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Building Students’ Confidence Through Role Models PLUS: Candidates for FBA President-Elect Prelude to the face-to-face 2022 FMEA Professional Development Conference

November 2021

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AT STETSON

STUDY

MUSIC FULL SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE 2022 AUDITION DATES January 22, 29 February 5, 12, 19 stetson.edu/music 2    F l o r i d a

Music Director


Executive Director Florida Music Education Association Kathleen D. Sanz, PhD

Hinckley Center for Fine Arts Education

402 Office Plaza Tallahassee, FL 32301 (850) 878-6844 or (800) 301-3632 (kdsanz@fmea.org)

Editor-in-Chief

D. Gregory Springer, PhD Florida State University College of Music 122 N. Copeland Street Tallahassee, FL 32306 (850) 644-2925 (office) (dgspringer@fsu.edu)

Editorial Committee Terice Allen (850) 245-8700, Tallahassee (tallen1962@hotmail.com) Judy Arthur, PhD Florida State University, KMU 222 (850) 644-3005 (jrarthur@fsu.edu) William Bauer, PhD University of Florida, Gainesville (352) 273-3182; (wbauer@ufl.edu) Alice-Ann Darrow, PhD College of Music, FSU, Tallahassee (850) 645-1438; (aadarrow@fsu.edu) Jeanne Reynolds (jeannewrey@gmail.com)

Contents November 2021

Volume 75 • Number 4

F E AT U R E S

Candidates for FBA President-Elect. . . . . . . . .

8-9

Building Students’ Confidence Through Role Models. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Prelude to the 2022 FMEA Professional Development Conference. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-23

John K. Southall, PhD Indian River State College, Fort Pierce (772) 462-7810; (johnsouthall@fmea.org)

Advertising Sales

Valeria Anderson (val@fmea.org) 402 Office Plaza Tallahassee, FL 32301 (850) 878-6844

Official FMEA and FMD Photographers

Bob O’Lary Debby Stubing

Art Director & Production Manager Lori Danello Roberts LDR Design Inc. (lori@flmusiced.org)

Circulation & Copy Manager

Valeria Anderson, (800) 301-3632

Copy Editor

Susan Trainor

D E PA R T M E N T S President’s Message. . . . . . . . . . . 5

Component News.. . . . . . . . . . . 26

Advertiser Index. . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

2021-22 FMEA Donors. . . . . . . 32-33

From the Editor.. . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Research Puzzles. . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Advocacy Report . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Committee Reports. . . . . . . . . .

36

Academic Partners . . . . . . . . . . 24

Executive Director’s Notes. . . . . .

38

Corporate Partners. . . . . . . . . . . 25

Officers and Directors.. . . . . . . .

39

November 2021

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Bridging Music and Medicine

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES BACHELOR OF MUSIC Performance Music Composition Music Theory Combination with an Outside Field BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN MUSIC EDUCATION BACHELOR OF ARTS IN MUSIC Entrepreneurship Event Management Music History and Literature Music History and Literature: Ethnomusicology Music Theory or Composition

XANDER BOGGS IS COMBINING MUSIC AND MEDICINE. “Music is all about the communication of emotion. It’s all about recognizing other people’s feelings and what they’re trying to say without words. With medicine, you have to have that same compassion.” READ MORE:

arts.ufl.edu/bridging-music WHY NOT BOTH?

Study music in combination with... • Master of Arts in Arts in Medicine • Master of Science in Management or Entrepreneurship • Pre-Health Professions • Second Bachelor’s Degree (engineering, psychology, journalism and more) • Minors & Certificates

MINORS Music Performance Music Theory History/Ethnomusicology Jazz Studies CERTIFICATES Music in Medicine Music Performance

GRADUATE DEGREES MASTER OF MUSIC Performance Music Education (campus/online) Conducting Theory Composition History & Literature Sacred Music PH.D. IN MUSIC EDUCATION PH.D. IN MUSIC Composition Musicology/Ethnomusicology DOCTOR OF MUSICAL ARTS Conducting Composition Performance

Photo by Brianne Lehan / UF Photography

MORE INFO: music@arts.ufl.edu or 352.392.0224

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ARTS.UFL.EDU/MUSIC/WHYNOTBOTH


Shelby R. Chipman, PhD

President’sMessage

President Florida Music Education Association

We Drive Our Students to SUCCESS G reetings, colleagues! Our Florida Music Education Association (FMEA) board members are fully com-

on all levels who desire to study music.

Music teachers should develop a comprehensive vision

mitted to working with each component organization and

and plan for their music classes by pursuing a set of

your programs. We are in a time when there is intense

supporting arts education. One factor for creating sup-

our members (you) to find the resources needed to assist focus on improving our nation’s schools, particularly in Florida, where schools are challenged to meet and maintain national and state testing standards that measure students’ academic achievements. The impact of school music

programs is of significant benefit to our society through educational, sociological, and cultural collaboration. The

realistic goals, embracing factors to shape consensus in port for music education is community networking and

involvement. In districts with strong arts programs, the community—broadly defined as parents and families,

artists, arts organizations, and local civic groups—should be actively engaged.

My FINAL (8) tips for ensuring a positive, vibrant, and

POWER and the influence of our music teachers are

SUCCESSFUL music program:

great news is we have a collective music body within our

2. Maintain a positive outlook, especially during

critical to developing students beyond the classroom. The general music, band, orchestra/strings, and vocal areas,

1. Be honest, be yourself, and make it fun … adversity …

as well as with our music stores and support groups

3. Embrace personal evolution (technology, social

ism of our teaching, mentoring, and caring helps drive

4. Preparation, Presentation and Practice (habits) …

within our profession. I firmly believe the professionalstudent SUCCESS. All should be centered on our students’ music experiences, which should be designed to

« Are able to perform music alone and with others; « Are able to improvise and compose music; « Are able to use vocabulary and notation of music; « Are able to respond to music aesthetically, intellectually, and emotionally; « Are acquainted with a wide variety of music, includ-

produce individuals who:

ing diverse musical styles and genres, representing

« Understand the uses and influences of music in the lives of human beings; « Support the musical likes of the community and encourage others to do so; and « Can continue their musical learning independently. cultures from around the world;

It is of utmost importance that we meet our students

where they are as music learners. How music stimulates others is a phenomenon we are charged to investigate

and to include as a means of building our school communities. Elementary programs establish a foundation

in the arts for all students, not just for those in specialized programs or for those who choose an arts course for

study in high school. Be relevant in stimulating students

media) …

5. Keep music education at the forefront of everything you do …

6. Build a supportive base (on campus and in the community) …

7. Don’t forget the importance of politics …

8. Manage your health, wellness, and emotional status …

As we enter November, be reminded to renew your

membership and to focus your programs on student, parent, and community involvement as you navigate hybrid teaching settings. Our association traditionally has been built on strong music teachers and support systems that function in concert.

Finally, I’m reminded when striving for access, equity,

and inclusion in the classroom, the relationships we form with students may be more important than the repertoire

or the materials we choose to use. Relationships in the

community are strongest when we connect and realize what the REAL objectives are in 2021 and beyond.

Thank you again for being amazing music educators

and making a DIFFERENCE!

Shelby R. Chipman, PhD, President

Florida Music Education Association

November 2021

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FromTheEditor 2021-22 FMEA Membership:

You are eligible for membership in the Florida Music Education Association if you are an individual engaged in the teaching, supervision, or administration of music in elementary and secondary schools, colleges, or universities within the state. Visit FMEA.org/membership to learn more about the benefits of active membership.

Gregory Springer, PhD Editor in Chief Florida Music Director

SUBSCRIPTIONS:

Direct correspondence regarding subscriptions to: Hinckley Center for Fine Arts Education 402 Office Plaza, Tallahassee, FL, 32301-2757 Subscription cost included in FMEA membership dues ($9); libraries, educational institutions, and all others within the United States: $27 plus 7.5% sales tax.

CIRCULATION:

Want to contribute a feature article to Florida Music Director?

W

e invite you to submit a feature

article to be considered for pub-

lication in Florida Music Director. Florida

Music Director is a previous recipient of

the Music Educators National Conference Award for Excellence. It is the official publication of the Florida Music Education

The circulation of the Florida Music Director is 4,500 educators. Published eight times annually by The Florida Music Education Association, Hinckley Center for Fine Arts Education: 402 Office Plaza, Tallahassee, FL 32301-2757. FMEA reserves the right to approve any application for appearance and to edit all materials proposed for distribution. Permission is granted to all FMEA members to reprint articles from the Florida Music Director for non-commercial, educational purposes. Non-members may request permission from the FMEA office.

SUBMISSIONS:

Article and art submissions are always considered and should be submitted on or before the 1st of the month, one month prior to the publication issue to: D. Gregory Springer, PhD, dgspringer@fsu.edu.

All articles must be provided in digital format (e.g., Microsoft Word). All applicable fonts and images must be provided. Images must be at least 300 dpi resolution at 100% of the size. All submissions must be accompanied by a proof (color, if applicable). Ads may be submitted via email to val@fmea.org.

Association, the largest unit in the 11-state

NAfME Southern Division and one of the

largest MEAs in the nation. Florida Music

Director contains articles of interest to music educators of all levels—from kindergarten through college. It is published

eight times annually and distributed to

more than 5,000 music teachers, district music supervisors, and other subscribers.

Please consider sharing your knowl-

edge with other music educators by

writing an article and submitting it for

consideration. You can view our submission guidelines for authors at FMEA.org/ FMD.

As FMEA members, you can view the

current issue and past issues of Florida Music Director at FMEA.org/FMD.

If you have any questions about sub-

missions, please contact me at dgspringer@fsu.edu.

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Advertiser Index The Florida Music Director is made possible by the participation of the following businesses whose advertisements appear in this issue. They make it possible to provide you with a high-quality publication, and we gratefully acknowledge their support of our mission. We hope you will take special notice of these advertisements and consider the products and services offered. It is another important way you can support your professional association and the enhancement of Florida music education. The publisher does not endorse any particular company, product, or service. The Florida Music Education Association (FMEA) is not responsible for the content of any advertisement and reserves the right to accept or refuse any advertisement submitted for publication. Information for advertisers (rate card, insertion orders, graphics requirements, etc.) can be found at FMEAMediaKit.org. Florida Music Director reserves the right to refuse any ad not prepared to the correct specifications OR to rework the ad as needed with fees applied. ADVERTISER Florida State University............................................................................................................................ BC Stetson University....................................................................................................................................... IFC University of Florida......................................................................................................................................4 University of South Florida........................................................................................................................28 Advertisers shown in bold provide additional support to FMEA members through membership in the Corporate and Academic Partners (FCAP) program. FCAP partners deserve your special recognition and attention.


AdvocacyReport

Jeanne W. Reynolds Chairwoman Government Relations Committee

I Can, You Can M y nephew, Michael, is a music ther-

as the processional piece. I am guessing

making the call, setting up the visit, or

director of therapeutic recreation for a

would have had the same reaction my

the work is very important and mean-

apist. More specifically, he is the

large nursing home in Manhattan. At

his core, he is a musician who embraces

a beautiful, inclusive musical philosophy that my sister describes brilliantly as “I

can, you can.” It is easy to see how this is a tremendous asset in his day-to-day work.

I am certain he is often asked to play,

sing, and improvise music he has never performed before, but is meaningful to

residents. In those settings, there is no

place for fear of failure or perfectionism. Michael invites residents, friends, and

more important than technical perfec-

older daughter is a very accomplished

instrumentalist (bassoon and piano) who

tion. Just do it!

has quite a high speaking voice. Her first

reaction was, “No one has ever asked

The Importance of Story

before.”

the Van Morrison tune will likely “stick.”

