Page 1

Daytona

Mural highlights history of Ormond Beach

U.S. POSTAGE PAID Permit #189 Daytona Beach, FL

EE FR

MARIAN WRIGHT EDELMAN: 50 years later, PRESORTED where do we go from here? See page 4 STANDARD

Halifax Health to present free music therapy programs See page 5

East Central Florida’s Black Voice

See page 5

www.daytonatimes.com www.daytonatimes.com

AUGUST 29 - SEPTEMBER 4, 2013

YEAR 38 NO. 35

Sequestration hits Midtown Head Start center

PEOPLE SPEAK

East Volusia II center, that primarily served Black children, has closed BY JAMES HARPER DAYTONA TIMES harperjames59@yahoo.com

Parents living in Daytona Beach’s Midtown who had hoped to send their children to the Head Start center on Henry Butts Drive no longer have that option. The East Volusia II Head

Start center no longer exists at that location this school year because of the federal budget reductions known as sequestration, said Heidi Rand, Head Start director for Mid Florida Community Services, which oversees the programs in Volusia, Sumter and Hernando counties. In the Greater Daytona Beach area last year, there were three centers – the East Volusia Education Center on Keech Street, East Volusia II, which was on Henry Butts Drive, and the Head Start class at Turie T. Small Elementary. Ninety-five percent

At left are children at a program last year at the East Volusia II Head Start center.

of the children who attend the centers were African-African, Rand said. “We know the need is here. We need to let our legislators know,” she continued. Nationwide, Head Start, the federal pre-K education service for low-income families, eliminated services for more than 57,000 children in the coming school year as a result of sequestration.

PHOTO COURTESY OF MID FLORIDA COMMUNITY SERVICES, INC.

Shock, disappointment The decision to stop the Head Start class on Hen-

Daytona approves new policy on naming of property

Please see center, Page 2

MARCH ON WASHINGTON ANNIVERSARY

BY JAMES HARPER DAYTONA TIMES harperjames59@yahoo.com

Prompted by an application last December to rename the Derbyshire Athletic Fields after retired educator Harold Lucas, the Daytona Beach City Commission voted last week to establish new procedures and guidelines for naming and renaming city-owned land and facilities and provides a mechanism for commissioners to recommend names they believe should be considered. The new policy also gives city commissioners sole discretion to not submit a name. There is no requirement to process a request received from a citiHarold zen. Lucas According to the new policy, there will be means to recognize prominent persons who have made substantial financial or community service contributions to the city of Daytona Beach, the state of Florida or the United States.

PHOTOS BY DUANE FERNANDEZ, SR./HARDNOTTS PHOTOGRAPHY

Local residents pose in front of the vehicle that took them to the March on Washington anniversary in D.C.

They were there

How it will work The process requires a person to submit a name to a member of the city commission who will give the information if they choose to the city manager who would schedule for city commission review. The city commission will then determine if the request meets the approved guidelines and will rank selections if more than one name is submitted for consideration. Names of deceased person are preferred over names of living per-

Along with those traveling to Saturday’s commemoration were local NAACP President Cynthia Slater and Bethune-Cookman University employee Davita Bonner.

About 40 residents from Volusia and Flagler counties boarded a bus on Friday, Aug. 24 headed to Washington D.C. for the 50th anniversary celebration of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Tens of thousands of people from across the nation gathered at the National Mall Saturday to commemorate the march and to rally for what they believe is the unfinished business of the civil rights battle. Speakers included Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., the only living speaker from the 1963 march.

Please see POLICY, Page 2

Daytona raises bar to work for Leisure Services Department BY JAMES HARPER DAYTONA TIMES harperjames59@yahoo.com

For the first time in several years, Daytona Beach will be hiring for a new position in the Leisure Services Department but interested applicants have only until Sept. 2 to apply. Daytona Beach posted on its website Aug. 23 an opening for an athletic manager. Persons with related experience but no bachelor’s degree need not apply which the Dayto-

na Times has learned upset many longtime employees in the department who knew the job was opening up. Leisure Services Director Percy Williamson told the Times this week the person hired for the position will take over the responsibilities of Hilary Rowley, who will be retiring Sept. 30 after 38 years of service.

Job requirements Williamson said the position held by Rowley has taken on added duties, which is why a bache-

lor’s degree in leisure services or closely related field is required. Also needed is a minimum two years of experience or training involving sports programs and knowledge of turf grass and athletic fields. The applicant also must have public speaking experience, standard first aid and CPR certifications, and a valid Florida driver’s license. According to the city’s website, though he has been acting as athletic manager, Rowley is listed as a recreation specialist who works

at the Midtown Cultural and Educational Center.

Another ‘critical position’ Williams also said the city will Percy be hiring for an- Williamson other “critical position” within the next year. Linda McGee, recreation manager for Leisure Services, will be retiring by next summer after 38 years with the city.

Neither Rowley nor McGee had college degrees when they began working for the city. Rowley is the third person to retire from Leisure Services within the last year, but his position is the only one the city is hiring a replacement. Longtime Leisure Services employees Fred Morrell, who worked for the city 35 years, and Wilma Hawkins, a 35-year employee, both retired last year as recreation specialists. Hawkins and Morrell also did not have Please see WORK, Page 2


7 FOCUS

R2

AUGUST 29 – SEPTEMBER 4, 2013

B-CU remembers the March Bethune-Cookman University students, faculty and staff converged on the campus quadrangle at noon on Wednesday to commemorate and celebrate the historic March on Washington. There was a re-enactment of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s “I Have a Dream” speech by B-CU Junior Zacory Scott, a criminal justice major. Remarks were made by Dr. Edison O. Jackson, president; and a prayer was delivered by the Rev. John Baldwin, II, chaplain.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF B-CU

Above: The B-CU family converged on the university’s “Quad’’ for the “ I Have a Dream” re-enactment. Left: B-CU junior Zacory Scott recites the “I Have A Dream’’ speech.

policy from Page 1 sons. The city commission will review each request on a case by case basis. Any living person whose name is proposed must be willing to submit to a background check, including a criminal history and code violation check.

Associated fees The use of a name is limited to a maximum of one city-owned land or facility. The city commission may impose fees on recipients of this recognition to offset expenditures associated with the naming or renaming request. Associated fees include signs, plaques, advertising and other hard costs. At a Dec. 5, 2012 city commission meeting, commissioners expressed concerns with the current policies and guidelines for city facility and park renaming while discussing whether or not to rename Derbyshire athletic fields after Lucas. The city staff came up with the new policy based on data received from local governments and other sources.

PHOTO COURTESY OF MID FLORIDA COMMUNITY SERVICES, INC.

Children are shown last year during a class at the Henry Butts Drive location. In Volusia County, classes were eliminated at that site and at the Chisholm Head Start Center in New Smyrna Beach.

