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UNIVERSAL Information Services, Inc (402) 342-31 78

RECORD WEDNESDAY WEEKLY CHADRON, NE Circulation= 2673

05/06/2009

L Rural Americans less fit, more obese than urban By Center for Rural Affairs walked or bicycled to Rural people were once school, today less than 15 better off in terms of physi- percent do. I/ Elnployment - fewer cal activity, nutrition and weight. However, accord- rural residents are ing to a report released ear- employed in rigorous occulier this year by the Center pations such as farming, for Rural Affairs, rural res- forestry, and fishing. (/ Availability - rural residents generally fare worse that their urban counter- idents have limited access parts in regards ro obesity, to healthy food choices. (/ Demographics - rural which is opposite to the situation that existed prior to residents are older, less 1980. educated and poorer than The Center for Rural urban residents - all conAffairs, in collaboration tributing to increased obewith Dr. Joe Blankenau, sity. Professor of Politics at "As the new administraWayne State College has tion and the new Congress undertaken the task of eva1:- begin to debate health care uating crucial health care -reform, they need to keep ,issues in rural America. ,?he -4eport. "Nutrition, ; Phys~cal."~&tivit~, and ' Obesity in Rural America," first in a series of reports analyzes available research relating to nutrition, physical activity and obesity and their impact on the health of rural residents relative to their urban counterparts. Crucial findings: (/ Exercise - forty years ago. half of all students

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in mind that the best longterm way to reform the health care systeni is to help create healthier pcople and healthier communities," comriiented Jon Bailey with the Center for Rural Affairs. Thc report comes as the Center prepares to share signatures and comments gathered fro111 an online p e t i t i o 11 (http:/icrww.cfra.org/O8ihc alth) calling on the Obama Administration to address failing health care policies. The petition, initii~ted by the Center has galliercd over 800 signaturrs. "Everyone has a stake in -

creating a healthier society and everyone has responsibility to do so. As this report shows, rural people and rural communities have significant health and wellness challenges. Public policy can help promote health and wellness, but each person, each family and each comn~unity in rural America has responsibility to creatc a healthier rural America," continued Bailey. The full report is available online at: http:!iwww.cfra.org/09/01/ healthreport


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LEADER THURSDAY WEEKLY SARGENT, NE Circulation = 592

Small Window Big Opportunity For Nebraska Farmers by Elisha Greeley Smith, elishas@cfra.org, Center for Rural Affairs T h e USDA recently announced that $1.8 million of EQIP funds has been set aside for a special three-week sign-up for Nebraska farms converting to organic production or expanding their organic production. Those with existing organic farms who desire to reach even higher levels of environmental performance are also eligible. The Nebraska funds are part of a nationwide effort. USDA has set aside $50 million from the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) for this opportunity. Unfortunately farmers have only three weeks to enroll in the program, and it's during the busiest time for farmers - the middle of planting season. The sign up period began Monday, May 11 and goes through Friday, May 29. Farmers can receive compensation for six core [conservation practices (conk

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servation crop rotation, cover cropping, integrated pest management, nutrient management, rotational grazing, and forage harvest management) under the program. Farmers who want to -. apply should visit their Natural Resource Conservation Service office. The application process can be confusing and complicated, ~but fortunately, help is available. The Center for Rural Affairs is gearing up to help producers as much as possible during this short application window. The Center is operating a Farm Bill Helpline where producers can call in and receive assistance in accessing programs like the EQIP organic initiative. Through our helpline you will speak to a real person who is knowledgeable abput the program rules to help you understand how to participate in the program. Producers can call (402) 687-2 100 and ask for the Farm Bill Hclpline.


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NEWS WEDNESDAY WEEKLY CREIGHTON, NE ;

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The Center for Rural Affairs, in partnership \\ rth llSDA Rural Development, will be available to share information on the Valued Added (3-.int Program ancl other LJSDAKural Dek clop~nentprograms. Mike Heavrin, ,of the Center for Rural Affairs, will be available from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Thursday, May 7, at the Plainview RC&D Office to answer que~tionsabout the Value Added Grant Program and assist , producers with completing the ap- , plication. In addition, Heavrin will help producers understand what types of projects are allowable under the grant. "There is so much interest in the Value Addcd program from Nebraska's farme~sand ranchers who are developing businesses that grow their income and bring much needed jobs to their communities," said Kathie Starkweather, Center for Rural Affairs. "Hictorically Nebraska has been one of the top states to receive Value Added Producer Grants."