The story of my nephew, his wedding, and

Marian the Librarian to do Van Morrison

Stories stay with us, particularly in an age

You may be wondering what this story

where we are inundated with information

and data. Tell your stories to decision

relations. I see three important advocacy

Take Risks—Just Do It!

ing process.

with decision makers, feeling as if they

to sing the Van Morrison tune Sweet Thing

of the piece of music and the setting are

was way out of their comfort zone. My

ipate, Michael makes people feel valued

Michael got married last weekend. He

the wedding. Sometimes the meaning

them are musically experienced, but this

takeaways.

asked my two daughters and his brother

daughters and nephew took away from

hesitation and sheer terror. All three of

expertise. All are welcome. Every voice is

and an important part of the music-mak-

Certainly, this is one of the lessons my

asked, something between humorous

has to do with advocacy and government

valued. Rather than being afraid to partic-

ingful, but it does not require perfection.

daughters and nephew had when first

visitors alike to make music with him regardless of their musical experience or

just speaking up for their programs. Yes,

some of you, as well-trained musicians,

makers. Inspiring stories about the power

of music education to transform students’ lives can have tremendous impact on policy making.

FMEA members are often fearful to meet must know all the answers to every pos-

Peer to Peer Support

Their fear of failure paralyzes them from

This is the year we need to strengthen our

I can, you can.

sible question that may come their way.

grass-roots networks by providing peer to

peer support. Let’s truly embrace President Shelby Chipman’s theme of Unity in Music

Education—Building Communities One Note at a Time. Invite one or two people to join

your advocacy efforts. Embrace my nephew’s philosophy by modeling his “I can, you can” philosophy. Certainly, it would have been much more challenging had

only one of the kids been asked to sing the Van Morrison tune. Not only were they

in it together, but Michael’s belief in them

gave them the motivation and confidence to succeed. The wedding was wonderful and magical—the processional song com-

municated musical meaning exactly as Michael envisioned and intended.

Together we can make magic happen at

weddings, in classrooms, and in legislative chambers. I can, you can.

November 2021

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Candidate for FBA President-Elect

Jeff Cayer

J

eff Cayer is in his first year as

He has served two terms as chair-

director of bands at Marshall

man of FBA District 12. He has served

City. Prior to joining the Marshall

in multiple facets such as junior high/

Middle Magnet School in Plant

staff, Mr. Cayer served as director of bands at Southwest Middle School

in Lakeland from 1995 to 2016 and Woodrow Wilson Middle School in South Tampa from 2016 to 2021. Over his 27 years of public school teaching,

Mr. Cayer’s bands have consistently earned superior ratings at concert and

jazz band music performance assess-

ments.

Early in his career, Jeff collabo-

the Florida Bandmasters Association middle school representative and state jazz chairman. He was also a

member of the Clinics, MPA, and Adjudicator committees. Jeff serves

as secretary of FBA District 7 and is an active adjudicator and clinician around the state. He has conducted numerous honor bands in both jazz

and concert settings and directed the 2016 Florida All-State Middle School

Band. Jeff serves as the jazz adjudica-

rated with a colleague to create the Polk Jazz Festival,

tor trainer for the state of Florida, where he is responsi-

musicianship at the middle and high school levels.

has presented many FMEA and FBA clinics on a broad

which sought to encourage the development of jazz

This program later evolved into the Polk County Jazz Showcase, an event that celebrates the diversity of

jazz ensembles in Polk County. Jeff was recognized as Southwest’s Teacher of the Year and was honored with the Chris Keehn Spirit of Teaching Award. During

his years at Southwest Middle School, Mr. Cayer also

ble for the approval and renewal of jazz adjudicators. Jeff

scope of topics, including Jazz Band Literature Selection,

Teaching Students With Exceptionalities in the Band Room, and a preconference event entitled Crossing the

Divide, focused on retention of middle school band students as they enter high school.

In Mr. Cayer’s free time, he enjoys competing on the

created an Elementary School Band experience, which

professional barbecue circuit; restoring classic cars; and

opportunity to explore band in a nine-week, before-

dren. His wife, Jennifer, is also a career educator, spe-

allowed fifth grade students at his feeder schools the school ensemble. In 2013, Mr. Cayer was selected as a

national quarterfinalist for the GRAMMY Foundation Music Educator Award.

Jeff earned the BME from Florida Southern College

in Lakeland in 1995 and the MEd in educational lead-

ership from Southeastern University in 2010. He was recognized as the Outstanding Master’s Graduate in

December 2010. He is pursuing the EdD in educational leadership at Florida Southern College.

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spending time with his wife, children, and grandchilcializing in gifted education and television production.

His daughters, Denise and Ashley, are both all-state French horn players and continue to enjoy music. Denise is a music educator in Polk County, and her husband,

Daniel, is director of bands at St. Paul Lutheran School.

Ashley received her doctorate in occupational thera-

py, and her husband, Austin, is an engineer with Con

Edison. Jeff is an active member in FBA, FMEA, NAfME, Alpha Chi, and Phi Beta Mu.


Candidate for FBA President-Elect

Jody Dunn

J

oseph Wayne (Jody) Dunn is a

additional concert bands, percussion,

School, where he now holds the posi-

niques, and The Big Red Machine

chamber winds, instrumental tech-

1986 graduate of Crestview High

marching band. Under his direction,

tion of band director. Mr. Dunn was

the Crestview Band has received

twice the principal trombonist of the

the Otto J. Kraushaar Award, the

Florida All-State Band while a high

highest award given by the Florida

school and junior high school stu-

Bandmasters Association, several

dent. He was also a member of the

times. In 2011, Mr. Dunn was a clini-

Florida All-State Choir. As a senior,

cian/conductor for the Southeastern

he served as the drum major of the

United States Honor Band at Troy

Crestview High School marching

University. In 2012, the Crestview

band, better known as “The Big Red

High School Band was featured

Machine.” He went on to earn his

in the 123rd Tournament of Roses

music education degree from the University of Southern Mississippi

Parade in Pasadena, California. In

in Hattiesburg in 1990. While at USM he was a member

2014, the Wind Ensemble performed at Carnegie Hall

he served as section leader and vice president. He was

performed at the Southeastern United States Concert

of the Pride of Mississippi Marching Band, for which

a member of the Wind Ensemble, the Symphonic Band, Jazz Lab I, and the Trombone Choir. He performed

in New York City. In February 2017, the Wind Ensemble Band Clinic in Troy, Alabama.

In spring 2019, Mr. Dunn served as the guest clini-

with the USM Chorale and Men’s Choir and was a

cian/conductor of the Matanuska-Susitna Honor Band

Upon graduation from USM, Mr. Dunn accepted

conductor of the 2020 Florida All-State High School

founding member of the USM Jazz Singers.

the position as director of the Pickering High School Band in Leesville, Louisiana. Under his direction, the

in Palmer, Alaska. Most recently, he was the clinician/ Honor Band.

Mr. Dunn is active as a clinician and adjudica-

band received its first ever superior ratings. In 1993, he

tor throughout the Southeast. He has served on the

the assistant director of the Richbourg Middle School

Association. He chairs the FBA Ethics Committee.

returned to his hometown of Crestview and became

Band and Chorus until 1996. From 1996 to 2006, Mr. Dunn was the associate director of bands at Crestview

High School. While serving as the associate director, he was the visual coordinator of the marching band

as well as the director of the Concert Band and Jazz Ensemble II.

He assumed his current position as director of bands

at Crestview High School in 2006. He conducts the

Wind Ensemble and Jazz Ensemble I and oversees three

state Executive Board of the Florida Bandmasters He is a recipient of the Certificate of Merit from the

National Band Association. He is a member of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, FMEA, NAfME, NBA, ASBDA, and Phi Beta Mu International Bandmasters Fraternity, where he serves as past president of the Omega chapter. Mr.

Dunn is a recent recipient of the prestigious Florida Bandmasters Association Oliver Hobbs Award.

Jody is the proud father of Olivia, Elizabeth, Joseph,

and Elijah.

November 2021

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Buil Confid

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ilding Students’ dence Through Role Models

S

by Faith Hall

Strong self-confidence is important to students’ performance, achievement, and

overall experience in music. A student’s belief in their own ability to perform suc-

cessfully is called self-efficacy. Music educators can help students build high selfefficacy through facilitating vicarious experiences—that is, seeing other people perform

an activity successfully, thereby opening up the possibility that they, too, can perform

the same activity successfully (Bandura, 1977). This concept is also known as exposing students to role models.

Young people determine their future goals at least in part based on the examples

around them. These examples positively or negatively shape their expectations for

themselves and others. When providing role models for students, it is important to consider the unique perspectives and backgrounds of the students in your class. People tend to have vicarious experiences through role models they perceive to be like them in an easily identifiable way, such as race or gender (Karunanayake &

Nauta, 2004). In fact, research has shown that same-gender and same-race role mod-

els are especially influential for female students and students of color (Zirkel, 2002). Providing the opportunity for female students and students of color to see musicians

who look like them playing instruments, singing, composing, improvising, and conducting opens worlds of possibility for their own musical futures.

Ultimately, exposing students to diverse musical role models is beneficial to all stu-

dents. Diverse musical role models bring fresh talent and unique musical perspectives that are not always represented in music classrooms. Furthermore, all children need

to see competent, supportive, successful leaders and teachers from various ethnic and racial backgrounds. Exposure to diverse role models can play a role in breaking down the stereotypes and prejudices that oppress underrepresented groups.

Continued on page 12

November 2021

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Building Students’ Confidence Through Role Models Continued from page 11

Here are some ways you can bring diverse role models into your music classroom:

Set up your classroom with images of diverse musical role models.

Fill the walls of your classroom with pictures of musicians who are as diverse as your stu-

dents. Post images of the musicians and composers whose music you are playing or studying, and talk

about them with your students.

Share videos and recordings of diverse musical role models.

Listening to and watching professional musicians

inspires young musicians to find their own timbral

models. Expose them to recordings and videos of musicians of all races and genders.

Program music written by diverse composers.

master classes and may be willing to perform for

« Invite college musicians and high school musiyour students online.

cians to perform for younger ensembles. Student

musicians can be just as inspiring and seem more

approachable to younger students.

Invite diverse clinicians and teachers to work with your ensemble.

Students need opportunities to see diverse con-

ductors and educators as well as performers. When setting up opportunities to bring clinicians to work

with your ensemble, consider asking women and

people of color who are established within the profession to come work with your students.

Music educators can build students’ self-efficacy and

When programming for ensembles, intentional-

inspire their students by exposing them to musical role

and composers of color. Programming works by

similar to themselves (Karunanayake & Nauta, 2004), so

selves reflected in the music they are performing.

Seeking out and promoting the music of diverse musicians

formed as often, diverse composers bring new

inclusive for students, musicians, and educators.

and choral music. Performing these works will

Faith Hall is a PhD student at the University

able way.

« There are many resources emerging for finding

as a graduate conducting associate and teach-

music written by composers of all races, ethnicities,

middle school band in Iowa and Arizona for six

ly include works written by female composers

models. Students tend to choose role models who are

diverse composers allows students to see them-

it is important find role models who reflect your students.

Furthermore, although their music is not per-

in the music classroom makes the musical world more

perspectives and special voices to band, orchestral, expand your program in an interesting and enjoy-

4

and genders. See Figure 1 for a list of resources.

Invite diverse musicians to perform for your class or take your students to see performances of diverse musicians.

