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Building Entrepreneurial Communities in the New Year By Elisha Greeley Smith Center for Rural Affairs

W i i c ~the ~ Nebraska Legislature cunvenes in January they .will make important decisions about the future of' ri~ralNebraska. One prograni up for debate is the successfi~lBuilding Entrepreneurial Co~nnlunities Act. The program makes grants to rural communities to support entrepreneurship, leaclership development, ~ 0 ~ 1 engagement th and local philanthropy - four proven strategies of rural comniunity revitalirotion. In this time of economic downturn there is no better way to invest our limited state dollars

than programs that look towards the future and build a more robust and resilient economy in our small towns. Albion and Fullerton are two co~ntnunitiec that have primary goals for successful long term dcveloument to attract and retain youth 'for new businesses and small business transition. Both towns used Building Entrepreneurial Communities funcls to send 30 high s c h ~ o stul dents to the 2008 Nebraska Marketplace. an event focused on energizing slnall businesses and rural communities. These studenls gained valuable kno~vledge and tools needed to improve or start their own business successfully. They were able to take what

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they learned at Marketplace and utilize that knowledge in their communities. Our Nebraska Senators made a wise choice in 2007 when they doubled funding for this program to $500,000. Still, in 2008 the demand for the program far ' exceeded the limited funds available even with that increase. With demand growing for the program, a growing need and dernonstrated success, Nebraska . Senators should act proactively to continue support for this program% at least $500,000 annually. For further information::

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CRITERION DODGE, Nebraska

Thursday, December 1 8 , 2 0 0 8 WEEKLY 11 2 0 30.94 s q . inches $5 12

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Economic Woes Best Addressed by Efforts Dealing with the Struggles of Modest Income and Estate Holdings Cmer&RurUiirs The gap between rich and poor in the U.S. is growing and is greater than in all but two of the world's 30 richest market-based democracies (Mexico and 'Turkey), according to a study by the Organization for l<coliomic Cooperation and Development. Income is more concentrated in rich hands than at any time since the 1920s. As in the 1920s. thc growing inequality of recent years was a major factor in thc economic calamity that followed, according to a Washington Post essay by Millsap College historian Robert McElvaine. Early in the century, the limited income of working people was holding down demand for the new goods being mass produced in factories. So business turned to aggressive advertising and easy credit to stimulate demand and economic growth. The rate of borrowing doubled. 1-oans from personal finance companies grew twelve-fold. "But a steroid-induced burst of great strength is always likely to be followed by impotence," writes McElvaine. "Sooner or later the limits of consumer credit are reached consumers find themselves with more bad debt than they can repay, sales decline, and banks, left holding bad loans, begin to fail. Sooner or later arrived in October 1929, as it did again in September 2008." In recent years, the construction and real estate boom kept the economy strong. But it was built on easy credit and mortgages people could not afford. Incomes have not kept up

for ordinary families. For a time, stagnant middle class income was masked by people working extra jobs, borrowing, and failing to save for retirement. 13ut there is a day of reckoning. The similarities are not cause to resign ourselves to a great depression. But we must learn their lessons to prompt recovery and avoid making the same mistakes. We can begin by focr~singeconomic stimulus measures on ordinary hardworking Americans and incentives and support for the smallest businesses to get started and invest. In the long term, we need income and estate tax policies that avert the tendency of wealth and income to concentrate, including: * Tax relief targeted to people of modest income and estates of modest size. * Proactive policies that enable all Americans to gain education to en-hance their capacity to contribute to America's prosperity and the opportunity to share in it. * New measures to enable average Americans to start farms and businesses, including caps on subsidy payments and tax incentives, technical assistance, training and loans targeted to the little guys. * Incentives for low and modestincome Americans to save money to start businesses, buy homes or enhance their education. Borrowing has its place. But helping average Americans save also creates opportunity, with the added benefit of stabilizing the economy.

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December 18,2008 HOME DELIVERY 3 3

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Johanns: Don't expect big policy changes World-Herald News Servlce the next U . ~secretary . of agriculmre, former Gov. Tom Vilsack may well spend much of his trade representstimeschmooz.ng with tives and courting members of Congress. But Mike Johanns, Nebraska's former governor himself a former apriculture secretary - cautioned that dra-\ii1sar1:-n ,dlc changes in U.S. agricultural policy cor~ldbe difficult to achieve. on Tuesday, President-elect Barack Obama prom~ L *'a U new kind of leadership in Wasb4.- m" T ~ J a t ~d-ierm . he announced his u ~ ~ ~ i m a t ~ u iA~.dck, i Democratic Iowa governoi*first elected in 1998.

' Johanns, a Republican who was elected Nebraska

and food stamps, conservation programs and rural

governor the same year that Vilsack won the Iowa governor's race, made the transition from the Statehouse to Washington in 2005. He stepped down as agriculture secretary late last year to seek and win to the He had only praise for his fellow former govp7ILur. "He's a great pick," Johanns said of Vilsack. "I like him a lot. We were governors in the same cycle, and a r worked together." '1he U.S. Department of Agriculture administers a wide array of programs, including farm subsidies and meatpacking inspections, schc (.I IIAIILL. programs

economic development efforts. The mammoth agency spends about $97 billion per year and employs more than 100,000exactly people.turn on a dime, Johanns said. It doesn't "It is not just the lT'3DA-farm policy really changer ui sort of an evolutionary way," he said. "Some of the polines that were p a n of the first farm bill in 1933, you can see them there all these years later." He wouldn't describe the agency as unresponsive -he said its staff are very good to work with and he was able to accomplish-Please many ofsee hisJOHANNS, goals while servpage 10

ronanns1Continued from Page

suramount of time he apitol Hill makers' conSe memS Some SomeOn of e or nt ' S

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in agricultural exports at stake, it's unportant to build first-name relationships with trading partners in other countries, he said. "The only way you do that is by getting on an airplane." Someagricultural groups said they hope Vilsack will change

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agricultural policy to ~romote. family farms. I "The Obama administration is committed to ending the sub- i sidized destruction of family: farming and to investing in the futwe of rural Ameriw;l said Chuck Hassebrook, director of the Center for Rural Affairs in i Lyons. &Thoseare compelling pieces of the Obama Not only does Gov V3sack sup- (/ port those, I believe he has the ability to them happen." ! Other farm organizations, which don't object to large-scale j farming, said they are l-eassured j by Vilsack9s understanding of 1 corn, soybean and livestock pro- i duction in Iowa and Nebraska. "If you don't know agriculture, you're not going to be governor of Iowa," Obama said Tuesday in discussing the nominees. Johanns said VilsackB cess will depend upon two suckey

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factors. "One is beyond h s control, and that is the state of the economy," Johanns said. "The second will be his relationships."

