Congress should But it doesn't fix what's sustain that veto, pass a one This farm bill, as cur- year extension, and start over ntly written, is not worthy of again because this farm bill is not worth it. We will have the opportu'There are victories, but the

nity to fight again, and we have real hope that we can do better, that we can win more, and that rural America can get a farm bill that is better than the one about to pass Congress. Rural America should not have to wait five more years to get a decent farm bill, and many of our rural communities cannot wait that long. In five more years there will be even fewer farmers,fewer jobs and more empty homes and businesses. Soget out theveto pen, Mr. President, and do the right thing. Kill this farm bill. For more information visit: www.cfra.org


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QUIZ WEDNESDAY WEEKLY

ORD,NE Circulation= 2350

05/14/2008

mid West Quilting And Embroidery Receives Award

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irector Monica Braun of Seward.

April anit recogni7ed at the GROW Nebraska Spring Meeting on Apr. 18. ?(XI8 ;it 8urchell's Whitehill I-.;u-frihouse In11 near Minden. The REAP recognition of equity award recipients ties nicely with GROW Nebraska's mission to maximize the

Program is designed to help lowand moderate-income wolnen who are owners of microenterprises businesses with five or fewer employees. The program, now in it's fourth year, is funded by Citi Foundation and managed by the .* Association of Enterprise

nesses and maximizing their equity 4! awards. Dianne Marie. Mid West QuiJti"g and as One to receive the $ of the REAP equity award. She was selected i through an application process f coordinated by REAP.

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REPORTER WEDNESDAY WEEKLY GIBBON, NE Circulation= 794

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from their neighbors? I t would be a sad mistake Times a r e good i n agri- to so squander today's farm culture. If we make good prosperity. To help us build decisions, those good times a strong rural future, visit ade regardless of can bring a new generation www.cfrn.org. Chuck Hassebrook s. It's just common of young people into agriculCenter for Rural Affairs ture. Lyons, Nebraska But if we continue the miswhy does David Kruse guided policy of subsidizi~lg Cl:uck Hassebrook is the mega farms to bid land away Excc,rrtiue Director of t h e from smaller operations, Center fiw Rural Affairs of there will still be little room Lyons, Nebrnska, a private, for young farmers. And good non-profit organization workcrop prices will quickly be ing to strengthen family-scale and rural comabsorbed by higher p r o d ~ ~ cagric.ul/ure tion costs - especially cash m unities. rent. ---

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JOURNAL STAR SUNDAY DAILY LINCOLN, NE Circulation = 74795

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05/25/2008

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JOURNAL STAR Sunday May 25,2008

bill screw-up Congressional leaders tried to portray the massive $290 billion farm bill as a marvelously engineered piece of legislation put together meticulously in order to balance the needs of millions of Americans. They should have difficulty selling that imaginative tale after the screw-upthis week in which they sent the president a bill with a whole section missOUR VIEW ing. This bunch can't even get the most ' elementary chores of government done properly. How can they be trusted to comprehend horrendously complicated programs that in all probability were hatched in a lobbyist's lair and not brought out into the sunlight until late in the process? A case in point is the new Average Crop Revenue Election (ACRE)program. The program was touted as reform, offering an alternative to traditional subsidies by providing a safety net that provides payments when either yields or prices drop sharply. Then lawmakers secretively and late in negotiations calibrated those new subsidies on the basis of current crop , prices, which are some of the highest in history. The U.S. Department ofAgriculturecalculated that the

izes deeper flaws

program could end up costing $16 billion more in crop subsidies than previous estimates. Word is already filtering out. A blog by Pro Farmer's Jim Wiesemeyer based on a USDA analysis drew a headline that the program was "lucrative beyond expectations." The USDA analysis was quickly countered by defenders who continue to believe that it represents true reform, although it might be costly. Later Pro Farmer's Chip Flory urged farmers to sign up for ACRE. Flory described himself as a "market-drivenkind of guy," but added, "those that know me also know I've never passed up pie when the pie is passed!" The point is that only a select few insiders really know what's in the bill. The debate now under way should have taken place in public How can this happen? The unhealthy dynamics of farm bill lawmaking are fairly simple. Lawmakers under the sway of greedy agribusiness interests hold important nutrition programs hostage. Using this leverage they persuade presumably otherwise sensible members of Congress to go along with their money-suckingschemes. Making the deal even more palatable in some instances is the political payoff. Members of Congress running in vulnerable districts can go home and boast that they brought

home the bacon. The farm bdl undoubtedly has some good elements. Increases in food stamp payments were overdue, for example. There are some improvementsin conservation programs, but also some curtailment. But when it comes to reform, the bill is a failure. Overall, as Chuck Hassebrook, executive director of the Center for Rural Affairs, put it, "This farm bill commits the federal government to subsidizing the destruction of family farming for another five years." The slip-up in sending the president a bill with a missing section is emblematic of the sloppiness and shoddiness that afflicts lawmaking in Congress these days. Too bad Congress didn't leave out Title 1,the section with the crop subsidy programs. That might have put the spotlight on the bill's excesses. As it was, lawmakers shrugged off the incident and said they would fixthe problem by passing the missing section next week. When representatives and senators try to figure out why the approval rating for Congress hovers near historic lows, they could start by taking a good look at this legislative travesty. The real embarrassment is not the mistake by a poor clerk, it's the farm bill itself. tlm-'

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Yankton Daily Press & Dakotan Yankton,SD Circ. 8072 From Page: 2b 5/3/2008

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A' Simple Solltion For A Complicated Problem

The ocgulk. m a r H has been a ~ w lor d a lun ILnc and C ~ year ~ r J hg w . an wa lo gw 1 a ntc oi 20 perrent State ag ~ i x w n i c t crkulalm , a # 54 mnual pr-~lrw~ t m to mna;gemmt (dtr deduciingI&r &rd prtduct~ql~liw:w]lw a Iwrwr crop rotaiinn d c h , mylwa~s, ail<md allalh. At thal talc, anly I f 1 acres are n d c d ta pwrate WS,W In nct tacome, while a nakoqmk c m j w y k a n rotalit~nlam with a p d l t d 6 2 p aue m d s $6wrrs I ~make J hsane awne).. M l r ~ s r g ~ kd w l i w prxtljres Is a sllsarllenge, but MKC mstsoed, cse PC# kes will oxtklrtp t r l yi,gldrr w i n g s and pre