« Seeing live performances is an important expe-

rience that inspires young musicians to continue learning their craft. Interacting with professional

musicians allows students to learn about them and their musical process. If you are unable to set up an opportunity in person, seek out virtual

performances to share with your students. Many musicians are offering virtual performances and

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of Missouri, where she works with the bands ing assistant. Ms. Hall taught high school and

years. She studied trumpet and music education

at the University of Northern Iowa and completed the MME from Florida State University in 2021. References Bandura, A. (1977). Self-efficacy: Toward a unifying theory of behavioral change. Psychological Review, 84(2), 191-215. https:// doi.org/10.1037/0033-295X.84.2.191 Karunanayake, D. & Nauta, M.M. (2004). The relationship between race and students’ identified career role models and perceived role model influence. The Career Development Quarterly, 52(3), 225-234. https://doi.org/10.1002/j.2161-0045.2004.tb00644.x Zirkel, S. (2002). Is there a place for me? Role models and academic identity among white students and students of color. Teachers College Record, 104(2), 357-376. https://www.tcrecord.org/ Content.asp?ContentId=10832


Figure 1

Resources for Programming Music by Diverse Composers Comprehensive List of Resources From Composer Alex Shapiro

https://www.alexshapiro.org/ProgrammingResources.html

Institute for Composer Diversity

www.composerdiversity.com

Wind Repertory Project

www.windrep.org

… And We Were Heard

www.andwewereheard.org

ColourFULL Music Project

www.colourfullmusic.com

The Horizon Leans Forward … Stories of Courage, Strength, and Book compiled and edited by Erik Kar Jun Leung Triumph of Underrepresented Communities in the Wind Band Field (GIA Publications, 2020) Queering Choir

www.queeringchoir.com

Beyond Elijah Rock: The Non-Idiomatic Choral Music of Black Composers

https://www.mlagmusic.com/research/beyond-elijah-rock

Music by Black Composers

www.musicbyblackcomposers.org

Latin Orchestral Music

www.latinorchestralmusic.com

Composer’s Equity Project

https://www.chamber-music.org/pdf/2018-Composers-Equity-Project.pdf

November 2021

13


We can’t wait to see you back, face-to-face, January 12-15, 2022, in Tampa Important Dates

The FMEA Professional Development Conference is one of the largest music

(Subject to change)

education professional development events in the United States. In addition to approximately 250 clinic sessions and concerts, it is host to 22 all-state

Nov. 13, 2021 Hotel Room Cancelation Deadline: 5:00 pm

ensembles featuring Florida’s top band, orchestra, chorus, guitar, Orff, and popular music students conducted by world-class conductors and teachers.

Nov. 15, 2021 Hotels will charge your credit card a nonrefundable deposit for the first night of each room.

It is attended by more than 10,000 people, including secondary music

Dec. 12, 2021 Preregistration closes at midnight. Payment must be postmarked on or before December 4 if you are paying by check. Preregistration is by credit card only after December 5.

the all-state ensembles, students and professional musicians performing with

Dec. 17, 2021 All school lodging checks are due, payable to the hotel where reservations were made for you and/or your students.

« More than 2,800 music teachers and 200 administrators « More than 120 sessions, covering a variety of topics for all music educators,

Dec. 17, 2021 The final deadline for discounted hotel blocks. Unsold rooms in the FMEA blocks are released back to hotels.

14    F l o r i d a

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directors, elementary music teachers, music supervisors, college students, college music teachers, school administrators, K-12 students performing in

invited performing ensembles, exhibitors, and parents and family members of performing students.

So many reasons to participate:

« An exhibit hall with world-class exhibitors providing products and services for music educators and students

« Performances and mini-concerts from some of Florida’s top music with on-demand access to recordings after the conference

« Networking opportunities, college fair, awards ceremony, and other special programs

events


All registration information must be entered online, beginning September 18 at

flmusiced.org/flmusicapps/conference/

register. At the end of the online form, you will have the opportunity to print an

invoice to send in with a check until one week before the preregistration deadline or to pay online instantly with a credit card until the preregistration deadline.

Please Note: To assist our members,

Registration Fees Description Director/Member

Collegiate Member Retired Member

$73

$63

$93

Preconference Workshop

$58

$68

Concert Tickets

$15

$15

$0

$0

Preconference Workshop (First-Year Teacher)

ship with our exhibitors who can benefit your students through scholarships, new

equipment, sheet music, software, and more, we ask that you please provide the ACTUAL, CORRECT MAILING

ADDRESS and EMAIL for each of your students and chaperones and do NOT

simply enter your school address or other incorrect information.

$0

$53

exhibitors to scan their badges rather than

In order to maintain a positive relation-

$0

Paid Chaperone

a barcode encoded with contact infor-

cards or mailing lists at their booths.

$88

$168

$98

Tri-M Student

manually writing information on contact

$58

$138

$73

Non-Teaching Spouse of Retired Member

Free Chaperone

mation. Attendees will be able to allow

On-Site Rates:

Non-Teaching Spouse

their students, and chaperones as they

visit exhibit booths, all badges will have

Preregistration Rates: Sept. 18-Dec. 11

$0

$0

All-State Student

$38

VIP Member

$25 $0

VIP Preconference Workshop

$0

$0

$38 $25 $0

Leadership Workshop – Student

$38

$38

Student Experience – Student

$38

$38

Leadership Workshop – Chaperone

$0

Student Experience – Chaperone

$38

$0

$38

To take advantage of early discounted rates, you must register and pay before the deadline. Note: If you are mailing a check to the FMEA office to pay for your registration, it must be postmarked early enough so that it will ARRIVE in the FMEA office before the preregistration deadline.

November 2021

15


2022 FMEA Professional Development

Registration

director, must explain

the extenuating circumstances preventing the director from attending,

3. Refunds must be requested in writing

tration materials. The school will be

4. All requests for refunds must be

6. Student observers are not allowed to

2022. Requests received after that date

and must be submitted with regisnotified of approval.

REGISTRATION POLICIES

attend the conference. If any student

1. All participants—directors, students,

6. Concert tickets are nonrefundable.

in sessions or working for the all-state

rials if preregistered.

3. All participating students must be

ticipation in the conference may be students registered and participating

groups or pick up registration mate-

concerts are exempt from this rule.)

chaperoned. As required by FMEA

7. All school music teachers must reg-

other than a director is required for

directors and be current members of

and FSMA, at least one chaperone

ister for the conference as FMEA

the FMEA. This includes directors of

every ten (10) students or fraction

invited performing groups, mini-con-

thereof; however, FMEA policy allows

certs, and session presenters. All-state

for one free chaperone for every six (6)

conductors from Florida schools, col-

students or fraction thereof.

leges, or universities must also be

4. An additional paid chaperone may

FMEA members. No current music

be registered for (a) each six (6) stu-

teacher may register as a chaperone.

dents registered or (b) for each all-

state rehearsal site where registered students are performing.

5. If a participating student is not accompanied by the director from that student’s school, then the principal from

REFUND POLICIES

1. Full registration refunds are avail-

able for cancellation requests made through December 15, 2021.

that school must furnish a letter des-

2. No registration refunds will be made

school district who is to be in charge

15, 2021, except for emergency situ-

ignating the person from the school or

of that student. The letter should be addressed to the FMEA executive

16    F l o r i d a

Music Director

will not be processed.

5. All refunds will be issued after the

eliminated the following year. (Tri-M

2. Only directors may register their

received no later than January 31,

observers are brought to the conference, the offending school’s par-

chaperones, and guests—must be reg-

istered for the conference.

(email is acceptable).

for cancellations made after December ations. These will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis.

conference is completed.

CHAPERONE REGISTRATION

Chaperone registration is based on the following rules:

« For each elementary student regisElementary Students

tered, one free chaperone and one

« Any additional attendees must purpaid chaperone may be registered.

chase a guest pass at on-site regis-

tration for entry into the convention center.

« For every six students registered, one

Middle School and High School Students free chaperone and one paid chap-

erone may be registered. No other chaperones may be registered until

« Any additional attendees (chaperones the seventh student is registered.

or guests) must purchase a guest pass

at on-site registration for entry into the convention center.


Conference

Security Procedures

T

he Florida Music Education Association is working with the

« If you have students in more than one Exceptions

performing ensemble, you may pay

for a chaperone for each performing ensemble in which you have regis-

« If you have students from different tered students.

schools, you may pay for a chaperone

for each school for which you have registered students.

Chaperones are not allowed to bring other children who are not participating

Tampa Police Department and Allied Security at the Tampa

Convention Center (TCC) to enhance the conference experience for the students and attendees.

GREAT NEWS! In order to help keep attendees safe, there will

be a heightened security presence throughout the TCC and at

various hotels. All entrances to the TCC will be patrolled by uniformed officers of the Tampa Police Department and uniformed

Allied Security personnel. They will be patrolling the TCC as well. The Tampa

Police Department will be at the crosswalks between Marriott Tampa Water

Street and the TCC, at concerts, and patrolling some of the downtown hotels during rehearsals.

All attendees (this includes members, chaperones, and student participants)

must wear their conference badge during the conference once the authorized

in an all-state ensemble. Only registered

registrant obtains the conference packet.

ing a conference badge are allowed in and

if at all possible, to use a clear bag, similar to those used at sporting events, for

students, teachers, and chaperones weararound the rehearsal areas. Directors are asked to make sure their chaperones are aware of this policy before agreeing to

Please be prepared for random bag and/or purse searches. It is encouraged,

entrance.

Enjoy the Conference Experience.

serve as a chaperone.

Health Information

W

e are watching the COVID-19 Delta variant situa-

tion closely. FMEA is committed to the health and

safety of our attendees and will make every effort to develop plans and policies to instill confidence in your ability to attend safely.

At a minimum, we plan to follow CDC recommendations

and guidelines that are in place at the time of the confer-

ence.* For example, if the CDC is still recommending that

everyone in high-risk areas wear a mask while indoors regardless of vaccination status and Tampa is still a high-risk

area at the time, we will follow that recommendation and require masks in all indoor facilities.

As we get closer to the conference, the health information

Tampa Convention Center (TCC)

« TCC holds a Global Biorisk Advisory Council (GBAC) Star Facility accreditation « Frequent sanitation and disinfectant of all restrooms « Continuous cleaning of all touchpoints « Overnight electrostatic cleaning of all areas used « COVID-19 branded signage in all common areas and pre-function spaces « Maintain 6-feet physical distancing in pre-function and “Ready Together” plan

common areas

*In the event the CDC recommendations differ for vaccinated

page on the FMEA website will be updated to keep our

and unvaccinated, we plan to meet or exceed all recommendations

ference attendees informed about what to expect during the

mendations for the unvaccinated that are possible given limitations

membership, all-state students, chaperones, and other conconference.

for the vaccinated, and will attempt to implement as many recomin regard to available facilities, budget, and various other factors.

November 2021

17


2022 FMEA Professional Development

Contracted Hotels

G

reetings! It’s that wonderful time of year when we start planning for our very

special conference event. The Florida Music Education Association has contract-

ed the following Tampa hotels for the January 12-15, 2022, Professional Development Conference. Please telephone your hotel of choice directly from the list below begin-

ning Sept. 25, 2021, at 9 am EDT. Guest rooms at the contracted rates are

available until the room block is full or until the cancellation deadline of Nov. 13, 2021, at 5 pm. If your hotel of choice is sold out, please continue to try

to make a reservation until Nov. 13, 2021, as FMEA attendees will periodically release surplus guest rooms.

A maximum of five (5) guest rooms may be reserved per teacher and/or parent.

Each and all rooms reserved on Nov. 15, 2021, will be charged a non-refundable,

one-night fee to the responsible credit cardholder. (Invalid credit cards risk a reservation cancellation.)

We urge any guest holding surplus reservations/rooms to cancel excess reservation(s) as soon as possible and no later than 5 pm on Nov. 13, 2021, and you must

secure a cancellation confirmation number. (This courtesy will make surplus rooms available to other guests.) In order to receive complimentary rehearsal

and meeting space, you should book guest rooms in the hotel you are using for your group functions.

NOTE: FMEA IS NOT offering a housing bureau service. All participants MUST call

the hotels directly beginning Sept. 25, 2021, at 9 am EDT and request the “Florida Music

Education Association” room block rate and confirm the guest room rate posted below.

