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1 Small Wlndow BIg OpprlmIty for Iowa Farmers 512 112~009

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Center fw Rural Affalrs

B Ellsha Greeley Smith,

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a n n o d that $1.4 million of EQJP funds has been set aside for a special three-week signup for Iowa f m converting to or anic production or I expan! 'ng their organic production. Those witb existing organic farms who desire to reach even higher levels of environmental performance are also eligible. The Iowa funds are part of a ' nationwide effort. USDA has set aside $50 million from the Environnlental Quality Incentives Rorpam (EQIP)for this oppoMty. .Unfortunately farmers have only three weeks to enroll in the program, and it's during the busiest time for,farmers the .

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middle of planting season. The sign up paid began Monday, May 11 and goes through Friday, May 29. Farmers can receive cbmpensation for six core conservation practices (conservdtion crop rotation, cover cropping, integrated pest management, nutrient management, rotational grazing, and forage harvest management) under the program. Farmers who want to apply should visit their Nahlral Resourcc C o w vation Wce office. The application process can be confusmg and complicated, but fortunately, help is available. The Center for Rural Affairs is gearing up to help producers as much as possible during h i s short application window. f i e Center is operating a Farm Bill Help&e where --

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producers can call in and receive assistance in accessing programs like the EQIP organic initiative.

the Farm Bill Helpline. The Center for Rural Affairs was established in 1973 as an unaffiliated nonprofit corporation under IRS code 501(c)3. The Center for Rural Affairs was formed by rural Nebraskans concerned about


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Information Services, Inc (402) 342-31 78

Pws-BLADE WEDNESDAY

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WEEKLY

BRIDGEPORT, NE Circulation= 1695

06113~2009

$1.8 Million Set ; Aside for NE Organic Farmers '

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Sign Upfor Program Begins j&exl Week Center for Rural i Affairs Offers Farm Bill Help Llne I Nebraska Farmers transitioning to organic fanning and I those already conducting or- 1 ganic practices now have an ' opportunity to apply for Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) money to , assist their organic efforts. I The USDA recently announced that $50 million out of $1 billion EQIP finds will be set aside for a special threeweek sign-up for farms convertlng to organic production or expanding their organic production. Those with existing organic farms who desire ! to reach even higher levels of environmental performance are also eligible. ! The State of Nebraska will receive $1.8 million to support organic transition through -- this national EQIP sign up. The sign-up period began Monday, May 11 and goes through Friday, May 29. Farmers can receive compensation for six core conservation practices (conservation crop rotation, cover cropping, integrated pest management, nutrient management, rotational grazing, and forage harvest management) under the program. These are available on a nationwide basis. Fanners who want to apply for these finds should visit their local District County Natural Resource Con- sewation Service office.

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"We commend NRCS and USDA leadership for listening to the concerns of organic farmers and applaud their new ' initiative," commented Traci Bruckner, Center for Rural Affairs. "It's unfortunate though that farmers have a very small window of only three weeks to sign up for the program and it's during the busiest time for farmers - the middle of planting season." According to Bruckner, the Center for Rural Affairs is gearing up to help producers as much as possible during this short application window. The Center is operating a Farm Bill . Helpline where producers can I call in and receive assistance in ,I accessing new conservatitiOn programs like the EQIP organic initiative. "The Center forRura1 Affairs has a long history of assisting family farmers and ranchers to access new conservation programs," added Bruckner. "Through 'our helpline you will get to speak to a real person who is knowledgeable about the program rules to help you understand how to participate in the program." Producers can call (402) 687-2100 and ask for the Farm BiiI Helpline. According to Bruckner, it is crucial that eligible producers move quickly because the time allowed for applications to this special EQIP sign up is only three weeks, began May 1 lth and ending May 29". I The EQIP organic initiative assistance is not the only program covered by the Center's Farm Bill Helpline. Assistance is also available for the Conservation Stewardship Program, the Cooperative Conservation Partnerships Initiative, the Value Added Agricultural Market Development Program

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UNIVERSAL Information Services, Inr