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MONITOR THURSDAY WEEKLY BLOOMFIELD, NE Circulation = 1405

05/07/2009

llllllllllllllllllllllllllHIIlllllll Plainview Location of Value Added Producer Grant ProgramTechnical ksistance Oftice Hoilrs Public Encouraged to Attend

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LYONS - The Center for Rural Affairs in partnership with USDA Rural , Development will be available to share __ infonnation on the Valued Added i

Grant Program and other USDA Rural - Development programs. Mike Heavrin of the Center for Rural Affairs will be available on May 7, from 10 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. at the Plainvicw RC&D Office to discuss and answer questions about the Value Added Grant Programs and assist interested producers with tips for completing the application. In addition he will help interested producers understand what types of projects are allowable under the grant. People can either call and set up an appointment or simply come into the Plainview office during those hours. "There is so much interest in the Value Added program from Nebraska's farmers and ranchers who are dcveloping businesses that grow their income and bring much needed jobs to their communities," said Kathie Starkweather, Center for Rural Affairs. "We are happy to be able to partner with : USDA Rural Development in order to j present information on this upcoming "opportunity." Starkweather continued, "Historically Nebraska has been one of the top states to receive Value Added Producer Grant funding." What: Technical Assistance office hours on the Value Added Producer Grant Program. When and Where: Thursday, May 7, 10:OO a.m.-2:00 p.m., Plainview RC&D Office, 702 East Park Avenue (Hwy 20), Plainview, NE 68769, (402) 5824866. The Center for Rural Affairs and USDA Rural Development are equal opportunity employers.

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MONITOR THURSDAY WEEKLY BLOOMFIELD, NE

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Circulabon = 1405

05/07/2009

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~ a k i nMoney ' Camp for Youth Coming Soonto Wayne and Nelloh a-

If you are going into the 5th through the 8th grades, a two-day Makin' Money Camp is for you! Participants will hear about what skills are needed to be a successful entrepreneur. Learn how to develop a business plan, practice borrowing money from a banker-' and design advertising and marketing slogans. Find out about advertising and marketing, pricing, character needed in , the workplace, how to sell products and protit/loss accounting. Each camper will make a product and then sell to customers at the Camp Marketplace. ; Tours of some local business will be part of the camp. The camp is set for May 28 and 29 at the Wayne State College Student Center and in Neligh at the Fountain Cafe on June 4 and 5th. The registration deadline is May 15th and the camp is limited to 30 participants. There is a small fee to attend. Registration forms can be obtained online at: antelope.unl.edu or by calling the UNL extension offices in Wayne (402-3753310) or Neligh (402-887-5414), or the Northeast Nebraska. Resource Conser- . vation and Development Council (402582-4866). Across the region youth are starting up their own businesses and making money right from home. Leam what it takes to get going by attending the Makin' Money Camp. Partners are the Northeast Nebraska RC & D, UNL Extension, Center for Rural Affairs, Wayne State College, Wayne Area Economic Development, Antelope County Resource Center, Neligh Chamber of Commerce and the Fountain Cafe in Neligh.