18    F l o r i d a

We look forward to seeing you in Tampa! Music Director


Conference

ROOM RATES HOTEL – Cutoff date: 11/13/21

Single

Double

Triple

Quad

Courtyard by Marriott Downtown Tampa

102 East Cass Street, Tampa, FL 33602 (813) 229-1100, ext. 1; Group Code: FMEA Comp. internet; $22 valet only

$164

$164

$164

$164

DoubleTree by Hilton Tampa Airport Westshore

4500 West Cypress Street, Tampa, FL 33607 (800) 514-3956; Group Code: FME Comp. internet; comp. parking

$150

$150

$150

$150

Embassy Suites Downtown

513 South Florida Avenue, Tampa, FL 33602 (813) 769-8300; Group Code: FMEA Comp. internet & breakfast; $24 valet only

$256

$256

$266

$276

Embassy Suites Tampa Airport Westshore

555 North Westshore Blvd., Tampa, FL 33609 (813) 875-1555 #1801; Group Code: FME or FMEA 2022 Comp. internet, self parking, & breakfast

$200

$200

$210 (up to 5 in room)

$220 (up to 6 in room)

Four Points by Sheraton Suites Tampa Airport Westshore

4400 West Cypress Street, Tampa, FL 33607 (800) 368-7764; Group Code: FMEA Comp. internet & self parking; comp. shuttle to Tampa airport

$146

$146

$146

$146

Hampton Inn Tampa Downtown Channel District

1155 East Kennedy Blvd., Tampa, FL 33602 (813) 525-9900, ext. 2; Group Code: FME Comp. internet & breakfast; $15 self parking

$196

$196

$196

$196

Hilton Downtown

211 North Tampa Street, Tampa, FL 33602 (800) 445-8667, ext. 1; Group Code: FMEA $9.99 internet (comp. for HH); $35 valet

$220

$220

$220

$220

Home 2 Suites Tampa Downtown Channel District

1155 East Kennedy Blvd., Tampa, FL 33602 (813) 525-9900, ext. 1; Group Code: FME Comp. internet & breakfast; $15 self parking

$221

$221

$221

$221

200 North Ashley Drive, Tampa, FL 33602 (888) 236-2427; Group Code: FMEA Comp. internet

$225

$225

$245

$245

700 South Florida Avenue, Tampa, FL 33602 (888) 789-3090; Group Code: FMEA Comp. internet for Bonvoy members; $32 overnight valet; $20 daytime valet

$211

$211

$211

$211

725 S. Harbour Island Blvd., Tampa, FL 33602 (888) 236-2427; Group Code: FMEA Comp. internet; $30 valet only

$211

$211

$211

$211

Sheraton Tampa Riverwalk Hotel Tampa Marriott Water Street Hotel (formerly Marriott Waterside) Westin Tampa Waterside

November 2021

19


2022 FMEA Professional Development

All-State Rehearsals

All-State Concert Orchestra

All-State High School Jazz Band

RESEATING AUDITIONS: TMWS, Salons 5-6 Thursday................................... 8:30am-11:30am

REHEARSALS: TCC, 30A Wednesday.......................................2pm-5:30pm Wednesday............................................ 7pm-9pm Thursday................................... 8:30am-11:30am Thursday............................................... 1pm-5pm Thursday.......................................... 7pm-9:30pm Friday...........................................8:30am-12noon

REHEARSALS: TMWS, Florida Ballroom, Salons 5-6 Thursday (Registration)....................8am-8:30am Thursday................................... 8:30am-11:30am Thursday............................................... 1pm-5pm Thursday............................................... 7pm-9pm Friday........................................ 8:30am-11:30am Friday.................................................... 1pm-5pm Saturday...............................................9am-11am CONCERT: Saturday, January 15, 2022, 6pm TCC, Ballroom A

RESEATING AUDITIONS: SR, Riverwalk Ballroom Thursday..............................................9am-11am REHEARSALS: SR, Riverwalk Ballroom Thursday............................................... 1pm-5pm Thursday.......................................... 7pm-9:30pm Friday........................................ 8:30am-11:30am Friday.................................................... 1pm-5pm Saturday............................................ 9am-12noon CONCERT: Saturday, January 15, 2022, 1:30pm TCC, Ballroom A

RESEATING AUDITIONS: HTD, Palma Ceia Thursday..............................................9am-11am

REHEARSALS: TCC, 14 Wednesday............................................ 1pm-6pm Thursday........................................ 8am-10:30am Thursday................................. 11:45am-12:45pm CONCERT: Thursday, January 13, 2022, 1:30pm TCC, Ballroom A

CONCERT: Saturday, January 15, 2022, 1:30pm TCC, Ballroom A

All-State Elementary Orff Ensemble

All-State Middle School Jazz Band

REHEARSAL: TCC, West Hall A Thursday..............................................11am-6pm

REHEARSALS: WTW, Conch Room Wednesday.......................................2pm-5:30pm Wednesday............................................ 7pm-9pm Thursday................................... 8:30am-11:30am Thursday............................................... 1pm-5pm

CONCERT: Friday, January 14, 2022, 1pm TCC, Ballroom A

All-State Concert Chorus REHEARSALS: TMWS, Grand Ballroom Thursday....................................7:45am-11:30am Thursday.....................................1:30pm-4:30pm Thursday............................................... 6pm-9pm Friday........................................ 8:30am-11:30am Friday............................................... 1:30pm-4pm

All-State Guitar Ensemble

CONCERT: Saturday, January 15, 2022, 11am TCC, Ballroom A

CONCERT: Thursday, January 13, 2022, 12:30pm TCC, 20

REHEARSALS: TMWS and TCC Tuesday..................................6pm-9pm, TMWS, 8 Wednesday................................ 8am-5pm, TMWS, Florida Ballroom, Salons 1-3 Thursday.......................... 7am-10:30am, TCC, 20

KEY ESD = Embassy Suites Downtown HTD = Hilton Tampa Downtown SR = Sheraton Riverwalk

20    F l o r i d a

All-State Middle School Band

REHEARSALS: HTD, Palma Ceia Thursday............................................... 1pm-5pm Thursday............................................... 7pm-9pm Friday........................................ 8:30am-11:30am Friday...............................................2pm-5:30pm Saturday.......................................8:30am-12noon

All-State Elementary Chorus All-State Concert Band

CONCERT: Friday, January 14, 2022, 7:30pm TMWS Grand Ballroom

Music Director

TCC = Tampa Convention Center TMWS = Tampa Marriott Water Street WTW = Westin Tampa Waterside

CONCERT: Friday, January 14, 2022, 7:30pm TMWS, Grand Ballroom All-State Middle School Mixed Chorus REHEARSALS: HTD, Bayshore Ballroom, 1-3 Thursday................................... 12:15pm-4:30pm Thursday..........................................6:30pm-9pm Friday....................................... 8:45 am-11:30am Friday..........................................1:30pm-4:30pm CONCERT: Friday, January 14, 2022, 6:30pm TCC, Ballroom A


Conference

All-State Middle School Orchestra RESEATING AUDITIONS: TMWS, Meeting Room 8 Thursday (Registration)......................... 8am-9am Thursday.........................................9am-11:30am REHEARSALS: TMWS, Meeting Room 8 Thursday............................................... 1pm-5pm Thursday............................................... 7pm-9pm Friday........................................ 8:30am-11:30am Friday.................................................... 1pm-5pm Saturday...............................................9am-11am CONCERT: Saturday, January 15, 2022, 6pm TCC, Ballroom A All-State Middle School Treble Chorus REHEARSALS: HTD, Bayshore Ballroom, 5-7 Thursday................................... 11:45am-4:15pm Thursday.....................................6:15pm-8:45pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:15am Friday............................................... 1:15pm-4pm CONCERT: Friday, January 14, 2022, 6:30pm TCC, Ballroom A All-State Popular Music Collective REHEARSAL: TCC, West Hall A Wednesday............................................ 8am-9pm CONCERT: Thursday, January 13, 2022, 4:15pm TCC, Ballroom B All-State Reading Chorus REHEARSALS: ES, Gandy Meeting Room Thursday....................................7:45am-11:30am Thursday.....................................1:30pm-4:30pm Thursday............................................... 6pm-9pm Friday........................................ 8:30am-11:30am Friday............................................... 1:30pm-4pm CONCERT: Saturday, January 15, 2022, 8:45am TCC, Ballroom A

All-State SSAA Chorus

High School Honors Band

REHEARSALS: WTW, Oasis Ballroom Thursday....................................7:45am-11:30am Thursday.....................................1:30pm-4:30pm Thursday............................................... 6pm-9pm Friday........................................ 8:30am-11:30am Friday............................................... 1:30pm-4pm

RESEATING AUDITIONS: SR, Bayshore Ballroom Thursday..............................................9am-11am REHEARSALS: SR, Bayshore Ballroom Thursday............................................... 1pm-5pm Thursday.......................................... 7pm-9:30pm Friday........................................ 8:30am-11:30am Friday.................................................... 1pm-5pm

CONCERT: Friday, January 14, 2022, 9pm TCC, Ballroom A

CONCERT: Saturday, January 15, 2022, 11am TMWS, Grand Ballroom

All-State Symphonic Band

High School Honors Orchestra

RESEATING AUDITIONS: TCC, 22 Thursday................................... 8:30am-11:30am

REHEARSALS: ESD, Skyway Ballroom Thursday (Registration)....................8am-8:30am Thursday................................... 8:30am-11:30am Thursday............................................... 1pm-5pm Thursday............................................... 7pm-9pm Friday........................................ 8:30am-11:30am Friday.................................................... 1pm-5pm Saturday...............................................9am-11am

REHEARSALS: TCC, 22 Thursday...................................12:30pm-4:30pm Thursday..........................................6:30pm-9pm Friday........................................ 8:30am-11:30am Friday.................................................... 1pm-5pm Saturday............................................ 9am-12noon CONCERT: Saturday, January 15, 2022, 1:30pm TCC, Ballroom A

CONCERT: Saturday, January 15, 2022, 2:30pm TMWS Grand Ballroom

All-State Symphonic Orchestra

Middle School Honors Band

RESEATING AUDITIONS: TCC, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 24 Thursday................................... 8:30am-11:30am

RESEATING AUDITIONS: HTD, Esplanade Suite Thursday..............................................9am-11am

REHEARSALS: TCC, 24 Thursday (Registration)....................8am-8:30am Thursday.........................................9am-11:30am Thursday............................................... 1pm-5pm Thursday............................................... 7pm-9pm Friday........................................ 8:30am-11:30am Friday.................................................... 1pm-5pm Saturday...............................................9am-11am

REHEARSALS: HTD, Esplanade Suite Thursday............................................... 1pm-5pm Thursday.......................................... 7pm-9:30pm Friday........................................ 8:30am-11:30am Friday.................................................... 1pm-5pm CONCERT: Saturday, January 15, 2022, 11am TMWS, Grand Ballroom

CONCERT: Saturday, January 15, 2022, 6pm TCC, Ballroom A

Middle School Honors Orchestra

REHEARSALS: ESD, Bayside Ballroom Thursday....................................7:45am-11:30am Thursday.....................................1:30pm-4:30pm Thursday..........................................6:30pm-9pm Friday........................................ 8:30am-11:30am Friday............................................... 1:30pm-4pm

REHEARSALS: SR, Riverview Room Thursday (Registration)....................8am-8:30am Thursday................................... 8:30am-11:30am Thursday............................................... 1pm-5pm Thursday............................................... 7pm-9pm Friday........................................ 8:30am-11:30am Friday.................................................... 1pm-5pm Saturday...............................................9am-11am

CONCERT: Saturday, January 15, 2022, 8:45am TCC, Ballroom A

CONCERT: Saturday, January 15, 2022, 2:30pm TMWS, Grand Ballroom

All-State TTBB Chorus

November 2021

21


2022 FMEA Professional Development

Concert Tickets All Concert Ticket Sales Are Final. No Refunds or Exchanges.

Please make sure you know the exact name of the all-state ensemble for which you need tickets before approaching the ticket sales window.

tickets for any all-state concert they

7. General ticket sales for all-state con-

3. There are no free or allotted tickets.

at the FMEA registration desk. There

wish to attend.

All concert attendees must either wear their conference badge or purchase a ticket.

4. A director who preregisters online

If paid for online, these tickets will be

of ensembles that are performing in

tion package.

1. Registered (BADGED) attendees do state concert. This includes directors/

nonregistered attendees for concerts

spouses, performing all-state students,

all-state students during the on-site

dent members, retired members, and

6. A director with all-state students may

not require tickets to attend any all-

purchase all-state concert tickets for

members, directors’ non-teaching

in which he or she has registered registration process.

purchase additional concert tickets for

your conference registration.

nonregistered attendees for concerts

attendees (parents, family members,

dents at the on-site registration desk

guests, etc.) are required to purchase

time.