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DAILY SUN EVENING DAILY BEATRICE, NE Circulation = 7998

05/21/2008 - --

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Gary G. Young, 65, of

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was president from 1983to 1992. " He also served on the USIlAs McLean, Nebraska, p a s ~ from d Sustainable Agriculture $ this life to the r1 Research and Education execulife eternal tive com,mittee for 4 years. In 1989, Gary and Delores sold 211::ssP% thcir dairy cows and switched to Saturday, May raising sheep, thus his nicknainc, "Sheepy Papa." Gaiy was 0 s m o n d given many titles in his lifetime, including "Dairyman of the Year," NSAS's Agriculture Stewardship Award winner, and , ,: September 10, nlost preciotls to him was to Gary G. Young 4 1942, 1942-2008 "Grandpa." Gary fought illness , Christonher for many years of his life. In July $ ;: and 'Mary 8 (Macklin)Young at Norfolk. 1996,he undelwent a liver transHe attended Magnet School plant, and then again in April of g and gaduated from Randolph 2004, along with a kidney transHigh School in 1960. On August plant. He beat colon cancer and ' 4 , 1964, he was joined in mar- skin cancer numerous times. Leaving to mourn his loss are riage to Delores 1'f:terka inTabor, S.D. To this union, 6 daughters his wife of 43 years, Delores; and were born. Gary started farrriing his daughters, Wthy ant1 David in 1961. In 1968, he and Delores Olson of Bloonificld, Beth and purchased the fanlily farm from Mark Krepcl of Crofton, Teresa his mother. Gary was p~.oudof and Randy Wissler of Beatrice, ( his land and he took very good Julie and Steve Svoboda of care of it. In 1970, he started Norfolk, Sara and Chad Thomas changing his farming practices of Pahn~mp,Nev., and Emily and _touse fewer chemicals. Crops of Tony Feurhoff of Oslllond; 17 ., corn, oats and alfalfa kept him grandchildren, Matthew, Megan i busy during the spring, summer and Melissa Olson, Christopher, and fall months. His grade A Brittney and Amy Krepel, Ann, "Queens Dairy" herd kept him Alisha and Robert Thorell, Tricia busy year-round. In 1975,he was Svoboda, Michael, Jonathon, chosen to participate in the Ethan and Tiffany Thomas, j ' !$ Center for Rural Affairs energy Hailey, Joshua and Mike1 / project. Through this project, he Feurhoff; sister, Vi Kruger of started reduced tillage of his row Norfolk; nieces, nephews and crops and developed a portable cousins. Preceding him in death solar collector, used to heat his were his parents; Aunt May family's home and dry grain, Bethune; infant brother, and his brother, Gene "Larry"Young. . that put him and his family in Funeral: 10:30 a.m. Thursday, :I-, ., many national 7V programs, 'it newspapers and nlagw.ine artiMay 22, St. Prances Catholic l i, ;x cles. In 1979, he participated in Church in Randolph, Nebraska, \'I the Small Farm Resources with burial in the church cemei?i.i; Project through which he tery. Visitation: 3 p.m.-8 p.m. 1 :,$. changed to relational pasture Wednesday, with a Rosary at grazing. In 1982, he joined the 7:30 p.m. at the Johnson Funeral Sustainable Home, in Randolph. t$ Ncbrvska 4> Agriculture Society, of which he (Paid)

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INDEPENDENT MORNING DAILY GRAND ISLAND, NE Circulation = 22792

05/20/2008

FARM .

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Hassebrook said the center's analysis of payment recipients found that more than 99 percent of the farmers affected by the payment limitation provisions in the conference report would continue receiving the same large direct payments by switching to other means of exceedingthe paper lim-

its on Thepayments. analysis, he said. found only five farmers in seven leading farm states - Oklahoma, North Dakota, Iowa, Georgia,Kentucky, Minnesota and Montana who would face any cut in direct payments under thcdirect attribution provisions of the Farm Bill conference agreement. "Closing one gate while leaving two open won't keep the hogs out of the trough," Hassebrook said. In voting against the Farm Bill, Sen. Chuck Hagel, R-Neb., said Congress musl reconnect its policy to its original purpose of providing a "true safety net to real farmers when they need it most, while limiting goverilnlent involve, ment in producers' decisions." Hagel, a supporter of the Dorgan-Grassley Amendment, said oneof the biggest problems with this Farm Bill is that it still does not close the loopholes that allow By Rcbert Pore robe~t.~ore'2~theinde~endent ccri! big landowners and agribusinesses Despite overwhehlli~igapprovalbytheHouse to abuse the farm payment and Senate for tlle new I k r n Bill, the Nebraskaprogram. based Center for Kura! Affairs in Lyons is en"Fewer than half of America's couraging President Bush to veto the bill. farms benefit from our current According to Chuclc Hassebrook, executive farm policx and nearly 66 percent director of the of farm payments go to only 10 CenterforRural percent of producers," Hagel said. One Affair h i .'It is unwise and wrong to continue these policies. The real farmfarm bill cornnlitsthefederal ers and taxpayers lose. The big p.ys win.'. Hassebrook agrees with Hagel, destruction of saying that the country can't affalllily farming ford to keep passing farm profor another five grams that are designed to destroy .?' years ant1 it illfamily farming. vests little in the Chuck Hassebrook "At some point, we have to stop fLiture of IYlral I and say no," he said. Center for Rural Affairs executive director cu:i~rl~ull~iies." The bill subsidizes large farmIiassehrook ers to go out and buy up smaller said the new farm bill breaks faith with rural , and medium-size farms, he said, America and reflects failure df leadership by giving them big payments. by both Congress and the administration. --__ "Congress produced o~llythe illusion of feform to provide political cover for its failure to adopt real reform," he said. Hassebrook said while the Bush administration talked about reform, it refused to support the Dorgan-Grassley Amendment and to use its administrative authority to close payment limitation loopholes. The Dorgan-Grassley Amendment would have capped subsidy payments to farmers at $250,000 and would have eliminated $1.15 billion from the con~moditytitle's outlay over the Farm Bill's lifespan (2007-2012).