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( Another arctic blast headed I toward Nebraska Sundav -

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OMAHA, Neb. (AP) - In the rel- cast of 1 or 2 more inches of snow on In most eastern Nebraska spots, the ative warmth of 15-20 degrees Friday Saturday promises that travel will be snow was preceded by freezing rain morning, northeast Nebraska was dig- perilous, especially in northeast or slcct. The State Patrol said up to a ging out from nearly a foot of snow Nebraska. half-inch of ice coated some roadand facing the prospect of another "We have a lot of new snow up ways Thursday night. arctic blast. there, and we're going to combine None will be melting anytime "There's not much going on here, that with winds of 30 mph or more," soon, at least with nature's help. but we're open," said Ruthann Bon- said Mayes, who works in the Weath"Sunday night the temperatures neau, manager of Cowabunga Komer er Service's Valley office. will really bottom out," Mayes said. restaurant in Walthill. "We have lots Already on the ground are 11 inch- "It will be coldest in east Nebraska of snow ... it's pretty high here." es that fell over the last 24 hours in mainly northeast will be the pit of it." About 15 niilcs south of Walthill, in Walthill and the 10 inches in Wayne Meteorologists in her office were Lyons, Brian Depew said the estimat- and Norfolk. Other northcast Nebras- expecting ternperahires in the low to ed 6-8 inches was "very pretty snow, ka reports ranged from 8 down to 5 mid-teens below zero by late Sunday, actually." inches of snow. with some spots approaching nlinus "lt fell all night," Depew said from Farther west and south, less snow 20. his ofice at thc Center for Rural fcll: -. Affairs. "There was ice before that - 3.5 inches at Chambers in 11olt--j that made it a little slick." County; He said the city's snowplows had - 5.2 inches at Mullen in Hooker most of the streets cleared by late Fri- County; day morning. - 4-5 inchcs at various spots in .:= Slick or otherwise impassable Douglas County, including Omaha; streets and stranded vehicles forced 4.5 inches at Ericson in Ciarficld -most eastern Nebraska schools to County; close Friday or to open late. - 2.9 inches at Kingsley Dam in More snow was on the way over Keith County; the weckcnd, as holiday journeys - 2.5 inches at Imperial in southbegin in carncst. west Nebraska's Chase County; National Weather Service meteor- 2 inches at Hastings in southologist Barbara Mayes said the fore- central Nebraska.


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Solution successful economic stimulus package lies in rural areas rural development strategic\ By Chuck Hassebrook I-lcre's how Congrcss can do it: :Bnter for Rural Affairs f'ro~ltle a direct ~ncentive Small enterprise has a critical rolc to play in A~nericn's eco- fnl.rural enterprise by establish. ing a . .Microenterprisc and nomic recovery, especially r r .. - .--. ~ InvestmnZfif' rural ;N-e;\s.-.Sowhen ConHess~ B c g i ~ s n i nFarmc. s up legislation to ~.ei'i~el our Tax Credi~of up to $10,000 to lomy, srnall entrcprcneur- stimulate small !>usinesscxpansion and new fann and business should be thc centerpiece. Microenterprises - owncr- startups. Fund Inore rul-a1 small rated businesses tl~atprovide employment and perhaps business loans, training and Ire a few ernployccs - create technical assistance by increa..ost new rusal jobs. Beginning ing funding for. the K:onl rnicl-s and value added agri- Microentrepreneurs Proglam. Iture bring additional vitality An inn-easc from $4 million to rural America. Thcre's no bet- $25 million in this new farm bill program would pay long- tern^ I. tiine tlitln lrow for federal licy to invest in these proven dividcnds.

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Add h n d s to the succcssf111 Value Addctl Producer <;r;lllts Program, which makes grants to family-size farn~el-sand rit~~chers to launch new venlure:; to estahlisli- loci3 ~narketsanif tc pi-ocess and market hig!i vnlilc crops and lives~ock.An acltled $24 nlillion would bring the program to the $40 million authori~cdby the farm bill. These three provisions would jump start rural economy and plant the seeds of long-term rul-a1 vitality through en[l.cprcncurship. Congress should enibrace thc111 as it dcvclops legislation to prompt economic recovery in America.

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EXPRESS SUPERIOR, Nebraska

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2008' All Rt& Rsaved

Nebraska wins latest skirmish

Another ray of sunshine has broken through the clouds surrounding Nebraska fight with Kansas over the limited supply of water flowing down thc Republican River. The O~nahaWorld-Herald reported Tuesday thc arbitrator now considering thc dispute has ruled against the Kansas attempt to collect at least $72 million from Nebraska for using morc than its allotted share of river water. In another ray ofsunshine. last week this ncwspapcr reported on Sen. Tom Carlson's cxpcctation that the most recent fivc year avcragc will show Nebraska i s back into compliance. Carlso~itold rnembcrs of the Superior Kiwariis Club that Nebraska efforts to reducc invasivc vegetation growing within thc rivcr's boundaries and chiinncl clearance comhincd with a moderahon ol' thc drought had succccdcd irl incrcasiiig stream flows. Now as reports I'rom monllorrng wells arc coir~ingi l l , 11 also appears water lcvcls in the underground aquifer are on t he upswing.

Weather

The World-Herald reported Tuesday the arbitrator ruled in a preliminary decision that Kansas can only seek payment for damages it allegedly suffered and not payment for what Nebraska gained. r r water Karl Dreher, a f o r r ~ ~Idaho official who is serving as arbitrator in the dispute between Kansas and Nebraska has also decided the computer models currently used to determine how the river water should be shared should reflect actual conditions. Nebraska has long contended the accounting procedure is flawed. The decision delivered Monday narrows the scope of the trial now scheduled for March in Denver. Commenting on this wcek's developments,laaBruning, Nebraskmuugeneral, said. W e are pl%asedbut this isn't the end of the line. The Supreme Court could be down the road, but we hope Kansas and Nebraska can arrive at a scttlemcnt before we both incur the expense of a trial."

