Page 1

CEL

AT EBR

ING

PRELUDE to the 2020 CONFERENCE

NAfME All-National Honor Ensembles FBA Roll of Distinction and Hall of Fame Concerts

Success Through Solfège November 2019

1


YOUR MUSIC IS OUR MUSIC

MUSIC fau.edu/music 561-297-3820

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Executive Director Florida Music Education Association Kathleen D. Sanz, PhD

Hinckley Center for Fine Arts Education

402 Office Plaza Tallahassee, FL 32301 (850) 878-6844 or (800) 301-3632 (kdsanz@fmea.org)

Editor-in-Chief

D. Gregory Springer, PhD Florida State University College of Music 122 N. Copeland Street Tallahassee, FL 32306 (850) 644-2925 (office) (dgspringer@fsu.edu)

Editorial Committee Terice Allen (850) 245-8700, Tallahassee (tallen1962@hotmail.com) Judy Arthur, PhD Florida State University, KMU 222 (850) 644-3005 (jrarthur@fsu.edu) William Bauer, PhD University of Florida, Gainesville (352) 273-3182; (wbauer@ufl.edu) Alice-Ann Darrow, PhD College of Music, FSU, Tallahassee (850) 645-1438; (aadarrow@fsu.edu) Jeanne Reynolds Pinellas County Schools, Largo (727) 588-6055; (reynoldsj@pcsb.org) John K. Southall, PhD Indian River State College, Fort Pierce (772) 462-7810; (johnsouthall@fmea.org)

Advertising Sales Valeria Anderson (val@fmea.org)

Director of Finance and Client Relations

Richard Brown , MBA, CAE, CMP (richard@fmea.org) 402 Office Plaza, Tallahassee, FL 32301 (850) 878-6844

Official FMEA and FMD Photographers

Bob O’Lary

Debby Stubing

Art Director & Production Manager

Lori Danello Roberts, LDR Design Inc. (lori@flmusiced.org)

Contents November 2019

Volume 73

Number 4

NAfME All-National Honor Ensembles. . . . . 12-13 Success Through Solfège . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 FBA Roll of Distinction and Hall of Fame Concerts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-19 Prelude to the 2020 Professional Development Conference How do I get to the conference? / 20

Student Leadership Workshop / 25

Registration Information and Fees / 21

All-State Rehearsals / 26

Policies / 22-23 Contracted Hotels / 24

New Security Procedures / 28 Important Dates / 29

D E PA R T M E N T S

Circulation & Copy Manager

Share Your Success. . . . . . . . . . 4

Research Puzzles. . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Copy Editor

President’s Message. . . . . . . . . . 5

Component News.. . . . . . . . . . . 33

Advocacy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Committee Reports. . . . . . . . . . 40

Academic Partners. . . . . . . . . . . 8

Executive Director’s Notes. . . . . . 45

Corporate Partners. . . . . . . . . 10-11

Advertiser Index. . . . . . . . . . . . 46

2019-20 FMEA Donors. . . . . . 30-31

Officers and Directors.. . . . . . . . 47

Valeria Anderson, (800) 301-3632 Susan Trainor

November 2019

3


ShareYourSuccess

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President’sMessage

Success With a Sense of Purpose

Steven N. Kelly, PhD

A

t the recent FMEA Board of Directors’ meeting, I asked the members to consider how they will define our success. I also asked how they might ignite a sense of purpose among the FMEA

membership. The conversations that followed were inspiring, and help set the future direction of

President Florida Music Education Association

FMEA. We revised the organization’s Strategic Plan, discussed ways to address the Florida music

teacher shortage, talked about why individuals should want to teach in Florida, made plans to contact state legislators, considered possible future concerns, and discussed ways to get high school stu-

dents interested in teaching music, as well as how our future is so bright because of the commitment from our current collegiate preservice teachers. We discussed inclusive classrooms, current trends in music offerings, and issues dealing with social justice in the music classroom. We even discussed

how FMEA could alter how members get hotel rooms for the annual conference! Yes, we really had this discussion!

Throughout these conversations, I was overwhelmed by the knowledge, passion, and profession-

alism of our board members. They told stories of how teachers across our state are doing so much

and how their students are performing at incredible levels, often despite many challenges. It was inspiring! The capacity of the FMEA membership and the bar for success are limitless.

I suggest that success is defined by the accomplishments of our students. As professional music

educators, we might ignite a sense of purpose by creating opportunities for our students to be

successful. Opportunities come in all sizes and are unique to each student. Helping students reach their individual capacities to their fullest is perhaps the greatest goal for all educators. The FMEA board is there to help you create successful opportunities for your students. I reminded the board

that everyone has the capacity for good, that no one is perfect, that evil and meanness cannot be tolerated, and that laughter is good for your health. In your work with students, perhaps these ideas will help you create success and purpose.

So, as we prepare to enter another busy phase of the school year, how will you define success and

ignite a sense of purpose? How can the FMEA Board of Directors and staff help you achieve your goals? I tell my teachers-to-be that teaching is a profession in which no single individual has all the

answers. It does indeed take a village. I challenge each of us always to put our students first, and to work together to create success with a sense of purpose.

I hope you are making plans to join me at the FMEA conference in January at the Tampa

Convention Center. This event promises to be the largest in our history. There will be something

for everyone, from teaching techniques to issues in teacher wellness to performances by some of the finest ensembles in our state at every level. There will be more about our conference in the next issue of the FMD.

Thank you for all you do and for supporting the Florida Music Education Association. Please

know that if I can ever be of assistance, I hope you will contact me.

Steven N. Kelly, PhD President

Florida Music Education Association

November 2019

5


AdvocacyReport

Jeanne W. Reynolds

Florida Seal of Fine Arts Legislation

G

etting legislation passed is a much heavier lift than killing detrimental legislation. How an idea becomes a bill, and

then how that bill becomes a law, is quite a lengthy and complex

process. Typically, it takes years to get a bill written, sponsored,

championed, and passed. FMEA is starting on this multiyear process. We know music education is good for students, and we

Chairwoman Government Relations Committee

1. The Florida Seal of Fine Arts for high school graduates will be established to recognize each high school graduate who has attained a high level of fine arts course work.

2. The purpose of the Florida Seal of Fine Arts is to encourage students to develop high level skills in performing and/or visual arts.

have the cohort data to suggest that the longer students engage

3. The Seal of Fine Arts shall be awarded to a high school stu-

A colleague recently told me that one of the principals in

meets the requirements established by the State Board of

in the arts the better.

her district called her last year and shared his frustration that although he had a great arts program at the school, he got nothing for it—meaning it didn’t count toward the school grade. The

value of arts education is well-known and well documented. Despite this, it can still be a challenge to advocate for strong

music programs in this age of accountability. Principals under-

standably are looking for points to boost their school grade. Now, even principals are feeling the frustration of a lack of rec-

ognition for music programs when they can see clearly that our programs are good for their students. It’s time for us to address this issue legislatively.

The Government Relations Committee has drafted some

dent who earns a standard high school diploma and who Education. In establishing the criteria for awarding the Seal

of Fine Arts, the state board shall include all of the following: a. Completion of three (3) year-long or the equivalent of 3 credits of sequential courses in dance, music, theatre, and/or visual arts with a “B” or higher. b. Completion of an additional full credit is required in the same or a different art form and two fine arts related co-curricular activities. c. Students must share their talent and industry knowledge by providing at least 20 hours of arts related community service and presenting a capstone presentation on their experiences.

There is also draft language in this bill to address school

language creating a Florida Seal of Fine Arts for high school

grade. Legislation is always a work in progress, and we are at

program of study in the arts and complete additional require-

to stay informed and to be ready to help when asked. Getting

graduates. Students who successfully complete a sequential ments will earn a Fine Arts Graduation Seal on their diploma. It is also possible that schools who have a number of these fine

arts graduates on their campus could earn additional points for their school grade.

Specifically, here are the criteria that have been drafted to

date. It should always be noted that the bill language will continue to change as it moves through the process.

6    F l o r i d a

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the very beginning of this process. We ask all of our members

legislation passed is much more of a marathon than a sprint. We will consider our efforts successful if we are able to get our bill

sponsored and filed this year. It is critically important to get this conversation started.

We know music education is good for students. It’s time we

introduced some legislative language to reward students and schools for doing the right thing.


Florida State University

COLLEGE OF MUSIC

122 N. Copeland Street | Tallahassee, FL | 850-644-4774 | music.fsu.edu

Make Great Music

Pursue Your Passion

Chart Your Future

2020 AUDITION DATES

APPLICATION DEADLINES

January 24-26

Freshman Priority Deadline: November 1 Freshman & Transfer Students: February 1 Graduate Student Priority Deadline: December 1

February 7-9 February 21-23

Additional dates available by appointment. Graduate Piano Accompanying and Opera Coaching Auditions: January 17 & February 14.