RECORD WEDNESDAY WEEKLY CHADRON, NE Circulation = 2673

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05/06/2009

REAP grant he ps reinvent loca business

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By KERRl REMPP Record staff writer An Infusion of $5,000 in grant funding enabled a local businesswoman to reinvent and sustain her business. Leala Jllnerson of Chadron was recently awarded a grant through the Center for Rural Affairs-Rural Enterprise Assistance Project Women's Business Center to help remake her line of horse and dog treats. The funding was provided to the Women's Business Center by the Women & Company Microenterprise Boost Program. Without the grant, Jimerson isn't sure her busmess would have survived the remake necessary because of trademark issues. Jimerson purchased a business Record photo by Kerri Rempp called Smarter Treats, LLC two Leala Jimerson balances two home-based businesses with raisyears ago. The company, started ing four boys, pictured here from left, Afton, 3, Dayne, 8, Brock, by Alice Carter in Harrison durI ing the 1980s, had been sold and 10, and Cole, 6. are hypoallergenic for dogs, she was for sale again when Jimerson grant solved that problem. The horse and dog treats will explained and healthier than the began looking for a business she could run from home. However, soon be marketed under their new original wheat and corn. The dog treats are available in somewhere along the way, one of name, Nibbly Jibbits, and the the owners had not renewed the product will undergo a more six flavors - beef, buffalo. organtrademark for Smarter Treats, and complete transformation as well. ic buffalo, lamb, peanut butter that meant it was unavailable Jimerson has deviated from the and carrot. Jimerson also original recipe and formulated changed the shape of the treats when Jimerson tried to renew it. The trademark issue meant healthier treats for equines and from a square to a dog bone. On Jimerson was facing the addition- canines alike. She's removed all the equine side, the muffinal expense of having new labels sweeteners from her product and shaped treats are available in created and she wasn't sure how switched to rice and buckwheat in apple or carrot flavors. The apple the business would survive. The her dog treat recipe. Those grains treat contains flax seed, stabilized

rice bran and brewer's yeast to help with digestion. The carrot treat is a more basic one of corn, wheat and carrots. Jimerson uses mostly organic ingredients and is able to get most of them from local farmers. The reinvented treats will also have new packaging going from a stand-up pouch to a craft-paper canister made from recycled paper. "I've always been environmentally aware so I'm trying to reflect that in everything," 1 Jimerson said. The two years she's had to run the business before making the changes were important, she said. They gave her a chance to see what needed to be improved and the time to research and experiment with how to get where she wanted. While the trademark issue was frustrating, she said in the long run it should be a positive benefit. "With all of the changes that are being made. 1 think it will work out for the better." She hopes to have the switch over comileted withid a month and will simply swap out the old product for new in the businesses that carry it. Jimerson sells her dog and horse treats at various stores throughout Wyoming, Montana, Colorado and -

Nebraska. Locally, Nibbly Jibbits will be available at the Natural Foods Co-op, Cleo's, Bean Broker and some veterinarian offices. as well as at Fort Robinson and the Ranch House in Crawford. Jimerson makes the treats in a basement apartment, along with products for her other homebased business, Lea'essentials. Half of the apartment is devoted to each business. Lea'essentials is a line of lip balms and soaps made by Jimerson. A friend got her interested in making soaps and she eventually expanded into lip balms. Jimerson said she already has plans to add a line of children's soaps made of avocado oil and hopes to expand into lotions once her businesses are firmly established. The Women & Company Microenterprise Boost Program is designed to help low-to-moderate income women who are owners of microenterprises, defined as businesses with five or fewer employees. The program is funded by Citi Foundation and managed by the Association for Enterprise Opportunity. The REAP Women's Business Center serves as a local partner for the grant program and selects the recipients each year.

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BIRD ISLAND UNION

Date: Location: Circulation (DMA): Type (Frequency): Page: Keyword:

Wednesday, May 13,2009 BIRD ISLAND, MN 795 (1 5) Newspaper (W) 4

Center For Rural Affairs

$50 Million available

nationwide tor organic farmers Sign upfor program continues through May 29 Farmers who are transitioning to organic farming and those already conducting organic practices now have an opportunity to apply for Environmental Quality Incentives Propam (EQIP)money to assist their organic efforts. The USDA recently announced that $50 million out of $1 billian EQIP funds will be set aside for a special three-week sign-up for farms converting to organic production or expanding their organic production. Those with existing organic fanns who desire to reach even higher levels of environmental performance are also eligible. The sign-up period begins Monday, May 11 and goes through Friday, May 29. Farmers can receive compensation for six core conservation practices (conservation crop rotation, cover cropping, integrated pest management, nutrient management, rotational gra&g, arld forage harvest management] under the program. These are available on a nationwide basls. Farmers who want to a ~ p l for v these funds should visit their local District County Natural ~Q;&rce Conservation Service ofice. "We commend NRCS and USDA leadership for listening 10 the concerns of organic farmers and applaud their new initiative," commented Traci Bruckner, Center."It's unfortunate though that farmers have a very small window of only three weeks to sign up for the program and it's dwing the busiest time for farmers the middle of planting season." According to Bruckner, the Center for Rural Affairs is gearing up to help producers as much as possible during this short application window. The Center is operating a Farm Bill Helpline where producers can call in and receive assistance in accessing new conservation programs like the EQIP organic initiative. "The Center for Rural Affairs has a long history of assisting family farmers and ranchers to access new conservation programs," added Bruckner. "Through our helpline you will get to speak to a real person who is knowledgeable about the program rules to help you understand how to participate in the program." Producers can call ..',.' ' . (402) 687-2100 and ask furlhe m3ln Helplfnd. * " The EQIP organic initiative assistance is not the only program cwered by the Center's Farm Bill Helpline. Assistance is also available for the Conservation Stewardship Program, the cooperative Conservation Partnerships Initiative, the Value Added Agricultural Market Development Program and a host of Beginning Farmer and Rancher provisions.

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B 2009 BIRD ISLAND UNION All RqhW R s ~ w e d .

Account: 18209C (m966) MN-29

Fw reprina or rghm, pleare m n w me publlshal


news mirror

Date: Location: Circulation (DMA): Type (Frequency): Page: Keyword:

Wednesday, May 13,2009 HECTOR, MN 3,300 (15) Newspaper (W) 4

Center For Rural Affairs

$50 Million available

nationwide for organic farmers Sign lip for program continues through May 29 Farmers who are transitioning to organic farming and those already conducting organic practices now have an opportunity to apply for En~lronmentalQuality Incentives Program (EQIP) money to assist their organic efforts. The USDA recently announced that $50 million out of fl'billion EQlP funds will be set aside for a special three-week sign-up for farms converting to organic productlon or expandlng their organic production. Those with existing organic farms who desire to reach cvcn higher levels of cnvironmcntal pcrformancc arc also cligiblc. The sign-up period begins Monday. May 11 and goes through Friday, May 29. Farmers can receive compensation for six core conservation practices (conservation crop rotation, cover cropping, integrated pest management, nutrient management, rotational grazing. ant1 forage harvest management) under the program.These are available on a nationwide basis. Farmers who want to apply for these funds should visit their local District County Natural Resource Conservation Service office. "\Ye commend NRCS and USDA leaders hi^ for listening" to the concerns of organic farmers and applaud their new initiative," commented Traci Bruckner, Center "It's unfortunate though that farmers have a verysmall window of only three weeks to sign up for the program and it's during the busiest time for farmers - the middle of planting season.According to Bruckner, the Center for Rural Affairs is gearing up to help producers as much as possible during this short application window. The Center is operating a Farm Bill Helpline where producers can call In and receive assistance In accessing new cnnrervatinn programs like the EQlP organic initiative.. "The Center for Rural Affairs has a long history of assisting family farmers and ranchers to ac'cess new conservation programs," added Bruckner. "Through our helpline you will get to spcak to a real person who is knowledgeable about the program rules to help you understand how to participate in the program.' Producers can call (402) 687-2100 and ask for the Farm Bill Helpline. The EQIP organic initiative assistance is not the only program covered bv the Center's Farm Bill Hel~line.Assistance is also available for (he Conservation stewardsip Program, the Cooperative Conservation Partnerships Initiative, the Value Added Agricultural Market Development Program and a host of Beginning Farmer and Rancher provisions. Page 1 of 1

0 2009 NEWS MIRROR All Rihb Resewed.