Marketing partnership policy

CENTER

Commissioners also will give precedence to the city’s marketing partnership policy when considering naming or renaming of city-owned land and facilities. The marketing partnership policy allows the city to consider selling the naming of city facilities to garner additional revenue. The previous naming/ renaming policy required Planning Board input. The Planning Board would discuss the cost to the city. The Planning Board reviewed and discussed application, then had to unanimously approve the naming and renaming. The former policy required supporting documentation, a petition signed by 50 residents of the city and a statement of the reasons for the proposed name.

from Page 1 ry Butts Drive came as a shock to Daytona Beach Leisure Services Director Percy Williamson. The city rented the facility to Mid Florida Community Services for the class. “I am disappointed and worried how this will impact families in that community. Head Start is necessary for children’s early foundation. It’s important to have Head Start located where it is most needed,” Williamson said, adding that the city will be looking for a new tenant for the facility. He hopes the client will be one that caters to young people. Two other Head Start

work from Page 1 college degrees. No one was hired to replace them due to budget cuts in the department.

Fewer people, more work In an interview this week, Williamson admitted they have fewer people in Leisure Services doing more work, which requires his employees to multitask. City commissioners are currently discussing next year’s budget, which goes into effect Oct. 1. Williamson said he hopes his new budget allows him “to be able to at least continue doing the things we have

locations still exist in the area – at Turie T. Small Elementary and on Keech Street. Head Start is a place where children can stay from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. compared to Volusia County’s VPK program, which is only three hours a weekday. There was a class at the Butts Street location with 17 to 20 students from 3 to 5 years old that lasted from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Parents had the option of keeping their children at the location until 5 p.m. if they were working or in school.  Rand said that if there was funding, she would want the Head Start class at another site. She added that her “preference would be to open at a site with multiple classrooms,” Rand said, noting that in DeLand the wait list been doing.” Williamson said there is a need for more employees in his department but he understands his budget “depends on the city’s priorities.”

Result of cuts His concern also is the growth in Zone 4 and admits in the future he predicts the need for a recreation center in that area and possibly more parks. The gutting of Leisure Service employees upset many in the community during last year’s budget process. As reported by the Daytona Times in April 2012, city commissioners voted in March of that year to eliminate four positions in the Leisure Services Department, including two

is over 100.

No job loss No jobs were lost in the closing of the center because staff there had agreed to a six-month hiatus of contributions to their retirement plans. Rand said they also could have decided on a shorter school year or fewer days during the week for classes to make up for loss of funding. She added that 53 slots for children were eliminated. In Volusia County, the decision was made to eliminate the classes at the Henry Butts Drive location and a class at the Chisholm Head Start Center in New Smyrna Beach. Rand said before the sequestration the program had funding for 977 chiloffice specialist positions and recreation leaders. At the time, Williamson admitted that losing these staffers has led to his department eliminating the track and field, boxing and adult flag football programs. He has reorganized the department and shifted his staff around to deal with the vote by the commissioners. “We are moving in a different direction. Currently the eliminated programs are run by city staff. The direction we are going is there are parent associations running these programs in other cities. The purpose of us running the program was to give them traction,” Williamson explained. Williamson said then reorganizing his department

dren at centers in the three counties they oversee. The number is now down to 924 with a waiting list of more than 400 children over the three counties who want to attend Head Start.

Classes, food, care The state to take the biggest hit was California where 5,611 Head Start kids were denied a spot in the program. In Texas, that number was 4,410. In New York it was 3,847. Head Start is best known for providing preschool to low-income students, but it supplies many of children with two hot meals a day, transportation to and from school and basic medical care. When these services are eliminated, it also affects would save the city money.

More changes Many residents voiced concern that saving money could also cost lives, implying they were worried there would not be enough supervision at the centers and the elimination of staff and elimination of programs could mean their children may end up hanging out on the streets instead of in a safe environment. Since last year, the city has signed contracts for the YMCA to operate out of the Midtown Center; the Boys and Girls Club is renting space at the John H. Dickerson Center; and the Police Athletic League returned to city property and is located at the Yvonne Scarlett Golden Center.

parents who often must find difficult-to-afford day care services or take off days of work to tend to their children. Mid-Florida Community Services, the nonprofit that administers her funding, must cut $454,296 from its budget of $9 million by Sept. 30. In response, the agency decided to end retirement fund contributions for its 225 employees. “We provide services not just for the child but for the whole family,” Rand said. “We have oral health specialists, nutrition specialists, mental health counselors and behavioral therapists. We also have family advocates who will help a mom get her GED or if a family is evicted will help find them a new home.” The new athletic manager replacing Rowley will administer the athletic activities of the recreation division and manage the daily operations of the Mid-

town center. The athletic manager also will be responsible for organizing the athletic programs and scheduling facility usage.

GOSPEL HALLELUJAH WORLD WIDE RADIO MINISTRIES Hosted by: Pastor Harold Ford and Prophetess Deborah Ford LISTEN TO WPUL 1590 Saturdays 10 am -noon Sundays 5am- 7am & 1pm-3pm Listen online at: www.wpul1590.com website: www.gospelhallelujah.com

Come let the Holy Ghost Get Ya!


3 7

M A NEWS YOR

AUGUST 29 – SEPTEMBER 4, 2013DECEMBER 14 - 20, 2006 COMMUNITY

Grief center schedules retreats for kids and teens SPECIAL TO THE TIMES

In September, Halifax Health – Hospice BeginAgain Children’s Grief Center will present Hearts and Hooves – grief camps for families, young children and teens involving expression through art and horses. During the retreats, trained grief counselors will guide participants through artistic activities and allow them healing interaction with horses. These activities give children and teens, who have experienced the death of a loved one, a safe and peaceful outlet for their grief expression.  The retreats will take place at Artquest School of Art & Design, 571 Leeway Trail, Ormond Beach. Retreats are available for families, children eight to 12 years of age and teens 13 to 18 years of age. Retreat dates and times are as follows: • The Family Retreat: Saturday, Sept. 7, 9 a.m. to noon. • Children’s Retreat (ages 8 to 12), Sept. 14, 9 a.m. to noon. • Teen Retreat, (ages 13 to 18), Saturday, Sept. 21, 9 a.m. to noon.  To receive an application to register for any of these retreats, or for additional information, call 386-2585100.

Hospitals offering free vascular disease screenings In the United States, more than eight million Americans suffer from Peripheral Vascular Disease (PVD), which is the hardening of the arteries – also known as “atherosclerosis” – in the limbs, often the legs. One in 20 Americans over the age of 50 has PVD, and many of those with PVD do not experience symptoms.  PVD can reduce mobility and increase the risk for heart attack and stroke, and if left untreated, PVD can be fatal. PVD is a serious disease that is on the rise among midlife and older Americans and is caused by the same risk factors that lead to heart disease. It is a common and treatable disease. ] Because vascular disease develops over time, it is important to lead a healthy lifestyle through awareness, prevention and risk reduction through healthy living are important. That’s why the Florida Hospitals in Volusia and Flagler counties are offering free screenings to help determine an individual’s risk of PVD. The screenings are: • Sept. 1 at Florida Hospital DeLand • Sept. 4 at Florida Hospital Fish Memorial in Orange City • Sept. 15 at Florida Hospital Flagler in Palm Coast • Sept. 16-20 at Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center in Daytona Beach  Appointments are required and space is limited. To be qualified for the screening, participants must take a free online PVD risk assessment at www.FHVascular. org. After completing the risk assessment, those who are identified as moderate or high risk will be able to register for the free PVD screening.