9. For entrance, ticket, and concert pur-

5. A director who registers on site may

2. All nonregistered (NONBADGED)

person to purchase tickets after this

attendees for concerts in which he or

preloaded into the director’s registra-

VIP guests that you entered as part of

any other registered attendee be the

8. All ticket sales are final. Concert tick-

she has registered all-state students.

registered chaperones, collegiate stu-

is no requirement that the director or

may reserve and prepay for all-state

concert tickets for nonregistered

ALL-STATE TICKET POLICY

certs will begin at 11 am on Thursday

in which he or she has performing stu-

or at a designated ticket sales location at anytime.

ets are nonrefundable.

poses, a concert is defined as the pair

the same venue in a common, defined

block of time. An example of a concert for purposes of entrance, ticketing,

etc., is the 1 pm concert on Saturday for the All-State Concert Orchestra and the All-State Concert Band.

CONCERTS AT THE STRAZ PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

« Registered

(BADGED)

conference

attendees do not need tickets. Badged attendees will be handed a ticket to enter the concert outside the entrance

« Nonregistered

to the Straz Performing Arts Center.

conference/concert

attendees (parents, family members, guests, etc.) may purchase tickets for

any Straz concert at $15 per ticket at the FMEA registration desk between 11 am on Thursday and 7 pm on Friday.

On Saturday beginning at 9 am,

all remaining tickets for Straz concerts will be sold at the Straz Performing Arts Center ONLY.

Note: Directors need to notify persons

for whom they have already purchased a

22    F l o r i d a

ticket. Tickets are nonrefundable. Music Director


Conference Michael Antmann, EdD Chairman, Student Development Committee

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Do I get free tickets for my students’ family members to attend the concert?

No. You can pre-order and pay for their tickets when you preregister for the concert, but there are no free tickets.

Can I get free tickets to any concerts?

FMEA Student Conference Experience

&

No. Registered attendees (directors, chaperones, students) are allowed admission to concerts

with their name badge, so no ticket is necessary. Attendees that are not registered for the conference (parents, family, etc.) must purchase tickets.

For concerts at the Straz Performing Arts Center,

FMEA Tri-M Conference Experience

before they walk in the door.

T

Can I buy extra tickets anytime?

Experience and the Tri-M Conference Experience.

the conference, you may purchase tickets at

access to the annual conference to students from throughout the state.

anytime during the regular registration hours.

tors, college representatives, and incredible performing groups. These

at 11 am on Thursday.

with their high school music programs. The program will take place

There are more family members and guests

Conference. Students will participate in workshops, observe rehearsals,

registered attendees with their conference name badge will be handed a ticket immediately

If you are an FMEA member registered for

he Florida Music Education Association offers two programs to make our conference accessible to students who may not have an

opportunity to attend as an all-state student: the Student Conference

The purpose of the FMEA Student Conference Experience is to expand

the computers in the on-site registration area

Participating students will interact with amazing clinicians and educa-

Everyone else may purchase tickets beginning

students will have memorable experiences they can take back and share

coming to watch my all-state student than I

have tickets. How and when do they get tickets?

Extra tickets may be purchased when general ticket sales open. Tickets will be sold at the main registration area and cost $15 each.

on Thursday and Friday of the 2022 FMEA Professional Development attend College Night, and engage in networking and social activities with their peers.

The purpose of the FMEA Tri-M Conference Experience is to provide

students with experiences that will build their leadership and advoca-

cy skills, as well as to expose them to the experiences available at the annual conference. Tri-M participants will be involved with portions of

Does my 2-year-old or 3-year-old need to buy

the Student Conference Experience. Tri-M students must preregister for

Everyone who will be taking up a seat will need

grams require chaperones to be present at all times.

sitting on an adult’s lap for the duration of the

and schools can only submit students for one of these programs. Details,

dren who are old enough to sit in their own seat

site. Please feel free to contact me with any questions.

a ticket?

a ticket. Babies that are being held by an adult or concert are welcome without a ticket, but chil-

the conference and should follow the Tri-M student schedule. Both pro-

One teacher per school may nominate students for these programs,

including requirements and deadlines, can be found on the FMEA web-

will need a ticket.

November 2021

23


Please take time to thank and support our 2021-2022 Academic Partners.

GOLD PARTNERS

BRONZE PARTNERS Cannon Music Camp - Appalachian State University Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra Rollins College Department of Music

University of North Texas The University of Tampa

Partners as of October 11, 2021.

*Please visit FMEA.org/partners for partnership details or call 850-878-6844.

24    F l o r i d a

Music Director


Please take time to thank and support our 2021-2022 Corporate Partners.

GOLD PARTNERS

SILVER PARTNERS

The Horn Section, Inc. Cardinal Digital Marketing Cathy’s Choir Class Excelcia Music Publishing Head’s House of Music

BRONZE PARTNERS

Music & Arts Music is Elementary Music Man, Inc. Romeo Music

Partners as of October 11, 2021.

*Please visit FMEA.org/partners for partnership details or call 850-878-6844.

November 2021

25


ComponentNews A

s we continue to navigate the teach-

FLORIDA MUSIC SUPERVISION ASSOCIATION

Lindsey R. Williams, President

A pair of ideas that have become

is hampered by the reduction of our

FMSA colleagues about our respective

are asked to be physically farther apart

ing and learning paradigm that is

apparent to me as I converse with my

perhaps more important—the persever-

visits to classrooms, both live and virtu-

upon us, I marvel at the creativity and— ance of our arts educators, students, and

extended family support systems. We are most of the way through the 2021

fall semester, and we have expectations of how things “should be” and yet must

constantly adapt to the fluid nature of our continued health situation.

ally, is that we appear to be both hopeful and exhausted. If we unpack both feelings, I think we’ll find they are related

to one another. The exhaustion I see is rooted in the fact that everything is still

more challenging than it “used to be.” Communication in a face-to-face setting

nonverbal cues blocked by a mask. We

from one another in an arts setting where proximity matters—both musically and

culturally. This is but a glimpse into the day-to-day struggles of our teachers and students.

In a rehearsal setting where I need

students to listen differently, I will often

have them perform with their eyes

FLORIDA COLLEGE MUSIC EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION

Marc Decker, DMA, President

I

can’t believe it’s already November!

November and it’s time to find a few extra

and notice areas needing improvement

ensembles prepare for the holidays,

a time to go out with friends, learn a

are doing great things, and you need

As the weather cools and our

this is the time of year when our own energy levels tend to wane. After all, the stretch of time between late summer planning and Thanksgiving break

is the longest uninterrupted contact time we get with our students. For this reason, I’ve decided today to address

one of the most important things we

as teachers need to do: Tend to our-

selves! Here are some suggestions for November to help us all refocus, reen-

ergize, and mentally prepare for the remainder of the year.

Make Yourself a Priority: It seems

impossible at the start of the semester to prioritize our own mental well-be-

ing. During those weeks, every hour of the day and evening is filled with plan-

ning, grading, teaching, and serving our school and community. But now it’s

26    F l o r i d a

hours per week for ourselves. Schedule new hobby, read a book, or reconnect with loved ones. It isn’t important what

you do, only that you find the time to do it. Prioritize yourself and realize that

your free time is important. You should indulge because you matter!

Talk Positively to Ourselves: By this

time of the year, many of us have already received feedback from judges and lis-

tened to recordings of recent concerts. All

too often I find myself listening to a per-

formance recording and hearing only the flaws. It’s as if my ears allow all the good

to seep out and with laser focus hone in on the smallest mistakes. It is helpful to be honest with ourselves because that’s

how we improve. But music teachers are

our own worst critics. I challenge myself and all music educators to look for the good, take pride in our accomplishments,

Music Director

without allowing for negativity. You to remind yourself of this with all the positivity you can muster.

Stay Healthy: I’m one of those people

who loves coffee more than water, fried food more than salads, and binging on Netflix more than visiting the gym. I’m

writing today’s column after eating a delicious but very unhealthy meal that

is doing cartwheels in my stomach. I

have regrets! Although it’s hard, I try to make better choices because I feel better, have greater energy, and am

more efficient throughout the day. I’m

going to challenge myself this month

to be healthier, and I hope you will join me because staying healthy will keep us strong and teaching well.

Enjoy this lovely time of year. Stay safe and teach well!


FLORIDA VOCAL ASSOCIATION

Jeannine Stemmer, President

closed, as it tends to focus the other

senses when the eyes are removed from

the equation. While COVID-19 protocols may have restricted some of the commu-

nication sources we give and receive, I

F

ebruary 28, 2020, was a wonderful day! It was music performance assessment day, and we were able to showcase the vocal technique and sight-reading skills

we had been diligently working on all year. We were proud of our performance, and as the day ended, we looked forward to our next choral experience. This story may look a lot

have seen many instances where teach-

like your story, but some of

connected to one another due to these

out on your 2020 MPA.

ers and students become more closely shared struggles. Though we are all a bit

on edge, we also tend to be more aware of how others in our sphere of influence

you may have even missed

When we were sent home on lockdown, we dealt with the anxiety of the pandem-

are feeling. This gives me hope for the

ic and the heaviness of not

Additionally, the restrictive nature of

seniors more choral expe-

future.

the protocols for virtual participation has opened access to the world, providing

hope for innovations in how we con-

nect. Two years ago, I spoke with one of our district’s choir teachers about using

Skype (remember that?!) to connect her middle school choir with the composer

Jake Narverud, as her choir was perform-

ing one of his pieces. I happened to know Jake, so I helped facilitate this connection. It was technologically challenging to make this happen for all involved.

Fast forward to today and our teachers wouldn’t even bat an eye at the thought of digitally connecting with someone for

such an event. Our immediate personal

being able to give our 2020 riences. Many of us sat for

hours trying to figure out how to make a virtual choir

and how to connect with

these kids for the last time. Fast forward to spring 2021: I contacted the 2020 seniors

and invited them to perform at our outdoor concert for one last high school choral experience. There were many tears as they sang

“You Will Be Found” from

2020 graduates join 2021 FCS Choir for outdoor concert.

Dear Evan Hansen with the 2021 seniors and the rest of the FCS Choir. There was more genuine gratefulness for that one moment than any other.

I never realized that a huge part of my identity as a music educator is being able to

sphere is certainly stranger today than it

provide a musical experience for my students. In retrospect, so much of my identity

is the myriad skills we have all devel-

began. Today, with a grateful heart I am here to tell you that our community is ready

was two years ago, but one silver lining oped related to technology and connectivity. Another silver lining is the proce-

dures many teachers have put in place to assess students via their district learning platform.

While I’m sure we are all ready for

these mitigation protocols to become

as a music educator has been chipped away and under attack since the pandemic to pour into us and our students. The FMEA Professional Development Conference and All-State Concerts is back and in person. Our FVA districts have completed the

audition cycle, and we are as ready to give our students this musical experience as they are to receive it. FVA is also excited to welcome the following fabulous clinicians to work with our all-state students: Francisco Nuñez, Dr. Andrew Minear, Frank Bianchi, Elena Sharkova, Dr. Amanda Quist, and Jake Runestad.

FMEA also offers the Student Conference Experience and the Tri-M Conference

unnecessary, I am encouraged by the

Experience for high school students who are not participating in an all-state

administrators, and our amazing stu-

sessions led by experts in our field to help feed our minds and spirits. Benjamin

efforts of our artist-educators, supportive dents and their families to continue to be beacons of light. I now see the light at the end of the tunnel, and it’s not a train.

ensemble. FVA and FMEA will be hosting inspirational professional development Franklin said, “An investment in knowledge pays the best interest.” We may still

experience apprehension, and tomorrow will always be uncertain, but our souls need healing.

November 2021

27


28    F l o r i d a

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ComponentNews

FLORIDA NAfME COLLEGIATE

Mark A. Belfast, Jr., PhD, Advisor

How can we make it to the end of the semester? by DaLaine Chapman, PhD The answer to is .

how yes

« Catch up. The key to moving forward is to do just that … move forward.

Do one assignment. Just one. Then maybe one more, reigniting your productivity. Then, before you know it,

completing your work may not seem

« Continue. Do your best to maintain so daunting.

your work ethic even after you feel some of the stress melting away. As I said earlier, keep moving forward.

While these are not the only ways

I

to move successfully to the end of the n the early years of the FMEA Summer

field observations, projects, rehearsals,

guest clinician from the MacPhail Center

FTCE exams, and then finals. That’s a lot.