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Resaved

The Holbrook/Grant man accused of killing a young Arapahoe mother more than a year ago faces a variety of charges in other counties as well. Herchel Huff, 35, has pleaded not guilty to charges of motor vehicle homicide, tampering with a witness and refusal t~ submit to a chemical test in the death of Kasey J o Warner, who died Oct. 3, 2007, when she pushed her young daughter out of the path of ~ ~car on f a county f ~ road southwest of Arapahoe. The little girl lived, but Kasey did not. During a hearing in Lexington Wednesday,Furnas Coun-

ty District Judge James Doyle with a prior conviction for IV increased Huffs bond to $2 driving while intoxicated. million cash, following Huffs Patterson said ~ u fhas f two arrest in Kearney Dec. 3 for vi- earlier DWI convictions in olating conditions of his re- Colorado, and another driving lease on $25o,ooo/io percent while intoxicated charge is pending in Lincoln County. bond. Furnas County Attorney The Lincoln County charge Tom Patterson, who is prose- and the Furnas County charge cuting Huff with the assis- could be considered Huffs tance of Mike Guinan of the third and fourth offense. Nebraska.Attnmey..Generalls Huff is expected to appear office, said Thursday after- to answer the Lincoln County noon that the motor vehicle charges on Jan. 16. homicide charge against Huff In the meantime, Madison includes the violation of driv- County officials want to'visit ing while intoxicated. with Huff about charges Patterson said that the against him there, where he is motor vehicle homicide charged with felony theft by charge increases from a Class de~eption.No one from the 111 felony to a Class 11 felony Madison County attorney's of-

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fice was immediately available to explain those charges in more detail. At the same time, Huff is charged with two stop sign violations and a speeding charge in Frontier County. Frontier County Attorney Jon Schroeder said Thursday afternoon that Huffs lawyers have requested two continuances on his court appearances there, waiting, Schroeder said, most likely for the result of the Furnas County case. Schroeder said he expects Huff to plead guilty to the Frontier County charges as the violations were witnessed by a Nebraska Game and Parks Commission officer.

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12/22/2008

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Ag NomilleeWould Be Hard-PressedTo id^ F~~~

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lisa.hare@yankton.net I

High expectations from farm, agribusiness and consumer organizations for the new Secretary of Agriculture will make riding any fences on issues pertinent to agri-

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appointed posiVilsack tion from nearly every sector of the food production chain - from the National Farm Bureau, to the Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA), to the Humane Society. "I think he's a good choice to implement the vision for rural America that presidentelect , Obama put forth in the campaign," said Chuck Hassebrook, executive director for the Center ,for Rural Affairs.

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According to ~ a s s e b x Obama ran on an aggressive platform of change in farm and rural policy, and Gov. Vilsack's most important job will be implementing that vision. "We will continue to work with Vilsack to keep rural entreor en curs hi^, anricultural conserkition. and f a d v farming and ranching at the ftrefront Gf cru-

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~ ; ~ s ~ ~ ; ~ ~ ; ~ ~ ; ~ a t e s ~ At a news conference in Chicago, Vilsack said his first priority would be to improve profitability for farmers and expand opportunities in rural America while encouraging sustainable agricultural prkt%es. Obama called Vilsack "fiercely protective" of family farmers, but as Iowa's governor, Vilsack has alreadv established a track record on farm issues. Some groups - namely sustainable and organic-promoting organizations - have been disappointed with his support of family farms. "Vilsack has a glowing reputation as being a shill for agribusiness biotech giants like Monsanto," a spokesman from the Organic Consumers Association said in a recent editorial. Some activists were hoping that, like Franklin Roosevelt's pick ,#i Henry Wallace during FDRt Dq~resSion-tornterm, Obama would make a radical move and select someone not of the Washington-insider variety for the position. Wallace was an editor - ---- --VILSACK, Page 1 3 p h e

and economist who developed hybrid corn. His contribution as U.S. Agriculture Secretary led to the creation of the U.S. farm support system still in use today. Hassebrook applied for the position last Thursday after growing discouraged with the reported list of possible nominees. And for a brief time, even New York Times journalist Michael Pollan was in the running, thanks to promotion provided by lobbyist and media representative Blane Friest. Author of the New York Times bestseller 20mnivore's Dilemma." as well as "In Defense Of Food," Pollan has established himself as a guru of the local, non-industrial food movement. "Most of the problems our food system faces today are because of its reliance on fossil fuels, and to the extent that our policies wring the oil out of the system and replace it with the energy of the sun, those policies will simultaneously improve the state of our health, our envirgnment and our security," Pollan.s_tated in

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a recent essay published in the Times. But Obama played it safer selecting Vilsack - a man who, according to Senate Agriculture Committee Chairman Tom Harkin of Iowa, "knows production agriculture and the changes we need to ensure its profitability and future." Nebraska Farmers Union President John Hansen said Vilsack's top three priorities should implementation of the 2008 Farm Bill as Congress intended it, reform of the USDA bureaucracy and aggressive pursuit of implementing renewable energy policies. "Vilsack is a Midwestern governor who should have some understanding of agriculture, but who will inherit a very tough agricultural economy," Hansen said. Senate Ag Committee member Sen. Ben Nelson @Neb), said Vilsack won't need any on-the-job training. Though Vilsack has avoided the issue of trade, he has said he will work with other federal departments on climate change, nutrition issues within food assistance programs and second generation, nonfood crop biofuel technologies. "From trade disputes to tight budgets, food safety to boosting exports, Vilsack will have his hands full," Nelson said. .-

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Another arctic blast headed toward Nebraska ( a little sl~ck." He said the city's snowplows had most of OMAHA -- In the relative warnlth of 15- the streets cleared by late Friday morning. 20 degrees Friday morning, northeast Slick or otherwise impassable streets and Nebraska was digging out from nearly a foot stranded vehicles forced most eastern of snow and facing the prospect of another Nebraska schools to close Friday or to open arctic blast. late. "There's not much going on here, but More snow was on the way over the weekwe're open," said Ruthann Bonneau, manag- end, as holiday journeys begin in earnest. er of Cowabunga Korner restaurant in National Weather Service meteorolog~st Walthill. "We have lots of snow ... it's pretty Barbara Mayes said the forecast of 1 or 2 high here." more inches of snow on Saturday promises About 15 miles south ofWalthill, in Lyons, that travel will be perilous, especially in Brian Depew said the estimated 6-8 inches northeast Nebraska. was "very pretty snow, actually." "We have a lot of new snow up there, and "It fell all night," Depew said fi'om his we're going to combine that with winds of 30 office at the Center for Rliral Affairs. mph or more," said Mayes, who works in the "There was ice before that fiat made it Weather Service'sValley office.

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Already on the ground are 11 inches that fell over the last 24 hours in Walthill and the 10 inches in Wayne and Norfolk. Other northeast Nebraska reports ranged from 8 down to 5 inches of snow. In most eastern Nebraska spots, the snow was preceded by freezing rain or sleet. The State Patrol said up to a half-inch of ice coated some roadways Thursday night. None wiLl be melting anytime soon, at least with nature's help. "Sunday night the temperatures will really bottom out," Mayes said. Meteorologists in her office were expecting temperatures in the low to mid-teens below zero by late Sunday, with some spots approaching minus 20.