Jacksonville minister to speak at First Church of Palm Coast “Christian Women Moving Forward” reflects the glory of Christ while highlighting a theme for the Women’s Day Service at 10 a.m. on Sept. 8 at First Church. The Rev. Patricia McGeathey will the Women’s Day guest speaker. She is the associate minister of St. Stephens A.M.E. Church in Jacksonville, as well as a marriage and Christian counselor. She’s also a registered nurse at the University of Florida Shands Hospital. The Rev. Cheryl Daniels of the First Church ministerial staff will speak at the 8 a.m. service. A repast will take place following the 10 a.m. service.      First Church is at 91 Old Kings Road North, Palm Coast. For more information, call 386-446-5759.

Halifax Health - Hospice to host annual run, walk Join Halifax Health - Hospice of Volusia/Flagler and presenting sponsor Glenn Yarbrough, senior vice president of Merrill Lynch Wealth Management at Halifax Health-Hospital of Volusia/Flagler’s 12th annual 5K Run & Walk on Sunday, Sept. 8. The event takes off at the Kenneth W. Parker Amphitheater, Port Orange City Center Circle. Register at www.hovf.org/5k. More information: Sheri Robbins  at 386-322-4747 or sheri.robbins@halifax.org.

Lecture to focus on Silver Sands The history of the Silver Sands Bridle Club is the next Port Orange history lesson. The lecture is scheduled for 1 p.m. on Sept. 13 at the Adult Center Annex, 3738 Halifax Drive. Now located west of town off Tomoka Farms Road, the Silver Sands Bridle Club’s arena and racetrack was originally located in Port Orange starting in the 1960s. For more information, call 386-506-5522.

DUANE FERNANDEZ, SR./HARDNOTTS PHOTOGRAPHY

Daytona Beach Police Officer Monica Lee inspects one of 32 guns turned in at the Dickerson Center during DBPD’s annual gun buyback on Aug. 22.

90 guns collected during buyback events FROM STAFF REPORTS

Daytona Beach Police Department spokesman Jimmie Flynt reported that 32 guns were collected Aug. 22 at the John H. Dickerson Center as part of the annual “Kicks for Guns” program. On the same day at the Volusia County Fairgrounds on State Road 44, the Volusia County Sheriff’s Of-

fice collected a total of 58 guns for gift certificates. This was the second time this year that local officers offered gift cards for guns with no questions asked.

Guns destroyed The last gun buyback in Daytona Beach took place at Hope Fellowship in May during a March Against Madness event organized by the church’s

pastor, Bishop Derrick Triplett. DBPD Police Chief Mike Chitwood said 19 guns were collected. This is Daytona Beach Police Department’s fifth year of participation in “Kicks for Guns,” an annual program throughout Central Florida where residents can safely dispose of their unwanted firearms in exchange for a gift card, with a value of up to $50, to local businesses including restaurants and retail stores. Following the event, all surrendered guns were destroyed. The Kicks for Guns program originated 15 years ago by an Orlando area radio host who was concerned about youths getting robbed for their brand-name sneakers.

Haiti to be topic of college’s first fall ‘lunch and learn’ event SPECIAL TO THE TIMES

Global topics and professional enrichment comprise a new series of “lunch and learn” presentations at Daytona State College starting this fall. The free, public seminars will be held from 11 a.m. to noon in Bergengren Hall, Room 112, on the college’s Daytona Beach Campus at 1200 W. International Speedway Blvd. • Sept. 4: Haiti After the Earthquake - International Disaster Health Services, presented by Dr. James Greene, College of Health and Public Services. • Sept. 11: How Generational Differences Impact Our Teaching and Learning, presented by Dr. Joy Lewis, College of Education. • Oct. 2: Revelation Theory of Learning (RTL) International Conference in Paris, presented by John Connor, School of Education. • Oct. 16: Bridging the Digital Divide, presented by Terrie Greenbaum, Academic Support Center. • Nov. 6: My Life and Experiences in Iran Before and After the Revolution of 1979, presented by Fatima Gilbert, Academic Support Center. • Nov. 20: Student Loan Default and Why it Matters to You, presented by Michelle Goldys, Financial Aid Services.

PATRICK FARRELL/MIAMI HERALD/MCT

Haiti’s massive earthquake three years ago has led to some good as an AIDS clinic is bringing comprehensive healthcare to Port-au Prince’s slums. In February, a supervisor looks on while masked technicians Sylvain Dumerlin, Mario Gaspar and Sezard Smith carefully check formulas. • Dec. 4: HIV Prevention in Nepal in the Early 90s, presented by Margaret Karda, School of Humanities and Communication. • Jan. 15: Comparing and Contrasting International NGO Settings Between the U.S. and Abroad, presented by Kathy Clark, Adult Education. • Jan. 22: Utilizing Diversity to Maximize Success, presented by Ana Blaine, College of Education. • Feb. 5: Italy, presented by Emma O. Brombin, School of Modern Languages. • Feb. 19: Embracing Business Etiquette, presented by Shana Deyo, School of Management. March 5: Rwanda’s Street Children - The Impact of the Genocide and its

Aftermath on Children, presented by Johani Kayinamura, School of Biological and Physical Sciences. • March 19: Contemporary Issues Facing Community Colleges, presented by John Brady, Professional Development and Shana Deyo, School of Management. • April 2: A Tale of Three Cultures - Lived Experiences, presented by Mary Beth Craig-Oatley, Occupational Therapy Assistant Program. Participants in the college’s Leadership Development Institute will be making these presentations. For more information, contact John Brady at BradyJ@DaytonaState.edu or 386-506-3837.

Local musicians to perform at free Bandshell concerts Acoustic soloist Perrie Kitching will perform live at the Daytona Beach Bandshell on Friday at 7 p.m. as the opening act for Alex Kinsey and Awesome Karma. The concert is free. Perrie Kitching was born in DeLand and started playing guitar at age 13. Selftaught, Kitching started writing songs and singing them with his guitar by age 15. As a troubled youth, he chose music as an escape route to defeat poverty.

At age 18, Kitching started playing for local business owners in exchange for donations. He then saved some money, cut his first demo, and hit the road gigging state-to-state. At age 20, he moved to Atlanta where he finished school as an Internet marketer. Using the Internet, he was discovered by major producers. Kitching went on to cut his first major recordings, and the international media attention

boosted his exposure. Now Kitching and his Grammywinning production team are in the works of releasing his first album.