NEWS & LEADER

WEDNESDAY

WEEKLY

NELIGH, NE Circulation = 1837

05/13/2009

April Activities At Antelope County Resource Center In response to a letter of support for wind energy. submitted to Nebraska Public Power District (NPPD) by the Resource Center. Sandy Patton, director, was contacted by John Richards, engineer for NPPD. Richards stated that NPPb had received 18 proposals for construction of an 80-megawat~wind farm in either the PetersburgJElgin or Broken Bow area. NPPD received seven proposals at Broken Bow and six at PetersburgIElgin on the NPPD site, and private developers submitted proposals for their sites, one at Broken Bow and four in the PetersburgEl,'u ~ narea. Aftcr an evaluation of proposals, expected to be completed this sum-

mer, NPPD will determine a short Extension Office or the Kcsou~.ce * list of developers. Evaluations will Center. be hased on proposed energy a x t to The Welconie lloinc to Anfclojr: --NPPD, cost for transmission addiCounty comtnittee will be enticjr~g tions, developer's experience and alum back to the 31-en with :I prcsentation on "Wh;~tYou ( k t 1':)r tile erivironmcntnl impact. Prepar-ations are in full swing for Money" at the alutnni b:~nqucts[his the Makin' Money Camp which is month. For more irifot.nlatiorl call scheduled for June 4 and 5 in Neor stop in at the Resource Centel. ligh. The two-day event exposes Sandy Patton was cont;~t:tetl by youth. grades 5-8. to entrepreneurthe Nebraska St:;tewidz Arhorctunr. ship. The young people learn how last week, announcing t l i ; ~ t~i l e to dcvelop a produc!, market and grant she had written a n d sub!niit~:d sell i t . One of the main goals of thc for the landscaping p~0.jtx-t al-ollx! carnp is to empower youth to t ~ l ~ etile Tourism Center- bu~l(lirisI I L I ~ charge oi' the future of their home- been approved. The lanil\i.al)ir!~ town through business ownership. project will befin as sc~oriarc thc For more information ahout the evmist fountain h;ts been cotn~lctcd. ent. contact thc Antelope County Along with several otlicr inc!ivicl uals from Antelope County. 1';rtton j attended the Ncbrask;~S~~st:riri;~bility Leadership Wo~.l\shol~ i r r Norl'oil, last week. Thc w/orl\sIiop w a s pr-csented by J o s l y ~Instrt~itc ~ l i ~ r!<irs tainable Comrnunitics ,~ntl a brainstorming process t o ~ I I . ; L ~ : I \ : , .. local and regional susti~inal)ilityi:,sues. Goals of the workshop were -:&I, geneyag strategies li>r addressing .. :;the ~~ssu<s~and~identify i.Gdicltor for .: c:.;' - [.. .measuring progress. -. Presentations werc n ~ a d c o n Community Food Syste~ns;;ntl (looperatives by Mike Heavl-in of the Center for Rural Af'fairs, 1,yons: and Energy Efficiency by l-);inicl Lawse of the Neighborhootl Ccntcr. Omaha. Consultant5 were on hnnd from Ncbraskn 1-lo~~sing I)evelopers Association in Lincoln and Northeast Nebraska Economic I>evelopment District in Norfolk. As one of the objectives of the workshop, a statewide network will be put together for the purpose of eicl.~nrrging and sharing rebourccs. ?'he workshops are being prcsented throughout Nebraska. The next Resource Cent!,! board meeting will be May 71 ;\I the Kesource Center in Neligh. The n1ec.t ing is open to the piih!ic and ail-yone interested in attencling may call the Resource C'enter f o r an -. agenda, date, tinle and location. The board encourages intlividuals to become involved with the Re source Center. Cu~renlly.thcrr ;Ire board vacancies for the 0rcli:lr.d ancl Tilden areas. Interested persons m y call 887-4447, or- stop by thc office located at 105 East 2nd Street in Neligh. Events. updates and i~~i;)rm;~tir>rl can be found at the web site vl.\vw. ante~opccountyresourwcrikr.org.