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By David Kwah-Mensah Extension Educator, Madison, Stanton, Wayne Counties

A common goal ,

Sustainable agriculture is a common goal that is widely discussed by those involved in agriculture. There are many definitions of sustainable agriculture. Most of them include the ideas of good stewardship, economic viability, social acceptability and environmental friendliness. In other words, ' for agriculture to be sustainable, it has to be economically successful and environmentally friendly to maintain natural resources for use by future generations. In order for farmers to sustain their farms, farmers are continually improving their knowledge about how to manage farm resources and what they need to do to keep farmc productive arid economically viable. Similarly, farmers adopt farming , systems that use current technology, government incentives . and personal preferences to achieve farming goals.

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FARMERS ALSO ARE aware that their long-teim success : requires that they protect, conserve and improve the health of their farm in order to remain productive, economically competitiw and relevant to their communitit;s Therefore, farmers _ ,-%ann"31chievesustainable agricultural practices but not without : a careful plan to maintain a balance beiween natural resources conservation ant1 economic viability of their farms. The farm in modern agriculture is an open systern and is no longer self-sufficient.As an open system, modern farms receive inputs from outside the farms to produce crops and live- stock, and their products move around the world. Therefore, the relationships between farm products and the system outside the farm have impact on the economic viability and sustainability of the farm. This means that farms have to balance productivity with good farm stewardship, which involves efficient land-use planning and good land-use management. How do farmers know when they have achieved sustainability? OUR UNDEKSTANDING OF what sustainable agricultural practices are will improve over time as we learn more about the impacts of management decisions.Poor management decisions have negative impacts on the sustainability of the farm. are specific sustainability questions that farmThe follo~~ring ers can ask themselves to measure and determine the sustainability of their farms. If the answers to the following questions are positive, farmers can conclude that their farming systems are sustainable. H Does your farming system maintain a high and stable economic growth? HAre your farming methods accepted by the community of your farming area? Does your farming system improve the health and quality of your farm soil by preventing soil erosion and loss? Does your farming system protect the quality of surface and groundwater resources in your watershed? WITHOUT THESE STANDARDS, it may be dlffjcult for farmers to determine and assess farm performance for sustainability. Sustainability involves good stewardship and environmental sensitivity. The idea of stewardship in sustainable agriculture means that farmers take good care of their farmland. Taking good care of the land involves a well-organized land-use plan and good land management. A well-organized land-use plan involves the careful selection of farmingpractices â&#x201A;Źfiat yield the potential for high prolit with minimum darnage to the farmland. Good land management practices include soil-sustainability practices (such as the use of appropriate tillage systems when necessary), continuous no-till cropping systems and the use of cover crops to protect the soil against erosion. Furthermore, a good land-management system also involves the careful application of fertilriers and manure at required rates based on soil test results. This approach prevents excessive buildup of nutrients in the soil and the subsequent leaching of nutrients to contaminate groundwater resources in the farm area.

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IN CONCLUSION, SUSTAINABLE agriculture is a common goal that is achievable, profitable and measurable. However, the benefits of sustainable agriculture can only be achieved and measured against good land stewardship and the selection of farming practices that prevent environmental damage. Finally, sustainable agriculture requires adequate time and effort for its benefits to be realized. Therefore, be a good steward of your farmland and protect your natural resources. You can learn more about sustainable agriculture from the Web sites of the following organizations: Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education, Appropriate Technology Transfer for Rural Areas and the Nebraska Sustainable Agriculture Society.You may further discuss the subject or send questions via e-mail to me at dkwawmensah2@unl.edu or call University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension in Madison County at 3704040.


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Thursday. BUFFALO.December MN 18,2008 6.500 (15) Newspaper (W) 28 Center For Rural Affairs

farmers), but won't show much concern for the guy who collects hu e subsidy payments from is den in Gross Pointe, and directs his tenants to plant from fence post to fence post and damn the CRP! According to National Public Radio, during his campaign Obama made it abundantly clear that he isn't against all subsidies, as are many of his urban political brethren. NPR noted that in Amana Iowa, Obama said, "Ifwe are really serious, we can make sure that family farmers are,supporte$ not just big agnbustness. That quote probably makes the hairs stand u on the back of the neck o r your local co-op manager and producers who farm thousands of acres, but it probably strikes a chord with average farmers from small communities. There has been a movement afoot in America for some time to try to limit subsidies te so-called megafarms, or people who own large numbers of acres they do not farm, and Chuck Hassebrook, executive director of Nebraska's or told NPR that Obama's campaign platform called for directing subsidies

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By PETER GRAHAM

Obama taking his time on ag In some ways, the Barack kinds of policies will he or Obama transition team is she be expected to direct? As we've outlined before, moving quickly to establish the kind of president he Obama may turn out to be will be. In agriculture, how- very good for farmers, ever, the farm state bred, because he understands but very urban Obama 1s minorities, how things work moving with what seems at the grass roots level, and like great caut~on. the importance of He has yet to name his America's farms to the secretary of agriculture, overall economy. He comes but all indicators seem to, from a farm state, and startwell. indicate that he may ed his trip to the top by winshake things up at the ning the Iowa Caucuses. USDA. The list of potentla1 Obama also supports consecretaries contains some servation and he knows very different animals, as strong U.S.exports are necwe've discussed before, and essary. though Obama was thrust Now, if you are an abseninto the presidency from a tee landlord with thoufarm state, he is every inch sands of acres of farmland, an urban denizen of that held as an investment for state, a state that contains your plastic surgery practhe "City of Big Shoulders," tice, you might not fare as as Carl Sandburg intoned well under Barack and a many years ago. Democratic congress. When Obama does They'll be looking to help appo~nt someone, what the little guy (that could include family and hobby

toward "family farmers." Now, what does "family" mean in that context? Time will tell. Bob Stallman of the American Farm Bureau believes dividing farms among big and small, family or corporate, won't be as easy as Obama may think. He told NPR, "Less than two percent of America's farms are corporate, and many of those are family corporations." Stallman also worries that targeting only small farmers for programs and subsidies would be the wrong thing to do. He said 80 to 85 percent of our nation's food is produced by larger farmers. That means the programs would miss the very farmers that are making our relatively cheap food supply possible. Who will be secretary of agriculture and what will the USDA become under one of the brightest and most pragmatic men ever to be elected president? Stay tuned. It would seem as if President-Elect Obama and his staff are ready to govern and making fair and equitable agricultural decisions should be child's play for them. We'll see. 1'11 see ya!