More local talent He will open up for Alex Kinsey and the Awesome Karma Band with special guest vocalist Sierra Deaton. Kinsey is a singer/songwriter from New Smyrna Beach where he graduated from New Smyrna Beach High

School. He plays shows all around Central and South Florida trying to promote himself as a guitarist and singer. His band, the “Awesome Karma Band,” is a recent formation. Food, beer and beverages will be available for purchase at the Bandshell. Chairs will be available to rent. No coolers allowed. For more information, contact Helen Riger at 386671-8252 or visit www.DaytonaBandshell.com.

Perrie Kitching is one of the musicians who will perform Friday at the Daytona Beach Bandshell.


R4

7 EDITORIAL

AUGUST 29 – SEPTEMBER 4, 2013

Where do we go from here? As the nation celebrates the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, many are discussing what Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. would say to the nation and world today and tell us to do. But his message to us today is as clear as it was 50 years ago if only we could hear, heed, and follow his warnings about what we need to do to make America America. Just as biblical Old and New Testament prophets were rejected, scorned, and dishonored in their own land in their times, so was Dr. King by many when he walked and worked among us. Now that he is dead, many Americans remember him warmly but have sanitized and trivialized his message and life.

King a disturber They remember Dr. King the great orator but not Dr. King the disturber of unjust peace. They applaud the Dr. King who opposed violence but not the Dr. King who called for massive nonviolent demonstrations to end war and poverty in our national and world house. They recite the “I Have a Dream” part of his August 1963 speech but ignore its main metaphor of the promissory note still bouncing at America’s bank of justice, waiting to be cashed by millions of poor and minority citizens. And while we love to celebrate his dream and great oratorical skills, we ignore his fears and repeated warnings about America’s misguided priorities and values. He worried that we were missing God’s opportunity to become a great and just nation by sharing our enormous riches with the

Marian Wright Edelman NNPA COLUMNIST

poor and overcoming what he called the “giant triplets” of racism, materialism, and militarism. In his last Sunday sermon at Washington National Cathedral, Dr. King retold the parable of the rich man Dives who ignored the poor and sick man Lazarus who came every day seeking crumbs from Dives’ table. Dives did nothing. Dives went to hell, Dr. King said, not because he was rich but because he did not realize his wealth was his opportunity to bridge the gulf separating him from his brother and allowed Lazarus to become invisible. He warned this could happen to rich America, “if we don’t use her vast resources to end poverty and make it possible for all of God’s children to have the basic necessities of life.”

Poor People’s Campaign At Dr. King’s death in 1968 when he was calling for a Poor People’s Campaign, there were 25.4 million poor Americans, including 11 million poor children, and our Gross Domestic Product (GDP) was $4.13 trillion. Today, there are 46.2 million poor people, including 16.1 million poor children, almost half living in extreme poverty, and our GDP is three times larger, and shamefully the younger children are the poorer they are. One in three Black and Lati-

VISUAL VIEWPOINT: MLK’S SHATTERED DREAM

no children are poor. National wealth and income inequality are at near record levels while hunger, homelessness, illiteracy, fear, and hopelessness stalk millions of children and adults across our land who have been left behind in our economy. Isn’t it time to ask ourselves again with urgency whether America is missing once again the great opportunity and mandate God has given us to be a beacon of hope and justice for the least among us, beginning with our children, who are the poorest Americans?

A burning house In his last week of life, Dr. King said to a group of close friends: “We fought hard and long, and I have never doubted that we would prevail in this struggle. Already our rewards have begun to reveal themselves. Desegregation…the Voting Rights Act…But what deeply troubles me now is that for all the steps we’ve taken toward integration, I’ve come to believe that we are integrating into a burning house.” “What would you have us do?” one shocked friend asked. Dr. King answered: “I guess we’re just going to have to become firemen.” In our nation and world desperately hungering for moral example, change, and hope and leaders who put national and community good ahead of personal and political gain, Dr. King gave Americans a special charge: “A nation that continues year after year to spend more money on military defense than on programs of social uplift is approaching spiritual death.

BOB ENGLEHART, THE HARTFORD COURANT

Pursuit of peace There is nothing, except a tragic death wish, to prevent us from reordering our priorities, so the pursuit of peace will take precedence over the pursuit of war. There is nothing to keep us from remolding a recalcitrant status quo with bruised hands until we have fashioned it into a brotherhood—and sisterhood. Fifty years later, we must not give up on building a just America that ensures a level playing field for every child and person. We must not let anyone tell us that our rich nation’s vaults of justice and opportunity are bankrupt. And we must not tolerate any longer any resistance to creating jobs, jobs, jobs which pay enough to escape poverty, public and private sector, and providing the education and early child-

hood development supports every human being needs to survive and thrive. I hope we will commit ourselves on this fiftieth anniversary to building and sustaining a powerful transforming nonviolent movement to help America live up to its promises and forge the will to translate America’s dream into reality for all. Let’s honor Dr. King and save America’s future and soul by hearing, heeding, and following our greatest American prophet.

Marian Wright Edelman is president of the Children’s Defense Fund. For more information, go to www.childrensdefense.org. Click on this story at www.daytonatimes.com to write your own response.

Faux Republicans ‘can’t handle the truth’ Earlier this week, the Republican National Committee (RNC) and its chairman, Reince Priebus hosted a great 50th anniversary commemoration of the March on Washington. It was truly wonderful to see the best of what America stands for. In attendance were Blacks, Whites, Hispanics, Asians, Democrats, Republicans, Independents, males and females. In other words, it was America. As I sat there and listened to the various speakers during the program, it dawned on me just how diverse the crowd was. I was also reminded how there were many differences of opinions represented in the room, but for that moment in time, we all rallied around that which we could all agree on — that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the March on Washington, helped move America toward delivering on its promise of equality for all. I was also reminded that not everyone in the civil rights community agreed with Dr. King’s approach. Some within the move-

RAYNARD JACKSON NNPA COLUMNIST

ment wanted a more aggressive, militant approach to the movement — namely Malcolm X. Malcolm X didn’t like the idea of non-violence. His position was, if you strike him, he was going to strike you harder. Many in the movement didn’t support the Montgomery, Ala. bus boycott or many of the sit-ins at various restaurants.

Different approaches No one disagreed with the goals of the movement, but many had other views on how to best accomplish the goal of true equality in America. Even those who disagreed with Dr. King’s methods, all made positive contributions to the goal of the movement, albeit

in their own way. This is the very reason why Dr. King and Malcolm X are equally revered, especially within the Black community. They had vastly different approaches, but both made positive contributions to the movement. In a similar vein, you have some Black Republicans constantly criticizing Reince Priebus and what he is trying to do to get more Blacks involved in our party. First the complaints were that the party had no Blacks on staff; then it was that he hired the wrong Blacks; then that the hires were just window dressing. Enough, already!