Center for Rural Affairs encourages president to kill Farm Bill, savs it subsidizes 'destruction ;)f family farmi&

"C1osil'g gate while leaving two open won't keep g tile out of the t ~ ~ g h

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"The Farm Bill shouldn't say that the bigger you get, the more money you get," Hassebrook said. He said the higher crop prices farmers arereceiving should have made it easier for Congressto limit the amount of government farm payments to bigger farmers. "When prices are high, those direct payments ought to be there to support mid-size farms," Hassebrook said. The Farm Bill passed by Congress last week does the following with regard to farm supports: It denies all supports to people with more than $500,000 adjusted gross income (AGI) and denies "direct" payments to people with more than $750,000 in farm income and $1.5 million for married farmers, regardless of crop prices. Sixty percent of the payments would go the wealthiest 10percent of recipients. Net farm income this year is expected to be $92.3 billion, up 4.1 percent from 2007, with the average farm household income projected to be $89,434, up 6.3percent from 2007 and 19.2 percent above the five-year average of 2002 through 2006. People with more than $1 million AGI are not eligible for land stewardship payments unless two.. thirds of income is from farming; waivers are allowed. Farm payments will be tracked to individuals and the "three-entity" rule allowing people to collect subsidies indirectly is eliminated. It creates the optional, Average Crop Revenue Election program, the first federal program to shelter growers from poor yields as well as low prices. Participants accept lower crop subsidy rates to.qualify for payments linked to nationwide revenue for a crop. It sets minor increases in subsidy rates for wheat, soybeans and some smaller-acreagecrops. The bill, for the first time, includes subsidies for fresh fruits and vegetables. It creates a standby $3.8 billion disaster relief fund for farmers and ranchers. - -

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UNIVERSAL

Information Services.. Inc .(402) 342-31 78

TIMES THURSDAY WEEKLY MILFORD, NE Circulation = 1173

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Kill the farm bill In a couple of days a farm -because this farm bill i ill will likely pass in Con- not worth it. ress. There are some wins We will have the bpportunding for beginning nity to fight again, and we I money for a rural have real hope that we can do erprise program, and better, that we can win more, r the Conservation and that rural America can get 1 ip Program. We're a farm bill that is better than seinvestments, the one about to pass' do some real Congress. Rural ~ m e r i c a d rm bill becomes should not have to wait five; more years to get a decentl n't fix what's farm bill, and many of rong with this bill. This farm our ural communities cannoP ill, as currently written, is not wait that long. worthy of passage. There are In five more years t h e wills victories, but the magnitude of be even fewer farmers, fewef those victories is not anywhere jobs and more empty homes close to the magnitude of the and businesses. So get out the veto pen, Mr. ortunities squandered. If bill hits the President's President, and do the right i hould veto it. And thing. Kill this farm bill. n Congress should sustain Elisha Greely Smith; t veto, pass a one year exCenter for Rural Affairs sion, and start over again $

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INDEX WEDNESDAY WEEKLY MITCHELL, NE Circulation= 893

0511412008 *.

Center for Rural Affairs: Veto This Farm Bill1

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In a couple of days a farm

.bill will likely pass in Congress. There are some wins ,such as funding for beginning farmers, money for a rural microenterprise program, and money for the Conservation Stewardship Program. We're grateful for those investments, and they will do some real .: good if this farm bill becomes L law. II!. But it doesn't fix what's [i " wrong with this bill. This farm bill, as currently written, is not worthy of passage. There are victories, but the magnitude of '

By Elisha Greeley Smith, elishas@cfra.orga those victories is not anywhere close to the magnitude of the opportunities squandered. If this bill hits the President's desk, he should veto it. And then Congress should sustain that veto, pass a one year extension, and start over again because this farm bill is not worth it. We will have the opportunity to fight again, and we have real hope that we can do better, that we can win more, and that rural America can get a farni bill that is better than

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the one about to pass Con- B gress. Rural America should not have to wait five more years to get a decent farm bill, 2 and many of our rural cornmu- ! nities cannot wait that long. In five more years there will be 3 even fewer farmers, fewer jobs, : and more empty homes and businesses. So get out the veto pen, Mr. President, and do the right thing. Kill this farm bill. For more information i visit: http://www.cfra.orgl , blog/2008/05/05/farm-billneeds-v ad

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Yankton Daily Press & Dakotan Yankton,SD Circ. 8072 From Page: 1 51312008

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framework for community wind projects to negotiate with utllities. 'GBFD mandates that developers have to offer the opportunity for turbine ownenhip to the landowners,"sald Martin Kleinschrnit,wind enegy w~ UK centw for ~ural 'And at least 30 Kent of the power generat has to go to the residents of the state, and no one partner can own more than o n ~ i x t hof the project." Kleinschmit added the benefit of GBED projects is It offers six times more economlc impact to ..rural communities than standard wind development pro ects. micaUy, an out -state developer wW come in, lease the land, put up the equipment and taahe all the monev? he sald. "C BED gives the community the opportunity to benefit from their own resou~ces."