Account: 18209C (20999) MN-142

For rcprlnh or Mhh, pleato conma me publlha


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BREEZE WAUNETA, Nebraska

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Thursday, May 14,2009 WEEKLY 1050 12.33 $6.8 9

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May REAP office hours in McCook Dena Beck, central and southwest Nebraska Business Specialist with the Center for Rural Affairs' Rural Enterprise Assistance Proj& will hold office hours in McCook on May 29. Hours will be 10 a.m. until 2:45 p.m. McCook Economic Development Corp. (MEDC) will handle the appointments; (308) 345-1200. MEDC office is located at 301 Norris Avenue, Suite 200. The Centerfor Rural Mairs'mEnterprise Assistance.Project (REAP) end its semicm.areavaili able to rural communities across Nebraska. B W offers technical assistance,educational and networking

opportunities, and a loan program for small businesses. REAP is designed to assist all types of small businesses, including businesses with 5 or fewer employees, selfemployed full-time, part-time, home-based,.farm-based, start-up, and store-hntbusinesses. BEBP has six regionally based Business Specialists across Nebraska. TheseBusiness Specialii can get involved in assisting entrepreneurs at various stagesof their bwMesspr0gress.

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MEDC ~spleased to partner with

BEaP in o,rder to offer an expanded l i t of services& businesses of all sizes.

http://news.universal-info.com Universal Information S e ~ c e ,sInc. Profile: I 1I- Center for Rural Affairs Recipient: John Crabtree

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REPUBLICAN IMPERIAL, Nebraska

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Thursday, May 14,2009 WEEKLY 2080 22.56 sq. inches $6.8 6

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h E R TO THE EMTOR

Small window, big opportunity for Nebraska farmers Dear Editor,

The USDA recently announced that $1.8 million of EQIP funds has been set asidc fcr a spccinl thrcsweek sic.up for Nebraska farms converting to organic production or expanding their ,organic production. Those with existing organic farms who desire to reach even higher levels of environmental performance are also eligible. The Nebraska funds are part of a nationwide effort. USDA has set aside $50 million from the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) for this opportunity Unfortunately, farmers have only three weeks to enroll in the program, and it's during the busiest time for farmers-the middle of planting season. The sign up period began Monday, May 11, and goes through Friday, May 29.

Farmers can receive compensation for six core conservation practices (conservation crop rotation, cover cropping, integrated pest management, nutrient management, rotational grazing, and forage harvest management) under the program. Farmers who want to apply should visit their Natu-

ral Resource Conservation Service office. The application process can be confusing and complicated,but fol-tunately, help is available. The Center far Rural Affairs is gearing up to help producers as much as possible during this short application window. The Center is operating a Farm Bill Helpline where producers can call in and receive assistance in accessing programs like the EQIP organic initiative. Through our helpline you will speak to a real person who is knowledgeable about the program rules to help you understand how to participate in the program. Producers can call (402) 6872100 and ask for the Farm Bill Helpline. The Center for Rural Affairs was established in 1973as an unfiliated nonprofit corporation under IRS code 501(c)3. Th-e was formed by rural Nebraskans concerned about family farms and rural communities, and we work to strengthen small businesses, family farms and ranches, and rural communities.

http://news.universaI-info.com Universal Information Services , Inc. Profile:111 - Center for Rural AiTairs Recipient: John Crabtree

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EliW h y Smith c.ntnforRwcllAPWrs b-4 NE

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REPUBLICAN IMPERIAL, Nebraska

Thursday, May 14,2009 Date: WEEKLY 2080 Frequency: Circulation: 50.37 sq. inches Clip Size: $6.8 Ad Rate: Pagelsection: 15