Biggest critic The biggest critic of Priebus’ moves has been someone by the name of Crystal Simone Wright. I can criticize a member of my family, but I will not allow an outsider to do so. Wright has absolutely no Republican Party credentials whatsoever. She holds herself out to be a Republican strategist, but

with no track record. What is most amazing about this so-called Republican operative is that she constantly criticizes the party and Priebus specifically; but yet I have learned through two media sources that she has met privately with people in the RNC begging them to give her a consulting contract to help the party with the Black community. The last meeting took place last month. She was totally and thoroughly rebuffed by the party, according to my sources. So, Ralph Abernathy, er, I mean Crystal Simone Wright, how can the party be as bad as you say; but yet you want to make a living helping the very party that you claim doesn’t care about people like you? As with Dr. King and Malcolm X, they disagreed with each other’s approach, but yet each made positive contribution to the cause. Wright was too busy trying to get a consulting contract to pay much attention to their example of peaceful coexistence.

So, my message to Wright can best be conveyed through the immortal words of Jack Nicholson in the movie, “A Few Good Men:” — “I have neither the time nor the inclination to explain myself to a man who rises and sleeps under the blanket of the very freedom I provide, then questions the manner in which I provide it! I’d rather you just said thank you and went on your way. Otherwise, I suggest you pick up a weapon and stand a post. Either way, I don’t give a damn what you think you’re entitled to!” In the end, Wright is wrong simply because she can’t handle the truth.

Raynard Jackson is president and CEO of Raynard Jackson & Associates, LLC., a Washington, D.C.-based public relations/government affairs firm. He can be reached through his website, www.raynardjackson. com. Click on this story at www. daytonatimes.com to write your own response.

No Rosa Park moment for Keystone opponents Fifty years ago on this Aug. 28, hundreds of thousands of citizens gathered in our nation’s capital to fight for racial equality. The March on Washington proved to be a turning point in one of the most profound moral crises our country has ever faced. But in the half century since, the rhetoric of racial justice has become a tool for scoring cheap political points. This tactic is quite apparent in the shameless moralizing deployed by opponents of the Keystone XL pipeline. A disturbing number of critics have sought to silence informed debate by comparing the issue to the struggle against racism. Besides being deeply offensive to anyone who has ever suffered the effects of institutional prejudice, such tactics do a disservice to those who risked their lives to defend the dignity of Black Americans. If completed, the Keystone XL pipeline would deliver oil from Western Canada to the Gulf Coast of Texas. Whether this infrastructure project is a worthwhile investment is a complex issue on which reasonable people can disagree. According to some environmentalists, however, opposing the pipeline is a moral cause on par with fighting for racial equality. In a column imploring President Obama to block the final phases of Keystone XL construction, Minnesota-based journalist James P. Lenfestey called the decision “a Rosa Parks moment” for the president. “A small, seemingly inconsequential decision,” he went one, “can influence how the entire world views the oil industry, the way a

hand, is a strategy for becoming less dependent on oil from foreign governments that are genuinely oppressive, and in some cases, still HARRY C. tacitly condone slavery. ALFORD The project could support over NNPA COLUMNIST 500,000 new American jobs by 2035 (according to api.org). And small, stubborn action on a Mont- according to an eight-volume gomery bus changed the nation’s State Department study, the pipetolerance toward Jim Crow.” line would increase America’s annual carbon emissions by only one third of one percent. Contentious opinion When, exactly, did it become acceptable to equate one’s con- Rosa Park moment tentious opinions about energy inI remember a very tense mofrastructure to the fearless acts of ment when my family was driving Rosa Parks, Nelson Mandela, and through Birmingham on our way Abraham Lincoln? Parks made a to a segregated Washington, D.C. stand against barbaric Jim-Crow- (1964). We pulled into a gas station era discrimination at a time when and my brother decided to use the lynchings and cross-burnings restroom. He was shouted out of were real threats. the front office for asking for the Nelson Mandela spent nearly door key. My aunt exclaimed, “We three decades in jail at the hands just passed the Civil Rights Act” of an unjust government to further and marched up and grabbed the the cause of human dignity. And key off the wall and escorted my Abraham Lincoln freed America’s brother to the door. slaves, and for that, he paid with The employee started towards my aunt. My father jumped out his life. Jim Crow laws, apartheid, and of the car, popped open the trunk slavery were indefensible evils. The where his shotgun was waiting Keystone XL pipeline, on the other for times like this. The employee

Opinions expressed on this editorial page are those of the writers, and do not necessarily reflect the editorial stance of the newspaper or the publisher.

THE CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS The Black Press believes that Americans can best lead the world away from racism and national antagonism when it accords to every person, regardless of race, color or creed, full human and legal rights. Hating no person, fearing no person. The Black Press strives to help every person in the firm belief...that all are hurt as long as anyone is held back.

backed off and we all sighed with relief. Now, that is a Rosa Parks moment. When Americans marched on Washington in the summer of 1963, they were raising issues that had been ignored for far too long. To use the legacy of that movement to stymie honest, necessary debate is an insult to the cause of racial jus-

tice, its ideals and its heroes.

Harry C. Alford is the cofounder, president/CEO of the National Black Chamber of Commerce. Website: www.nationalbcc.org, email: halford@ nationalbcc.org. Click on this story at www.daytonatimes.com to write your own response.

W W W.DAY TONATIMES.COM Central Florida Communicators Group, LLC, P.O. Box 48857 Tampa, Fl 33646, publishes the Florida Daytona Times on Thursdays. Phone: 877-352-4455, toll-free. For all sales inquiries, call 877-352-4455; e-mail sales@ flcourier.com.

Charles W. Cherry, Sr. (1928-2004), Founder Julia T. Cherry, Senior Managing Member, Central Florida Communicators Group, LLC

Subscriptions to the print version are $59 per year. Mail check to P.O. Box 48857 Tampa, Fl 33646, or log on to www.daytona.com; click on ‘Subscribe’.

Dr. Glenn W. Cherry, Chief Executive Officer

SUBMISSIONS POLICY SEND ALL SUBMISSIONS TO NEWS@DAYTONATIMES.COM. Deadline for submitting news and pictures is 5 p.m. the Monday before the Thursday publication date. You may submit articles at any time. However, current events received prior to deadline will be considered before any information that is submitted, without the Publisher’s prior approval, after the deadline. Press releases, letters to the editor, and guest commentaries must be e-mailed to be considered for publication. The Daytona Times reserves the right to edit any submission, and crop any photograph, for style and clarity. Materials will not be returned.

Dr. Glenn W. Cherry, Cassandra CherryKittles, Charles W. Cherry II, Managing Members

Charles W. Cherry II, Esq., Publisher Dr. Valerie Rawls-Cherry, Human Resources Jenise Morgan, Senior Editor Lynnette Garcia, Deborah Ford, Marketing Consultants/Sales Linda Fructuoso, Marketing Consultant/Sales, Circulation Angela van Emmerik, Creative Director Larry Steele, Circulation James Harper, Andreas Butler, Ashley Thomas, Staff Writers Delroy Cole, Kim Gibson, Photojournalists MEMBER National Newspaper Publishers Association Society of Professional Journalists Florida Press Association Associated Press National Newspaper Association


5 7

M A YNEWS OR

AUGUST 29 – SEPTEMBER 4, 2013DECEMBER COMMUNITY 14 - 20, 2006

PHOTOS COURTESY OF JOHN REEVES/B-CU

From left to right are B-CU Trustees Johnny McCray; A. Ray Brinson, president of the National Alumni Association; Madeline Scales-Taylor; the Rev. John Harrington, B-CU board chairman; B-CU President Edison Jackson; Albert Bethune; State Rep. Dwayne Taylor; Daytona Beach City Commissioner Paula Reed; Architects Chelsea Shell, Bob Rabits and John Roche; and B-CU Provost Dr. Makola Abdullah.

