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MIDLAND NEWS WEDNESDAY WEEKLY VALENTINE, NE Circulation= 2056

04/30/2008

-Meeting N o t e s Outlaw Trail Scenic Byway meets

President hlary Rose called the meeting to order. Minutes and treasurers report given. Memberships in the Hassett RC&D and the Northeast RC&I) were paid. The Northeast Travel Council meets on Thursday May 29 a t Tarnov for their annual meeting. They will be voting whether to expand their area to include Boyd and Holt Counties. Officers elected for the coming yew were president - Mary Rose and secretary - Marita. Because of a conflict, the May meeting date was changed to Tuesday, May 27, a t Fordyce. The brochure swap starts a t 92.0 a.m. on May 22 in Kearney. The 2008 budget and review of Bylaws were tabled until the next meeting. Mary Rose gave a brief overview of the bus tour she is working on for July 26 for Day of the Cowboy. BRAN (Hike Riders Across Nebraska) will be following part of the Outlaw Trail Scenic Byway and stay in Butte overnight on June 10. The next day they will travel to Creighton, etc. This is a Signature event for BRAN. The tour goes through the best towns by vote of the BRAN riders where they havestayed during the past years. Twyla read a request from Snitily Carr for a list of places and things to do along the byway to be used for pod casting, banner rollups, and geopicting. Neckerchiefs and window clings will be ordered. The next meeting will be on Tuesday, May 27, at Fordyce. Michael Holton, Rural Opportunities and Stewardship Program Community Development Specialist for the Cent.er for Rural Affairs, spoke to the group about rural communities and the vitality we need to support them,- ,--.-- .The following was part of the program. Rural communities are a wellspring of entrepreneurial energy and are our national conscience to be good neighbors. The future of our communities relies on effective rural leadership, active entrepreneurship, and commitment to a viable future. Traditional approaches to rural development have ignored small businesses, cooperatives and ~

Our work begins with the assets and strengths of rural communities that are the basis for their future vitality. They have schools t h a t work, strong churches, low crime rates, high levels of community involvement, and business sense. We work in several Northeast Nebraska communities to offer leadership-training, youth engagement, and entrepreneurial development programs that enable rural people to build on those assets to create genuine opportunity and build comunities i n which their children and grandchildren will want to raise


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JOURNAL THURSDAY WEEKL Y PLATTSMOUTH, NE Circulation= 4379

05/01/2008

PHOTO BY RICK SETCHELL/T~PJournal This years winners of the Bess Streeter Aldrich Writing Contest are, front, from left, Mackenzie Leigh Glenn and Mariah Orduna; back, Veronica Lawrence, Karla Decker, Lesa Cameron, Josiah Fuchser, Meghan Bernholtz and Lee Crone.

Short story winners announced Rick Setcllril Jourt~al stoflulrilei

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1 Streeter Aldrich

~ c o r i d ~ ~ cits ted annual spring Banquet April 12. at Elmwood-Murdock's Elenlentary gymnasium. Executive DyFecRfbf the Aldrich House Teresa Lorensen welcomed the near capacity crowtl and introduced Loren Lockrnan. Lockn- an works on, ~.ehuilds and restores all types of windmills. Ilc is also a historian and gave a PowerPoirlt presentation or1 many styles of windi~lillsthat were used in Nebraska during the late 1800s and early 20th century. Most of the windmills were manufactured by con]panies such as Air Motors, Dempster and Kregcl Windmill Company in Nebraska City. At one point, there were more than 480 companies making windmills. As the necd for windmills diminished, Inany companies went out of business. Many, such as Kregel scldom '.. . j '-\.-.shipped their products out? -

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Barbara Chamness from the Center for Rural ~ f f a i r s spoke about the "Windmills Across Nebraska" project.