Mental health care in some rural areas may be deficient support worker; Judy m e w s k i , a drug/alcohol counselor; Helm as a licensed independent mental May i s National Mental health practitioner; and the newHealth Awareness Month. Howest member, Rhonda Osborne as a ever, accordingto the Center for licensed mental health practitioRural Affairs, over half of the ner. counties in the United States Heim said that it may be perhave no mental health profesceived that rural areas of Nesionals, a situation that has braska aren't served as well as changed little in 45 years. urban areas. However, she said Not so in southwest Nebrasthat's probably "a lack of funding ka, according to Shona He* of to offset the unique problems of Heartland Counseling in Imperural areas, such as transportarial. tion" and telephone charges. Heartland Counseling is part She said some people have to of Region I1 Human Servicesof make a several hundred mile Nebraska. The Imperial, Ogalround trip for one appointment. lala, McCook. North Platte and The Center for V Lexington offices serve 17 counsaid in many rural areas a prities. mary physician's workload may In 1972, a federal mental include as much as 20-25 percent health law was passed where in mental health and behavioral evelyone had to have access to health issues. mental health services. It said there is a need for midHeim firstjoined Great Plains level professionals to provide Mental Health Center 27 years mental health services and a ago. That then became Richard marketplace for such services. Young Family Life Center, and According to the Center,"Health then the present Heartland care reform legislation can begin Counseling about 10 years ago. to addressthese disparities by pro"We do a pretty good job of viding inmths and m i m b m coverkng the area," Heim said. ment mechanisms for mid-level "We have a presence in every mental health providers (providcounty we serve, not on loca- ers at the Bachelor's and Master's tion, but in the area weekly." degree level) in rural areas and by Services provided by the providingresourcesfor a specially Imperial office inmental heath marketplace similar clude outpatient to what exists for rural medical mental health clinics." counseling for all Heim said that while the workages, group work, load for Heartland Counseling's family counselstaff may be heavy at times, it is ing, education, also seasonal. drug and alcohol She said in a rural comrnucounseling, comnity. with agriculture as the munity support, basic economy, the workload is helping clients seasonal. Heim explained that at live independent- IlhonbOdmm certain times of the year farmers ly, and consulting with schools are in the field, and children are nursing homes and private busi- in school, thereby making schednesses. uling of appointmentsdimcult. The Imperial office is staffed However, she feels that Region by Nicole Tjaden, a ~0mmunity n and Heartland a goodjob of

providing mental health services for anyone needingthem in the 17 counties they serve. Rhondso.boma Former Imperial resident Rhonda Bahler Osborne began working for Heartland Counseling about tbur weeks ago. Prior to that she worked in HolyoRe, Colo. as a certified addictions counselor. The 1% Chase County High School graduate received a Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology h m Nebraska Wesleyan University in 1998. She then was awarded a Masters degree in Mental Health Caunseling from Doane CoUege in

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osborne was certified in Colorado in 2006 and in ~ e b r a s k a this Asyear. a licensed practitioner, she works in mental health therapy and substance abuse treatnlent in Nebraska. She also hopes to establish a private practice this year. Osborne works four days a week for Heartland, with Thursdays iri Ixnperial -tram 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. She and husband Chad live near Amherst, Colo. and farm

in Chase County They have two

children; Scott and Lagm, 10. Osborne likes to work with horses and garden in her h e time.

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HERALD

Date: Thursday, May 7,2009 WEEKLY Frequency: Circulation: 1854 Clip Size: 15.59 sq. inches Ad Rate: $7.1 8 PageISectron: B 8

WAYNE, Nebraska

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Makin' Money Camp for Youth coming soon to Wayne If you are going into the fifth through the eighth grades, a twoday Makin' Money Camp is for you! Participants will hear about what skills are needed to be a successful entrepreneur. Learn how to develop a business plan, practice borrowing money from a banker and design advertising and marketing slogans. Find out about advertising and marketing, pricing, character needed in the workplace, how to sell products, and profitlloss accounting. Each camper will make a product and then sell to customers a t the Camp Marketplace. Tours of some local business will be part of the camp. Locally, the camp is set for May 28,. ,and 29 a t the Wayne State College Student Center. The registration deadline is May 15 and the camp is

limited to 30 participants. There is a small fee to attend. Registration forms can be obtained online at: antelopc.unl.edu or by calling the UNL extension offices in Wayne (402-37.5-3310) or the Northeast Nebraska Resource Conservation and Development Council (402-5824866). Across the region youth are starting up their own businesses and

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making money right from home. Learn what it takes to get going by attending the Makin' Money Camp. Partners are the Northeast Nebraska RC & D, UNL Extension, Center for Rural Affairs, Wayne State College, WayneArea Economic Development, Antelope County Resource Center, Neligh Chamber of Commerce and the Fountain Cafe in Neligh.