Institute, we were fortunate to have a

for Music in Minnesota. One day, he was offering the teachers techniques for solv-

ing seemingly impossible problems. A

particular “technique,” which was really

and yes. The answer? In order to solve any problem, one must have a vision for

success before a solution is found. Never

give up on working to find a solution. Of course there will be obstacles, but do

not yet worry about HOW you will do it,

just commit yourself to the YES of getting it accomplished. Easier said than done? Most definitely.

I recently asked my students to list all

of the assignments they had due between

midterm and the end of the semester.

The lists were, as you might imagine, very long. Students have everything from

state of Florida’s music education stu-

dents. I look forward to the day you all

first half of the semester.

become teachers, and I know that your

Before COVID-19, anxiety and stress

ly exacerbated the situation. In a large-

not make the connection between how

students at FAU are doing, but the entire

have outstanding assignments from the

As I sat among my colleagues, mutter-

see how it was a helpful solution. I could

so proud of the work that not just my

It is exponentially more difficult if you

already posed a challenge for college

ing that phrase to myself, I struggled to

if you are feeling overwhelmed. I am

concerts, and recitals to football games,

somewhat of a mantra, was “The answer to how is yes.”

semester, they are a solid place to begin

own students will be lucky to learn from you.

students. The pandemic has undoubted-

DaLaine Chapman, PhD,

scale study (n = 707), researchers found

is the coordinator of music

65.7% of college students reported feeling

education at Florida Atlantic

“overwhelming anxiety” during the pre-

University. She is a member

vious year (Hoyt, et al., 2021). Now that

of multiple state and nation-

you are back in school, did you bring that

al organizations and is an

feeling with you? Likely. But it does not

active clinician, presenting at conferences

have to last forever. When students fall

nationwide. Dr. Chapman holds bachelor’s

behind, it seems as though there is no

and master’s degrees from Florida State

hope of catching up and finishing. But

University and the PhD from The University

« Communication. Talking with your there is. Let’s call them the three C’s:

of Texas at Austin.

professors is often a great place to

Reference

start. You might be quite surprised to

Hoyt, L.T., Cohen, A.K., Dull, B., Castro, E.M., & Yazdani, N. (2021). “Constant stress has become the new normal”: Stress and anxiety inequalities among U.S. college students in the time of COVID-19. Journal of Adolescent Health, 68, 270-276. https://doi. org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2020.10.030

find how helpful they will be. Make sure to be as open about your struggles as you are comfortable being,

and be accountable for your missteps.

November 2021

29


ComponentNews

FLORIDA NAfME COLLEGIATE

Alexis Hobbs, President

Fall Conference: Community and Education by Allison Yopp

C

ollegiates enjoyed another success-

ful time of experiencing and learn-

ing through the many different avenues offered at the 2021 Fall Conference. After

being fully online last year, collegiates traveling from as far as Tallahassee gathered together on Southeastern University’s

Campus in Lakeland, Florida, to have some well-deserved community time, to learn more about their chosen profession from expert presenters, and to take advantage of one-on-one educational opportunities.

Starting the conference off with a great

speech was Dr. Jeffery Redding, who set

Crystal Lake Middle School presentation

the pace for the rest of the day. Our

from Florida, helping collegiates to refine

wide range of topics. Dr. Brandon Meeks

Something new and exciting this year

presenters offered their expertise on a

their interview skills.

spoke on conquering the fear of parents,

was a breakout session where attend-

ence specifically for students with special

to attend based on their preference in

Emma Lines introduced a new experi-

needs called “FigureNotes,” and Dr. Lori Gooding gave insights into what music

therapists can share with music educators. Attendees had a chance to sit in on

a live master class with a local band from Crystal Lake Middle School and were able

to meet with many music supervisors

ees chose which session they wanted music education. Ending the day strong was a first-year teaching panel where the presenters shed light into the crazy

world of music education as it is today.

Attendees left feeling fulfilled and excited for the FMEA Professional Development Conference in January.

Scott Feshanko’s elementary music session

Speaking for the Florida NAfME

Collegiate Executive Board, we cannot

thank everyone enough for their attendance and for their dedication to col-

legiate music education in Florida. We cannot wait for next year!

Allison Yopp is president-elect of Florida NAfME Collegiate. She is a junior at

Southeastern University where she plays trombone in many ensembles and serves as

the fundraising chair on the SEU NAfME Executive Board. Allison will graduate in spring 2023 and

plans to teach for a few years New teacher panel with Julian Grubb, Casey Mindermann, Kimberly Brunetto, and Briauna James

30    F l o r i d a

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before obtaining her master’s and doctoral degrees.


FLORIDA ORCHESTRA ASSOCIATION

Laurie Bitters, President

H

appy fall, everyone! I hope you have begun to feel a little relief

preparation for the holidays.

ship. These positions often

to check the deadlines for hotel rooms as

have

Who am I kidding? This is

a month when Americans give thanks,

2022 FMEA Professional Development

their

music educator. Thank you for striving

member individually, but I extend my

learning. Thank you for staying after

appreciation to them all. Also, thank

time to start teaching, but these teachers

are the future of our profession and we

should always let them know they are

Finally, I thank you, the reader and

ually makes the hard deci-

I want to thank those brand new teach-

This certainly hasn’t been the easiest

will see you all there!

sions in order to move FOA forward.

Our board is too large to name each

ers who ventured into the classroom.

well as conference registration. I hope I

challenges;

however, the board contin-

this month’s article will focus on showing my appreciation.

Conference. As a reminder, don’t forget

for our general member-

from the heat as we move toward

Florida! Since November is

hours arranging services

for more knowledge to improve student

school to help that student who needs a little individual attention. Thank you

you to all those who helped record and

for your support of FOA, FMEA, and

adjudicate the students who auditioned

our other music education organizations.

for all-state orchestras. It is exciting that

Wishing you all the best!

we will be able to meet in person at the

appreciated. On the other end of the

spectrum, my gratitude goes to our men-

FLORIDA ELEMENTARY MUSIC EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION

tor teachers. These teachers have served through many changes in the field of

Joani Slawson, President

education. These teachers serve as inspi-

ration to younger teachers. It is my hope

that even in the time of social distancing, we are reaching out to help each other.

I would also like to thank FOA

Executive Director Don Langland and the staff in the FMEA/FSMA office. Mr.

Langland continually works to make our association run more effectively. Thank you, Don, for representing our group in

such a professional way. The staff of our

parent organizations, FMEA/FSMA, also works day in and day out to move the arts

to the forefront of our state’s education process. They are advocates for us and the other arts organizations throughout

our state in the law- and rule-making processes. This staff produces month-

ly publications, like the Florida Music Director magazine. They also help keep

us organized technically and financially. On behalf of FOA, thank you to Kathy Sanz, Valerie Terry, Shelby Chipman, Val

Anderson, and the rest of the staff in Tallahassee.

FOA runs on volunteer people power.

Our district chairpersons and members of the Executive Board spend countless

T

his time of year, we are all busily preparing for performances. Even though

these unprecedented times may have changed how we spread holiday cheer,

I know many of you have created ways to share music with the community. It can also be stressful and overwhelming with all we have on our plates. Research is showing more and more that one way to cope with stress is to be thankful.

According to Harvard Medical School, “With gratitude, people acknowledge

the goodness in their lives. In the process, people usually recognize that the

source of that goodness lies at least partially outside themselves. As a result, Continued on page 35

November 2021

31


FLORIDA MUSIC EDUCATION ASSOCIATION 2021-2022 DONORS

Thank you to all of the donors who have shown their dedication to the improvement of music education in Florida by supporting our Mission through financial contributions.

Our donors support specific causes by donating to the FMEA funds of their choice: FMEA Scholarship Fund Music Education Advocacy General Fund

June M. Hinckley Scholarship Professional Development for Members Mel & Sally Schiff Music Education Relief Fund

The following have graciously donated to FMEA from April 1, 2021, through October 11, 2021. MAESTRO’S CIRCLE $10,000 and up

No current donors at this time.

ARTIST’S CIRCLE $1,000 – $9,999

Russell Robinson Artie Almeida In Honor of June Audrey Grace & Katie Grace Miller

SUSTAINERS $100 – $999 Carlos Abril In Honor of Dr. Patricia Flowers Andre Arrouet Lucinda Balistreri In Memory of June Hinckley Katarzyna (Kasia) Bugaj Dale Choate In Memory of Linda Mann Alice-Ann Darrow In Dedication to Mr. & Mrs. O. B. Darrow Virginia Densmore In Memory of Dr. James Croft Anna Marie Friars In Honor of Dr. Andre Thomas Stanley Hoch Dennis Holt Marsha Juday Steven Kelly Carlton Kilpatrick In Honor of Cynthia Berry Sheila King In Memory of John W. King Martin Kivell In Memory of Mel Schiff Jason Locker In Memory of June M. Hinckley Robert McCormick Carolyn Minear John Nista Mary Palmer

32    F l o r i d a

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Douglas Phillips In Memory of Dr. Bobby L. Adams & Mr. Lawrence W. Phillips, Jr. David Pletincks In Honor of Alexis & Jonathan Pletincks Jeanne Reynolds In Honor of Pinellas County Performing Arts Teachers Janice Roberts In Memory of Mel Schiff Mary Catherine Salo In Memory of Gary Rivenbark & Wes Rainer Kathleen Sanz In Memory of June M. Hinckley J. Mark Scott In Honor of Dr. Andre Thomas & Dr. Judy Bowers D. Gregory Springer Jeannine Stemmer In Memory of Barbara Kingman & Lauren Alonso Ira Strachman In Memory of Mel & Sally Schiff Richard Uhler Howard Weinstein In Memory of Barry Weinstein David Williams William Zoch In Memory of Mel Schiff Anonymous (2) In Dedication to Steve & Mary Catherine Salo In Memory of Mel & Sally Schiff


PATRONS $25 – $99 Sharon Adams In Memory of Rosemary Collins Ann Adams-Valle In Memory of Bobby L. Adams Sandra Adorno Michael Antmann David Bayardelle In Honor of Harry Spyker Mark Belfast In Memory of Dr. Mark A. Belfast, Sr. Richard Bradford In Memory of William & Helen Bradford Gordon Brock Dana Burt In Honor of Kathy Sanz Alexander Busby Greg Carswell Shelby Chipman Zachary Chowning Dayna Cole In Memory of Linda Mann Catherine Dalzell Matthew Davis In Memory of Robert Morrison Nicholas DeCarbo Dennis Demaree Virginia Dickert In Memory of Lindsay Keller & Debbie Liles

Abbey Duncan Christopher Dunn Kathryn Eaton Judith Evans Bradley Franks In Memory of Gary W. Rivenbark Elizabeth Frogel In Memory of one of my favorite uncles and his lifetime dedication to music and education Suzanne Gagliardini Olivia Green Llewellyn Humphrey Jon Hutchinson Michael Johnson Mary Keyloun Cruz In Memory of Laurice Keyloun Ginger Lerner-Wren In Memory of Mel & Sally Schiff Allie Levine In Memory of Uncle Mel Joseph Luechauer Claudia Lusararian In Honor of Sue Byo-Passell Jeneve Medford Jarvis Kim Miles Katie Grace Miller In Honor of Artie Almeida

Ree Nathan In Dedication to Rosemary Caldwell Collins Galen Peters Edward Prasse In Honor of Nancy Marsters Melissa Rawls On Behalf of Nancy Bartels Kristian Reid-Drummond C. William Renfroe In Memory of James O. Johnston Diana Rollo John Sinclair Harry Spyker In Honor of Fred & Marleen Miller Eddie Steadman In Memory of Janie Walker Valerie Terry Mark Thielen Alex Toussaint John Watkins Brad Wharton Billy B. Williamson

Rose Grace Walter Halil Angela Hartvigsen Ciara Hill Sarah Hoover Calvin Jasper Jason Jerald Jennifer Jimenez In Memory of Linda Mann Ronald Jules Kathleen Kerstetter Kevin Lusk Deborah Mar In Memory of Rosemary Collins Mackenzie Meiers

Lorri Naylor Kristy Pagan Edgar Rubio Ian Schwindt Mark Stevens Christian Torres Michelle Tredway Max Vitagliano Songra Wenninger Collins Richard Yaklich

Anonymous (3)

FRIENDS

up to $24 Carmen Aquino Judy Arthur In Memory of Ray Kickliter Crystal Berner In Memory of Rosemary Collins Joseph Callaway Ernesta Chicklowski Christopher Creswell Richard Dasher Liza Dean Marc Decker Beth Ann Delmar Tina Gill In Memory of Gary Rivenbark Lise Gilly

Anonymous (8)

DONATE TODAY FOR A STRONGER TOMORROW. With your support, FMEA will continue to grow its programs for teachers and students, strengthen united advocacy efforts, and improve your professional development opportunities. Visit FMEA.org to learn more information about each fund and to make a donation.