FINAL DEADLINES MAY VARY BY PROGRAM SEE APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS ONLINE November 2019

7


Please take time to thank and support our 2019-2020 Academic Partners.

GOLD PARTNERS

SILVER PARTNERS

University of North Florida

BRONZE PARTNERS Cannon Music Camp - Appalachian State University Florida College Florida Gulf Coast University Holy Cross Lutheran Academy Infinity Percussion Kent State University School of Music Mercer University

Palm Beach Atlantic University Rollins College Department of Music Union University University of North Texas Valdosta State University West Virginia University School of Music

Partners as of October 3, 2019.

*Please visit FMEA.org/partners for partnership details or call 850-878-6844.

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November 2019

9


GOLD

SILVER PARTNERS Music is Elementary Music Man, Inc. The Horn Section, Inc. Partners as of October 3, 2019.

*Please visit FMEA.org/partners for partnership details or call 850-878-6844.

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Please take time to thank and support our 2019-2020 Corporate Partners.

PARTNERS

BRONZE PARTNERS Cadence Music Carl Fischer Music Excelcia Music Publishing Head’s House of Music J.W. Pepper & Son, Inc. MakeMusic, Inc. Music & Arts

National Concerts Noteflight Romeo Music Tampa Bay Institute for Music Therapy Tampa Music School West Music Company

November 2019

11


All-National Honor Ensembles November 7-10, 2019 Gaylord Palms Resort & Convention Center Orlando, Florida

The NAfME All-National Honor Ensembles (ANHE) represent the top-performing high school musicians in the United States. So much more than a musical showcase, the ANHE program is a comprehensive and educational experience. The 2019 ensembles will meet at the Gaylord Palms Resort & Convention Center in Orlando, Florida, under the leadership of top conductors in the field of music education. Saturday, November 9, 2019: 7 pm-10pm: Modern Band, Guitar Ensemble, Mixed Choir, and Jazz Ensemble Sunday, November 10, 2019: 9:30 am-10:45 am: Symphony Orchestra and Concert Band

CONCERT BAND Student

Instrument

School

School City

Teacher

Lila Barrett

Piccolo

Robinson High School

Tampa

Christopher Revett

Mateo Buitrago

Trombone 1

Sickles High School

Tampa

Keith Griffis

Ethan Burke*

Clarinet 1

Dr. Phillips High School

Orlando

Charles Watford

Kian Fotouhi

Percussion

Blake High School

Tampa

Daniel DuBay

Anastasia Imeson

Percussion

Douglas Anderson School of the Arts

Jacksonville

Ted Shistle

Carla Irizarry-Delgado*

Bassoon 1

American Heritage School

Plantation

Kimberly Imerbsin

Robert Kerr

Trumpet 3

Lake Nona High School

Orlando

Michael Weintraub

Julia Lanni

Clarinet 3

Gainesville High School

Gainesville

Bill Pirzer

SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Student

Instrument

School

School City

Teacher

Victoria Bramble

Violin 1

Alexander W. Dreyfoos School of the Arts

West Palm Beach

Wendell Simmons

Alex Heidt

Violin 2

Howard W. Blake High School of the Arts

Tampa

Jason Jerald

Anna Held*

French Horn 2 Sickles High School

Tampa

Keith Griffis

Randy McLaughlin*

Trombone 3

Winter Springs High School

Winter Springs

Kyle Ferland

Lili Pope

Cello

Trinity Preparatory School

Winter Park

Maureen May

Cal Richards*

Trumpet 1

Plant High School

Tampa

Brian Dell

Anjana Vishnubhotla

Viola

Timber Creek High School

Orlando

Staci Conkling

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MIXED CHOIR Student

Part

School

School City

Teacher

Zoe Beaton

Alto 1

Martin County High School

Stuart

Kylie Lowe

Aaron Bradford*

Tenor 1

C. Leon King High School

Tampa

Richard Estes

Benjamin Butenschoen*

Bass 2

Timber Creek High School

Orlando

Paul Wesley

Karrah Christensen

Soprano 2

South Sumter High School

Bushnell

Pete Perrone

Riju Datta

Bass 1

Berkeley Preparatory School

Tampa

Morgan Burburan

Lleyton Elliott

Bass 1

Olympia High School

Orlando

Janet Le

Daniel Galvez

Bass 2

Trinity Preparatory School

Winter Park

Christina Carter

Francisco Gomez*

Tenor 1

St. Thomas Aquinas High School

Fort Lauderdale

Wanda Drozdovitch

Leigh Ives

Soprano 2

Howard W. Blake School of the Arts

Tampa

Joseph Galeczka

Breanna Johnson*

Soprano 1

North Fort Myers High School

North Fort Myers

Christina

Gabriela Mercado

Soprano 1

Olympia High School

Orlando

Janet Le

Amari Osouna*

Alto 2

St. Thomas Aquinas High School

Fort Lauderdale

Wanda Drozdovitch

Veronica Prevost

Alto 1

International Baccalaureate at Bartow High School

Bartow

Angela Guira

Samuel Rosenkranz*

Tenor 2

William T. Dwyer High School

Palm Beach Gardens

Pam Varnadore

Shayna Singer*

Soprano 2

North Broward Preparatory School

Coconut Creek

Elizabeth Korkos

Aidan Veghte*

Bass 1

Pine Crest School

Fort Lauderdale

Michael Testa

JAZZ ENSEMBLE Student

Instrument

School

School City

Teacher

Ryan Granada

Trumpet 1

Dillard High School

Fort Lauderdale

Christopher Dorsey

Connor Munroe

Tenor Saxophone

Ransom Everglades School

Coconut Grove

Jon Hamm

Anthony Oro

Guitar

Alexander Dreyfoos School of the Arts

West Palm Beach

Pedro Hernandez

School City

Teacher

GUITAR ENSEMBLE Student

Instrument

School

Juan Del Toral

Guitar Part 3

Ronald W. Reagan Doral Senior High School Doral

Alvaro Bermudez

Diego Namnum

Guitar Part 3

Freedom High School

Christopher Perez

Jose Pineda

Guitar Part 4

Ronald W. Reagan Doral Senior High School Doral

Alvaro Bermudez

Gabriel Quintero

Guitar Part 2

Freedom High School

Orlando

Christopher Perez

Jessie Thurman

Guitar Part 3

Harrison School for the Arts

Lakeland

Robert Phillips

Orlando

MODERN BAND Student

Instrument

School

School City

Teacher

Carter Nelson

Guitar

Lincoln High School

Tallahassee

Eric Robles

Soraya Rafat

Guitar

The Bolles School

Jacksonville

Maggie Vance

* Student is a member of the Tri-M Music Honor Society.

November 2019

13


Success Through

Solfège

by Dustin Burgess, PhD

Fa i M R o D e

S

Solfège, or solfeggio, is defined as the practice of singing scales, intervals, and melodic exercises using solmization

syllables (Randel, 1986). The use of solfège in music teaching is commonly found in elementary music programs

and choral programs. Many choral programs use solfège

as a rehearsal and sight-reading strategy (Holt & Jordan,

2008). Solfège is also a foundational part of the elementary teaching methods of Èmile Jaques-Dalcroze and Zoltán Kodály, where traditionally the Dalcroze pedagogy uses

a fixed-do (in which C is always the starting note of the

scale) and the Kodály method uses a movable-do (where the tonic of the scale moves). Regardless of the approach (fixed-do vs. movable-do), solfège has been successfully utilized in elementary music instruction (Campbell & Scott-Kassner, 2014).

At some point in their undergraduate studies, many

music education students have likely studied Edwin

Gordon and his Music Learning Theory. As part of this theory, Gordon (2012) discusses audiation, or inner hearing. Gordon’s theory, along with other music education

research and practice supports the use of singing, audia-

tion, or solfège in every music classroom, including a band classroom (Huenink, 2002; Liperote, 2006; MacKnight, 1975). However, research studies have indicated that band

teachers infrequently use singing or solfège in their daily practice (Burton, 1986; Kretchmer, 1998). This could pos-

sibly be due to a focus on note reading or instrumental pedagogy (Clauhs, 2018). Some band method books, such

as Jump Right In by Azzara, Gordon, and Grunow (2001), incorporate exercises that encourage the development of

audiation skills but are not used that often in beginning band classes in favor of other more popular methods.