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GAZETTE McCOOK, Nebraska

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Friday, May 15,2009 DAILY 5903 13.38 sq. inches $10.95 7

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Dena Beck, central and ployees, self-employed fullsouthwest Nebraska Business time, part-time, home-based, Specialist with the Center for farm-based, start-up, and Rural Affairs' Rural E n t e ~ store-front businesses. REAP prise Assistance Project will has six regionally based Busihold office hours in McCook ness Specialists across Neon May 29th. Hours will be braska. These Business ro a.m. until 2:45 p.m. Mc- Specialists can get involved in Cook Economic Development assisting entrepreneurs at Corp. (MEDC)will handle the various stages of their busiappointments; (308) 345- ness progress. 1200. MEDC office is located at 301 Norris Avenue, Suite MEDC is pleased to partner 200. within order to offer an expanded list of services to The Center for R u d A f - businesses of all sizes. fairs'-R-aur lance Project (REAP) and its services are available to rural communities across Nebraska. REAP offers technical assistance, educations! and networking opportunities, and a loan program for small businesses. BEBP is designed to assist all types of small businesses, including businesses with 5 or fewer em-

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"mn Clrculatlon (DMA)

KERKHOVEN, Wednesday, 1,473 (15) May MN13,2009

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Newspaper (W) 8 Center For Rural Affa~rs

'Seed money' available to grow organics A brief window of opponunity ois opens for anyone interested in organic farming. During the next three weeks, farmers can apply for financial assis-, tance under a federal program designed to encourage organic growing practices. Ag analysts say it's a good deal because the consumer market for organics is increasing and the program's incentives promote conservation. The sign-up period runs through May 29. Traci Bruckner, assistant director of the &nkr for R m M f a b rural policy program. expects many producers in Minnesota and around the nation to take advantage of it. "'This program is for farmers who are interested in transitioning to certified orga~licproduction. If they're already certified organic. it's for adding either more acres or livestock herds to that certified system." Organic producers who want to increase their conservation efforts also are eligible, Bruckner adds. Farmers can apply at any district or county Natural Resources Conservation Service office. Bruckner says the program is Jesigned to meet increasing consumer demand for organic foods. She calls it a win-win deal. Under the program, farmers receive compensation for basic conservation practices including crop rotation, pest management and forage harvest policy. Anyone with questions can call the Center help line. 402-687-2100.

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Account: 18209C (21 151) MN-im For reprink or rghk, please mnmd me pubushw


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TRI COUNTY NEWS

Wednesday, May 13,2009 HERON LAKE, MN 926 (1 5) Newspaper (W) 8 Center For Rural Affairs

$50 million available nationwide for organic farmers Sign up for program began Monday Lyons. NE - Farmers who are transitioning to organic farming and those already conducting organic practices now have an opportunity to apply for Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) money to assist their organic cfforts. USDA recently announced that $50 million out of $1 billion EQIP funds will bc set aside for a special three-week sign-up for farms converting to organic production or expanding their organic production. Those with existing organic farms who desire to reach even higher levels of environmental performance are also eligible. The sign-up period begins Monday, May I I and goes through Friday. May 29. Fanners can receive compensation for six core conservation practices (conservation crop rotation, cover cropping. integrated pest management, nutrient management, rotational grazing. and forage harvest management) under the program. These are nvnilnble on a nationwide basis. Farmers who want to apply for these funds should visit their local District County Natural Resource Conservation Seryice ofice. "We commend NRCS and USDA leadership for listening to the concerns of organic farmers and applaud their new

initiative," commented ' Traci f a r _ Bruckner, Affaifi. "It's unfortunate though that farmers have a very small window of only three weeks to sign up for the program and it's during the busiest time for farmers - the middle of planting season." According to Bruckner, the Center for Rural Affairs is gearing up to help producers as much as possible during this short application window. The Center is operating a Farm Bill Helpline where producers can call in and receive assistance in accessing new conservation programs like the EQIP organic initiative. Producers can call (402) 687-2100 and ask for the Farm Bill Helpline. The EQIPorganic initiative assistance is not the only program covered by the Center's Farm Bill Helpline. Assistance is also available for the Conservation Stewardship Program, the Cooperative Conservation Partnerships Initiative. the Value Added Agricultural Market Development Program and a host of Beginning Farmer and Rancher provisions. /Wnd mein 1973for as an Rum/ utufiliarrd nonprofir es!& r o l ~ ~ ~ a r iunder a n IRS CUJC 501fc)3. ~ ~ t e cenrrr p r ~ u r dAffairs near prmrd by rum1 Nrbraskmu conrnnrd about familv fins and rommun8fitS, Y~DrP

w mcngrhcn S ~ O Ibuslncssrs.fiilyloms I und rumhrs. undmrul i ~ l ~ l u n i r i c s .