sidc the region. Windmills are still in production and play a vital part in providing water for arcas that have little or no water service or electricity. Uarbara Chamness from the Center for Rural Affairs spoke about thc "Windmills Across Nebraska" ~ ~ r o j c c t . Artists could use any media to makc a reprotluction of windnlills. The works were judg~tlin May of last year and displayed throughout the state during last summer. They were ai~ctioned off in September and the

proceeds pron~oted Women's Project for Rural America. It's goal is to increase rural won~en's activism and advocacy for rural issues. Cham~lesssaid they learned about more than just windmills. "We learned that nobody doesn't like windmills," she said. One of the highlights of the evening was presenting the winner of the Bcss Streeter Aldrich Short Story contest. Each of the winners received a certificate and a j check. - 7E ,,


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NEWS-TIMES MORNING YORK, NE

DAIL Y

Circulabon = 4196

05/07/2008

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Guest Opinion

Opportun y*available to (- secure rental farmland By Elisha Greeley Smith Center for Rural Affairs Higher land costs and skyrocketing cash rents create challenges for far~nersand ranchers. especially beginners, who need iand, but cannot afford the expense. In 1978, there were 350,000 American farmers under the age of 35, by 2002, that number fell to fewer than 70.000. Without strategies to foster a new generation of family farmers and ranchers, rural America will continue to decline. New Spirit Venbearchiilg tures is a new co1111~111y , for such strategies. They are looking for sustainable and organic farmers who want to

~ e c u r ~ e n tfarmland. al The company will set up long-term leases for farmers who agree to use environmentally s o G ~ d farming practices. Robert Karp, New Spirit owner and former Practical Farmers of Iowa director. anno~inced the project saying. "'lhc prograin is designed to help the best of OLII. pioneering sustainablelorganic family farmers succeed." l'he goals of' the program are to: . Foster the viability and growth of farmers ancl ranchers coii~illit~edto organic. and sustaiili~lde agticulture; . lJreserve I:lr~llI;tlidaucl sti.e~~gtlle~l the econor~lic.. soci:rl and ecological healtll of rural communities: .

Create a community of interest among farmers and investors committed to the values of environmental sustainabili ty, farmland preservation and healthy food. The company is looking for farmers in Nebraska, Kansas, North Dakota, Iowa, Wisconsin, and Minnesota with at least 5 years experience. The Center for Rural Affairs is helping spread the message. June 15th is the pre-application deadline. Interestecl producers should contact Robert Karp at nsv@centtrryte1.net or 262.642.9672 or the Center for Rural Affairs at (302) 687-2100.


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NEMAHA CO. HERALD FRIDAY WEEKL Y AUBURN, NE Circulation = 2628

05/08/2008 L

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ay Course for Businesses May 12 & 19 in Nebraska City Bay for Business is a twosion course being offered in braska City at the all new ter lab at the MortonPublic Library. It will be om 5:30-8:30 pm on May 19 for southeast Nebraska ea businesses, entrepreneurs, ventors, youth, self-employed dividuals and artisans, farmers nd anyone aspiring to start a usiness, eBusiness or develop vide attendapproach s of eBay business-

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uct quality," states Kahl. May 7 Registration

velopment Corporation, Auburn Economic Development, and Deadline . the City of Tecumseh Economic The registration deadline for Development. The University of the eBay for Business course is Nebraska - Lincoln Extension is May 7 and space is limited. The also assisting the partners with course is offered for a minimal training and program develop$10 fee per participant to cover ment efforts. the cost of training materials Registration f o r h i ~ k eavailonly. able at loc;?. economic developThis workshop is made pos- ment nr &amber offices and it g sible in part from a BECA grant is a0;ilable to print at www. (Building Entrepreneurial Corn- - RiverCountryEDC.org. munities Act) from the Nebpska Registration and payment, Department of Economic De- made payable to RCEDCIBECA, velopment admiqistered by the should be mailed or delivered to: Rural Developlrrent Commission RCEDCIBECA, 806 I st Avenue, nd the pgfiering organizations Nebraska City, NE 68410. For cludiifg the Rural Enterprise more specific information, consfstance Project (REAP). tact RCEDC at 402-873-4293. j ver Country Economic De/"I

second session. The training i1be facilitated by UNL Extenon Educator Dennis Kahl.

more immediate opportunity move clearance items while

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BANNER-PRESS THURSDAY WEEKLY DAVID CITY, NE .'