Brian Sullivan, an Orange County Public Schools veter-

an band teacher, created an innovative approach to teaching band and has successfully used solfège as a part of his

band curriculum for the past 27 years. Recently, I (Dustin

Burgess) sat down with Brian Sullivan and conducted an interview in order to gain a better understanding of his unique approach to teaching band.

14    F l o r i d a

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a So La DB BS

Do

Ti

What inspired you to use solfège in your teaching?

I was teaching a summer band program along with my wife, Jennifer, at that time at a nearby middle

school. We wanted to offer a four-week beginning band class, and we were concerned about how much (how little)

we would be able to accomplish in that short amount of time. At this point, Jenny and I had been teaching middle

notation, how would we communicate with our mixed-

forever for our beginning classes to really get going, hav-

tem, and we considered using numbers and concert-pitch

standard method books, teaching all of the theory, nota-

solfège syllables. That summer beginning program was

and expecting the students (many of whom, in our com-

haul our beginning curriculum for the coming fall. What

the notation before we even attempted to play the lines.

playing sooner proved to be a life-changer for my wife

school for just a few years, and it always seemed to take

instrument summer group? We needed a shorthand sys-

ing plodded through the first few pages of one of the

letter names to refer to our notes before finally settling on

tion, and symbols as they were presented in the books,

incredibly successful, prompting us to completely over-

munity, struggled with English) to read and understand

started out simply as a shortcut to get summer beginners

We did not want our summer beginners to have to deal

and me, pedagogically speaking!

We decided to focus on playing fundamentals, knowing

DB

with this—we wanted them playing as soon as possible!

that we would cover reading and theory when the school year started in August. Well, without note names and staff

BS

Do you have a background in singing or using solfège?

I do not. My college sight singing was based on

numbers. Jenny’s school used moveable-do solfège,

and I was aware of fixed-do solfège that many of my con-

ducting colleagues, especially those trained abroad, used. Continued on page 16

November 2019

15


Solfège

Continued from page 15

DB BS

Table 1.

Do you use fixed- or

Sullivan Chromatic Solfège System, Fixed-Do, Based on Concert B-flat

Ascending Do Di Re Bb B C

moveable-do?

We decided on fixed-do, with concert B-flat as do. Because we employ

the entire chromatic solfège system (see

Descending Do Ti Te Bb A Ab

Table 1), our students can handle just about any key. Students who continue in music at the college level have had no

problem making the switch to moveable-do, and they have expressed tremen-

dous appreciation for their early solfège training.

DB

Describe how you use solfège in your teaching.

DB

Ri C#

Mi D

Fa Eb

La G

Le Gb

  Sol Se F Fb

How often do you use solfège? Do you use it with all your

ensembles? Do you feel it has

contributed to the overall success of your program?

Fi E

  Sol Si F F#

  La Li G G#

Ti A

Fa Eb

  Me Re Db C

  Ra Do Cb Bb

DB

Mi D

Do Bb

You have created your own

method book. Describe your

method book.

BS

My book is intended to be a threeyear resource for my students, con-

Every day, every class! As I men-

taining just about everything (other than

single-syllable solfège words for concert

has been such a game-changer for me. It’s

cover with them in middle school as well

six syllables (example: con-cert E nat-ur-

own ear has gotten so much better. I can

BS

In a nutshell, the Sullivan Solfège

System (catchy, huh?) substitutes

pitch letter names, which require three to

al). We still teach standard transposed and concert pitch letter names, which are

needed to fully grasp certain theory concepts such as key signatures and chord

symbols, but solfège is our primary lan-

guage during band class. Before playing a

line, the class sings it, and singing in

solfège is less cumbersome and much more musical than trying to sing with letter names, and it demonstrates musical

literacy better than neutral (“la la la”) syllables.

DB BS

What is the student response to singing in band class?

We do it from day one in beginning band, so they’re used to it. One of

our mantras is, “First we say it, then we

play it!” For some reason, kids who might feel funny “singing” something in class have no problem “saying” the exact same

thing. While they’re singing the line (oops—I mean while they’re saying the

line), I am supporting their pitch by play-

BS

fun, it’s student-friendly, it’s effective. My sight sing and audiate at a much higher

level than before. It allows students to work together and learn from each other. They have a common language—they are

no longer in segregated groups according to their clef or transposition requirements. It allows for more efficient rehearsals,

even involving advanced full-band compositions. If a section of the band is hav-

ing trouble with a challenging musical

fragment, I can have the entire ensemble practice it simply by follow-the-leader exercises—I sing it, they play it. No need

to write it out on the staff board five or six

different ways. Beginning-of-class warmup activities can be improvised and varied endlessly. If I can think it up, my band

can play it right then and there. We know that having band students sing in rehears-

al is a desirable goal—the solfège system makes this easier and more effective. It

allows the director to concentrate on musicality, rather than getting hung up on notation and theory.

ing along on an electric keyboard I have by my podium.

16    F l o r i d a

tioned earlier, discovery of solfège

Music Director

performance repertoire) that I hope to as advanced supplemental material for

the more “gung-ho” stars. It includes my beginning band curriculum, warm-ups

and technique exercises for advanced classes, and extensive theory material. It can actually be used by any director with

their own program. The only unconventional wrinkle is the inclusion of the solfège names (alongside standard letter names) as new notes are introduced.

DB

Why do you think solfège is not frequently used by band

directors? Would you like to see it become a more common practice?

BS

I certainly wish it was used by more

directors. It would certainly help

with students as they transition from one

middle school to another, or from middle school to high school. I’m sure a big reason more directors don’t use it is simply

lack of familiarity—very few if any of us

learned it during our own band experience, and there’s a natural suspicion of something so unconventional. And, frankly speaking now, not every director has (or thinks they have) the musical

chops to make it work. You must have (or


A graduate of Winter Park High School, he

holds a bachelor’s degree from the University

of Florida and a master’s degree from Florida State University. A recent recipient of the FBA’s prestigious Oliver Hobbs Award, he is a busy FBA adjudicator and is the primary

trainer of new adjudicators for that organization.

References Azzara, C. D., Gordon, E. E., & Grunow, R. F. (2001). Jump right in: The instrumental series. Chicago, IL: GIA Publications. Photo: Tatiana Veras

Burton, J. B. (1986). A study to determine the extent to which vocalization is used as an instructional technique in selected public high school, public junior college, and state university band rehearsals: Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, and Mississippi (Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global. (8626438)

be willing to develop) a good (better) ear,

your readers would like to explore this

new funny-sounding words, and you

sullivan@ocps.net.

you must be willing to learn a bunch of

must be capable of singing with confi-

with me, I welcome their emails at brian.

dence and good pitch accuracy, with or

Dustin

very least, if a director chooses not to use

music education at Shorter

without support from a keyboard. At the

a solfège system themselves, I hope they

would be open-minded and professional enough not to unfairly disparage it when

discussing it with students, parents, or other directors.

DB

Any suggestions or resources for band directors that would like to

use solfège in their teaching?

Burgess,

University

in

Rome,

the director of music educa-

Holt, M., & Jordan, J. (2008). The school choral program. Chicago, IL: GIA Publications.

tion with an emphasis in wind conducting at

Huenink, J. S. (2002). Sing it, hear it, play it! Teaching Music, 10(1), 56-61.

tion. He completed the PhD in music educa-

the University of Florida. Previous teaching

ers. (Although, I’ve had great success

using it in rehearsals of honor bands I’ve

conducted over the course of a day or two—those kinds of kids really tend to

appreciate challenges like that!) If any of

Kretchmer, D. L. (1998). Phenomenological instructional techniques employed in beginning instrumental materials (Master’s thesis). Retrieved from ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global. (1394586)

positions for Dr. Burgess include music programs in Pennsylvania, North Carolina, and Florida.

at Glenridge Middle School

upon a class of second- or third-year play-

Gordon, E. E. (2012). Learning sequences in music (8th ed.). Chicago, IL: GIA Publications.

Georgia, where he serves as

have to stay one new note ahead of them! It would be a little awkward to force it

Cohen, A. (2016). Starting a Kodály-inspired beginner band: Six tips for success. Kodály Envoy, 42(3), 14-15.

is assistant professor of

Brian Sullivan is in his

of beginners. This way, you’ll just

Clauhs, M. (2018, June). Beginning band without a stand: Fostering creative musicianship in early instrumental programs. Music Educators Journal, 104(4), 39-47. doi:10.1177/0027432118768383

PhD,

I’d suggest trying it out with a class

BS

Campbell, P. S., & Scott-Kassner, C. (2014). Music in childhood: From preschool through the elementary grades (4th ed.). Boston, MA: Schirmer Cengage Learning.