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UNWERSAL

Information Services, Inc

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MIDLANDS BUSINESS JRNL FRIDAY WEEKLY OMAHA, NE Circulation = 5000

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MIDLANDSBUSINESSJOURNAL --- MAY22,2009

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Micro-lending appealing to growing budnesses seeking capital under $35,000 At Community Development Resources, the average amount is presently $15,000, which is being used to sustain payroll, purchase inventory and makeup for cases where cash flow is down because sales are down, he said.

by Kristin Durbin Whether rural or urban - wherever the fertile ground may be for the entrepreneur in Nebraska - micro-enterprises mean jobs in the state. A majority of Nebraska businesses are ( micro, meaning five or fewer employees, Rose Jasperson, executive director of the Oakland-based Nebraska Enterprise Fund said. The Nebraska Enterprise Fund, through its program partners, has loaned to 897 businesses in its 15 years with an average loan size less than $10,000. Loans less than $35,000 are considered micro, and micro-lending requests have - -been increasing because people are not looking for a large loan, but rather something to get by in this economy, said Rick 'Wallace of the Lincoln-based Community Development Resources. The SBA has recently notified CDR of approval for $750,000 through SBA's kicro-lending program, which CDR can distribute with its 15 percent match, Wallace said. -. The newly injected capital will add to its inventory of loan products, he said. Entrepreneurs are sometimes referred bv banks to organizations like CDR and REAP, the ~ u ; a l Enterprise Assistance

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I Project, which has training, technical as-

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sistance like preparing a business plan and Eetworking, in addition to micro-lending. 1 ' REAP has service regions throughout ?he state with a business specialist in each, ; said Jeff Reynolds, the program director I who is based in Plymouth. In 2008, REAP 1 had 5 1 loans and 20 packaged loans, down slightly from 2007 because funding sources pulled back due to the economy, Reynolds

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Vicki Wilson Tederman, executive director of the Omaha Small Business Network. said. N. 24th St. Three banks are also loaning the OSBN "We're on track to have a very large a total of $125,000 for a non-traditional vear." he said. Some people are loan fund of $875,000, Tederman said. In the last six months OSBN closed 10 turning to starting businesses because loans for a total of $325,000. "Nice start," Tederman said. of a lack of other opWhile a small amount of capital, a portunities, he said. " S m a l l b u s i - micro-loan may be someone's first borrowness lending is very ing experience, Wallace said. risky," -Reynolds ----- . said. "REAP takes on a risk." The Omaha Small Business NetReynolds work is, like REAP, a Small Business Administration-approved Micro Loan Intermediary Lender. The SBA approved $750,000 to re-loan with the option to go back to the SBA for up to $3.5 million more based on its lending record and without further application, said Vicki Wilson Tederman, executive director of the Omaha Small Business Network, 2505

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Salute to Small Business, see page 27 of this week's MBJ

Business owners face challenges including poor credit and the tremendous impact of the economy hurting good businesses through no fault of their own, Wallace said. Micro-lending is just one part of CDR's services. What is most important is the technical assistance prior to any loans, he said. Wallace noted the CDR offices are in the vicinity of the Nebraska Business Development Center and offices for the Service Corps of Retired Executives at 285 S. 68th St. Place in Lincoln. "These businesses do create jobs oftentimes beyond the job for the owner. Studies show in recessive times those jobs are the ones that remain," Jasperson said. In Omaha, Nebraska Enterprise Fund partners that have micro-loans programs are Catholic Charities, Midlands LatinoCCD, Center for Women Entrepreneurs and the New Community Development Corporation.


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INDEPENDENT GRAND ISLAND, Nebraslca

r Comght 2009 i All Rlghls RCSWcd

Friday, May 29,2009 DAILY

22792 Clip Size: 51.02 Ad Rate: $21 Pagelsection: A I

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Report: Rural mental health concerns/overlooked -

By Robert Pore robert.pore@theindependent.com

LYONS-A new report &om theCenterforRuralairs released this week found that there were "alarmhgdeflciencies in the mental health care system in rural America." The center's report is titled "MentalHealth: Overlookedand Disregarded in Rural America." According to Kim Preston, rural research assistant for the Center for Rural Affairs, m a 1 Americansremainunderserved

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in terms of mental health care providersand health insurance coverage for mental health services, despite the fact rural Americans suffer just as much from mental illness. She said the report "further demonstratesthat ruralAmerica's economic dependence on small bminess and selfemployment calls for health care reform that includes an affordable, meaningful public health insurance option." 'Nnd that any such reform should also ensure that all

Americans, rural and urban, have reasonable access to quality mental health care," Preston said.

upto-dab n ~ i h

The Centerfor Rural &airs, in collaborationwith Dr. Dianne Travers Gustafson of Creighton University, recently evaluated rural Americans' access to crucial mental health care services. Preston said this is the fourth in a series of Center for Affairs reports examin-