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ble entity to develop a WEU project and receive payment for energy sold. And whlle law quires that utllitles negotiate with qualified GBED projects, it does not quire them to actuak si the contracts. am very proud of the efforts made in Nebraska, Iowa and Minnesota on GBED develo ment," Kloucek sald. 'Now we sRa11push forward and adopt this leglslatlon in South Dakota." But not everyone agrees wind development needs to be lated Lsue. "Some people like to focus on the corporate structwing of these projects," sald South Dakota Publlc Utlllties . Commissioner Dusty Johnson.. "But we need to focus on doing these because it's the right thing to do." Now ranked fifth in the nation for percentage of duced from wind,xL!gta Is also working hard to develop more wind energy pro ects for . the state, Johnson ad ed. '(South Dakota) Is moving forward at a gr&t rate of speed," he said. "We've bro ht two massive projects o 3 n e this with the Bmkhgs County akota Project and the McPherson County Tatonka

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slow1 than some would like to see,tieregs no 'magic wandnand the South Dakota model for wind energy development 'makes a lot more sense." We're working on standardlzing the inte~~onnection proca dures." he sdd. 'We want to make it easier for people with individual wind turbines to connect." Johnson addd that most states that have tax incentives create a negative effect for consumers. 'Our South Dakota model just makes a lot more sense it's the difference between mandate and encouragement,"Johnson sald. W ' e don't want to rely on heavy-handed mandates, we believe the development can hap~enthrough smart econom-

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He sald he believes mandates are not in the long-range'best interestoftheconsumers. LooMng ahead to the future of wind energy development for South Dakota,'Johnson was optlmistic. 'I'm aware of about two dozerr pro ects in South Dakota currently ing considered," he said. 'Not all will become a reality,but we're definitely moving forward with this."

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REPUBLICAN THURSDAY WEEKLY IMPERIAL, NE Circulation= 2080

05/22/2008

Center for Rural Affairs urges farm bill veto The Center for Rural Affairs has announced its opposition to passage of the farm bill conference report and encouraged President Bush to veto the bill. "We urged Congress to vote against this farm bill and we encourage President Bush to veto it. This farm bill commits the federal government to subsidizing the destruction of family farming for another five years and it invests little in the future of rural communities," said Chuck Hassebrook, Executive Director of the Center for Rural Affairs. Hassebrook said, "The farm bill funds just one new rural development initiative-the Rural Microentrepreneur Assistance Program-which provides loans, training and technical assistance to rural small businesses. The Center for Rural Affairs commends Senator Ben Nelson for championing the program. It creates genuine opportunity for rural people and a future for their communities. It was only Nelson's insistence with Congressional leaders that saved the program, after it was initially dropped." "The new farm bill breaks faith with rural America and reflects a failure of leadership by both Congress and the Administration. Congressproduced only the illusion of

reform to provide political cover for its failure to adopt real reform. The Administration talked reform, while refusing to support the one true reform on the table-the Dorgan Grassley amendmentand refusing to use its existing administrative authority to close payment limitation loopholes," explained Hassebrook. The Center's analysis of payment recipients (www.cfra.org/ falsereform) found that over 99 percent of farmers affected by the payment limitation provisions in the conference report would continue receiving the same large direct payments by switching to other means of exceeding the paper limits on payments. The analysis found only five farmers in seven leading farm states (which include OK, ND, IA, GA, KY, MN, MT) that would face any cut in direct payments under the direct attribution provisions of the farm bill conference agreement. "Closing one gate while leaving two open won't keep the hogs out of the trough," added Hassebrook. The Center also offered the following evidence that the equally flawed means test (AGI) provisions are no more effective at denying payments to high income recipients: 1) Senator Chuck Grassley's

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analysis of U.S. Internal Revenue Service data revealed that about 40percent of those who would lose farm payments under the income limits are landlords who will switch to cash rent arrangements. The federal checks will now be sent to tenant farmers, but high income landlords will still capture them through top dollar cash rents. 2) High income farms will divide income between spouses to stay below the limits. Rich couples can put their multimillion dollar income in one spouse's name and the farm in the other. For example, Nancy Pelosi is the 15th richest member of Congress, but according to her financial disclosure reports, she'd be eligible for payments. That is because most of the couple's investments are not in her name. 3) Large farms that approach the income limit will get around it by expanding their operation purchasing land and other assets to create deductions for interest, depreciation and inputs. Secretary Schafer got it right when he said recently that "If there is a farm in America that can't meet a $500,000 hard cap, they need a new accountant." (The cap in the final legislation is even higher.) For more information visit: www.cfra.org/falsereform.

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NEWS-TIMES MORNING YORK, NE

DAILY

Circulation = 4196

05/28/2008

1

Guest Opinion

Provisions do not exceed losses 1 By Elisha Greeley Smith Center for Rural Affairs

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The Center for Rural Affairs opposed passage of the new farm bill because it commits the federal government to subsidizing the destruction of family farming for another five years and invests little in the future of rural commuThis is heartbreaking because bill has particularly strong beginning farmer and rancher provisions. It would provide $ I5

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million of competitive grants annually for initiatives to help beginners get started, give an extra two years of payments on land enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program if it is sold or rented to a beginning farmer. If funded, a pilot program would provide matching funds to beginners and a land sales program would offer loan guarantees to individuals who sell land to beginners. Finally. loans to beginners who convert to sustainable and organic agriculture

would be prioritized. Despite all of these wins, the final bill failed to address the advantages the farm program gives to mega farmers. If they go on creating "paper" farms to exceed the limits, they unfairly disadvantage everyone. especially beginners. Land values and cash rents continue to be bid higher, further outweighing the benefits of any good programs. Ultimately, this destroys the prosperity of rural America and is simply not worth supporting.