Liperote, K. (2006, September). Audiation for beginning instrumentalists: Listen, speak, read, write. Music Educators Journal, 93(1), 46-52. doi:10.1177/002743210609300123

15th year as band director

MacKnight, C. B. (1975). Music reading ability of beginning wind instrumentalists after melodic instruction. Journal of Research in Music Education, 23(1), 23-34. doi:10.2307/3345200

in Winter Park, Florida— the

school

he

attended

Randel, D. M. (Ed.). (1986). The new Harvard dictionary of music. London: The Belknap Press of Harvard University press.

“back in the day.” Prior to

his Glenridge post, he taught middle school

band in Osceola County, high school band in Brevard County, and led several professional,

university, community, and youth orchestras.

November 2019

17


T HE S CHOOL

OF

M USIC

presents

T HE T HIRTIETH A NNUAL FLORIDA BANDMASTERS ASSOCIATION HALL OF FAME

Roll of Distinction Concert HONORING THE

Gary D. Green E ME R I T US P R OF E S S OR OF M US I C A N D D I R E C T OR OF B A N D S , F R OS T S C HOOL OF M US I C U N I V E R S I T Y OF M I A MI

2019 I NDUCTEES

Leander A. Kirksey (1909-1995) D I R E C T OR OF B A ND S , F L OR I D A A&M U N I V E R S I T Y D I R E C T OR OF B A N D S , I ND US T R I A L H I GH S C HOOL / R OOS E V E L T H I GH S C HOOL

featuring

Southern Winds D OUGLAS L. P HI LLI PS , C ONDUCTOR

S ATURDAY , N OVEMBER 23, 2019 • 7:30 P.M. E LIZABETH H ALL - L EE C HAPEL

18    F l o r i d a

Music Director


T HE S CHOOL

OF

M USIC

presents

T HE T HIRTIETH A NNUAL FLORIDA BANDMASTERS ASSOCIATION

Hall of Fame Concert HONORING THE

2019 I NDUCTEES

Eddie Steadman

Joe Hooten

D I R E C T OR OF B A ND S (R E T .) R UC K E L M I D D L E S C HOOL

D I R E C T OR OF B A N D S (R E T .) J.M. T A T E H I GH S C HOOL

featuring

Stetson University Symphonic Band D OUGLAS L. P HI LLI PS , C ONDUCTOR

S UNDAY , N OVEMBER 24, 2019 • 4:00 P.M. E LIZABETH H ALL - L EE C HAPEL

November 2019

19


How do I get to the conference? Making your case to attend the 2020 FMEA Professional Development Conference

G

etting approval to attend the Florida Music

Education

Association

Professional Development Conference may require developing a proposal. Due

to tight budgets in today’s economy, school principals and district officials

carefully scrutinize requests to attend professional development. That does not mean you shouldn’t give it your best

effort by showing your administrators

how your attendance will benefit the stu-

dents in your school. Rather than assuming your administrators are aware of the

critical importance of you professionally benefitting from content-specific sessions, consider submitting a formal proposal.

Through this proposal you can demon-

strate how your participation directly

relates to the strategies and the objectives of your school (including those beyond

the classroom). This will allow you to

personal contributions to the attain-

funding you will need, detail your case

education and how it will benefit your

and make note of the clinicians and

download the conference schedule, list

ment of those goals and strategies,

articulate the need for your continuing

others you will be able to observe

students, your school, and you.

«« Write

and/or with whom you will be able

Develop Your Case

to interact while at the conference. List the high-quality performances

down three of the most

you will observe and from which you

important goals and strategies being

«« Think about how you personally con-

will learn. You can download the con-

addressed in your school’s plan.

tribute to those three goals and strate-

gies. How does your work as a music educator affect the overall mission of

your school? Make a list of your per-

ference app from the FMEA’s website

«« Write

and bookmark your sessions.

attending the FMEA Professional Development Conference and meet-

ing the people there will help you

sonal contributions to your school’s

«« Review the conference’s professional

contribute to your school’s goals and

goals and strategies.

strategies, and use this case with your administrators when making your

development schedule to better under-

request to attend the conference.

stand how the information provided will support your school’s goals. Mark meetings that relate to your list of

20    F l o r i d a

down your case for how

When you create your proposal, in

addition to providing a summary of the

Music Director

for attending. List your school’s goals, the sessions and the clinicians and presenters who will be there, and list the spe-

cific sessions you plan to attend. Also, list the performing groups you will have the opportunity to observe during rehearsals with national clinicians as well as the performances by these well-known conductors (from whom you can gain program-

ming and conducting ideas). Additionally, let your administrators know that this conference has more than 10,000 teachers, administrators, students, and parents in

attendance, the second largest music education conference in the nation.

Finally, ask your administrators to sup-

port you to attend the FMEA Professional Development Conference in Tampa, January 8-11, 2020.


2020 FM E A Professi ona l Development Conference E CEL

B

IN R AT

G

J a n u a r y 8 -1 1 , 2 0 2 0 Ta m p a C o n v e n t i o n C e n t e r 3 3 3 S o u t h F r a n k l i n , S t r e e t , Ta m p a , F l o r i d a All registration information must be entered online at flmusiced.org/flmusicapps/conference/

REGISTRATION FEES Description

Preregistration Rates: Now- Dec. 6

On-Site Rates:

Director/Member

$138

$168

Collegiate Member

$58

$88

Retired Member

$0

$0

Non-Teaching Spouse

$73

$98

Non-Teaching Spouse of Retired Member

$0

$0

Paid Chaperone

$53

$73

Free Chaperone

$0

$0

All-State Student

$63

$93

Tri-M Student

$38

$38

Preconference Workshop

$58

$68

we ask that you please provide the ACTUAL,

Preconference Workshop (First-Year Teachers)

$25

$25

for each of your students and chaperones and

Concert Tickets

$15

$15

VIP Member

$0

$0

VIP Preconference Workshop

$0

$0

Leadership Workshop Student

$38

$38

Leadership Workshop Chaperone

$0

$0

Student Experience - Student

$38

$38

Student Experience - Chaperone

$38

$38

register. At the end of the online form, you will have the opportunity to print an invoice to send

in with a check until one week before the prereg-

istration deadline or to pay online instantly with a credit card until the preregistration deadline on December 6, 2019.

Please Note: To assist our members, their stu-

dents, and chaperones as they visit exhibit booths,

all badges will have a barcode encoded with contact information. Attendees will be able to allow exhibitors to scan their badges rather than

manually writing information on contact cards or mailing lists at their booths. In order to maintain

a positive relationship with our exhibitors who can benefit your students through scholarships,

new equipment, sheet music, software, and more, CORRECT MAILING ADDRESS and EMAIL do NOT simply enter your school address or other incorrect information.

To take advantage of early discounted rates,

you must register and pay before the deadline. If you are mailing a check to the FMEA office to

pay for your registration, it must be postmarked

SEVEN DAYS BEFORE the preregistration deadline.

November 2019

21


REGISTRATION POLICIES 1. All participants—directors, students, chaperones, and guests— must be registered for the conference.

2. Only directors may register their groups or pick up registration materials if preregistered.

3. All participating students must be chaperoned. As required by

FSMA, at least one chaperone, other than a director, is required for

every 10 students or fraction thereof; however, FMEA policy allows for one free chaperone for every six students or fraction thereof. 4. An additional paid chaperone may be registered for (a) each six students registered or (b) for each all-state rehearsal site where registered students are performing.

5. If a participating student is not accompanied by the director from that student’s school, then the principal from that school must

furnish a letter designating the person from the school or school district who is to be in charge of that student. The letter should be addressed to the FMEA executive director, must explain the

extenuating circumstances preventing the director from attending, and must be submitted with registration materials. The school will be notified of approval. This does not release the director from the requirement that he or she must be registered for the conference. If approved, the person designated in the letter will pick up the

director’s preregistration packet and supervise the student at all times.

6. Student observers are not allowed to attend the conference. If any student observers are brought to the conference, the offending school’s participation in the conference may be eliminated the

following year. Tri-M students or those approved for the Student Experience program who are registered and participating in

sessions or working for the all-state concerts are exempt from this rule. Chaperones or other attendees are not allowed to bring

children who are not participating in an all-state ensemble. Only

registered students, teachers, and chaperones wearing a conference badge are allowed in and around the rehearsals and conference

areas. Please make child care arrangements before attending the conference.

CHAPERONE REGISTRATION Chaperone registration is based on the following rules:

«« For each elementary student registered, one ELEMENTARY STUDENTS

free chaperone and one paid chaperone

«« Any additional attendees must purchase a may be registered.

guest pass at on-site registration for entry into the convention center.