MENTAL HEALTH

a sei.lous mental illness. f i n d tells you they were diStress: Stress is associMental illness,m~)rdmgagnasedwith a mental illness, ated with increased mental toDHHS&cUis ofbmmis- ask them do dell ynt abouttheir health*ddm understood but is a common experience and feelings." ple experience stresswith cy. health condition that causes Here are some tips &om clicalf h m crises,naturaldi- changes in a person's think- DHHS on how to respond if sasters and mlal isolation. ing, mood and behavior. a kiend tells you he or she W Barriers of availabil"It's important to remem- has a mental illness: ity: More than 85percent of ber that people can and do re Express your concern the 1,668federally designated coverh m mental illness and and sympathy mental health professional lead ploductisre liveswith the Make sure your fkiend shortage areas-are rural. support of our kiends in the understands that you honW Lack of accessibilitv: communi&"saidCsuolCous- estly care. Ask for more deonly in rural ~ m e r i ~ & d t f ksons de Reyes, Oace of Con- tails about how he or she is Nadonal Advisory Commit- sumer Affairs admjnisirator managing and really listen. tee on Rural Health (1W. find ) in the Departmentof Health IRemind your Briend that entire countieswith no urac- and Human Services. -. a mental illness is treatable. ticing psychiatristi h+i~ol-Friends make dlffemm Find out if themend b getogists or social workers. 'Ilmarernoretr&~tments ting the care he or she needs Sodal sQpa: The scz cia1stigma attached to men- and community support sys- ,and wants. Ask what you can do tal h.ealth problems, in com- tems thanever befoe,but re to assist. Rides to medical m r y does not happen in i w bination with a general lack app~intments or keeping lation, said Scot Adams, of anonymity in many small person company in the communities,leads somepee director of the Division of Be the waiting room can ease havioral Health in DHHS. ple to forego treatment. of the anxietyand re some He said friendship is one W Lack of at!Eordable, of the most important fac- luctance that people feel -healthwhen faced with a lifecoverage: Rural Americans tors in recovery changing diagnosis. "My friends and family mlesskelythanhW .Besumdoinchdeyour have made a difference just ioansdomhealthinin everyday plans, that covers mental or behav- by understandingand assist- &iend such as going out to eat or ing throughout the course of ioralhealth servicea catching a movie. If ywr mental illness," Coussons my Amrding do theNebraska DeDarhnentd Health and Hu- de Reyes said. *Youcan do a fkielxlresk~overturer IWSSUE and reinvite withm &S ~ervim,approximately lot by simply listeningdo some out being overbearing. one. For example, when a n,oooadults in Nebraska have "You can make a differContinued from 1-A

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Universal Information Services , Inc. http://news.universaI-info.com Profile: 111 - Center for Rural Affairs Recipient:John Crabtree

ing crucial health care issues in rural America. Previous reports can be found on the h n t page of the center's Web site (www.cfra.org). Findings from the report include: Depressioww o r depm sion rates in some rural areas sii3nificantlyexceed those in urban areas. Teens and older adults in rural areas have significantly higher suicide rates than their urban counterparts. turn to M L I T U HLALTH, we 2-A

ence in your community just by being present and available to your Priend who is living with a mental illness," Coussons de Reyes said. The new Network of Care Web site is an easybuse, comprehensiveWeb site that provides vital information about treatment resources and diagnoses, insurance, advocacy and other pertinent behavioral health Web sites. The Network of Care Web for Be havioral Health canbe accessed at www.dhhs. ne.gov/networkofcare/. If a Wend is in crisis or suicidal due to a mental illn- ask what khdd h e 1 ~ they need and respond inimediately Enmut-agethem to seek support, including calling a crisis line or the NafionalSuicidePrevention Line at 1800-2T3.TALK. -.

On the Net

Download the report at http://fles.cfra.org/pdf/ Mental-Health-Overiookedand-Disregarded-in-RuralAmerica.pdf.