Circulation= 3139

05/08/2008

1 . .

4)CFRA promotes farm rent program L~

By Elisha Greeley Smith

looking for sustainable and organic farmers who want to Higher land costs and sky- secure rental farmland. The company will set up longrocketing cash rents create term leases for farmers who challenges for farmers and agree to use environmentalranchers, especially begin- ly sound farming practices. ners, who need land, but canRobert Karp, New Spirit not afford the expense. owner and former Practical I n 1978, there were Farmers of Iowa director, * 350,000 American farmers announced the project sayunder the age of 35, by 2002, ing, "The program is that number fell to fewer designed to help the best of than 70,000. Without strate- our pioneering sustaingies to foster a new genera- able/organic family farmers tion of family farmers and succeed." ranchers, rural America will The goals of the program continue to decline. are to: New S ~ i r i Ventures t is a - Foster the viability and new comiany searching for growth of farmers and ranchsuch strategies. They are ers committed to organic and Center for Rural Affairs

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application deadline. sustainable agriculture; Preserve farmland and Int,erested producer9 should strengthen the economic, contact Robert Karp a t social and ecologicaI health nsv@centurytel.net or of rural communities; 262.642.9672 or the Center . Create a community of for Rural Affairs a t (402) interest among farmers and 687-2100. investors committed to the Thc Center for Rural values of environmental Affairs was established in sustainability, farmland 1973 as an unaffiliated nonpreservation and healthy profit corporation under IRS food code 501(c)3. The Center for The company is looking Rural Affairs was formed by for farmers in Nebraska, Kansas, North Dakota. rural Nebraskans concerned Iowa, Wisconsin, and about family farms and Minnesota with a t least 5 rural communities, and we years experience. The walk to strcilgtllel~ small Center for Rural Affairs is businesses, family farms helping spread the message. and ranches, and rural cornJune 15th is the prc- munities.

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BURT CO. PLAINDEALER WEDNESDAY WEEKL Y TEKAMAH, NE Circulation = 15S8

04/30/2008

We Can't Afford to Walk Away from Rural America, By Elisha Greeley Smith, elishas@cfra.org, Center for Rural Affairs President Bush's proposed budget for 2009 zeros out funding for 20 inlportant rural development programs. That is the finding of the Center for Rural Affairs recently published Rural Brief. It's crucial for the long term health and viability of rural cornmunities that we create opportunities, generate wealth and build assets for individuals, but if funding for rural development keeps being neglected our rural communities will continue to decline. The less we invest now i n rural development, the more our rural communities' infrastructure deteriorates and the more it will cost in the long run. As with prcvious budgets, the 2009 budget recommends termination of numerous federal rural development and rural asset-building programs. Adoption of the Administration's 2009 budget would cause total rural development funding to be 72 percent less than its 2003 level. Scn. Tom Harkin was recently quoted in an article by Philip Brasher in The Des Moines Register saying "What good does it clo if we 81keep giving more money to fanners but they don't have any towns, thcy don't have churches, they don't have hospitals, they don't have schools, they don't have water?" Senator Harkin's analysis is more than accurate - it is a snapshot of what is already happening to our most n ~ r a communities. l And giver1 the rapid decline in rural development funding, it's apparent the federal governrncnt is walking away from any comrnitrnent to the future of our rural communities and the 60 million people who call rural America home. To view the entire Rural Brief: http://www.cfra.org/node/1172

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STAR-HERALD MORNING

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SCOTTSBLUFF,NE Circulation = 1 1625

05/02/2008 -

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I Rural declinei

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Our taxes don't go down; they usually just go away