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Thursday, December 1 1,2006 OLIVIA. M N 1,600 (1 5) Newspaper (W) A6 Center For Rural Affairs

The makings of a good stimulus package Chuck

Hassebrook LL.:M

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l3uGUhh Small enternrise has a critical role in America's economic recwery, especially in rural areas. So when Congress takes up legislation to refuel our economy, small entrepreneurship should be the centerpiece. Microenterprises - owncr-operated businesses that provide sclf employment and perhaps hire a few employees - create most new rural jobs. Beginning farmers and value added agriculture bring additional 'vitalit)r*torlua h e i i c c t . Thcrc's no better time than now fot federal DOEcy to invest in these p m n rural development strategies. Here's how Congress can do it: Provide a direct incentive for rural enterprise by establishing a Microenterprise and Beginning Farmer Investment Tax Credit of up to play

to $10,000 to stimulate small business expansion and ncw farm and i&kincsx, startups.

Fund more rival small business loans, training and technical assir tance by increasing funding for the Rural Microentrepreneurs Program. An increase from $4 d o n to 825 million in this new farm bid program would pay long-term dividends. Add b d s to the successful Value Added Producer Grants Program, which makes grants to f d y - s i z e farmers and ranchers to launch new ventures to establish local markets and to process and market high value crops and livestock. An added $24 million would bring the program to the $40 million authorized by the farm bill. These three provisions would jlimp start r u d tconomy and p w 'tlit:'seeds of long-term nkd vitality through entrepreneurship. Congress should embrace them as it dewlops legislation to prompt cconomic rtcovcry in America. For more information visit: www.cfra.og


UNIVERSAL

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12/03/2008

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Secretary of Agriculture must be devoted to innovative vision By Chuck Hassebrook, Center for Rural Affairs Barack Obalna launched his campaign in Iowa with a promise to create genuine opportunity for rural people and a better future for their connmunitie~.?low President-elect Obama must appoint a Secretary of Agriculture who embraces the change needed to achieve those goals. Farm and rural policy illustrate the broken politics of Washington. The federal governmet~tspends billions subsidizing mega farins to drive smaller fanns off the land and largely fails to invest in the future of rural communities. Barack Obalna proposed changing those failed policies. He proposed capping payments to mega fanns and enforcing rules against unfair pricing practices by meat packers to strengthen family size farms. To revitalize rural com~nunities,he proposed investing in small business, microenterprise development and value added agriculture. He proposed increased production of biofuels and wind energy. And he pledsed support for protecting our land and water through the Conservation Stewardship Program, which rewards fanners for good practices. These reforms run head-on into demands for new spending by big far111and comnlodity interests. The president's commitment is most critical to achieving reform, but his Secretary of Agriculture is almost as important. A secretary committed to the status quo will not help Obama achieve change. The new presideill should s t a t with one simple test for those who would be Secretary of Agriculture. Have they worked for the rural agenda on which he campaigned and are they cornmitted to advancing it when he takes office in January?

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y Ho~vclrd Bcl-Xr,v cltiorlcrl Pr11,licRtrtlio Prcsidcxnt-elect Barack Ohama's pa\t as an ul-h;ui coni~~iunilyorganixr in (:hi,.;!:c; !~:;:bc.:; somc ~ ~ 7 1 1 : : I , i I I 1: I a r

rural people. "The most i~nl~ortant thin2 the oreside;it co111tldo i s s i I i ~ ~1l0Y stop suhsiclizing megaI 1 I s~iller -ol~criltioi,, 0111 of h t ~ s i ;:,:..,." i:~; C' . liu::l.. ., Hasc.171.ook. e.\coirli\r.

dircctor of the Center for RLI~;II Affairs, a Nebrash:)based advocacy group I i . focused on small and fnmily 1.i1l-~ncrs. 7'lic prcccd~~ig article is f i o ~ ~(-'e;,~~,i~! for RLIK~II -: A t ~ ' a i i hat Lyo~iq.Nchr. I-


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UNIVERSAL

lnformatlon Servrces, Inc

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12/31/2008

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Vilsack will have to live up to potential ! I

President-elect Obama's choice of former Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack as secretary of agriculture has gotten as much or more attention as any Cabinet appointment. There have been Vilsack detractors, the most vigorous from among the foes of agricultural -biotechnology And some farm organizations expressed concern, behind the scenes, about Vilsack's .. desire to reform farm programs. i Last month I stuck my neck out and said that I think Vilsack is a good choice (www.cfra.orgib1og).He and I don't always agree, but he's smart and he listens. He shares Obama's views on reforming farm programs, investing the savings in conservation and rural development, and on the need for livestock market reforms, such as banning packer ownership of livestock and ending volume-based price discrimination. Vilsack's biggest challenge will be bringing his skills and intelligence to the task of supporting the president and implementing their shared Toward that end, the center recently launched a grassroots letter to Secretary Vilsack (www.cfra. org/08/grassroots-letter). We will deliver the letter, with signatures and con~ments,to Secretary Vilsack ally Over 1,170have signed

and many have added their thoughts on needed reforms. At the center, we will continue working to ensure that President Obama and Secretary Vilsack live up to their potential and their promises to rural America, We will keep fighting for a rural America that offers genuine opportunity to all who live there. We will fight alongside Obama and Vilsnck ~ l i l e nwe can, but we'll also take them on when we have to. We've done it before.

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John Crabtree Center for Rural Affdirs Lyons

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Tribune

Date: Location: Circulation JDMA): Type (Frequency). Page: Keyword:

Wednesday. December 17,2006 SPRING VALLEY. MN 1,900 (1 53) Newspaper (W) 8 Center For Rural Affairs

Obama taking his time on ag farms to the overall economy. He comes from a farm state, and started his trip to the top by winning pi-;,4 &Your the Iowa caucuses. Obama also .,A-S\ $F:* .supports conservation and he L 4 , knows strong U.S. exports are necessary. Now. if you arc an absentee lar~dlordwith thousands of acres of farmland. held as an investment J n some way\. the Barack for your plastic surgcry practice. Obama transition team is niovinp you rrligllt nut fare as well under quickly to eqtablish the kind ot' Barack and a Democratic presiden~he will be. I n agricul- Congress. They'll be looking to ture. howcvcr, the fnrni-state hrcd. help the little guy (that could hut very orbnn. Obnm;~is moving include family and hobby farmwith what seems like great cnu- ers), but won't show much concern for the guy who collects huge tion. He has yet to name his secretary subsidy payments from his den in Pointe, and directs his tenof agricul~ure,hut all indica~orb Gross ants to plitnt from fence post to seem to. wcll. indicate thal he nlay shake things up at the USDA. The fence post and damn the CRP! According ta Nationd Public list of potential secrelarics conRadio. during his catiipaign tains some very different anitnals. Oba~nanude it abundantly clear ns ~vc'vcdiscusscil bcfore. itnd tli:rt he isn't against a11 subsidies. though Ob;t~~in was tltru\t into the as are many of his urban politicul presidency from a t'nrtii state. he is brethren. N P R noted that in every inch an urhon rleni7en of Amana. Iowa, Obama said. "If we thirt statc. a stittc that ci)nt;tins the s . can make are really ~ e r i o ~we "City of Big Shouldcrs." as Carl sure that family farniers are supSandburs intoned Innny years itpcj. ported. not just big agribusiness." \\'hen 0b:tma doc.. :rppoint That quotc probably makes thc someone, u.ll;it kinds of policies hairs stand up on the hack of the will he or she be expected to neck of your local co-op 11ianager direct:' and producers who farnl thouAs tvc'vc outlined heforc. Obama n1ag turn out to be very sands of acres. but i t probably good Eor farnicrs. hecause hc strikes a chord with average farmunderstands minorities. how ers Iron1 small comniunitirs. There has been a movement things work nt the grassroots level. afoot in America for some time to and 111simpurtiu~ct.vf America's try to limit subsidies to so-called r