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INDEX MITCHELL, Nebraska

c Copyright 2009 \ A l l RightsRepwed

Wednesday, May 13,2009 WEEKLY 893 18.99 sq. inches $4.5 6

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Center for W.ural Affairs Small Window Big Opportunity for Nebraska Farmers By Elisha Greeley Smith The LJSDA recently announced that $1.8 million of EQl P funds has been set aside for a special three-week signup for Nebraska farms converting to organic production or expanding their organic production, l'hose with existing organic farms who desire to reach even higher levels o f environmental performance are also eligible. The Nebraska funds are part of a nationwide effort. lJSDA has set aside $50 million from the Environmental Quality - lncentives .-Program (EQIP) for this opportunity. Unfortunately farmers have only three weeks to enroll in the program. and it's during the busiest time for farmers the middle o f planting season. The sign up period began Monday, May I I and goes through Friday. May 29. Farmers can receive compensation for six core conservation practices (conservation crop rotation, cover cropping. integrated

pest management, nutrient management, rotational grazing, and forage harvest management) under the program. Farmers who want to apply should visit their Natural Resource Conservation Service office. The application process can be confusing and complicated. but fortunately, help is available. 'l'hc Cenkr for Rural Affkiw: i s gearing up to help producers as much as possible during this short application window. The Center i s operati n g a Farm Bill Helpline where producers can call in and receive assistance in accessing programs like the EQIP organic initiative. Through our helpline you will speak to a real person who is knowledgeable about the program rules to help you understand how to participate in the program. Producers can call (402) 687-2 100 and ask for the F a n Bill Iielpline.

Universal Information Services , Inc. http://news.universaI-info.com Rofile: 111 - Center k r Rural A L i r s Recipient: John Crabtrea

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COURIER MINDEN, Nebraska

c Copyright 2009 \ A l l R i g k Resewed

Wednesday, May 13,2009 WEEKLY 2348 17.24 sq. inches $5.75 A6

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Pricing For Profit Topic At I & E Club Meeting Pricing for Profit is the topic of the May 18 I & E Club meeting in Minden. Monica Braun of theRural E n t e r p r i s m Project (REAP) will present the topic and engagediscussion.The meeting is open to all inventors. investors and entrepreneurs whether they have an existing or startup business-or just a business idea. Starting time is 6 p.m. for the meeting which will be held at the Minden Fire Hall, 325 N Colorado Ave. For entrepreneurs, pricing takes into consideration a variety ofthings. It's important to know the target market, the competition and the input costs. Braun will be discussing these factors

in determining the "right" price, as well as bringing examples of the pricing of products and services. Participants can input their own information if they have it available. The I & E Club is a supportive group of Inventors, Innovators and Entrepreneurs creating a contagious entrepreneurial environrnenl in which participants can investigate the potential of their business ideas. Meetings are held the third Monday of the month at 6 p.m. and include social time, an educational component. and networking time. For more information, contact Club Chairs: Lisa Karnatz Stadler. Kearney County Economic Development Agency. kceda@kearneycounty.net, (308) 830-3206; or Monica Boyken, Phelps County Development Corp., pcdc@justthe placenebraska.org, (308) 9954148. The PK Partnershipof Phelps and Kearney County is a public-private consortium of area professionals with adeep interest in helping businessessucceed in South Central Nebraska.

http://news.universaI-info.com Universal Information Services , Inc. Profile: 111 - Center for Rural Affairs Recipient:John Crabtree

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LOCOMOTIVE LAWRENCE. Nebraska

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The Nebraska funds are pan of a nationwide effort. USDA has set aside $50 million from the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) for this opportunity. Unfortunately fanners have only three (Bv Elisha Greeley Smlh, mf for Rural weeks to enroll in the program. and it's during ~ffalrs) the busiest iime for farmers the middle of The USDA recently announced that $1.8 planting season. The sign up period began million o f EQlP funds'has been set aside for a Monday, May II and goes through Friday. special three-week sign-up for Nebraska farms May 29. Farmers can receive compensation for converting to organic production or expanding six core conservation praclices (conservation their organic production. Those with existing crop rotation, cover cropping, integrated pest organic fanns who desire to reach even higher management, nutrient management. rotational levels of environmental performance are also grazing, and forage harvest management) eligible. under the program. Farmers who want to apply

Small Window Big Opportunity for Nebraska Farmers

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http://news.universaI-info.com Universal Information Services , Inc. Profile: 111 Center for Rural A k i r s Recipient:. John Crahtree

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Thursday, May 14,2009 WEEKLY 832 16.52 sq. inches