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few nuggets gleaned from recent news items: .; Four Nebraska school districts that sued the state over school aid will get 40 percent of $70.8 m~ll~on the state will hand out in additional school support next year. Omaha Public Schools will of the increase, for a total handout get $20.8 m~ll~on of $171.2 million. Meanwhile, many small rural school districts saw the~rslice shrink, even as the overall pie got bigger. Pres~dentBush's $3.1 trillion Fiscal Year 2009 budget recommends termination of 20 federal rural development and rural asset-bullding programs. If approved, it will mean that since since 2003, programs for rural water and sewer systems would have been reduced by 62 percent; programs for rural business and cooperatives would have been reduced by 50 percent; programs for rural community facilities would have been reduced by 76 percent; and programs for rural housing would have been reduced by 95 percent. Funding for programs such as telemed~cine, distance learning, economic development, water and sewer, community fac~lity,business, renewable energy, and value added agriculture would decline by over 87 percent from their FY04 high, according to a report by the Center for Rural Affairs. The recent farm b~llproposal reduces the subsidy for ethanol blending from 51 cents per gallon to 45 cents per gallon, and Republicans in Congress are calling for repeal of federal incentives for ethanol production. At the same time, Democrat are blaming ethanol for rising food prices, despite the more significant run-up in 011prices, which affects agriculture across a broad spectrum ranging from the cost of fertllizer to truck~ngcrops off the farm. Rep. Jeff Flake, R-Arizona, on Wednesday called for a repeal of government incentives designed to boost ethanol production, calling them "a classic case of the law of unintended consequences." "Congress surely did not intend to raise food prices I by incentivizing ethanol, but that's precisely what's happened," Flake told the Associated Press. Earlier , in the week Sen. Kay Balley Hutchison, R-Texas, pra- - ' posed freezing the ethanol production mandate at current levels. Meanwhile, Democrats are holding heanngs on food prices, in which ethanol IS expected to be cast in the role of economic villa~n.

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whatever your opinion about ethanol, it's hard to argue that the alternative energy boom hasn't been good for Nebraska. The state ranks second nationally in ethanol production, according to the Nebraska Ethanol Board, which says the state's 21 operating ethanol plants, produce more than 1.3 billion gallons of ethanol each year using nearly a half billion bushels of corn. Corn prices are good for the first time in years. We all say we want lower government spending, but nearly half the income in seven of 11 Panhandle counties comes directly from government sources such as farm subsidies, Social Security, Medicare, veterans' benefits, welfare and public sector salaries. Even when we elect so-called conservatives, our taxes don't go down, they just go away - to pay for B -somebody else's schools, roads and jobs. - If governments are going to spend our money, we'd prefer that at least some of it be spent on preserving the long-term health and viability of rural cornmunities. It doesn't do much good to subsidize farms and ethanol plants if there are no stores, no schools, no hospitals, no distance learning opportunities, no I towns and no new highways. No matter how you feel 1 I about the issue, endless data shows that cutting funding for rural development leads to continuiqg decline in rural communities and the 60 million people who call rural America home. In the most recent edition of the Scottsbluff High School newspaper, student journalist Scott Nelson wrote column titled, "Scottsbluff is a pretty cool place ... really." 1 "We live in Small Town, Nebraska, USA," Nelson te:ls fellow students, 'meaning that this entire comI munity worships the ground you walk on. ... Enjoy it I I while you can. It's cliche, but it will be gone before you know it." Nelson means high school, but he might as well be talking about a way of life. What do we tell kids after the stores are abandoned and boarded up, the " school buildings sit empty and there's nothing left to 1 come back to, even if they long for the same experience for their own children? How could anyone let it happen to the nation's Heartland? We don't hear either political party offering an an- swer. When you live in rural America it's sometimes hard to escape the feeling, as one joker put it, that you're a chicken and the only candidate on the ballot is Col. Sanders. , ' ?