November 2021

33


ResearchPuzzles FOR MUSIC TEACHERS

William I. Bauer, PhD FMEA Research Committee Chairman, University of Florida

Code-Switching Musicians

O

ver the years, researchers and educators have noted the

The purpose of their study was to “… examine the experi-

that are part of school curricula and the musics that exist

skill and comfort in switching between formal ensembles

disconnect that may exist between the types of music

in society at large. To engage with the varied musical styles,

genres, and performance contexts in the world, a diverse set

of knowledge and skills is necessary. Traditionally, school

ences and perceptions of musicians who have demonstrated in a School of Music, and less formal ensembles in multiple genres, outside the university setting” (p. 4).

music programs have prioritized certain forms of musician-

Participants and Methodology

may be essential to performing certain types of music. As

males, four females) ranging in age from 18 to 28, who also

ship (e.g., note reading) over others (e.g., playing by ear) that music teachers, how do we help students develop a broad, flexible musicianship that will allow them the opportunity to

be active musical participants throughout their lives in varied

musical contexts that exist on a continuum from formal (very

structured and planned) to informal (little structure and more spontaneous)?

Code-switching is a theory that has been used by lin-

guists to examine the ways in which some people are able

to move back and forth between (a) dialects (e.g., a formal

way of speaking, such as that used in school, and the type of conversation among friends that might involve slang) or (b) two or more languages. Music educators Dan Isbell and Ann Marie Stanley (2018) wondered if this theory could be used

Isbell and Stanley recruited 11 college music majors (seven

were active performers in ensembles outside of school, to participate in their study. All the participants played more

than one instrument, and six identified as composers. They each took part in a one-hour guided interview with one of the researchers. The researchers also attended participants’ performances inside and outside of school, talking with them

informally in these settings. Finally, participants completed a

questionnaire to gather demographic information and details

about their prior musical experiences. All data was analyzed qualitatively (coding and developing concept maps), with descriptive statistics used to examine quantitative portions of the questionnaire.

to better understand musicians who can easily adapt to and

Findings

code-switchers. Isbell and Stanley believed it was important

their data analysis. The participants:

switch between disparate musical styles and genres—musical to understand “people adept at navigating multiple ways of

making music, who inhabit multiple formal and informal musical worlds and who can switch gears depending on, where, what, and with whom they are performing” (p. 3).

34    F l o r i d a

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The authors described several broad themes, derived from 1. had all experienced a stimulating, supportive home musical environment as they were growing up;

2. reported learning about music in multiple ways and in varied venues, including (a) lessons outside of school,


This on-going column seeks to stimulate awareness of research issues for FMEA teachers and researchers.

ComponentNews FLORIDA ELEMENTARY MUSIC EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION

Continued from page 31

being grateful also helps people connect to something larger than themselves as individuals—whether to other people, nature, or a higher power” (Harvard Medical (b) copying recordings, (c) family members, (d) classroom general music, and (e) bands outside of school;

3. performed frequently in varied settings throughout their

communities, including “clubs, bars, restaurants, base-

ments, stores, open mic nights, family gatherings, and concert halls” (p. 11);

4. often felt they had to hide their non-school musical activ-

ities as they perceived there was a hierarchy where “real

music” (school music) was better than other types of music; and

5. seemed to also have social code-switching skills, the abil-

ity to adapt to the conventions of performing with others in varied settings that utilize disparate styles and genres of music.

Implications

The researchers noted that the ability to code-switch as a

musician is not recognized in most collegiate audition processes, where a high level of technical performance skill

necessary to perform notated Western art music is prioritized. Colleges and universities may want to reflect on ways

in which additional musical skills such as those embodied

by these code-switching musicians could be considered in admissions decisions. In addition, to help students develop

the knowledge and skills to be able to acquire the type of “flexible musicianship” (p. 14) that these code-switching

musicians exemplified, music teachers can facilitate students’ (a) aural skills, which participants highly valued, including

the ability to learn and perform music by ear; (b) ability to improvise; (c) understanding of varied musical styles through focused music listening and by affording them the experience

of playing varied genres and styles of music; and (d) opportunities for a range of formal and informal music-making expe-

riences, including providing time for student-led musicking in small collaborative ensembles. Reference Isbell, D. S., & Stanley, A. M. (2018). Code-switching musicians: An exploratory study. Music Education Research, 20(2), 145-162. https://doi.org/10.1080/14613808.2016.1238061

Email your questions and feedback to wbauer@ufl.edu with a subject heading Research Puzzles.

School, 2021).

So, as we go into this holiday season, here are some of the things I am grateful for:

I am grateful for my family. I have wonderful parents who always let me sing and practice around the house when I was young and never told me to stop (except at

the dinner table). My husband is also a musician, and

we enjoy sharing the creative process. We share musical ideas for compositions and bounce ideas off each other.

We also enjoy watching old movies and baseball games together. I have two brothers and two sisters, lots of nieces and nephews, and two great-nieces. I am grateful for the fun we have together.

I am grateful for all my teacher friends who are there

for me whenever I need them. My teacher besties are there to cheer me up, share a joke with me, or be a shoul-

der to cry on. I couldn’t do my job without their love and support.

I am grateful for my students. I love to watch them

grow as musicians. They make me laugh and smile, and

they teach me about the world. Even though days can be

long and the workload overwhelming, when I hear students singing songs they learned at recess, receive thank

you letters from former students, or see them succeed on a challenging part, I know I am in the right profession.

I am grateful for the FEMEA Board of Directors. I am

constantly amazed at the dedication of this board. On

top of a regular teaching job, they strive to help teachers and students around the state of Florida. No task is ever

too big or too small. I am so inspired by these passionate, hardworking, and selfless individuals.

I am grateful for you! Elementary music teachers are

some of the hardest working people I know. You give of yourselves every day to share the world of music with your students. You teach the entire school, and you get to know all your students. Your share your ideas with

others, and you lend a hand to those in need. I wish you all the happiest of holiday seasons! Reference Harvard Medical School. (2021, August 14). Giving thanks can make you happier. Retrieved from Harvard Health Publishing, https://www.health.harvard.edu/healthbeat/giving-thankscan-make-you-happier

November 2021

35


CommitteeReports

AWARDS COMMITTEE Sondra A. W. Collins Chairwoman

Y

our FMEA Awards Program has

truly been the light of FMEA in

this month of gratitude. Remember that

these awards shine a true light on music education to decision and policy makers throughout our state. And that light will show that through a pandemic, music education is still strong and still alive.

Whether you are new to FMEA or a

longtime member, please know that the light of FMEA, the FMEA Awards Program, is an integral part of our organization

and

our

and the community. FMEA

annual conference, con-

necting all areas of the

as administrators, district leaders,

school board members, music industry

leaders, NAfME and FMEA leadership,

mony also plays a pivotal role for music

brate individuals who have made

way to showcase amazing music edu-

during the conference to cele-

FMEA membership, as well

outstanding contributions to music

education—who have been brave enough

Be An @ ! r o t i b i h x E RESERVE YOUR SPOT TODAY! https://fmea.org/conference/exhibitor-information

Contact Us: (850) 878-6844 Toll-Free 1-800-301-FMEA exhibits@FMEA.org

36    F l o r i d a

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to see and be the light. The awards cere-

takes a special moment

advocacy for all who attend. It’s a great cation models and to advocate to others

about all the exemplary music education


EMERGING LEADERS COMMITTEE

Mary Palmer, EdD, Chairwoman programs and partners we have throughout the state.

Your FMEA Awards Committee has

selected some simply outstanding light within the major categories of the FMEA

awards. It was so heartwarming to read

the applications and the testimonies about those out there providing a quality music

W

hen we empower each other, we multiply the good we can do in music

education. Music teachers are among the most passionate people on the

planet! Each of us plays a role in ensuring the future of music education in our

schools and communities. Now is the time to talk with decision makers such as school principals, school board members, and legislators who represent you.

Check out the FMEA Government Relation’s action items and take action! Tell your story and advocate for music education.

I am looking forward to seeing all of you in per-

education for all, in all schools, even in the

son at the 2022 FMEA Professional Development

I want to take this opportunity to thank

… with some GREAT new opportunities for student

midst of a pandemic.

everyone who took the time to submit a

nomination packet for the 2022 FMEA Awards Program. It was obvious that the nominators put much time and effort

into the application process. We received applications representing all areas of the state, from large districts to small rural

districts. The selection committee was impressed by seeing evidence of quality

Conference. There is truly something for everyone engagement! FMEA Emerging Leaders will continue

with our very popular “Coffee Talk” with FMEA, NAfME, and other national leaders. This is such an

amazing opportunity to interact with the incredible leaders who serve music education in Florida and across the county. Our fast-paced, multifaceted Pecha Kucha presentation of teaching ideas from 10 FMEA Emerging Leaders will

be included in the conference program. I can’t wait! Everyone is invit-

music education happening in a variety

ed to join us for these opportunities

thanks for your participation in the pro-

Elementary teachers (and any-

of demographic settings. So, nominators,

… and we will be excited to see you!

cess this year, and if your nominee wasn’t

one else!), please consider shar-

next year. We certainly have many worthy

Orchestra’s 2021 Virtual Young

selected, please consider resubmitting for individuals we would love to celebrate.

I also want to seize the opportunity

to thank the dedicated members of the

FMEA Awards Committee, who had the daunting job of selecting just one nominee from each category. Trust me when I say it

was no small job. The committee gave due diligence in reviewing each and every

list of achievement and letter of support

presented in each nomination packet, ultimately making the tough decision of selecting just one awardee.

ing the Orlando Philharmonic

People’s Concert: Scaling the Musical

Eras One Tune at a Time. This is an adventure story with Millie Second—inven-

tor and music time traveler extraordinaire in her Chord

Explorer—as the lead character! Designed for children in grades 3 to 5, a well-constructed Teachers’ Guide to the music (created with the assistance of several past

FMEA Emerging Leaders!) provides specifics for in-class

lessons. This year’s professionally produced virtual program (a 15-camera shoot!) will be available for online

viewing worldwide on November 15 and other times by arrangement.

Here are some program highlights: Millie Second teleports us to the 1848 Gold

Soon you will have the opportuni-

Rush in the Wild West (Aaron Copland: Hoe-Down from Rodeo) to the French

awardees. I know you will be just as

Jurassic Park, Outer Space with music from Gustav Holst’s “The Planets,” and

ty to read about all of the 2022 FMEA inspired by them as we are. Until then,

I look forward to celebrating with YOU

and all the 2022 FMEA award recipients at our FMEA Professional Development Conference in January!

Revolution, the Renaissance period with soprano solo from Verdi’s La Traviata,

more. Please let me know if you are interested (mpalmerassoc@aol.com) and I’ll provide further information.

You matter and your students need you. Your impact on lives is lifelong … you

affect and change lives every day. Together, let’s make it happen!

November 2021

37


ExecutiveDirector’sNotes

FMEA Executive Director Kathleen D. Sanz, PhD

Getting Ready for Session and Conference Advocacy/Legislation

Senate and House committees are meeting and bills are being filed! The mission

SB 318 Florida Seal of Fine Arts Program: This bill establishes the Florida Seal of Fine Arts with-

Music Education

of Fine Arts for graduating seniors. We are excited about this bill to recognize fine arts students

of the Florida

Association is to promote quality,

comprehensive music education in all

Florida schools.

in the Department of Education, specifying eligibility requirements for the awarding of a Seal who meet the criteria. We will continue to keep you updated on the movement of this bill.