B-CU starts renovation of Harrison Rhodes building FROM STAFF REPORTS

Bethune-Cookman Chairman John Harrington brings greeting on behalf of the Board of Trustees.

Bethune-Cookman University continues its mission of meeting the needs of 21st- century students with the renovation and new construction of the Harrison Rhodes Memorial Building. The groundbreaking for the project took place Aug. 23 on the front lawn of the facility.

Harrison Rhodes was built in 1941 as Bethune-Cookman’s first library. The building was named after Harrison Garfield Rhodes, a noted playwright and author of travel books who was a trustee of Bethune-Cookman and a staunch advocate of the school. Years later, the Harrison Rhodes building housed the School

of Social Sciences, and most recently, the School of Liberal Arts. Plans include demolition of the back of the building and the construction of three new stories. The end result will be a four-story building with a conference room, 18 classrooms and 33 offices, two research areas and three computer labs.

Mural highlights the history of Ormond Beach FROM STAFF REPORTS

“Faces of Pride, Then and Now,” a mural of Ormond Beach residents and others was unveiled again during a special ceremony on Aug. 25 at the South Ormond Neighborhood Center, 176 Division Ave. The mural has been framed and protected with Plexiglas to preserve it for future generations to enjoy. It was painted by Kamal Mateen, an Ormond Beach native. Mateen is an accomplished painter, writer and musician whose work has been featured in the sitcom television shows “Living Single” and “The Jamie Foxx Show.”

B-CU curator speaks The mural combines influential African-Americans in both the nation’s history as well as the history of Ormond Beach. The mural was first dedicated on Dec. 5, 1999, and it has been on dis-

play at the South Ormond Neighborhood Center. The speaker for the “Unveil Again” program was Dr. Ashley N. Robertson curator, Bethune Foundation, Bethune-Cookman University. She was introduced by Daisy Grimes, also of B-CU. The Rev. John BaldKamal win II, the uniMateen versity’s chaplain, delivered the invocation. Guests were entertained with a vocal selection from Dawn Gross. Also on the program was Ormond Beach Leisure Services Director Robert Carolin who gave the welcome. City Manager Joyce Shanahan read a proclamation. VITAS Innovative Hospice Care General Manager Shanda Nobles, RN, also spoke. VITAS was one of the sponsors.

Kamal Mateen’s mural is on display at the South Ormond Neighborhood Center.

Halifax Health to present free music therapy programs SPECIAL TO THE TIMES

Music therapist Hakeem Leonard (with guitar) will be the special guest at the Sept. 12-13 programs.

On Sept. 12-13, Halifax Health will present Music Therapy – A Compliment to Cancer Care featuring presentations by music therapist Hakeem Leonard.   The Sept. 12 program takes place in the Halifax Health Medical Center Auditorium, 303 N. Clyde Morris Blvd., from 5:30-7:30 pm.  The program, which is free and open to the public, will include an exhibit and light refreshments, a music therapy interactive presentation and a question and answer session.    The Sept. 13 program will be at the Halifax Health – Center for Oncology, 303 N. Clyde Morris Blvd., from 9 am-1 pm.  The program

will provide information on patient-focused services for oncology inpatients and outpatients. Topics will include inpatient oncology, adult psychiatry and outpatient oncology.  In addition, Halifax Health staff will be on hand to provide patient education and resources.   

Student, teacher, entrepreneur The guest presenter for both programs is Hakeem Leonard, a doctoral student and graduate teaching assistant at Florida State University, where he teaches Anatomy for Music Therapy and Music Therapy Drumming. Leonard is the owner of Healing Hearts Music Therapy, a private practice in

Tallahassee. He has experience in psychiatric, substance abuse, special education, hospital inpatient, older adults, rehab, and atrisk youth settings/populations.  His areas of research are music for pain management during orthopedic rehab, rhythm reproduction of non-musicians, funding in music therapy, and music with mood disorders and substance abuse. Genentech, Millennium Pharmaceuticals and Celgene are the presenting sponsors for both programs. For more information about these programs, call 386-254-4212 ext. 1864.  It is not necessary to RSVP.


R6

7 CLASSIFIEDS Mechanic B

Minimum of 2 yrs experience with diagnosing, repairing and maintaining internal combustion engines, accessories, power-trains, chassis components, and sub-systems. Must be familiar with the practices and procedures of preventive maintenance; be able to obtain your own tools, willing to work a flexible schedule including nights and weekends and be able to obtain a CDL Class B permit and passenger endorsement. This is a full-time position with benefits. $12.61 per hour.

T: 4.5 in

AUGUST 29 – SEPTEMBER 4, 2013

T: 4.5 S: 3.5 in in

Florida Health Care Plans www.fhcp.com

IT

only

TAKES A SPARK.

IT

only

TAKES A SPARK.

I TI T

EOE/AA

S: 3.5 in

only only

TT AA KK EE SS AA SSPPAAR RK K. .

A Drug Free – Smoke Free Work Place

Votran is an equal opportunity employer and a drug and tobacco free workplace. Please email resume to esuchsland@volusia.org OR fill out an application at: 950 Big Tree Road; South Daytona, FL 32119 between the hours of 9AM – 4PM.

Advertise For all local sales for The Daytona Times & WPUL AM 1590 News Progressive Talk, Sports & Inspiration call Deborah E. Ford at 386-492-2908 ext 12

S: 5.75 in

S: 5.75 in

T: 6.75 in

Please

Please

ONLY YOU CAN PREVENT WILDFIRES. ONLY YOU CAN PREVENT WILDFIRES. s ms om ko ke eyPlease ybbee aa rr .. ccoomm O N L Y Y O U C A N PPlease REVENT WILDFIRES. smokeybear.com

ONLY YOU CAN PREVENT WILDFIRES. smokeybear.com

F O O T E

C O N E SAN

F O O T E

C O N E

&

B E L D I N G

FRANCISCO

&

FILE JOB BEAR-PRINT-P0964 NAME # IMAGE SAN FRANC NAME

P0964_SMOKEY_4.5X6.75_V2.INDD B E L D I N G

CLIENT APPROVAL: INSERTION NOTES

IMAGE NOTES

BE THE RICH F O ONone T E

CECDO MATT C O N EI S & B EREINHARD L D I N G

FCREATIVE R A NDIRECTOR CISC O VERSION NONE FILES A N P0964_SMOKEY_4.5X6.75_V2.INDD NONE JOB BEAR-PRINT-P0964 NAME # FILE ART DIRECTOR JON STOA JOB BEAR-PRINT-P0964 UNIT NONE P0964_SMOKEY_4.5X6.75_V2.INDD IMAGE NAME ECD MATT REINHARD # NAME COPYWRITER MICHELLE ALLISON