MIDDLE SCHOOL AND HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

«« For every six students registered, one free chaperone and one paid chaperone may be registered. No other chaperones may

be registered until the seventh student is

«« Any additional attendees (chaperones registered.

or guests) must purchase a guest pass

at on-site registration for entry into the convention center.

«« If you have students in more than one EXCEPTIONS

performing ensemble, you may pay for a

chaperone for each performing ensemble in

«« If you have students from different schools, which you have registered students.

you may pay for a chaperone for each school for which you have registered

7. All Florida school music teachers must register for the conference

as FMEA directors and be current members of FMEA and NAfME.

students.

This includes directors of all-state students, invited performing

Chaperones are not allowed to bring children

from Florida schools, colleges, or universities must also be FMEA

ensemble. Only registered students, teachers,

Collegiate students must be collegiate members of FMEA and

are allowed in and around the rehearsal

members of NAfME. Attendees who live outside of the United

chaperones are aware of this policy before

groups, mini-concerts, and session presenters. All-state conductors

who are not participating in an all-state

members. No current music teacher may register as a chaperone.

and chaperones wearing a conference badge

NAfME. Attendees who live outside of Florida must be current

areas. Directors are asked to make sure their

States may contact our office for registration instructions.

agreeing to serve as a chaperone.

22    F l o r i d a

Music Director


ALL-STATE TICKET POLICY 1. Registered (BADGED) attendees do not require

tickets to attend any all-state concert. This includes directors/members, directors’ non-teaching

spouses, performing all-state students, registered chaperones, collegiate student members, retired

members, and VIP guests that you entered as part of your conference registration.

2. All nonregistered attendees (NONBADGED)

attendees (parents, family members, guests, etc.) are

required to purchase tickets for any all-state concert they wish to attend at $15 per ticket.

3. There are no free or allotted tickets. All concert

attendees must either wear their conference badge or purchase a ticket.

4. A director who preregisters online may reserve and prepay for all-state concert tickets for nonregistered attendees for concerts in which he or she has

registered all-state students. If paid for online,

these tickets will be preloaded into the director’s registration packet.

5. A director who registers on site may purchase all-

state concert tickets for nonregistered attendees for concerts in which he or she has registered all-state students during the on-site registration process.

6. A director with all-state students may purchase additional concert tickets for nonregistered

attendees for concerts in which he or she has

ALL CONCERT TICKET SALES ARE FINAL.

NO REFUNDS OR EXCHANGES. Please make sure you know the exact name of the all-state

ensemble for which you need tickets before approaching the ticket sales window

performing students at the conference on-site

registration desk or at a designated ticket sales location at any time.

7. General ticket sales for all-state concerts will begin at 11 am on Thursday at the FMEA registration desk. There is no requirement that the director

or any other registered attendee be the person to purchase tickets after this time.

8. All ticket sales are final. Concert tickets are nonrefundable.

9. For entrance, ticket, and concert purposes, a

concert is defined as the pair of ensembles that

are performing in the same venue in a common,

defined block of time. An example of a concert for

REFUND POLICIES 1. Full registration refunds are available for cancellation requests made through December 15, 2019.

2. No registration refunds will be made for cancellations made after December 15, 2019, except for emergency

situations. These will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis. 3. Refunds must be requested in writing (email is acceptable). 4. All requests for refunds must be received no later than

January 31, 2020. Requests received after that date will not be processed.

purposes of entrance, ticketing, etc., is the 2 pm

5. All refunds will be issued after the conference is

and the All-State SSAA Chorus.

6. Concert tickets are non-refundable.

concert on Saturday for the All-State TTBB Chorus

completed.

November 2019

23


2020 FM E A Professi ona l Development Conference

Hotels Contracted for 2020 FMEA Professional Development Conference The Florida Music Education Association has contracted the following Tampa hotels for the January 8-11, 2020, Professional

Development Conference. Please tele-

phone your hotel of choice directly from the list on the following page beginning

September 21, 2019, at 9 am EDT. Guest

rooms at the contracted rates are available until the room block is full or until the

cancellation deadline of November 9, 2019, at 5 pm. If your hotel of choice is sold

out, please continue to try to make a res-

ervation until November 9, 2019, as FMEA attendees will periodically release surplus guest rooms.

A maximum of five (5) guest rooms

may be reserved per teacher and/or

parent. Each and all rooms reserved on

November 12, 2019, will be charged a non-refundable, one-night fee to the

responsible credit cardholder. (Invalid credit cards risk a reservation cancellation.)

We urge any guest holding surplus

reservations/rooms to cancel excess reser-

vation(s) as soon as possible and no later than 5 pm on November 9, 2019, and you

must secure a cancellation confirmation number. (This courtesy will make sur-

plus rooms available to other guests.) In order to receive complimentary rehearsal

and meeting space, you should book guest rooms in the hotel you are using for your group functions.

NOTE: FMEA IS NOT offering a

housing bureau service. All participants

MUST call the hotels directly beginning September 21, 2019, at 9 am EDT and request the “Florida Music Education

Association” room block rate and confirm the guest room rate posted below. We look forward to seeing you in Tampa!

24    F l o r i d a

HOTEL — Cutoff date: 11/9/19

ROOM RATES

Group Code: FMEA unless otherwise noted

Single

Double

Triple

Quad

Barrymore Hotel Tampa Riverwalk 111 West Fortune Street, Tampa, FL 33602 (813) 223-1351, Comp. internet; $10 parking

$143

$143

$143

$143

Courtyard by Marriott Downtown Tampa 102 East Cass Street, Tampa, FL 33602 (813) 229-1100, ext. 1, Comp. internet; $20 valet only

$154

$154

$154

$154

DoubleTree by Hilton Tampa Airport Westshore 4500 West Cypress Street, Tampa, FL 33607 (800) 514-3959, ext. 1, Comp. internet & parking

$157

$157

$157

$157

Embassy Suites Downtown 513 South Florida Avenue, Tampa, FL 33602 (813) 769-8300, ext. 1

$249

$249

$259

$269

Embassy Suites Tampa Airport Westshore 555 North Westshore Blvd., Tampa, FL 33609 (800) EMBASSY, Group Code: FME or FMEA 2020

$193

$193

(up to 5 in room)

(up to 6 in room)

Four Points by Sheraton Suites Tampa Airport Westshore 4400 West Cypress Street, Tampa, FL 33607 (800) 368-7764, Comp. internet

$142

$142

$142

$142

Hampton Inn Tampa Downtown Channel District 1155 East Kennedy Blvd., Tampa, FL 33602, Group Code: FME (813) 525-9900, ext. 1, Comp. internet & breakfast; $15 parking

$185

$185

$185

$185

Hilton Downtown 211 North Tampa Street, Tampa, FL 33602 (800) 445-8667, ext. 1, $9.99 internet (Comp. for HH); $24 valet

$208

$208

$208

$208

Holiday Inn Tampa Westshore Airport 700 North Westshore Blvd., Tampa, FL 33609 (800) 465-4329, Group Code: FMA, Comp. internet & parking

$124

$124

$124

$124

Home2 Suites Tampa Downtown Channel District 1155 East Kennedy Blvd., Tampa, FL 33602, Group Code: FMA (813) 525-9900, ext. 2, Comp. internet & breakfast; $15 parking

$215

$215

$215

$215

Tampa Marriott Water Street (formerly Marriott Waterside) 700 South Florida Avenue, Tampa, FL 33602 (888) 789-3090, ext. 3, Comp. internet for Bonvoy members; $27 overnight valet & $15 daytime valet

$205

$205

$205

$205

Residence Inn 101 East Tyler Street, Tampa, FL 33602 (813) 221-4224, Comp. internet; $17 self-parking

$176

$176

$176

$176

Sheraton Tampa Riverwalk Hotel 200 North Ashley Drive, Tampa, FL 33602 (888) 236-2427, Comp. internet

$199

$199

$219

$219

Westin Tampa Waterside 725 South Harbour Island Blvd., Tampa, FL 33602 (800) 937-8461, Comp. internet; $30 valet

$199

$199

$199

$199

Music Director

$203

$213


Student Leadership Workshop The keynote speaker and clinician for the 2020 Student Leadership Workshop will be…

Fran Kick. Mr. Kick will bring his high-energy, interactive presentation style to FMEA in this humorous, informative, educational, and entertaining workshop. The workshop is designed for high school student leaders. All participants will be actively involved through activities, examples, and valuable information. students will be exposed to the following:

• • • • • •

Setting High Standards of Excellence Fundamentals of Self-Discipline Effective Communication Principles Value of Risk Behavior Modification vs. Motivation Dealing With Insecurities