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should visit their Natural Resource Conservarion Service office. The application process can be confusing and complicated. b u ~fortunately. help is available. The Center for Rural AtYain is paring up to help producers as much as possible during this short npplicntion window. The Center is operating a Farm Bill Hclplinc where producers can call in and receive assistance in accessing programs like the EQIP organic initiative. Through our hclpline you will speak to a real person who is knowledgeable about the program rules to help you understand how to participate in the program. Producers can call (402) 687-2 100

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HOLT CO. INDEPENDENT THURSDAY WEEKLY --. O'NEILL, NE Circulation = 3453

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$1.8 Million Set Aside For Nebraska Organic Farmers

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Sign Upfor Program Begins Centerfor Rural Affairs Offers Farm Bill Help Line 0

Nebraska Farmers transitioning to organic farming and those already conducting organic practices now have an opportunity to apply for Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) money to assisttheir organic efforts. The USDA recently announced that '$50 million out of $1 billion EQIP funds will be set aside for a special three-yeek sign-upfor farms converting to organic production or expanding their organic production. Those with existing organic farms whodesiretoreach even higher'levels of environmental performance are also eligible. The Stateof Nebraska will ieceive $1.8 million to support organic transition through this national EQIP sign up. The sign-up period began Monday, May 11 and goes through Friday, May 29. Farmerscan receive i'compensati~n for six core conservation practices (conservation crop rotation, cover cropping, integrated pest management, nutrient management,rotational grazing,and forage harvest management) under the program. These are available on a nationwide basis. Farmers who want to apply fop these funds should visit their local District County Natural Resource Conservation Service office. "Wecomniend NRCS and USDA leadership for listening to the concerns of organic farmers and applaud. their new initiative," commented Traci Bruokner, Center for Rural Affairs. "It's unfortunate though that farmers have a very small

window of only 'three weeks to sign up for the program and it's during the busiest time for farmers - the middle of planting season." According to Bruckner, the Center for Rural Affairs is gearing up to help probcers as much as possible during this short application window. The Center is operating a Farm Bill Helpline where producers can call in and receive assistance in accessing new conservation programs like the EQIP organic initiative. "The Center for Rural Affairs has a long history of assisting family farmers and ranchers to access new conservation programs," added Bruckner. "Through our helpline you will get to speak to areal person who is knowledgeable about the program rules to help you understand how to participate in the program." Producers can call (402) 687-2100 and ask for the Farm Bill Helpline. According to Bruckner, it is crucial that eligible producers move quickly because the time allowed for applicationsto this special EQIP sign up is only three weeks, beginning May 11 and ending May 29. The EQIP organic initiative assistance is not the only program covered by the Center's Farm Bill Helpline. Assistance is also available for the Conservation Stewardship Program, the Cooperative Conservation Partnerships Initiative, the Value Added Agricultural Market Development Program and a host of Beginning Farmer and Rancher provisions.

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I -uNIVERSAL

lnformat~onServ~ces, Inc (402) 342-31 78

NEWS & LEADER WEDNESDAY WEEKLY NELIGH, NE Circulation=1837

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mahin' money Camp ! -Scheduled In neligh 7

.A two-day Makin' Money Camp, for studenls entering grades 5-8, will be held soon in Neligh. Participants will hear about skills are needed to be a successful entrepreneur and will learn how to develop a business plan, practice borrowing money from a banker and design advertising and marketing slogans. The youth will learn about advertising and marketing, pricing, character needed in the work place, how to sell products and profit/loss accounting. Campers will make products then sell them to customers at the Camp Marketplace. Tours of some local business will also be part of the camp. A Makin' Money Camp is set for May 28 and 29 at the Wayne State College Student Center and in Neligh at the ricluntain Cafe on June 4 and 5. The registration deadline is May 1.5 and the camp is limited to 30 participants. There is a small fee I to attend. Registration forms can be obtained online at: antelope.unl.edu ox by calling the UNL extension offices in Wayne (402-375-3310) or Ne- ! ligh (402-887-5414), or the North- ' east Nebraska Resource Conservation and Development Council (402-582-4866). Partners are the Northeast Nebraska RC & D, UNL Extension, Center for Rural Affairs, Wayne State College, Wayne Area Eco-- nomic T_)ev_elopment, Antelope,County Resdurce Center, Neligh !? Chamber of Commerce and the Fountain Cafe in Nesgh. .

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