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(402) 342-31 78

BANNER-PRESS THURSDAY WEEKLY

DAVID CITY, NE Circulahon = 3139

05115/2008

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From the Center by Elisha Greeley Smith, Center for Rural Affairs

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Veto this farm bill In a couple of days a farm bill will likely pass in Congress. There are some wins such as funding for beginning farmers, money for a rural mTcroenterprise program, and money for the Conservation Stewardship Program. We're grateful for those investments, and they will do some real good if this farm bill becomes law. But it doesn't fix what's wrong with this bill. This farm bill, as currently written, is not worthy of .passage. There are victories, but the magnitude of those victories is not anywhere close to the magnitude of the opportunities squandered. If this bill hits the President's desk, he should veto it. And then Congress should sustain

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that veto, pass a one year exten-: sion, and start over again because this farm bill is not worth it. We will have the opportunity toB fight again, and we have real hop? that we can do better, that we caq win more, and that rural Arneric can get a farm bill that is bett than the one about to pa Congress. Rural America shoul not have to wait five more years get a decent farm bill, and many of our rural communities cannot wait, that long. In five more years there will be even fewer farmers, fewei jobs and more empty homes an4 businesses. So get out the veto pen! Mr. President, and do the righ thing. Kill this farm bill. For more information http://www.cfra.org/blog/200 51farm-bill-needs-veto

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UNIVERSAL Information Services Inc

NEWS THURSDAY WEEKLY ORCHARD, NE Circulation = 654

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$sign-upb for Makin' 1 @:~oneyCarnp I! -.''if you're going into the 5th 1 ,

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through 8th grades this two-day ~ a k i n Money ' ,Camp is for you! Participants will hear about: what skills are needed to be a successful entrepreneur. Learn how to develop a business plan, practice bor- ! rowing money from a banker and design advertising and marketing slogans. Each camper will make a 1 product and then sell to customers at the Camp Marketplace. ?Camp is May 29th & 30th in The ; Wayne at the Wayne State College g Student Center. :. E's not too late to register, but i the deadline is May 15th and the camp is limited to 30 par- ; ticipants. There is a small fee to attend. Call 582-4866 to register ' TODAY! The camp is funded in

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Farm Billmust be

INDEPENDENT MORNlNG DAILY GRAND ISLAND, NE Circulation= 22792

05/22/2008

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all over FARM BILL: Congess has to pass it again "Now is also not the time to create a new uncapped revenue guarantee that could cost billions of dollars more than advertised," Bush said. "This is on top of a farm bill that is anticipated to cost more than $600 billion over 10years. In addition, this bill would force many businesses to prepay their taxes in order to finance the additional

By Robert Pore robert poremthelndependent corn

Even though he rec,)gnized there are flaws in the Farm Bill, Rep. Adrian Smith, R-Neb., on Wednesday voted to override President Bush's veto. The House voted 316-108 to overturn the veto. But they're going to have to go through the process all over again because Congress sent Bush the wrong copy of the bill. It was discovered after the House vote that a 34-page section of the bill had been omit- Adrian ted, so Bush vetoed a different Smith bill from what Congress passed. Democrats hoped to pass theentire bill, again, on Thursday under expedited rules usually reserved for unopposed legislation The correct version would then be sent to Rush for anothei expected veto. Lawnldkers also probably mill have to pass an extension of current farm lalv, which expires Friday Smith, a member of the 1-Io11.se.4grir*1r!ttic.~ Comnl~tteeand Farm Bill architect, said brfort) Wednesday's Housevote that he was disap~x)it~tcul that Congress and the Bush adn~mistrationwere unable to come to an agreement. "It has been more than two years since work began on this necessary legislation beginning with listening sessions in nearly every state, including Nebraska," he said Smith said the Farm Bill he voted for "wasn't a perfect bill." "I would have preferred the Farm Bill contain more reforms, but it does take some steps in the rignt direction," he said. In vetoing the Farni Bill, Bush said, "At a time of high food prices and record farm income, this bill lacks program reform and fiscal discipline." "It continues subsidies for the wealthy and increases farm bill spending by more than $20 billion, while using budget gimmicks to hide much of the increase," Bush said. He said the Farm Rill is inconsistent with his administration's international trade negotiation objectives, which include securlng greater market access for American farmers and ranchers. turn to FARM BILL, page 2-A

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Bush's reference to high food prices in his justification for vetoing the bill. "He should know, as USDA has said, that Tom farmers reBuis ceive less than 20 cents of every retail food dollar," But the vast majority of Buis said. "If you want to agricultural organizations know the real culprit of do not support Bush's veto. higher food prices, look at National Farmers Union the skyrocketing costs of enleads a broad coalition of ergy In addition, this Farm 1,054 organizations calling Bill makes a huge new comon Congress to override the mitment to nutrition and president's Farm Bill veto. anti-hunger programs, more NFU President Tom Buis than ever before, to help those said the Farm Bill reduces with limited incomes to adoverall spending and takes dress higher food prices." steps to reform con~modity Buis noted the 1,054-group program participation. coalition surpasses the re"The president's veto cord 557 groups that called shows how out of touch this on Congress to pass the Farm administration is with what Bill last week. is happening in real-world He said the coalition repAmerica," Buis said. resents farm, conservation, "Using today's commodity commodity, specialty crop, prices asjustificationto oppose nutrition, anti-hunger and the bill does not utilize lessons consumer groups, cooperalearned that gravity works and tives, religious organizations hat goes up will come down. and others that represent milny farm bill works in peri- lions of peopleacross the of good times;Congress is country The coalition, in a letter for the difficult times. Ironi- to lawmakers, said the Farm Bill ConferenceReport makes significant farm policy reforms, protects the safety netfor all of America's food producers, addresses important is also took issue with infrastructure needs for speContinued from 1-A

Smitl~ailloilg 316 in House voting to override president's veto; but clerical error sent incomplete copy of bill to Rush