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mega-fanners, or people who own large numhers of acres thcy do not farin. and Chuck Hassehrook. executive director of Nebraska's r tor Ruraltold NPR that Obama's campaign platform cillled for directing subsidies toitpard "fatnily farmcrs." Now. what does "filmily" niean in that context'? Tinie will tell. Bob Stallman of the American Farm Bureau bclicvcs dividing Fdr~nsamong big and sm;\11, family or corporate, won't be as easy ns Ohnm:~mipht think. Hc told N P K . "Lcss that 2 pcrccnt of A m r r i c : ~ ' farnls ~ are corporate, and niany of thosc are fnmily corporations." Stallman also worries that targetins only small farmers for pragrams and subsidies would be the \vron_c thing to do. He said 80 to 85 percent of our nation's food is produced by larger l i r n ~ a That ~. rnritns thc propmnis would miss the very farmcrs who ilrc making our relatively cheap h o d supply possible. \Vho will bc secretary of agriculture and what will the USDA brcomr i~ndrrone of the brightest and most pngmatic men ever to be elected president'? Stay tuned. It would srrm as if President-Elect Oha~naand his stilff are ready to govern and muking fair and equitablt. agricultural decisions should he child's play for them. We'll see.

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Thursday, December 18,2008 MABEL. MN i

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Obama taking his time on ag In sollle way\, the Ri~racl, mega-farmers. or pcoplc s! ho on n Obanra transition train is moving nin~ihcrsof' acres rhcy do not Farming large quickly to c\tahlish the kind of farm. nnd Chuck Hiissehrook, 1, & Your president he will hc. I n ngriculexeculive direclor of Nebraska's $ a%$ture, however, the f~rni-statebred, ''. ks told NPN Lleaterio-Freedom t - but very urhi~n,Ohnm:~is moving that Ohamn's campaign platform called for directing suhsiciies with what seems like great c;iurial. to\vard "family farrr~crs."Nots. I lc ha\ yCt lo nnnie h i cccrctiiry what docs "fiimily" mean in that or agriculture, but all in~lic;~tors context'! Timc will tell. seem to, well, indicate that hc may Bob Sti~llr~:~n of the Atnt.ric:~n shnkc things up at thc USIIA. The you might not P~rcas 51~c.Il under Farm Rureat~believes dividing list of potential srcret:~ries con- B;~r:~ck and :I De~nocr:~tic farnrs among big and small, frimi~i~inc ccrriic: vcry tfiffcrcnt animalq. Congress. They'll be looking to ly or corporate, won't b.L J.c ea\! a$ W C ' V C disc11sscd hcforc, and hclp the little guy ([hat could 3%0bani;i might tl~ink.lie tol~l though Ohanlit \\'as thri~stinto the include frlnrily 2nd Ilohby farm- N P R , "l.ess that 2 percent o l presidcnc.!; fro~na farm slale. 11e is ers). hut won't s11t)w nluch con- .America's farms arc corpor;1tc. etery inch 1\11 oltlan tletti7cn nf ccrn filr llic guy \vho cnllccfs huge and many of t h nrc~family ~ cnr~ that st;t[c. a state th;~tcont;iinr the subsidy ~;1y111cnts from his den in por:ltions." "City 01' Big Sliituldrn," 11s Call C;IO\\ I'oinrc, and Jitects his trnStrtll~nanalso rvc~rriesthat tarSnndhurg intonetl nreny years ago. anls to plant f r o n ~fence post to geting only crn;tll f:~rmcrsfor proWhen Ohanra doe\ iippctint frnce post and dirnln the CRP! pr;tmc and subsidies \vould hc the om cot^^, what Lindc of policicc According to Nati,nnal f'uhlic wrong thing to do. Hc ci~ici80 10 will he or she he cxpcctcii to H:rdio. during his campaign 8.5 percent of our naion's focd is direct? 0hitm:i made it abundantly clear produced by larger farmers. Tha As \ve'\e ouilitird brfore. ~ h he~ isn'~ t against all sirbsidies. means tllc progritm* would mi.r\ Obaela III;IY turn ~ ) i t tto bc very its arc nlany of hi\ urlriin pctliticiil tlic wry fiirrners who are making good for f;lrnrcrs. hecclusr he h r e ~ h r e n .N P R noted that i n our relatively cheap focxl cupply understands ~ ~ ~ i n o r i t i eIro\v s, Aaiana, Iowa. Obarua said. "lf wz pc~cihle. Who will be secretary of agrithing$ uvrk at the grassrclots level, arc rei~llyserious, we can make and tht. i~nnort;u~cc of Anierica's sure that lumily li~rtiiersare sup- culture and \\hat \vill the USUA farnis to thc overall economy. He ported, not just big agribusiness.'" become under one of the hrightckl cotncc from A fitrill state, and ctart- That qnotc prnhahly ni:~kes the and most pragtn;~ticrllen ever to ed his trip to the top by winning hairs stund up on the h : ~ kof the be elected president? Stay ~uned. the losv;~caucusc\. Obnrnil also neck of your local co-op rnulaper It wnulcl seen1 nc if I'rcsC(icnt-Elecf ~ othou- Ohanla and Iiis staff itre rcndy to supporis con\ervnlion nnil he t~ndproducers ~ l f;irnl knows strong 1J.S. export\ are sitnds of ncres, hut i t probably govern and making fair atid rqttistrikes a c11ol.d wilh nverage farm- table agricullural dccisionu should necess;lry he child's play for than^. We'll Now, if you are an absentee ers front srit;tll coniniunilic.\. There has been ;I movenient see. landlord \vitll thousand\ of ncres uf i'artnliintl,lieltl its an invcstmcnt ;rfot,t in Amcrica for some tiinc to I'll see yu! for your plastic surgery practice, try to lilnit subsidies to so-called U

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REPUBLICAN IMPERIAL, Nebraska

Thursdav. December 25.2008 WEEKLY

2080 18.47 $6.8 6

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A wise investment in business Doar Edltor,

In 2009, the Nebraska Unicameral has an opportunity to continue support for,establishingand creating small businesses all across the state. The Nebraska Microenterprise D e velopment Act provides funds for small business loans, training and technical assistance. These funds, administered by the Nebraska Enterprise Fund, provide vitally needed money to sup* main street businesses in Nebraska's rural communities and urban neighborhoods. Since creation of the Nebraska Microenterprise Development Act in 1997, over 19,000 businesses and individuals in every Nebraska county have received loans and/or technical assistance as a result of its funding. Many rural communities have self-employment and small business ownership rates many times greater than urban areas. Small businesses are also the job creators in much of rural America.