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(402) 342-31 78

RECORD WEDNESDAY WEEKL Y CHADRON, NE .. Circulation = 2673

A simple solution for a complicated problem By Elisha Greeley Smith elishas8cfra.org Center for Rural Affairs Most agriculture production

in this country is marketed as

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generic grain or livestock, where the only way to compete is to produce for less. These shortterm gains are quickly lost as others learn these skills or adopt new technology. The one practice that has kept many farms solvent is increased production, but steadily increasing production means greater investment, an option not available to most wanting to get into agriculture. Is it possible the

"get bigger or get out" philosophy is making it impossible for young people to get in? One option to enter agriculture is getting more per acre rather than adding more acres of production. Instead of focusing on the generic market, produce for a premium market. There is an established market today that pays a premium, not for what is produced but for how it's produced. The organic m&ket has been around for a long time and continues to grow at a rate of 20% per year. Craig Chase, an Iowa State ag economist, calculates a

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$254 annual per-acre return to= ! management (after deduct~ng labor and production expenses) 1 for a four-year organic crop rotation of corn, soybeans, oats I and alfalfa. At that rate, only 171 acres are needed to generate $45,000 in net income, while a non-organic cordsoybean rota- I tion farm with a profit of $52 ! per acre needs 865 acres to = make thc same money. Learning organic production practices is a challenge, but once mastered these practices , will continue to providc savings and premiums.. To learn more:www.cfra.org

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NEMAHA CO. H E M L D FRTDAY WEEKL Y AUBURN, NE CirculaClon = 2628

05/08/2008

op'portunity Available to Secure Rental Farmland 1

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Elisha Greeley Smith enter for Rural Affairs

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Higher land costs and skyrocketing ,cash rents create challenges for farmem and ranchers, especially beginners, who need land, but cannot afford the expense. In 1978,there were 350,000American farmers under the age of 35, by 2002, that number fell to fewer than 70,000. Without strategies to foster a new generation of family farmers and ranchers, rural America will continue to decline. New Spirit Ventures is a new company searching for such strategies. They are looking for sustainable and organic farmers who want to secure rental farmland. The company will set up long-term leases for farmers who agree to use environmentally sohnd farming practices. Robert Karp, New Spirit owner

best of our pioneering sustainablelorginic family farmers succeed." The goals of the program are to: Foster the viability and growth of farmers and ranchers committed to organic and sustainable agriculture; Preserve farmland and strengthen the economic, social and ecological health of rural co~nmunities: Create a community of interest among farmers and investors committed to the values of environmental sustainability, farmland preservation and healthv food. The company is looking for farmers in Nebraska, Kansas, North Dakota, Iowa, Wisconsin, and Minnesota with at least five years experience. The Center for Rural Affairs is helping spread the message. June 15th is the pre-application deadline. Interested producers should contact Robert Karp at nsv@centurytel.net or 262.642.9672 or the Center for Rural Affairs at (402) 687-2100. -

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NEWS-BLADE WEDNESDAY WEEKLY BIIIDGEPORT, NE Circulation = 1695

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Creating - - I, $ 'Opportunities By Elisha Greeley Sntith,

I eAhuc(a&fra.erg* Centerfor Rural Affairs As a young mother I know 1 that even with two steady incomes from my husband and me, it can still be difficult making ends meet. We are not , alone. There are many families that have two or more john and still struggle to adequately provide for their family For three consecutive years, % Nebraska has ranked number ' 4 cne in the U.S. for the number of children living with working parents, yet child poverty in% creased by 50% in just five 'years (Annie E. Casey Founda,tion, National Klds Count Data ! Book, 2007). I Recently the e n t e r for Ru- : & Affairs along with other leaders in the nonprofit, business, human service and philanthropic fields came together to f o ~ i na ncw initiative called Opportunity@ Work. dp?,oI-tiTiiy@WZL is a con- ' !Ti2t ion of organizitiolis wolklng *to enhance Net11nAa's worh? force by supporting progl ams and initiatives thnt create opportunlty for working fan~il~es to achieve financial stabll~ty, contribute to the prospcrity of i local communities and .L strengthen the state's econonlq. 4 The programs will help educate people or1 p c runs1 ~ fi;nances, and improve their eco-