Students who are not in an all-state ensemble can receive a one-day exhibit pass for Thursday, but are expected to travel home on Thursday afternoon with a chaperone. Students may not stay for the rest of the week if they are not in an all-state ensemble. Students who ARE in an all-state ensemble or who are also attending the conference as a Tri-M student or are attending the Student Conference Experience must also be registered for the conference. Chaperones who will be attending for the remainder of the week must also be registered for the conference. Wednesday, January 8, 2020, 1 pm–4:30 pm Tampa Convention Center, West Hall A The cost for the workshop is $38 per student. Chaperones are free. Register as part of your FMEA conference registration. go to: flmusiced.org/FLMusicApps/Conference/Register/

November 2019

25


All-State Rehearsals ALL-STATE CONCERT BAND

ALL-STATE ELEMENTARY CHORUS

ALL-STATE INTERCOLLEGIATE BAND

RESEATING AUDITIONS: SR, Riverwalk Ballroom Thursday.............................................. 9am-11am

REHEARSALS: TCC, 14 Wednesday........................................ 12noon-1pm Wednesday.............................................1pm-6pm Thursday.............................................. 8am-11am Thursday..................................11:45am-12:45pm

RESEATING AUDITIONS: DW, Lake Forest Ballroom Wednesday..............................11:30am-12:45 pm

REHEARSALS: SR, Riverwalk Ballroom Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday.......................................... 7pm-9:30pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.....................................................1pm-5pm Saturday............................................ 9am-12noon CONCERT: Saturday, January 11, 2020, 1:30pm TCC, Ballroom A ALL-STATE CONCERT CHORUS REHEARSALS: TMWS, Grand Ballroom Thursday.........................................8am-11:30am Thursday..................................... 1:30pm-4:30pm Thursday.......................................... 6:30pm-9pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday............................................... 1:30pm-4pm

CONCERT: Thursday, January 9, 2020, 1:30pm TCC, Ballroom A ALL-STATE ELEMENTARY ORFF ENSEMBLE REHEARSALS: TCC Thursday................ 10am-11am, TCC, West Hall A Thursday..................11am-6pm, TCC, West Hall A Friday 8:45am-10:15am............................TCC, 14 Friday 10:45am-1pm....................TCC, Ballroom A CONCERT: Friday, January 10, 2020, 1pm TCC, Ballroom A

REHEARSALS: DW, Lake Forest Ballroom Wednesday.........................................1pm-4:30pm Wednesday................................... 6:30pm-9:30pm Thursday........................................8:30am-12noon Thursday.......................................1:30pm-4:30pm Thursday.......................................8:30pm-9:15pm TCC, room TBA CONCERT: Thursday, January 9, 2020, 9:30pm TCC, Ballroom A ALL-STATE MIDDLE SCHOOL BAND RESEATING AUDITIONS: HD, Palma Ceia Thursday.............................................. 9am-11am

CONCERT: Saturday, January 11, 2020, 11am TCC, Ballroom A

REHEARSALS: TMWS Tuesday.................................. 7pm-9pm, TMWS, 8

ALL-STATE CONCERT ORCHESTRA

Wednesday........................................8:30am-5pm, TMWS, Florida Ballroom, Salons 1-3

REHEARSALS: HD, Palma Ceia Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday.......................................... 7pm-9:30pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.....................................................1pm-5pm Saturday............................................ 9am-12noon TCC, room TBA

RESEATING AUDITIONS: TMWS, rooms TBA Thursday....................................8:30am-11:30am

Thursday...........................8:30am-12noon, TMWS, Florida Ballroom, Salons 1-3

CONCERT: Saturday, January 11, 2020, 1:30pm TCC, Ballroom A

REHEARSALS: TMWS, Florida Ballroom, Salons 5-6 Thursday (Registration)................... 8am-8:30am Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday................................................7pm-9pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.....................................................1pm-5pm Saturday.................................................4pm-5pm

CONCERT: Thursday, January 9, 2020, 12:30pm TCC, 20

ALL-STATE MIDDLE SCHOOL JAZZ BAND

CONCERT: Saturday, January 11, 2020, 6pm TCC, Ballroom A

ALL-STATE GUITAR ENSEMBLE

ALL-STATE HIGH SCHOOL JAZZ BAND REHEARSALS: TCC, 30A Wednesday....................................... 2pm-5:30pm Wednesday.............................................7pm-9pm Thursday....................................8:30am-11:30am Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday.......................................... 7pm-9:30pm Friday........................................... 8:30am-12noon CONCERT: Friday, January 10, 2020, 7:30pm TMWS Grand Ballroom

REHEARSALS: WTW, Conch Room Wednesday....................................... 2pm-5:30pm Wednesday.............................................7pm-9pm Thursday....................................8:30am-11:30am Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday.......................................... 7pm-9:30pm Friday........................................... 8:30am-12noon CONCERT: Friday, January 10, 2020, 7:30pm TMWS, Grand Ballroom ALL-STATE MIDDLE SCHOOL MIXED CHORUS REHEARSALS: HD, Bayshore Ballroom, 1-3 Thursday................................... 12:30pm-4:30pm Thursday.......................................... 6:30pm-9pm Friday........................................8:45 am-11:30am Friday.......................................... 1:30pm-4:30pm Saturday................ 6:30am-8am, TCC, Ballroom A CONCERT: Saturday, January 11, 2020, 8:30am TCC, Ballroom A

26    F l o r i d a

Music Director


KEY DW = Doubletree Westshore

HD = Hilton Downtown

TCC = Tampa Convention Center

ESD = Embassy Suites Downtown

TMWS = Tampa Marriott Water Street

WTW = Westin Tampa Waterside

SR = Sheraton Riverwalk

ALL-STATE MIDDLE SCHOOL ORCHESTRA

ALL-STATE SYMPHONIC BAND

HIGH SCHOOL HONORS BAND

RESEATING AUDITIONS: TMWS, rooms TBA Thursday.........................................9am-11:30am

RESEATING AUDITIONS: TCC, rooms TBA Thursday....................................9:30am-11:30am

RESEATING AUDITIONS: SR, Bayshore Ballroom Thursday.............................................. 9am-11am

REHEARSALS: TMWS, Meeting Room 8 Thursday................................................8am-9am Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday................................................7pm-9pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.....................................................1pm-5pm Saturday........................................10am-12:30pm

REHEARSALS: TCC, 22 Thursday................................... 12:30pm-4:30pm Thursday.......................................... 6:30pm-9pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.....................................................1pm-5pm Saturday............................................ 9am-12noon

REHEARSALS: SR, Bayshore Ballroom Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday.......................................... 7pm-9:30pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.....................................................1pm-5pm

CONCERT: Saturday, January 11, 2020, 6pm TCC, Ballroom A ALL-STATE MIDDLE SCHOOL TREBLE CHORUS REHEARSALS: HD, Bayshore Ballroom, 5-7 Thursday...................................... 12noon-4:15pm Thursday..................................... 6:15pm-8:45pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:15am Friday...........................................1:15pm-4:15pm Saturday................ 6:30am-8am, TCC, Ballroom A CONCERT: Saturday, January 11, 2020, 8:30am TCC, Ballroom A ALL-STATE READING CHORUS REHEARSALS: ES, Gandy Meeting Room Thursday.........................................8am-11:30am Thursday..................................... 1:30pm-4:30pm Thursday.......................................... 6:30pm-9pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday............................................... 1:30pm-4pm Saturday...................................... 8:30am-9:30am CONCERT: Friday, January 10, 2020, 6:30pm TCC, Ballroom A ALL-STATE SSAA CHORUS REHEARSALS: WTW, Oasis Ballroom Thursday.........................................8am-11:30am Thursday..................................... 1:30pm-4:30pm Thursday.......................................... 6:30pm-9pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.......................................... 1:30pm-4:30pm

CONCERT: Saturday, January 11, 2020, 11am TMWS, Grand Ballroom

CONCERT: Saturday, January 11, 2020, 1:30pm TCC, Ballroom A

HIGH SCHOOL HONORS ORCHESTRA

ALL-STATE SYMPHONIC ORCHESTRA

RESEATING AUDITIONS: ESD, Skyway Ballroom Thursday (Registration)................... 8am-8:30am Thursday....................................8:30am-11:30am Thursday................................................1pm-5pm

RESEATING AUDITIONS: TCC, rooms TBA Thursday....................................8:30am-11:30am REHEARSALS: TCC, 24 Thursday (Registration)................... 8am-8:30am Thursday....................................8:30am-11:30am Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday.......................................... 7pm-9:30pm Friday................................................ 9am-12noon Friday.......................................... 1:30pm-5:30pm Saturday.................................................1pm-3pm