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cialty crops, increases funding to feed our nation's poor, enhances support for important conservation initiatives, and promotes the next generation of renewable fuels. "It has been a long process. The time has come for a new Farm Bill to be completed," Buis said. Republican Sen. Chuck Hagel of Nebraska voted against the Farm Bill and supports Bush's veto. He said one of the biggest problems with the bill is that it doesn't close the loopholes that allow big landowners and agribusinesses to abuse the farm payment program. "Fewer than half of America's farms benefit from our current farm policy and nearly 66 percent of farm payments go to onlv 10 percent of producers," Hagel said. "It is unwise and wrong to continue these policies. The real farmers and taxpayers lose. The big guys win." Also supporting Bush's veto is the Nebraska-based Center for Rural Affairs in Lyons. According to Chuck Hassebrook, executive director of the Center for Rural Affairs, "This Farm Bill commits the federal government to subsidizing the destruction of family farming for another five years and it invests little in the future of rural communities." Hassebrook said the new Farm Bill breaks faith with rural America and reflects

a failure of leadership by both Congress and the administration. "Congress produced only the illusion of reform to provide political cover for its failure to adopt real reform," he said. Also supporting Bush's veto is the National Wildlife Federation, which is affiliated with the Nebraska Wildlife Federation. Larry Schweiger, president and CEO of the National Wildlife Federation,said that Congress passed a Farm Bill that "sows the seeds of disaster for wildlife." "This Farm Bill jeopardizes America's wildlife and irresponsibly aggravates the threat of climate change," Schweiger said. He said Congress has hit conservation with a "one-two punch by reducing funding for land conservationpmgrams and failing to enact either the House or Senate-passed"Sodsaver" provision to eliminate incentives to break out even the most marginal of native grassland areas. "If passed into law, the Farm Bill will severely impact habitat needed by many species of wildlife and lead to enormous releases of carbon dioxide as native grasslands are plowed to grow crops," Schweiger said. -.

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STAR-JOURNAL WEDNESDAY WEEKLY AINSWORTH, NE Circulation = 2500

05/14/2008

Dave Buchholz to provide Free Marketing for Businesses on Mav 20 fl 7

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free marketing workshop will presentation. Dave Buchholz is president of -te held for businesses interested in about effective mar- David & Associates, a marketing tegies for their business communications firm headquartered , 2008 at the Ainsworth in Hastings, Nebraska, which he Center. The workshop founded in 1984. The agency has from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 satellite offices in Grand Island and n to all start-up and Lincoln. The company serves regionsscs. Businesses In- al, national and international clients erested in participating are encour- in agriculture and agribusiness, ed to bring any current market~ng ethanol, healthcare, telecommunirmation (ads, flyers, business cations, financial, manufacturing, ), as Dave has offered to critique tourism and economic development, within the weeks following the professional services and retail.

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The firm has won several regional and national awards for its creative work. He was the 2002 recipient of t h e National Agri-Marketing Association (NAMA) a w a r d for professional excellence i n public relations. Raised on a farm near Ayr, Nebraska, he is a graduate of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. On weekends, he plays keyboards in Blackberry Winter, an 8-piece classic horn rock band. He and his wife, Debra, are parents of a son, Djorn. To learfi

more about Dave and David and AS-: sociates, please visit the website atR www.teamdavid.com. Registration is requested by noon' onMay 19th. Formoreinformation, or to register, please call Kristin at the North Central Development Center, 402-387-2740 ext. 10. The workshop is sponsored by the REAP Women's Buslness Centerpartially funded by the SBA, a n d , the North Central Development: Center. -

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ROCK COUNTY LEADER WEDNESDAY WEEKLY BASSET, NE Circulation = 1413

05M412008

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businesses

A free marketing workshop will be held for businesses interested in learning more about effective marketing strategies for t h e i r b u s i n e s s o n May 2 0 , a t t h e Ainsworth Conference C e n t e r . The workshop will be held from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. a n d is open to all start-up and existing businesses. Businesses interested in partici. pating a r e encouraged to bring a n y current marketing information ( a d s , flyers, business cards), a s Dave h a s offered to critique them within the weeks following the presentation. Dave Buchhclz is president of avid and Asjuu::..tcs, a markctg communications firm headquartered in Hastings, NE, which he founded in 1984. The agency has satellite offices in Grand Island and Lincoln. The company serves regional, national a n d international clients in agriculture a n d agribusiness, ethanol, healthcare, telecon~munications,financial, manufacturing, tourism and economic development, professional services and retail. The firm .has won several regional a n d national awards for its creative work. --He was the 2002 recipient of the National k g r i MarketingAssociation (NARIA) award for professional excellence in public relations. Raised on a farm near Ayr, NE, he is a graduate of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. On week ends, h e plays keyboards in Blackberry Winter, a n eigh-piece classic horn rock band. He a n d his wife, Debra, a r e parents of a son, Djorn. To learn more about Dave a n d David and Associates, visit www.teamdavid.com. Registration is requested by noon on May 19. For more information, or to register, call 402387-2740 ext. 10. The workshop is sponsored by the REAP Women's Business Center-partially funded by the SBA, a n d the North Central Develop: !

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Tyndall Tribune & Register Tyndall,SD Circ. 1168 From Page: 6 51712008

County elected officials

3f 6'T 7 5 SenatorK1oucekand Bruce VoiM attend windpower meeting in Nebraska

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District 19 South Dakota State Senator Frank Kloucek from Scotland and Bruce Voigt of Tyndall attended the ground breaking ceremonies for the Elkhorn Ridge wind project northeast of Bloomfield, Nebr. recent1 The glkhorn Ridge 180 megawatts] and Crofton Hills Wind project [42 megawatts] in Knox County will more than double the current wind energy praduction of 73 Megawatts of electricity. These wind fa- are a direct result of Sen. Cap Dierks LB 629 the unanimous approval of the Nebraska Unicamera1 and strong support by the governor. Key support by the Nebraska Public Power District, Nebraska Farmers Union, Center for Rural Affairs, American ~ o r n i r o w e r s ,and many other groups and organizations made this a reality. Sen. Kloucek congratulated Gov. Dave Heineman, Sen. Cap Dierks Sen. Annette Dubas, NFU Pres. John Hansen, CFRA wind expert Martin Kleinschmit, Dan McGuire American Corn Growers Foundation and wealth from the wind Director, Keith Dittrick President of the American Corn growers Board of Directors, NPPD Officials, -