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ployer, can also benefit thcsc pr ogiaiii\ by cutting i wn on employee abwntce- iI sm, boasting protitdbil~ty, niproving and enriching tlie ommunities in which they own businesses, and bolstet ing the econolny of thc state It's crucial for the lung terl11 health and viabil~ty of rural communities, that we continue crealir~gopportunities, generating wealth and building assets for individ~~alq. Anyone inte~cctctfin the financial stabil~ty of Nebr,r:kans, should become involved in Opportunity@Work by vis-

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~:l/~ww.opporti~nityatwork, miget-involved.shtrn 1. II For more about the Center ; 4 for Rural Affairs: y.cfra.org. ,

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LEADER WEDNESDAY WEEKL Y BLUE HILL, NE Circulation = 1389

0413012008

-programs help young farmers in finding loans, land and tax breaks This is the second story of a three-part series /ocu.sitig on young farmers and the challenges they face. By Rita Brhel Blue Hill Leader BLUE HILL - The number of young farmers working in the fields or livestock lots this spring is as low as the nation has ever seen: Those ages 34 and younger make up only about 5 percent of all U.S. farmers, according to the latest census. High land values and input costs continue to make it difficult for young people to get into farming, and for beginning farmers to stay in business. ~~t there is hope, programs - from local FFA chapters to a college-level project to programs offering land links, tax breaks and mon-

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people to farm starts young. Through the 4-H and FFA programs, young children through high school students are learning the skills they'll need to run a farming business. 4-H is facilitated by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln county Extension offices in Red Cloud and Hastings. Children can join at age 8 and enroll in projects and hands-on activities to learn a variety of farmmanagement skills. from animal husbandry and crop production to weed identification and veterinary care. These projects are then exhibited at the county and state fair. Additional contests for livestock judgCassie IvviBlur H I / /Lrurlering, for example, are available at the While young farmers face many challenges, several utilize the county, district and state levels. programs available to keep their operations, like this one, going. FFA, formerly known as Future etary incentives are help~ngyoung Here, in Webstcr and southern Farmers of America, is part of a voAdams County, encouraging more cational agriculture curriculuni offarmers to stay on the land. -

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fered at participating high schools. While middle school students may have the option of taking an introductory class, the courses are directed toward those in grades 9-12. Besides the classroom hours, FFA members are involved in a project through which a student is involved in either his own agricultural business or as an employee in an agricul$ral business. Members also compete at district, state and national contests that test agricultural knowledge and skills. For a young person interested in farming, the knowledge and skills learned through FFA are invaluable. "We give students a knowledge base of the different areas of agriculture," said Melissa Bonifas, who teaches at Blue Hill High School and See. .FARMERS,pge . .. .- ,: ... 6B -

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programs available through organizations, agencies and

gram. Where the Farm Bill Fits

Continued from page 1A as the Blue ill FFA

institutions to help beginning farmers get established. While not an exhaustive list, the programs listed below have been used extens i v e l ~ Young farmers: " The University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension service. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Farm Service Agency. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Setvice. The Nebraska Investment Finance Authority, commonly known as NIFA. The Nebraska College of Technical Agriculture. The Center for Rural Affairs. The State of Nebraska, through the Nebraska Departnient of Agriculture office in Lincoln, * The Nebraska Departmerit of Agriculture, Beginning Farmer Connection Pro-

In a d d i t i ~ n ~ these to wellknown programs, groups - such as the Center for Rural Affairs - are working to make even more options available to young farmers. "Where the nation is trying to go with public policy is creating incentives and developing programs, Lo allow beginning farmers to start out smaller with smaller debt and to reward innovative farmers with premiums on the markets," said Rruckner, \vho has been heavily involved in creating young and beginning farmer policies for the next Farm Rill. "You look at the number of farmers under the age ol' 34," Bruckner said. "That's the reason we need to develop and fund programs that help beginning farmers." Debate over funding is ongoing, but each of the programs below has a lot ofsupport from agricultural organizations and farmers across