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In Nebraska, 86 percent of private, non-farm businesses are small busi- . nesses with five or fewer employees. Nearly one'in five private, non-farm jobs in rural Nebraska are in these small businesses. Microenterprises and small businesses are a major part of Nebraska's economy. And in a time of economic hardships. it is a wise investment to provideopportunity and economic growth to businesses that create new jobs and innovation in rural communities. Investing in the small businesses across the state revitalizes main streets and builds communities. In the last budget, Nebraska senators wisely dedicated $1.5 million to support the Nebraska Microenterprise Development Act. They should maintain the same level of h d i n g for the program even in these tight economic times. srinD.p.w,c.nt.rfbt RurrrlAlhk.,Lyonr,N.b.

Universal Information Services , Inc. http://news.universal-info.com Profile: 111 - Center for Rural Afiirs Recipient: John Crabtree

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GAZETTE

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McCOOK, Nebraska

cC

Saturday, December 20,2008 DAILY 5903 32.53 sq. inches $10.95 2

W & ZOOS \ All RigNs Ressved .-

Another arctic blast headed toward Nebraska

OMAHA (AP) - In the relative warmth of 15-20 degrees Friday morning, northeast Nebraska was digging out from nearly a foot of snow and facing the prospect of another arctic blast. "There's not much going on here, but we're open," said Ruthann Bonneau, manager of Cowabunga Korner restaurant in Walthill. "We have lots of snow ... it's pretty high here." About 15 miles south of Walthill, in Lyons, Brian Depew said the estimated 6-8 inches was "very pretty snow, actually." "It fell all night," Depew said from his office at t h e m ler for Rural Affairs. "There was ice before that ? that made it a little slick." He said the city's snowplows had most of the streets cleared by late Friday morning. Slick or otherwise impassable streets and stranded vehicles forced most eastern Nebraska schools to close Friday or to open late,In Lincoln, police responded to 26 weatherrelated crashes by late Friday afternoon. Some flights in and out of Omaha were delayed or canceled. More snow was on the way over the weekend, as holiday journeys begin in earnest. National Weather Service meteorologist Barbara Mayes said the forecast of 1 or 2 more inches of snow on Saturday promises that travel will be perilous, especially,in northeast Nebraska. "We have a lot of new snow up there, and we're going to combine that with winds of 30

mph or more," said Mayes, who works in the Weather Service's Valley office. Already on the ground are 11 inches that fell over the last 24 hours in Walthill and the 10 inches in Wayne and Norfolk. Other northeast Nebraska reports ranged from 8 down to 5 inches of snow. Farther west and south, less snow fell: 3.5 inches at Chambers in Holt County; 5.2 inches at Mullen in Hooker County; 4-5 inches at various spots in Douglas County, including Omaha; 4.5 inches at Ericson in Garfield County; 2.9 inches at Kingsley Dam in Keith County; 2.5inches at Imperial in southwest Nebraska's Chase County; H 2 inches at Hastings in south-central Nebraska. In most eastern Nebraska spots, the snow was preceded by freezing rain or sleet. The State Patrol said up to a halfinch of ice coated some roadways Thursday night. None will be melting any: time soon, at least with nature's help. "Sunday night the temperatures will really bottom out," Mayes said. "It will be coldest in east Nebraska ? mainly northeast will be the pit of it." Meteorologists in her office were expecting temperatures in the low to mid-teens below zero by late Sunday, with some spots approaching minus 20. -Associated Press Writer Timberly Ross contributed to this report.

Universal Information Services , Inc. http://news.universaI-info.com Profile: 111 - Center for Rural Affiirs Recipient: John Crabtree

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INDEX MITCHELL, Nebraska

Wednesday, December 24, WEEKLY 893 17.08 sq. inches $4.5 1B

A Wise Investment in Business By Brian Depew, Center ica. for Rural Affairs

In 2009, tfie Nebraska Uni-era1 has an opportunity to continue support for establishing and creating small businesses all across the state. The Nebraska Microenterprise Development Act provides funds for small business loans, training and technical assistance. These funds, administered by the Nebraska Entetprise Fund, provide vitally needed money to support Main street businesses in ~ ~ b rural~ communities ~ k ~ and urban neighborhoods. Since creation of the Nebraska ~ i ~~~~~l~~ ~ in 1997, over 19,000 businesses and individuals in every Nebraska County have received loans andlor technical of its f ~ n d assistance as a ing. Many rural communities have self-employment and small business owners hi^ rates- man" times greater than urban &. Small businesses are also the job crearors in much of rural Amer-

.

~

Jn Nebraska, 86 percent of private, non-fm businesses are small businesses with five or fewer employees, Nearly one in five private, n o n - f m Jobs in nual Nebraska are in these small businesses. Micr~nteWisesand small businesses are a major Part of Nebraska's economy- And in a time of e~onomichardships, it is a wise investment to provide OPPOrfUnitY and economic growth to businesses that Create new l jobs ~ and innovation in rural communities. Investing in the small businesses ~ across ~ the state ~ revitalizes t ~ Main Streets and builds communities. In the last Nebraska Senators wisely dedicated $1.5 million to support the Nebraska Microenterprise Development Act. They should maintain the Same level of funding for the Proeven in these tight emnOmic times. For further information: w.ch.org

http://news.universaI-info.com Universal Information Services , Inc. Profile: 111 - Center for Rural Affairs Recipient: John Crabtree

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GAZETTE McCOOK, Nebraska

Thursday, December DAl LY 5903 120.97 sq. inches $10.95 PREVIEW 1

GAZETTE McCOOK, Nebraska

s Com%4t 2008 \All Ridus R 8 d

c Cowi&

uff bond u ~ to~$2emillion cash -

Date: Frequency: Circulation: Clip Size: Ad Rate: Pagelsection:

Thursday, December 18,2008 DAILY 5903 120.97 sq. inches $10.95 PREVIEW 1

2008 \ AU &$us Rcsmrd

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million with a 15 percent proBy CONNIE JO DlSCOE vision for release from jail. During the hearing in LexingWednesday, Doyle LEXINGTON - Furnas ton County District Court Judge amended that bond to $2 milJames Doyle IV Wednesday lion cash. A spokesperson for - - eh t morning set a new bond amount of $2 million cash for &s office said that Huffs the man who has pleaded bond violation(s) included guilty to manslaughter in the continuing to consume alcodeath Oct. 3,2007, of an Ara- hol. Attorney General Jon pahoe woman. Nebraska Attorney Gener- Bruning said following Huffs al h m l k w h g whose office bond hearing Wednesday, is assisting with the prosecu- "No break will be given. No tion of Herchel Harold Huff, deal will be made. We're sicksaid he is "sickened by Huff ened by Mr. Huff and his and his crimes. crimes, and our intent is to see Huff, 35, of Holbrook and him behind bars for a long Grant, is charged with the time." death of 28-year-old Kasey Jo Judge Doyle set the bond Warner, who was killed when high, he said Wednesday, beshe was struck by Huffs car as cause of Huffs bond violation she and her young daughter and the seriousness of the walked on a county road charges against him, and besouthwest of Arapahoe. Huff cause Huff has already pleadwas free on his original bond ed guilty to manslaughter (alof $250,000, 10 percent of though not sentenced yet), which was posted by his with allegations of more mother and stepfather, but is crimes. now back in Furnas County During a hearing Nov. 26, jail in Beaver City. Huff pleaded guilty to On Friday, Dec. 12, Judge manslaughter in the death of Doyle and prosecution and Warner. Warner was a former defense attorneys conducted a volleyball coach at Arapahoe telephone hearing during High School, and was teachwhich Huff was accused of vi- ing biology at McCook Comolating conditions of his bond munity College at the time of release, which includes stipu- her death. She is survived by lations that he avoid alcohol her husband, Dan, and her and any unlawful activities. young daughters, Gentry and Aspokespersonfor the City Berkley. of Kearney Police Department At the same hearing in Nosaid this morning that at 2:30 vember, Huff pleaded not p.m., Wednesday, Dec. 3, a guilty to motor vehicle homiKearney police officer assist- cide, tampering with a witness ed Fumas County Sheriff Kurt and refusal to submit to a Kappennan in the interview of chemical test. Huff waived a a reporting party regarding jury trial for the charges of bond violations by Huff. At tampering with a witness and the hearing Friday then, Doyle refusal to submit to a chemical increased Huffs bond to $2 test, and reserved a jury trial

for the charge of motor vehicle homicide, Furnas County Attorney Tom Patterson said after the Nov. 26 hearing. At the hearing Wednesday in Lexington, Judge Doyle gave Charles Brewster of Holdrege, an attorney for Huff, until Jan. 20 to prepare his arguments for a dismissal of charges motion and a 'plea in bar," in which Brewster and co-attorney Richard Calkins of Alma contend that because Huff has already pleaded guilty to the manslaughter charges, other charges against him should be dismissed. Brewster told Judge Doyle, "Mr. Huff should not be tried on two felonies for causing the same mishap." Brewster said, "The law is fairly complex, and we ask 30 days to submit our arguments in writing." Doyle gave Brewster until the middle of January to prepare his arguments for the motions to the court, and then asked for a response by Feb. 5 from Patterson and Mike Guinan, an attorney with the Nebraska Attorney General's &ice who is assisting Patterson. Calkins also asked Doyle to suppress testimony from one of two Furnas County deputies who investigated Warner's death and has since moved to Minneapolis, Minn. Calkins said that he and Guinan traveled to Minneapolis to interview the deputy, and offered into evidence the deputy's deposition. Because of trial delays such as these motions and pleadings, Judge Doyle told Huff, the state is beyond the sixmonth time limit, required by

http://news.universaI-info.com Universal Information Services , Inc. Profile: 221 - Attorney General - Nebraska Recipient: Jon Bruning

a "speedy trial" law, during which it must bring him to court. Huff waived his right to a speedy trial as Patterson/Guinan argued to sentence Huff on the manslaughter conviction and, at the same time, try him on the motor vehicle homicide charge and other two charges. Guinan requested a trial date in March. Brewster argued that state statutes provide forthe plea in bar, and asked the judge to rule on that motion and the motion to dismiss and sentence Huff on the manslaughter conviction before setting a trial date on the other charges. Guinan told Judge Doyle that process could create "worlds of issues to handle" and ra double jeopardy situation," because a defendant cannot be tried twice for the same crime. Judge Doyle did not set a trial date Wednesday. Guinan told Judge Doyle that the state has no objection to the defendant's request that his original bond not be forfeited, as allowed by state law under violations of bond conditions. Brewster walked over to the courtroom gallery, leaned over front row seats and whispered to a woman seated in the second row, 'Did you put up your house as security for this bond?" She answered, 'Yes." Brewster then told the judge that 'a bail bondsman had paid Huffs bond, but accepted as security Huffs mother's home. Through his attorney, Huff later thanked the judge for his kindness in not taking his mother's home. Page:

Brewster asked the judge that arrangements be made to get glasses for Huff if he is incarcerated until his trial in the state penitentiary in Lincoln, which does not allow an inmate to wear contact lenses. Judge Doyle said he will not interfere with the rules that a penitentiaryor a sheriff makes for a facility. Huff was taken to the jail in Beaver City. Manslaughter is a Class I11 felony with a penalty of up to 20 years in prison, a $25,000 fine or both. Motor vehicle homicide is a Class I1 felony with a penalty of up to 50 years in prison. Tampering with a witness is a Class IV felony with a penalty of up to five years in prison, a $io,ooo fine or both. Refusing to submit to a chemical test is a Class IIIA felony with a penalty of up to five years in prison, a $io,ooo fine or both.

Connie Jo OisaehkCook Daily Guene

Herchel Huff (left) and his attorneys Charles Brewster of Holdrege (front) and Richard Calkins of Alma walk to the district courtroom in Lexington, before a motions hearing Wednesday morning. In November, Huff pleaded guilty to manslaughter in the death of Kasey Jo Warner, who died when she was struck by Huff's car on a county road southwest of Arapahoe on Oct. 3,2007. Huff still faces charges of motor vehicle homicide, tampering with a witness and refusal to submit to a chemical test.

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Universal Information Services , lnc. http:/lnews.universaI-info.com Profile: 221 - Attorney General - Nebraska Recipient: Jon Bruning

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