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ing Jerry Thunker of Crofton, farmers, landowners, community leaders, investors and deveiopers through out the afternoon. "It is amazing how one ~ i e c eof leeislation can have kuch a posi%ve effect on rural economic development!" said Senator Kloucek. Bruce Voigt, wind power proponent from ,Tyndall said, " We are working with wind developers for possible projects in Bon Homme, Douglas and Hutchinson Counties. The opportunity is there we just have to pur ue it!" "It i long past time our nation pulls away from this dependence on foreign oil and the spiraling deficit impact it hts had on our economy. It is time we pull our heads 9 , 3 4 s $fIm and b l k d s of Cans a "afid to6k'' ro "wifld Power# ethanol, solar and safe alternative energy long-term S O ~ U ~ ~t0O Our ~ S ener y crisis. I am very proud of t e efforts made in Nebraska, Iowa and Minnesota on C-bed develop ment; Now we shall push forward and edo t legislation O p in the wind Own land pOmnib' and ilfinite South Dakota! concluded SenatorKloucek The groundbreaking was at the Elkhorn Ridge Facility northeast of Bloomfield, and the Program was at the Bloomfield School gymA

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BANNER-PRESS THURSDAY WEEKLY DAVID CITY, NE Circulation = 3 139

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The Center for Rural Affairs opposed passage of the new farm bill because it comlriits the federal government to subsidizing the destruction' of family farming for another five years and invests little in the future of rural communities. This is heartbreaking because the bill has particularly strong beginning farmer and rancher provisions. It would provide $15 million of competitive grants annually for initiatives to help beginners get started, give an extra two years of payments on land enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program if it is sold or rented to a beginning farmer. If funded, a pilot program "- would provide matching funds to

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by Elisha Greeley Smith, Center for Rural Affairs

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beginners and a land sales pro- ! gram would offer loan guarantees k to individuals who sell land to El beginners. Finally, loans to beginners who convert to sustainable and organic agriculture would be prioritized. Despite all of these wins, the final bill failed to address the advantages the farm program gives to mega farmers. If they go I on creating "paper" farms to exceed the limits, they unfairly disadvantage everyone, especially beginners. Land values and cash rents continue to be bid higher, further outweighing the benefits of any good programs. Ultimately, this destroys the prosperity of rural America and is simply not worth supporting. For more information visit: www.cfra.org . B

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CEDAR CO.NEm'S WEDNESDAY WEEKLY

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hlghllght tourlsm banquet

NORFOLK - This year's Northeast Nebraska Travel Council Annual Banquet will feature windmills, agri-tourism, and an eclectic mix of other entertainment aimed at enlightening and uniting the tourism industry in Northeast Nebraska. The event will f$ be 6-8:30p.m. May 29, at the St. Michael Historic Complex in -3 l'arnov. The public is invited to attend. Barbara Chamness. director of Windmills across Nebraska, will :, : speak about her collaborative project that brought together .;r Nebraska artists and communities for rural revitalization and ,$ tourism. She works as a development director for the Center for Rural Affairs in Lyons. Karen Kollars, agri-tourism consultant for the Nebraska Division of Travel and Tourism, will speak about farms, ranches, hunting and outdoor recreation businesses in Nebraska. She is hased in Sidney and is a former director of the Cheyenne County (Sidney)Chamber of Commerce. The evening event will also include the 2008 Northeast Nebraska Tourism Awards anti a n appearance by the "Swedish Cleaning Ladies'' from Wausa. Tickets for the event can be purchased at the door with a n RSVP or by contacting Emelia Brandt at 402-371-5433 or ebrandt(t3nebrask;llifc.com. -.Prior to the banquet and beginning at 3:30p.m., the Northeast Nebraska Travel Council will hold its annual meeting, which will include election of new officers. The Northeast Nebraska Travel Council is a non-profit, membership organization that promotes and develops the tourism industry in Northeast Nebraska. It represents businesses, tourist attractions and communities in 18 counties of Northeast Nebraska: Antelope, Boone, Burt. Cedar, Colfax, Cuming, Dakota, Dixon, Dodge, Knox, Madison. Nance. Pierce, Platte, Stanton, Thurston, Washington and Wayne. Membership can be purchased on a n aru~ualbasis and are available to any individual, businesses or organization that wishes to enhance the tourism industry in Northeast Nebraska. More information is available at p:TravelNeNebraska.com->

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CHIEFTAIN THURSDAY WEEKLY TECUMSEH, NE Circulation= 1824

0511 512008 -

lVeto this Farm Bill

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B; ~ l i s h aGreeley Smith, Centerjor Rural Ajuirs eliskas@cfru.org - ---

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In a couple of days a farm bill will likely pass in Congress. There are some wins such as funding for beginning farmers, money for a rural microenterprise program, and money for thc Conservation Stewardship Program. We're grateful for those investments, and they will do sornc real good if this farm bill becomes law. But it doesn't fix what's wrong with this bill. This farm bill, as currently written, is not worthy of passagc. There are victories, but thc magnitudc of those victories is not anywhere close to the magnitude of the opportunities squandered. If this bill hits the

President's desk, he should veto it. And then Congress should sustain that veto, pass a one year extension, and start over again because this farm bill is not worth it. We will have the opportunity to fight again, and we have real, hope that we can do better, that we can win more, and that rural America can get a farm bill that is better than the one about to pass Congress. Rural America should not have to wait five more years to get a decent farm bill, and many of our rural communities cannot wait that long. In five more years there will be even fewer farmers, fewerjobs and more empty homes and businesses. So get out the veto pen, Mr. President, and do the right thing. Kill this farm bill.

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M O N D A Y , M A Y 2 6 , 2,008

MARKETPLACE ADS INSlllE SECTION

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WORLD-HERALD MORNING DAILY OMAHA, NE Circulilbon = 192075

05/26/2008

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- -~ . - I< I. I h h I, bf :$ \ (1 K A ( Reinke Manufacturing of Deshler, Neb., is one of four world leaders in center-pivot irrigation systems. All are Nebraska firms.