Topics in Hill agricultural classes inc[ude range management and soil science: natural resource fianagement; crop producion; beef, sheep and swine duction; meat science; ding and agricultural mehanics; horticulture; commodity marketing and agricultural business. ' She doesn't just touch on "material; she teaches the acskills that would help a ng farmer be successful, om calculating stocking atcs and crop pest control to oing through meat quality ssurance training and busiMost of 'onifas' students on't plan on farming, but or those students, FFA offers a glance at the Oppo*uin agriculture. For those nts who do plan to the vocational agricultural classes provide a solid foundation from which to build

These classes "are absolutely essential to someone who will own loan, have animals," raise crops, repair small engines, keep records or any of the myriad aspects f farm management, Bonifas

Other Programs in Place Once a young person gradates from high school or colge, there are a number of

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the natlon: I Ire Value Added Produeer (;rant (VAPG) Program, I r n~liich was included in this ' last Farrii Bill, helps farmers to capture added premium on their products through niche farming through grants for planning and working capi- I tal. The Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program, which was also included in the last Farm Bill but not allowed funding, would provide grants to local and state organizations and I agencies. The Beginning Farmer 1 and Ranchcr lndividual De- ; velopn~entAccounts is a new program modeled after a suc- ' cessful project in California, where the government provides a cash match to a young farmer's personal contribu- ; tions to a savings account created specifically to help with beginning farm expenses, such as down payments, and purchasing livestock and equipment.

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METRO MAGAZINE OMAHA, NE

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SUNDAY APRIL 27,2008 6PM REGENCY COURT 100% of t ~ c k e sales t h e l p ensure no kid In America g r o w s up h u n g r y LOCAL BENEFICIARIES CENTER FOR RURAL AFFAIRS THE FOOD BANK VISITING NURSE ASSOCIATION VOICES FOR CHILDREN NATIONAL HONORARY CHEF MARY SUE MILLIKEN

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MORETOCOME... General A d m ~ s s ~ o$75 n 00 V.1 P. $150 00 Now ava~lablefor purchase o n l ~ n e or at Wlnestyles starting 4 01 08 72nd & Pac~ficor 168th &Burke Or please call 877.26.TASTE

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THURSDAY WEEKLY LYONS,NE Circulation = 735

05/01/2008

Center for Rural

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By Elisha Greeley Smith elishasOcfra.org

Most agriculture production in this country is marketed as generic grain or livestock, where the only way to compete is to produce for less. These short-term gains are quickly lost as others $ learn these skills or adopt new 'ii technology. k , ,.. The one practice that has ~4 2* kept many farms solvent is in2 creased production, but steadily "increasing production means greater investment, an option not available to most wanting to get into agriculture. Is it possible the "get bigger or get out" philosophy is making it impossible for young people to get in?

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continues to gr& at a rate of 20% per year. Craig Chase. an Iowa State ag economisl, calculates a $254 annual per-acre return to management (after deducting labor and production expenses) for a four-year organic crop rotation of corn, soybeans.oats and alfalfa. At ~lisha Greeley Smith that rate, only 171 acres are needed One option to enter agri- to generate $45.000 in net income, culture is getting more per acre whileanoa-organiccorn/soybean rather than adding more acres of rotation farm w i ~ ha profit of $52 production. Instead of focusing per acre needs 865 acres to make on the generic market, produce the same money. for a premium market. There is Learning organic producan established market today that tion practices is a challenge, but pays a premium, not for what once mastert.d, thesc practices is produced, but for how it's will continue to providc savings produced. and preiniums. The organic market has To learn more: www.cfra. been around for a long time and o g

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Date: Location: Circulation (DMA): Type (Frequency): Page: Keyword:

Rural areas can't lose developmentalsupport

Tuesday, April 29, 2008 ST. CLOUD, MN 27,888 (1 5) Newspaper (D) 48 Center For Rural Affairs

have any tcntm,they don't haw: churches, they don't have hospitals, they don't have schools, they don't have water?" President Bush's proposed Harkin's analysis is more than budget for 2009 zeros out fund- accurate - it is a snapshot of ing for 20 important rural d e what is already happening to our velopment programs. That is the most rural communities. And finding of the Center for Rural the rapid decline in ruralgiven Maits' m n t l y published "Rural development funding, it's apparBrief7 ent the federal gcn~mmentis It's crucial for the long-term waking away from any commithealth and viability of rural ment to the future of our rural communities that we create opcommunities and the 60 million portunities, y r a t e m ~ d t hand people who call rural America build assets or individuds, but if funding for rural development home. Elisha Greeley Smith keeps beiig neglected, our rural , communities will continue to Lincoln, Neb. decline. The less we invest now in rural development, the more our rural communities' infrastructure deteriorates and the mom it till cost in the long run.As with previous budnets, the 2009budnet recommends ktmination ofnumerous federal rival development and rural asset-building programs. Adoption of the administration's 2009 budget would cause total rural develop ment funding to be 72 percent less than its 2003 level. Sen. Tom Harkin was recently quoted in The Des Moines Register saying 'What good does it do ifwe keep giving more money to farmers but they don't


COOKCOUNTY

Date: Location: Circulation (DMA): Type (Frequency): Page: Keyword:

NEWSWHERALD

Friday, April 25, 2008 GRAND MARAIS, MN 5,500 (1 37) Newspaper (W) A4,A5 Center For Rural Affairs

Feds walking away from rural America Elisha Greelv Smith April's Center for Rural Affairs' Ruml Brief takes a close look at R u d Develop ment funding for FY 2009. President Bush released his FY '09 budget on Feb. 3. While this $3.1trillion budget for the entire federal government sets the parameters for future debate and deliberations in Congress, it is primarily a recommendation and the first step in the annual appropriations process. As with previous budgets, the FY09 budget recommends tennination of numerous federal rural development and rural asset-building programs. Of the 40 programs highlighted in the Rural Brief, President Bush recommends tennination and zero funding for 20 of the programs. "The president's budget recon~mendationsand the recent decline in rural development investment suggest that the federal govenunent is walking away from any conuritment to the future of^ rural America and its conlmunities. Combined with a lack of investment in any rural economic or community development in the Farm Bill, this demonstrates a seri-

ous disregard for the economic and social challenges facing many rural conullunities a i d to the 60million people who call rural America home," commented Jon Bailey, rural research and analysis program director at the Center for Rural Affairs. The president's FY09 budget continues a trend of significant reductions in nual development funding since 2003. If the Administration's FY09 budget were approved, since FY03: Program for rural water and sewer would have been reduced by 62 percent Programs for rural business and cooperatives would have been reduced by 50 percent Programs for rural conlmunity facilities would have been reduced by 76 percent Programs for rural housing would have been reduced by 95 percent Funding for programs such as tclcmedicine, distance l e a r n i ~ gecononlic develop ment, water and sewer, community facility, busin'ess, renewable energy, and value added agriculture would decline by over 87 percent from their FYO4 high point if the Administration's FY09 budget were adopted. The FY09 Budget Proposal

would eliminate the MicroLoan technical assistance grants. The ~ u d g e tProposal also proposes making the SBA MicroLoan program a "zero subsidy" program with a goal

RURAUAS toward making the program self-funding through an increase of interest rates cllarged to program interne diaries. This has the result of nlakirlg tllc cost of serving rural erllrepreneurs more expensive and likely less attractive, eventually resulting in fewer intermediaries interested in providing services to rural entrepreneurs, thus decreasing the number of nual people interested in beginning small businesses. Visit www.cfra.orCf/node/ 1172 to view the entire Rural Brief. The Rural Brief is a publication of the Center for RuraI Affairs and analyzes federal executive, legislative and administrative action concerning rural development and asset-building programs and initiatives. The Rural Brief is available both electronically and in print. Call the Center at (40'2) 687-2100 or e-mail at info@cfra.org.

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