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0 2009 TRI COUNW NEWS All RiphD Resewed.

Account: 18209C (21 155) MN-I4U

For rqprinb or @ h e , please mnscl me puMihcr


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REPUBLICAN OSMOND, Nebraska

Date: Wednesday, May 6,2009 Frequency: WEEKLY Circulation: 800 Clip Size: 14.50 sq. inches $5.2 Ad Rate: Pagelsection: 5

Youth 'Money Camps' to be in Wayne, Neligh Students who will enter the fifth through the eight11 grades are eligible to attend a two-day "htakin' Money Camp." I'articipants will hear about what skills arc necdcd to he a successful entrcprcncltr. 'I'hey will learn how to dcvelop a b~tsiness plnn. practice borrowing money from a hanker and design advertising and nlarkcting slogans. In addition, the camp will co\lcr advertising ant1 tnarkcting. pricing. character nceded in thc workplace. hnw to sell prcducts. atltl piijfiiloss ;~ccounting.Each camper will make a product and thcn sell to customers at the (:amp Xlnrkctplace. Tours of sottic local business wit1 be part of the CiiIk\p. The camp is set fbr %lay 28 and 29 at thc Wayne State College St~tdent (:enter and in Neligli at thc Fountain (:are on J u t ~ c4 and 5 . 'l'hc registration deadline is blay IS. and the camp is lilnitcd to 30 participants. There is a stnall fee to attend. Registration forms can he obtained orllinr at antclope.unl.cdu or by calling the (IN-L estcnsion offices in Wayrle. ( 4 0 2 ) 375-33 1 (I. or Ncliph. (402) 88.7-5414,-or. tll? Sorthcast ~ b h r n s k aResource ('o11scrvatiot~ and Devclopmcn! C'ortncil. (402) 582-3866. Across. the regton yotttli ;ire starting up their ow11 h~~sincsscc and making tnotley riglit I'ro~n home. said RC'&I) ('oordinator la11 Jorgcnscti. ('amp partners arc Northcast Nchrnska RC'LYrD, LK-I. ... . . Extension, w. M'ilyllc Stiltc ('ollcge. \\:a! llc :\rcil Llco~~o~iiic I)evclopnir~it. i\titclopc C'ou~it) Kcsourcc C'cntcr. Ucligli Chntnbcr o f ('otnmcrcc ;~nd tllc Fo~tntnin('arc in Ycligli.

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CEDAR CO. NEWS HARTINGTON, Nebraska

Wednesday, May 6,2009

WEEKLY 2091 15.65 $6.32

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Makln9Money Camp coming to Wayne, Neiigh HARTINGTON - If you are going into the flfth through the eighth grades, a two-day Makin' Money Camp is for you. Participants wlll hear about what skills are needed to be a successful entrepreneur. Learn how to develop a business plan, practice borrowing money from a banker and design advertlsing and marketing slogans. Find out about advertislngand marketing. prlclng. character needed in the workplace. how to sell products. and profit/loss accounting. Each camper wlll make a product and then sell to customers a t the Camp Marketplace. Tours of some local buslness wlll be part of the camp. The camp is set for May 28-29 at the Wayne State College Student Center and in Neligh a t the Fountain Cafe. June 4-5. The registratlon deadline is May 15 and the camp ts limited to 30 partlclpants. There I s a small fee to attend. Registration forms can be obtained online at: antelope.unl.edu or by calling the UNL extension offices in Wayne or Dkcon County (402-375-3310 or 402-584-2234) or Neligh (402-887-5414). or the Northeast Nebraska Resource Conservation and Development Council (402582-4866). Partners: are the Northeast Nebraska WC & D,UNL Extensdon, I . , , t , , Wayne State College. Wayne Area Economic Development, Antelope County Resource Center. Neligh Chamber of Commerce and the Fountain Cafe in Neligh.

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