None IMAGE F O O None TBLEEDE NoneC O N E &ECD MATT B EREINHARD L D I N G CREATIVE DIRECTOR NONE

NAME VERSION NONE

N inF R A N CDIGITAL I S ARTIST C O DAN LAU 4.5 inS xA6.75 CREATIVE DIRECTOR NONE ART DIRECTOR PRINT PRODUCER JON STOA RACHEL THOMAS NONE LIVE 3.5 in x 5.75 in FILE JOB BEAR-PRINT-P0964 ART DIRECTOR JON STOA UNIT NONE P0964_SMOKEY_4.5X6.75_V2.INDD ACCT MANAGER HILARY HAMER NAME COPYWRITER MICHELLE # BLEED ALLISON None GUTTER NONE COPYWRITER MICHELLE ALLISON IMAGE BLEED None ART BUYER NONE ECD MATT REINHARD None DIGITAL ARTIST DAN LAU NAMETRIM SCALE 1:1 4.5TRIM in x 6.75 in DIGITAL ARTIST DANERIN LAURITCH PROJECT MANAGER 4.5 in x 6.75 in VERSION NONE CREATIVE DIRECTOR NONE COLORS CMYK PRINT PRODUCER RACHEL THOMAS LIVE 3.5 in x 5.75 in PRINT PRODUCER PROOFREADER RACHEL THOMAS KAI GONZALEZ LIVE UNIT

VERSION

TRIM

NONE

CLIENT APPROVAL: CLIENT APPROVAL:

INSERTION

IMAGE NOTES

IMAGE NOTES

Publication: INSERTION NOTT

COLOR NOTES

Publication: Ad MaterialThe Close Date: None Material Close: None

Date: None

CLIENT APPROVAL:

INSERT

IMAGENOTES NOTES COLOR COLOR NOTES

Publicati Date: Non Material C

Helvetica, ITC Franklin Gothic, SignPainter FONTS USED

ECCENTRIC 3.5 in x 5.75 in ART DIRECTOR STOA ACCT MANAGER JON HILARY HAMER NONE ANITA IRWIN ACCT MANAGERLEGAL HILARY HAMER NONE GUTTER NONE COPYWRITER ART BUYER MICHELLE ALLISON NONE BLEED None ART BUYER 7/27/06 4:52NONE PM LAST REVISION SCALE 1:1 SCALE 1:1 PROJECT MANAGER DIGITAL ARTIST ERIN RITCH DAN LAU PROJECT MANAGER ERIN RITCH TRIM 4.5 in x 6.75 in COLORS CMYK COLORS CMYK PROOFREADER PROOFREADER PRINT PRODUCER KAI GONZALEZ KAI GONZALEZ RACHEL THOMAS LIVE 3.5 in x 5.75 in LEGAL ANITA IRWIN LEGAL HILARY ANITA IRWIN ACCT MANAGER HAMER GUTTER NONE 7/27/06 4:52 PM LAST REVISION ART BUYER 7/27/06 4:52 PMNONE LAST REVISION SCALE 1:1 PROJECT MANAGER ERIN RITCH COLORS CMYK PROOFREADER KAI GONZALEZ

Publication: The Ad Council Date: None Material Close: None

UNIT GUTTER

COLOR NOTES

DOCUMENT PRINTED AT: 100%

Helvetica, FranklinGothic, Gothic,SignPainter SignPainter Helvetica, ITC ITC Franklin

FONTS FONTS USED USED

M10035_Fuse_DGST 10035

CYAN MAGENTA DOCUMENT PRINTED AT:AT: 100% DOCUMENT PRINTED 100% Y Helvetica, ITC Franklin Gothic, SignPainter

FONTS USED

M10035_Fuse_DGST M10035_Fuse_DGST

RELATIVE YOU LEGAL

LAST REVISION

0

M10035_Fuse_DGST

ANITA IRWIN

10035

10035

M10035_Fuse_DGST

M10035_Fuse_DGST

MAGEN DOCUMENT PRINTEDCYAN AT: 100% CYAN MAG

7/27/06 4:52 PM

M10035_Fuse_DGST 10035

M10035_Fuse_DGS

CYAN M

WISH YOU HAD. FEEDTHEPIG.ORG

WHEN IT COMES TO FINANCIAL STABILITY, DON’T GET LEFT BEHIND. There are people just like you who are making good financial decisions every day. To learn how you can join them, and take control of your financial future, visit feedthepig.org.


7

SPORTS MA YOR

AUGUST 29 – SEPTEMBER 4, 2013 DECEMBER 14 - 20, 2006

Carter’s foundation honors community leaders and scholarship winners FROM STAFF REPORTS

Dr. Edison O. Jackson, president of BethuneCookman University, and Charlie Lydecker, Brown & Brown’s retail division president, were recognized for outstanding community service Aug. 17 at the Vince Carter’s Embassy of Hope Foundation annual Charity Gala at the Ocean Center in Daytona Beach. Also acknowledged during the program were Embassy of Hope Foundation scholarship winners for the 2012-2013 school year: John Stewart and Jasmine Picott, Seabreeze High School; Petra Merrick, New Smyrna Beach High School; and Devin Cameron, Atlantic High School. “It is so important for all

of us to work together as a community to help those who need it the most,” said Vince Carter. “It truly does take a village to raise our children to be tomorrow’s leaders.”

Community involvement Jackson, the sixth president of Bethune-Cookman, holds memberships in a number of civic, educational and community organizations and has written extensively on issues of concern to educators. He says that his role at Bethune-Cookman is “not only to lead, but to move this institution to new heights – from great to greater.” Lydecker has earned many designations in his

Daytona Beach native and NBA player Vince Carter is shown with Embassy of Hope Foundation scholarship winners for the 2012-2013 school year. From left to right are John Stewart and Jasmine Picott of Seabreeze High School, Petra Merrick of New Smyrna Beach High School, and Devin Cameron, Atlantic High School.

field of work. He also has received numerous awards and recognitions for his many years of community and public service, most recently with the Boy Scouts of America. Lydecker holds three U.S. Masters Swimming world records. Carter, now with the Dallas Mavericks, also takes great pride in his work off the court through the Embassy of Hope Foundation, which assists children and their families in Florida, New Jersey and Toronto. Carter established his foundation in 1998 when he was drafted into the NBA. For more information about the foundation, call Ann H. Smith at 386-2398215.