REHEARSALS: ESD, Skyway Ballroom Thursday................................................7pm-9pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.....................................................1pm-5pm Saturday............................................... 9am-10am CONCERT: Saturday, January 11, 2020, 2:30pm TMWS Grand Ballroom

CONCERT: Saturday, January 11, 2020, 6pm TCC, Ballroom A

MIDDLE SCHOOL HONORS BAND

ALL-STATE TTBB CHORUS

RESEATING AUDITIONS: HD, rooms TBA Thursday.............................................. 9am-11am

REHEARSALS: ESD, Bayside Ballroom Thursday.........................................8am-11:30am Thursday..................................... 1:30pm-4:30pm Thursday.......................................... 6:30pm-9pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday............................................... 1:30pm-4pm

REHEARSALS: HD, Esplanade Suite Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday.......................................... 7pm-9:30pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.....................................................1pm-5pm CONCERT: Saturday, January 11, 2020, 11am TMWS, Grand Ballroom

CONCERT: Friday, January 10, 2020, 6:30pm TCC, Ballroom A

MIDDLE SCHOOL HONORS ORCHESTRA REHEARSALS: SR, Riverview Room Thursday (Registration)................... 8am-8:30am Thursday....................................8:30am-11:30am Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday................................................7pm-9pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.....................................................1pm-5pm Saturday............................................... 9am-10am

CONCERT: Friday, January 10, 2020, 9pm TCC, Ballroom A

CONCERT: Saturday, January 11, 2020, 2:30pm TMWS, Grand Ballroom

November 2019

27


NEW SECURITY PROCEDURES The Florida Music Education Association is working with the Tampa Police Department and Allied Universal Security at the Tampa Convention Center (TCC) to enhance the conference experience for the students and attendees. GREAT NEWS! In order to help keep attendees safe, there will be a heightened security presence throughout the Tampa Convention Center and at various hotels. All entrances to TCC will be patrolled by uniformed officers of the Tampa Police Department and uniformed Allied Universal Security personnel. They will be patrolling the Tampa Convention Center as well. The Tampa Police Department will be at the crosswalks between Marriott Tampa Water Street and TCC, at concerts, and patrolling some of the downtown hotels during rehearsals. All attendees (this includes members, chaperones, and student participants) must wear their conference badge during the conference once the authorized registrant obtains the conference packet. Please be prepared for random bag and/or purse searches. It is encouraged, if at all possible, to use a clear bag, similar to those used at sporting events, for entrance.

ENJOY THE CONFERENCE EXPERIENCE.

28    F l o r i d a

Music Director


Getthereadyconfeforrence… IMPORTANT DATES NOVEMBER 9 • 5 PM The hotel room cancellation deadline is at 5 pm. NOVEMBER 12 Hotels will charge your credit card a nonrefundable deposit for the first night of each room held. DECEMBER 6 • 11:59 PM Preregistration closes. Payment must be postmarked on or before December 6 if you are paying by check. All registrations not received or postmarked by December 6 will pay the on-site rate. DECEMBER 7 You can enter students and chaperones online to make on-site registration easier, but you will need to stand in the ON-SITE registration line to print your badges and pay when you arrive at the conference. DECEMBER 15 All school lodging checks are due, payable to the hotel where reservations were made for you and/or your students.

November 2019

29


FLORIDA MUSIC EDUCATION ASSOCIATION 2019-2020 DONORS

Thank you to all of the donors who have shown their dedication to the improvement of music education in Florida by supporting our Mission through financial contributions.

Our donors support specific causes by donating to the FMEA funds of their choice: FMEA Scholarship Fund

June M. Hinckley Scholarship

Music Education Advocacy

Professional Development for Members

General Fund

Mel & Sally Schiff Music Education Relief Fund

The following have graciously donated to FMEA from April 1, 2019, through October 3, 2019.

ARTIST’S CIRCLE

MAESTRO’S CIRCLE

($1,000 – $9,999)

($10,000 and up) No current donors at this time

All County Music, Inc. Clifford Madsen Russell Robinson

SUSTAINERS ($100 – $999)

Artie Almeida In Memory of June Audrey Grace Lucinda Balistreri In Memory of June Hinckley Shelton Berg Anthony Chiarito Alice-Ann Darrow In Memory of Mr. & Mrs. O. B. Darrow Virginia Densmore In Memory of Shirley Kirwin

30    F l o r i d a

Cynthia Heidel Dennis Holt In Memory of Dr. Gerson Yessin Llewellyn Humphrey Steven Kelly Carlton Kilpatrick Sheila King In Memory of John W. King Cathi Leibinger In Memory of Linda Mann; In Honor of Ken Williams

Music Director

Jason Locker In Memory of June M. Hinckley Angel Marchese Carolyn Minear Edward Prasse On Behalf of Nancy Masters Mary Catherine Salo In Memory of Gary Rivenbark & Wes Rainer

Steven Salo In Honor of John Jamison & Dr. Bill Prince Kathleen Sanz In Memory of June M. Hinckley J. Mark Scott In Honor of Judy Arthur & Judy Bowers Karen Smith In Memory of Retired SFC Alfred C. & Nita Greening

Harry Spyker In Honor of Fred J. & Marleen Miller Jeannine Stemmer In Memory of Barbara Kingman & Lauren Alonso Leiland Theriot Robert Todd In Memory of Gary Rivenbark Richard Uhler David Williams Kenneth Williams


PATRONS ($25 – $99)

Carlos Abril Judy Arthur In Memory of Ray Kickliter Shawn Barat In Memory of Duane L. Hendon Jessica Blakley In Memory of John Rose Karen Bradley In Memory of Harold Bradley Jamie Bryan In Memory of Wes Rainer Katarzyna (Kasia) Bugaj Dana Burt Stanley Butts Carol Casey Dale Choate

Don Coffman Dayna Cole In Memory of Linda Mann Erin Cushing Virginia Dickert In Memory of Lindsay Keller & Debbie Liles Jason Dobson Michael Dye Judith Evans Melanie Faulkner Bradley Franks In Memory of Gary W. Rivenbark Mark Goff Louise Gore Sharon Graham John Henderson

Stanley Hoch Marsha Juday Pauline Latorre Joseph Luechauer Kevin Lusk Cak Marshall In Memory of Sylvia Perry of Peripole, Inc. Stephen Mayo Robert McCormick Kim Miles Ree Nathan John Nista Mary Palmer Harry “Skip” Pardee On Behalf of Quinn & Vivienne Pardee

Galen Peters David Pletincks In Honor of Alexis & Jonathan Pletincks Edward Prasse C. William Renfroe In Memory of Herb Beam, Past FVA President Jeanne Reynolds Rollins College Department of Music Alicia Romero-Sardinas In Honor of John Rose Cristyn Schroder Thomas Silliman In Honor of Dr. Thomas Silliman, Sr. John Southall

Timothy Stafford In Honor of Olive Stafford Sharon Tacot John Watkins John Weaver Howard Weinstein In Memory of Barry Weinstein Farryn Weiss Donald West In Honor of Melvin Maxwell Anonymous (5) In Memory of Elliot Tannenbaum

FRIENDS (up to $24)

Carmen Aquino Ernesto Bayola Richard Beckford Jessica Calandra Ella Carr Renee Cartee Kelly Chisholm Blair Clawson In Memory of Shirley Kirwin David Cruz Richard Dasher

Matthew Davis In Memory of Robert Morrison Debbie Fahmie Jenny Freeman Tina Gill In Memory of Gary W. Rivenbark Lise Gilly Gerry Hacker Harold Hankerson Cheryce Harris Angela Hartvigsen

Ashton Horton Aisha Ivey Jason Jerald Rolanda Jones In Memory of June M. Hinckley Catherine Lee Anthony Lichtenberg Claudia Lusararian In Honor of Sue Byo Deborah Mar In Memory of Mrs. Barbara Kingman

Matthew McCutchen In Honor of John C. Carmichael Kristy Pagan Hank Phillips Marie Radloff In Memory of Charles F. Ulrey Emma Roser Stacie Rossow Edgar Rubio Melissa Salek Jack Salley

John Sinclair Thomas Stancampiano Phil Tempkins Gary Ulrich Billy B. Williamson Matthew Workman Richard Yaklich Anonymous (5) In Memory of Tom Damato

DONATE TODAY FOR A STRONGER TOMORROW. With your support, FMEA will continue to grow its programs for teachers and students, strengthen united advocacy efforts, and improve your professional development opportunities. Visit FMEA.org to learn more information about each fund and to make a donation.

November 2019

31


ResearchPuzzles FOR MUSIC TEACHERS This on-going column seeks to stimulate awareness of research issues for FMEA teachers and researchers.