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Reinke a big part of Nebraska's irrigation

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Forty years ago last week, a Ruskin, Neb., farmer pushed the button to start up the first "Electrogator" center pivot irrigation rig built and sold by Reilike Manufacturingof Deshler, Neb. As the decades passed, the pivot continued to make its slow circles to water corn and soybeans in south-central Nebraska. S ~ n c e1989, it has been used to water a field outside Deshler owned by area farmer Bob Duensing. Meanwhile, the Reinke business grew to become one of four leading irrigation equipment manufacturers in the world. The company, still fanlilyowned and based in Deshler, employs about 400 people. The other three leaders, Valmont Industries Inc., Lindsay Corp. and T-L Irrigation Co , also are based In Nebraska. R e i n k e , f o u n d e d by farmer and self-taught engineer Kichard Reinke, was not the first company to manufacture a center pivot Competitor Valmont Industries, now based in Omaha, bought the center pivot patent from Colorado inventor Frank Zybach and began manufacturingits version in 1954. But the Electrogator Included two crucial innovations, according to Reinke CEO Chris Roth-who, at39, is younger than the invention that launched the company's irrigation business. It was the first electric center pivot

Center pivots now irrigate 4.6 million acres in Nebraska. that was reversible, meaning it could be installed in a field too small to allow the pivot to turn a full circle. The reverse feature allows the pivot to swing back and forth, sort of like a windshield wiper. Reinke also was the first to place the watering pipe above the rig's support trusses, adding more stability and giving it thelook commonly seen with today's irrigation equipment. Earlier versions fastened the water-

ingpipe below the trusses. The 1960s were a crucial time of development for Nebraska's center pivot industry, with the Lindsay Corp. of Omaha developing its "Zimmatic" system and T-L Irrigation Co. in Hastings developing i t s hydraulically powered pivot at about the same time Reinke developed the Electrogator. In 1968, there were probably more than 100 companies seeking a foothold in manu-

facturing various center pivot irrigation mechanisms, industry leaders said. Only four major manufacturers survived and prospered, all in Nebraska, in part because the state's semiarid climate creates a demand for irrigation in the area and in part b e cause the Ogallala aquifer provides a ready water supply. ~ 0 t h "There a r e well over 55,000 pivots in Nebraska, of all different brands," said Jim Kostal, U.S. marketing manager for T-L Irrigation Co. "I think it ought to be the state tree." The Nebraska Pivot Irrigation Manufacturers' Association says that pivots now irrigate 4.6 million acres in Nebraska and that, based upon a study by Charles Lamphear of the Nebraska Policy Institute, each pivot results in $76,000 of economic benefit each year. Roth and other pivot manufacturers said there's room for growth in their industry, even though much of the state is more carefully managing water usage and many western areas have put moratoriums on additional wells, irrigated acres and new appropriations from streams, rivers and lakes. The moratoriums have spiked recent demand for pivots, as farmers rush to drill wells before See Reinke: Page 2


Reinke: Firin investing-- in new technology, job trai~ljng Continupd from Page 1 terested in agrici~ltui-e.After water restrict;ons take ef- five years with KPMG professional services. he accepted a fect, Ko<tal saici. -- Chuck Hassebrook of the job in Reinke's finance deCenter for Rural Affairs said partment and worked his way ir~igationremalns a boon to up to CEO. Roth said his comNchraska agriculture, but it pany is as committed to preserving small-town rural Nemust beused judiciously. "There is a place for irriga- braska a s it is to conserving tion. I t has dramatically en- water. hanced productivity," he Deshler, in Thayer County said. "Rut we have a responsi- in south-central Nebraska, bility to future generations to has a population of al)out 880. use it in a way that's sustain- The company worked with able." Deshler Public Schools and The pivot manufacturers Southeast Community Colsaid that's where they come lege to develop certified 1 in. They saidpivots wasteless welder training programs for water than "flood" methods of area high school students and irrigation, in which water is adults. Both programs begin this fall. % delivered into fields via eated ir # pipes and furrows in the crop The curriculum is designed rows. Roth and other industry so that students can obtain leaders said their companies American Welding Society a r c working on new technolo- certification and go to work gies, from computcw to bet- as professional welders right '! ter-designed nozzles, s o out of high school. The hope is farmers can apply a precise that some of those welders amount of water a t the pre- will stay in Deshler and go to :cise time needed to achieve workat Reinke, Roth said. - the best c r o-~ v,i e l d s . ;; Roth grew up in Calloway, a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;We're still famlly-owned, *custer county village along and we're still in rural Ne"That sets the south L~~~ ~ i~i~ fa~ braska," ~ ~Roth said. , -- in our-phither left farming during the US a little bit a part 1980s farm crisis, but Roth, - - 10~0phy Wc're-vwy cornmitted to therural areas." who holdb a business degree dfronl the University of Ne- .contact the wrlter. braska-Lincoln, remained in- 402 473 9581 irsl~eteedlowh corn

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0512612008


CLIPPER THURSDAY WEEKLY SHELTON, NE Circulation= 745

Good crop prices make it (even more critical to put a -firm cap on farm payments - especially the direct pay' ments made regardless of crop prices. It's just common .sense. So why does David Kruse ;.want the Center for Rural ' Affairs to stop talking about farm payment limitations? Why in times of $6 corn should the federal government write , $80,000 checks to subsidize the biggest farms to drive cash rent through the ceiling in the process of bidding land away

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from "their neighbors? Times are good in agriculture. If we make good decisions, those good times can bring a new generation of young people into agriculture. But if we continue the misguided policy of subsidizing mega farms to bid land away from smaller operations, there will still be little room for young farmers. And good crop prices will quickly be absorbed by higher production costs - especially cash rent.

It would be a sad mistake to so squander today's farm prosperity. To help us build a strong rural future, visit www.cfra.org. Chuck Hassebrook Center for Rural Affairs Lyons, Nebraska Chuck Hassebrook is the Executive Director of the Center for Rural Affairs of Lyons, Nebraska, a private, non-profit organization working to strengthen family-~cale, agriculture a n d rural communities.


CFRA Clippings for 060508