DUANE FERNANDEZ, SR./HARDNOTTS PHOTOGRAPHY

Wildcats kick off football season at No. 23 in FCS poll SPECIAL TO THE TIMES

LUIS SINCO/LOS ANGELES TIMES/MCT

Los Angeles Clippers coach Doc Rivers, middle, and newly signed Clippers players take the stage during a news conference at the team’s practice facility in Los Angeles on July 10. Team members include, from left: Matt Barnes, Darren Collison, Jared Dudley, Ryan Hollins and Chris Paul.

Doc Rivers’ skills at strategy and motivation are needed BY HELENE ELLIOTT LOS ANGELES TIMES/MCT

LOS ANGELES — Because Doc Rivers had played one season for the Clippers, he pretty much knew where he wanted to live when he moved to Los Angeles to become their coach and senior vice president of basketball operations. He didn’t know how odd the whole experience would feel as he moved things around his new condo last week. “It’s strange to be anywhere other than Boston right now, honestly,” he said. “I was in one place for nine years and I didn’t have any plans of not being in that place. It kind of came so quickly. Usually you plan yourself. You kind of say, ‘This is my last year here, then I’m going to go somewhere else.’ ”

T:7”

‘Expectations are great’

From Orlando to L.A.

As much as he needs fresh scenery, the Clippers will need his strategizing and motivational skills to meet the high expectations they will face this season. With Blake Griffin in his prime and Chris Paul secured to a fiveyear, $107.3-million extension, winning a playoff round or two won’t be enough for this team. Rivers must make the players’

For most of the summer, since prolonged talks brought him to the Clippers in late June in exchange for a first-round draft pick, Rivers has traveled from his Orlando home to spend four days a week in Los Angeles. He has analyzed game films — an ongoing task — and talked to players while they have worked out at the Clippers’ Playa Vista facility. He has deliberately limited the chats. “I don’t try to overdo that,” he said. “I recognize that, at least hopefully, we’re together a long time next season. They’ll hear my voice enough. I talk to them enough to try to get a feel on their thoughts on the team and their teammates and all that stuff.” His conclusions aren’t surprising. He sees no urgency to make massive changes and he credited his predecessor, Vinny Del Negro, for providing a solid foundation. “Listen, they won 56 games, so they’re not all bad,” Rivers said. “That’s why I’m watching all the films, because there are things that you absolutely want to continue to do. Vinny did so many

T:4.875”

He paused, then laughed. “So in that way it’s different,” said Rivers, who didn’t want to be part of the Celtics’ rebuilding and led an exodus that continued with Kevin Garnett, Paul Pierce and Jason Terry being traded from Boston to the Brooklyn Nets. “But the excitement and the energy that I have because it’s something new, that’s been great. In retrospect, it’s probably what I needed.”

considerable individual talents add up to a cohesive whole, polish their many assets, and solidify their defense before they can be a championship contender in a rugged conference. “The expectations are great. I don’t want us to shrink from that at all. I don’t want us to run from that,” he said. “But what we’ve got to get our guys to understand is expectations are one thing. Realization is a whole different thing, and just because you’re expected to do anything doesn’t mean you’ve arrived. “We have not arrived. We didn’t win a playoff series last year. So we have a lot of work to do as a group. We should expect to do that work. We have to expect that it’s going to be much harder and we have to embrace it and do it.”

good things here. And you want to continue to do some of those things, and then you want to add some of the areas where you think you can make improvements. “As athletic as we are, we didn’t run enough. We have to get up and down the floor more offensively. We have to do a better job of our spacing offensively. And we have to find a way to close games. Over anything, that’s what stands out. We have to execute as a group better. Each guy has to buy into that execution, and so there’s things we have to do.”

Needs big lineup Acquiring premier outside shooters Jared Dudley and J.J. Redick in a three-way trade with Phoenix and Milwaukee adds a wrinkle and should open the floor. “That was very important for us, to add shooting. Because we’re athletic. We just need more skill,” Rivers said. “I thought we needed more veterans like that, guys that are still pretty much in the middle of their career and they kind of know their skill set, so they’re not going to get in your way. I thought that was important.” Rivers is still tinkering with some ideas. “We have to have a big lineup that you can function with, with DeAndre (Jordan) and Blake, and we also have to have a small lineup as well that is a very functional team. And I think that’s an area where we really have to improve in,” Rivers said. He has less than six more weeks to figure that out and plan to prepare players to meet higher expectations. He sounds as if he has a handle on it. “We haven’t proven we can be a good team yet,” he said. “We’ve proven that we can be an exciting team. We have to prove that we can be a good team.”

The Bethune-Cookman Wildcats enter the 2013 season at No. 23 in The Sports Network FCS Preseason Top 25, it was announced earlier this month by The Sports Network office in Philadelphia. This is the first time the Wildcats have been a member of the network’s preseason poll under head coach Brian Jenkins. With Jenkins set to embark upon his fourth year at B-CU, the Wildcats finished the 2012 campaign ranked No. 22 after winning their second MidEastern Athletic Conference (MEAC) title in three years with an overall record of 9-3 (8-0 MEAC). B-CU advanced to the opening round of the FCS Playoffs, hosting the Coastal Carolina Chanticleers to Municipal Stadium – the third time the Wildcats had hosted a playoff game since 2003. The Wildcats have been predicted to win the MEAC, voted on by head coaches and sports information directors around the league. Senior running back Isidore Jackson was voted Preseason Co-Offensive Player of the Year, while senior linebacker Jarkevis Fields was selected Preseason Defensive Player of the Year.

Sept. 1 game The poll’s national panel of sports information and media relations directors, broadcasters, writers and other dignitaries confirmed North Dakota State as the preseason No. 1 by giving the Bison 127 of the 134 first-place votes and 3,340 points. North Dakota was followed by Montana State in second place; defending runners-up Sam Houston State at third; Eastern Washington in fourth; and Villanova rounds out the top five. Bethune-Cookman opens the 2013 slate on Sept. 1 at Tennessee State as part of the John Merritt Classic at L.P. Field in Nashville, Tenn. The Tigers of TSU received 151 votes in the preseason poll, figuring them at No. 30, respectively. During the regular season, the Top 25 will be released every Monday afternoon, except for the final weekend of the regular season, when it will be released Sunday morning, Nov. 17, prior to the selection of the FCS playoff field. The Sports Network will release a final Top 25 following the FCS championship game, which will be held Jan. 4 in Frisco, Texas.


R8

7AUGUST 29 – SEPTEMBER 4, 2013

Savings

Add a side of to every meal.

Whether shopping for the week or for the items you need to prepare your favorite dish, with a little planning, you can take advantage of savings that are just as satisfying as the meal itself. There are deals throughout the store. Bring in your coupons and save even more. With all the ways Publix helps you stretch your grocery dollars, you can plan on leftovers of the green kind regularly. And we don’t mean lettuce.

Love To Shop Here. Love To S a v e He r e . For a list of current Buy One Get One Free deals, weekly specials and coupons, visit publix.com/save. To view deals on your smartphone, scan the code.

Daytona Times - August 29, 2013  

Daytona Times - East Central Florida’s Black Voice

Advertisement