Please be sure to follow the FMEA website for legislative updates throughout the 2022 session,

scheduled to begin on January 11 and end on March 11. 2022 Professional Development Conference

Unity in Music Education: Building Communities One Note at a Time

We are looking forward to our face-to-face Professional Development Conference, January 12-15, 2022. Please be sure to read important information on the FMEA website and in this magazine on policies related to the conference, including those for registration, all-state tickets, student conduct, etc.

FMEA plans to follow CDC guidelines for participation in the all-state rehearsals, concerts, profes-

sional development sessions, and other conference events. We will continue to update information, as it is received, on the website.

We are very excited about the many opportunities that will be afforded to Florida students during

the conference. In particular, the Student Leadership Session with Dr. Tim Lautzenheiser, scheduled

for Wednesday, January 12, 2022, will be a fantastic opportunity for high school students to learn valuable leadership skills.

« November 13, 2021 – Hotel room cancellation deadline. « November 15, 2021 – The hotels will charge credit/debit cards for the first night. « December 12, 2021 – Preregistration closes at midnight. Payment must be postmarked on

In addition, please review all of the deadlines for the 2022 Professional Development Conference:

or before December 4, 2021, if you are paying by check. After the deadline the registration

« December 17, 2021 – Final deadline for discounted hotel rooms. Unsold rooms in the fee will be the same as for on-site registration.

FMEA room block will be released back to the hotel. Hotel rooms that are cancelled will be available until this date. Please book your rooms in the contracted hotels.

For additional information, visit the FMEA website and click on “Conference.” See you in Tampa in January!

Kathleen D. Sanz, PhD

38


F LO R I DA M U S I C E D U C AT I O N A SSO C I AT I O N

Officers and Directors

EXECUTIVE BOARD President

Shelby Chipman, PhD

Florida A&M University, Department of Music Foster-Tanner Music Bldg., Room 318 Tallahassee, FL 32307; (850) 599-8165 shelby.chipman@famu.edu Past President

Steven N. Kelly, PhD

Florida State University; College of Music, KMU 330 Tallahassee, FL 32306 (850) 644-4069; skelly@admin.fsu.edu President-Elect

Jason Locker

Orange County Public Schools 445 W. Amelia St.; Orlando, FL 32801 (407) 317-3200; jasonlocker@fmea.org FBA President

Ian Schwindt

Titusville High School 150 Terrier Trail S.; Titusville, FL 32780-4735 (321) 264-3108; schwindt.ian@brevardschools.org FCMEA President

Marc Decker, DMA

Florida Atlantic University 777 Glades Rd.; Boca Raton, FL 33431 (561) 297-3883; deckerm@fau.edu FEMEA President

Joani Slawson

Holy Trinity Episcopal Academy 1720 Peachtree St.; Melbourne, FL 32901 joanislawson@gmail.com Florida NAfME Collegiate President

Alexis Hobbs

Southeastern University (352) 220-2791; aphobbs@seu.edu Florida NAfME Collegiate Advisor

Mark A. Belfast, Jr., PhD

Southeastern University 1000 Longfellow Blvd.; Lakeland, FL 33801 (863) 667-5104; mabelfast@seu.edu FMSA President

Lindsey Williams, PhD

Seminole County Public Schools (407) 320-0434; willialz2@scps.k12.fl.us FOA President

Laurie Bitters

Winter Park High School 2100 Summerfield Rd.; Winter Park, FL 32792 (407) 622-3200; laurie.bitters@gmail.com

EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS

FLORIDA COLLEGE MUSIC EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION

Historian/Parliamentarian & Executive Director....................................................Kathleen D. Sanz, PhD Hinckley Center for Fine Arts Education 402 Office Plaza Dr.; Tallahassee, FL 32301-2757 (850) 878-6844; Fax: (850) 942-1793; kdsanz@fmea.org

President......................................................................... Marc Decker, DMA Florida Atlantic University; 777 Glades Rd.; Boca Raton, FL 33431 deckerm@fau.edu

Editor-in-Chief.....................................................D. Gregory Springer, PhD FSU College of Music; 122 N. Copeland St.; Tallahassee, FL 32306 (850) 644-2925; dgspringer@fsu.edu

President...................................................................................Alexis Hobbs Southeastern University; (352) 220-2791; aphobbs@seu.edu

President.................................................................................Joani Slawson Holy Trinity Episcopal Academy; 1720 Peachtree St.; Melbourne, FL 32901 joanislawson@gmail.com

Budget/Finance, Development................................ Shelby Chipman, PhD Florida A&M University, Department of Music, Foster-Tanner Music Bldg., Room 318 Tallahassee, FL 32307; (850) 599-8165; shelby.chipman@famu.edu

Past President............................................................ Ernesta Chicklowski Roosevelt Elementary School; 3205 S. Ferdinand Ave.; Tampa, FL 33629 (813) 272-3090; ernesta.chicklowski@sdhc.k12.fl.us

Committee Council...........................................................Bernie Hendricks Ocoee High School; bernard.hendricks@ocps.net

Executive Director............................................................. Jennifer Sullivan 1750 Common Way Rd., Orlando, FL 32814 (321) 624-5433; slljenn@aol.com

Conference Planning Committee.............................John K. Southall, PhD Indian River State College; 3209 Virginia Ave.; Fort Pierce, FL 34981 (772) 462-7810; johnsouthall@me.com

FLORIDA MUSIC SUPERVISION ASSOCIATION President...................................................................Lindsey Williams, PhD Seminole County Public Schools (407) 320-0434; willialz2@scps.k12.fl.us

Contemporary Media................................................... David Williams, PhD University of South Florida; 4202 E. Fowler Ave., MUS 101 Tampa, FL 33620; (813) 974-9166; davidw@usf.edu

Past President............................................................Harry “Skip” Pardee pardeh@collierschools.com

Emerging Leaders............................................................ Mary Palmer, EdD 11410 Swift Water Cir.; Orlando, FL 32817 (407) 382-1661; mpalmerassoc@aol.com

Treasurer......................................................................................... Ted Hope Hillsborough County Public Schools, School Administration Center 901 E. Kennedy Blvd.; Tampa, FL 33602 (813) 272-4861; ted.hope@sdhc.k12.fl.us

FMEA Corporate & Academic Partners.....................................Fred Schiff All County Music; 8136 N. University Dr.; Tamarac, FL 33321-1708 (954) 722-3424; fred@allcountymusic.com

FLORIDA ORCHESTRA ASSOCIATION

Government Relations..................................................Jeanne W. Reynolds jeannewrey@gmail.com

President.................................................................................Laurie Bitters Winter Park High School; 2100 Summerfield Rd.; Winter Park, FL 32792 (407) 622-3200; laurie.bitters@gmail.com

Health & Wellness........................................................ Revae Douglas Ross Brandon High School; 1101 Victoria St.; Brandon, FL 33510 (813) 744-8120, ext. 311; revae.douglas@hcps.net

Past President.......................................................................Matthew Davis Harrison School for the Arts; 750 Hollingsworth Rd.; Lakeland, FL 33801 (863) 499-2855; matthew.lawson.davis@gmail.com

Multicultural Network...........................................................Bruce J. Green (407) 927-3141; bruce.green@ocps.net Professional Development........................................................Scott Evans Orange County Public Schools; 445 S. Amelia St.; Orlando, FL 32801 (407) 317-3200; scott.evans@ocps.net

Executive Director............................................................. Donald Langland 220 Parsons Woods Dr.; Seffner, FL 33594 (813) 502-5233; Fax: (813) 502-6832; exdirfoa@yahoo.com

Reclamation......................................................................... William Reaney Buffalo Creek Middle School; 7320 69 St. E.; Palmetto, FL 34221 (239) 826-8077; reaneyw@manateeschools.net

FLORIDA VOCAL ASSOCIATION President........................................................................ Jeannine Stemmer Florida Christian School, 4200 SW 89th Ave.; Miami, FL 33165 j9stemmer@floridachristian.org

Research......................................................................William I. Bauer, PhD University of Florida; wbauer@ufl.edu

Past President......................................................................... Jason Locker jason@fva.net

Secondary General Music.............................................................Ed Prasse Leon High School; 550 E. Tennessee St.; Tallahassee, FL 32308 (850) 617-5700; prassee@leonschools.net

Executive Director.....................................................................Michael Dye 231 S. Bayshore Dr.; Valparaiso, FL 32580 (850) 217-7419; mike@fva.net

Student Development.............................................. Michael Antmann, EdD Freedom High School; 2500 W. Taft-Vineland Rd.; Orlando, FL 32837 (407) 816-5600; michael.antmann@ocps.net

Business Manager..................................................................Jo Hagan, CPA 8975 San Rae Rd.; Jacksonville, FL 32257 (904) 379-2245; Fax: (904) 379-2260; business@fva.net

Social Justice & Diverse Learners..................................Bernie Hendricks Ocoee High School; bernard.hendricks@ocps.net

CENTER FOR FINE ARTS EDUCATION

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE

402 Office Plaza Dr.; Tallahassee, FL 32301-2757 (850) 878-6844; Fax: (850) 942-1793

Exhibits Manager fmeaexhibits@fmea.org

President..................................... Kathleen D. Sanz, PhD (kdsanz@fmea.org)

Local Chairman Ted Hope—(813) 272-4861; ted.hope@sdhc.k12.fl.us

Director of Operations........................Valeria Anderson, IOM (val@fmea.org) Technology Director......................................Josh Bula, PhD (josh@fmea.org)

FLORIDA BANDMASTERS ASSOCIATION

Past President..................................................................... Cathi Leibinger Ransom Everglades School; 2045 Bayshore Dr.; Miami, FL 33133 (305) 250-6868; pastpresident@fba.flmusiced.org

Miami Northwestern Senior High School cnorton@dadeschools.net

FLORIDA ELEMENTARY MUSIC EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION

Awards............................................................................Sondra A. W. Collins sondra.collins@marion.k12.fl.us

Florida Christian School 4200 SW 89th Ave.; Miami, FL 33165 j9stemmer@floridachristian.org

Chad Norton

Past President...........................................................................Julian Grubb Florida Gulf Coast University, grubb.julians@outlook.com

FMEA COMMITTEE CHAIRPERSONS

FVA President

Member-at-Large

Florida NAfME Collegiate

FSMA President ........................................................................Valerie Terry vterrymusic@gmail.com

President...................................................................................Ian Schwindt Titusville High School; 150 Terrier Trail S.; Titusville, FL 32780-4735 (321) 264-3108; schwindt.ian@brevardschools.org

Jeannine Stemmer

Public Affairs & Communications Coordinator..................................... Jenny Abdelnour, CAE (jenny@fmea.org) Marketing & Membership Coordinator................................. Jasmine Van Weelden (jasmine@fmea.org) Business Manager..................................Carolyn Gentry (carolyn@fmea.org)

AFFILIATIONS

Executive Director......................................................................Neil Jenkins Florida Bandmasters Association P.O. Box 840135; Pembroke Pines, FL 33084 (954) 432-4111; Fax: (954) 432-4909; exec@fba.flmusiced.org Business Manager..................................................................Jo Hagan, CPA 8975 San Rae Rd.; Jacksonville, FL 32257 (904) 379-2245; Fax: (904) 379-2260; jo@barefootaccounting.com

November 2021

39


Florida State University

COLLEGE OF MUSIC

2022 AUDITION DATES

January 29 | February 12 | February 26

Application Deadlines

Additional dates available by appointment.

Freshman Priority Deadline: November 1 Freshman & Transfer Final Deadline: February 1 Graduate Student Priority Deadline: December 1

Graduate Piano Accompanying and Opera Coaching Auditions: January 21 & February 18

FINAL DEADLINES MAY VARY BY PROGRAM SEE APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS ONLINE

Florida State University F l o r i d a College M u s i c of D i Music r e c t o r| musicadmissions@fsu.edu | music.fsu.edu 40

@musicFSU