RESEARCH COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN

Don D. Coffman, PhD University of Miami

Taking a moment to celebrate …

T

his month’s column marks the 100th appearance of “Research Puzzles.” From July 2007 to May 2013, my predecessor and friend Victor Fung (University of South Florida) prepared 48 installments of this column, with the hope

that readers would have a better understanding of the research process through reading the column over an extended

period of time. Each of his monthly contributions presented two questions with short answers, such as “What is a random sample?”, and during his six years he provided answers for nearly 100 questions. I became research chairman

in 2013 and shifted the column’s direction a bit, presenting questions that reflected the findings of published research studies. I’ve had some help along the way from members of the FMEA Research Committee—thank you, Bill Bauer, Cathy Benedict, Jennifer Bugos, Sangmi Kang, Michael Zelenak, and Steve Zdzinski for your contributions. What’s the outlook for high school and college enrollments?

Recently a colleague recommended a book by Nathan D. Grawe, Demographics and the Demand for Higher Education. The webpage from the publisher presents this sobering news:

Higher education faces a looming demographic storm. Decades-long patterns in fertility, migration, and immigration persistently nudge the country toward the Hispanic Southwest. As a result, the Northeast and Midwest—traditional higher education strongholds—expect to lose 5 percent of their college-aged populations

between now and the mid-2020s. Furthermore, and in response to the Great Recession, child-bearing has plum-

meted. In 2026, when the front edge of this birth dearth reaches college campuses, the number of college-aged students will drop almost 15 percent in just 5 years. … The future demand for college attendance, he argues, depends critically on institution type. While many schools face painful contractions, for example, demand for elite schools is expected to grow by more than 15 percent in future years (John Hopkins University Press).

This prompted me to do some more browsing about high school enrollments, and in one source (Seltzer, 2016), I

found detailed projections about a plateau in overall graduation numbers but a sizable increase in Hispanic students for the next 10 years. Higher education and PK-12 institutions indeed face some significant challenges in coming years that will vary by region and type of institution.

How might we respond as music teachers? Changes in demographics are beyond our control, yet our potential to

influence locally and statewide does make a difference. Being open to change and adapting our teaching to meet stu-

dents’ needs and interests is something I sense that FMEA members do well. I’m still a relative newcomer to Florida

(since 2011), but I continue to be impressed and enthused about a state whose music teachers, for example, support an

all-state guitar ensemble and, more recently, the Crossover Music Festival. Maintaining the status quo will not be

realistic for many teachers, so reflecting on who we will find in our classrooms, or who we might consider for our ensembles, or even the types of ensembles we offer is perhaps more important now than ever before. References John Hopkins University Press. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://jhupbooks.press.jhu.edu/title/demographics-and-demand-higher-education Seltzer, R. (2016, December 6). The high school graduate plateau. Retrieved from Inside Higher Ed: https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2016/12/06/high-school-graduates-drop-number-and-be-increasingly-diverse

Email your questions and feedback to d.coffman1@miami.edu with a subject heading Research Puzzles. Your questions, if selected for publication, will remain anonymous.

32    F l o r i d a

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ComponentNews

FLORIDA BANDMASTERS ASSOCIATION

Cathi Leibinger, President

presenter will be our 2020 FBA Hall of

Fame inductee Eddie Steadman discussing “Individual Musicianship in Middle School Band—How to Raise the Bar.”

We have some amazing clinicians

working with our student ensembles as well. Dr. David Waybright (University of

Florida) will be conducting the All-State Symphonic Band, and Dr. David Ragsdale

(University of Alabama Huntsville) will

be conducting the All-State Concert Band.

The All-State Middle School Band will be led by Michael Garasi (North Broward

Preparatory School) and will premiere a new piece by Haley Woodrow, entitled HIM, about the hurricanes of 2017 that

hit Florida. Jody Dunn (Crestview High

W

hile the start of the school year

discussion of the motivations of directors

love fall. My students and I are settling

Unfortunately, the conference allows for

seems like a crazy, mad dash, I

into a good routine and adjusting to our

newly adopted rotating block schedule. The kids are much better at this; I still

and accolades from the entire school

community. The time seems to go by so quickly, and now it is time to start looking ahead to the 2020 FMEA Professional

Development Conference to be held in Tampa, January 8-11.

Our FBA clinics committee spends

nical pedagogy as well as on high-level

music interpretation. There is even a deep

and the Middle School Jazz Band will

have a wonderful time with Cleve A.

Maloon (Conservatory School at North Palm Beach).

2020 is an FBA election year, and we

from the University of South Florida.

The ever-popular “Fix-It” clinics hosted

have two wonderful candidates for the

Erin Bodnar of the University of North

Barat and Bernard Hendricks, Jr. Their

position of president-elect in Shawn

by Ivan Wansley are always popular.

profiles are in the October issue of

Florida will be discussing “Cognitive

Florida Music Director. This year, voting

Conducting: Using Mental Activities to

will be done online through the FMEA

Aid Our Movement.”

website, allowing voting members who

FBA presents the Tom Bishop Award

in a relatively short period of time, and

There is a focus on practicality and tech-

at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh),

Myth” presented by Matthew McCutchen

amazing group of people carefully con-

as well as those who are quite seasoned.

Tomaro (Mary Pappart School of Music

music list and “The Work-Life Balance

to directors who have gone into a band

siders the needs of the younger teachers

piece written by its conductor, Mike

on the annual selection process of titles

much time looking at the many clinics

proposed to present to our members. This

School Jazz Band will premiere a new

Two of the sessions that will be of

to be added to the FBA concert MPA

the year, which resulted in admiration

Middle School Honor Band. The High

presented.

The beginners are excited that they can

students had their first performance of

Fundamental School) will conduct the

only a fraction of those many ideas to be

most value are Ted Shistle’s presentation

play their first five notes, and the older

Band, and Calista Zebley (Clearwater

and how to manage healthy work habits.

have to look at the calendar, rotation

list, and time chart to figure things out.

School) will lead the High School Honor

are unable to attend the FBA General Session on Thursday to take part in the

program and turned the program around

election. Voting will open in December and close on Thursday, January 9, so

at this year’s FMEA conference, we’ve

the results can be announced at the

assembled a panel of Bishop Award win-

meeting.

ners to give their thoughts on how to

I’m looking forward to seeing everyone

“Turn the Boat Without Capsizing or

there. It will be here before we know it.

Jumping Ship.” Another award-winning

November 2019

33


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA SCHOOL OF MUSIC

Welcomes new faculty

Barry Hartz Assistant Professor Music Education

Scott Lee

Sarah Politz

Assistant Professor Composition

Assistant Professor Ethnomusicology

Jose V Ruiz-Resto

Danielle VanTuinen

Silviu Ciulei

Assistant Professor Music Business & Entrepreneurship

Assistant Professor Low Brass, Tuba, Euphonium

Adjunct Assistant Professor Guitar

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES

GRADUATE DEGREES

PH.D. IN MUSIC

BACHELOR OF MUSIC

MASTER OF MUSIC

Performance

Performance

History & Literature

Music Composition

Conducting

DOCTOR OF MUSICAL ARTS

Music Theory

Theory

Conducting

Combination with an Outside Field

Composition

Composition

Ethnomusicology

Performance

BACHELOR OF MUSIC

History & Literature

IN MUSIC EDUCATION

Sacred Music

BACHELOR OF ARTS

Jazz Studies

Music

MASTER OF MUSIC EDUCATION (campus/online)

Entrepreneurship Event Management

PH.D. IN MUSIC EDUCATION

Music History and Literature Music History and Literature: Ethnomusicology Music Theory or Composition

INCOMING FRESHMEN AUDITION DAYS Saturday, January 18, 2020 Saturday, January 25, 2020 Sunday, January 26, 2020 TRANSFER AUDITION DAY Saturday, March 14, 2020

34    F l o r i d a

Music Director

SCHOOL OF MUSIC APPLICATION

arts.ufl.edu/music

Composition


ComponentNews

FLORIDA VOCAL ASSOCIATION

Jason Locker, President

chairwoman) and I are excited to welcome

Dr. Martha Shaw (High School Concert Chorus), Dr. David Brunner (Reading

Chorus), Dr. Lori Hetzel (SSAA Chorus), Dr. Leslie Blackwell (TTBB Chorus), Dr.

W

ithin the first week of November,

wanted when they were first available

process will be released. Congratulations

hotel of choice around November 9, as

the results of our all-state audition

to all of our students of the 2020 All-State Chorus and to the dedicated music edu-

cators whose sacrifice of time allowed

Jacob Narverud (Middle School Mixed

Chorus), and Dr. Lynne Gackle (Middle

School Treble Chorus) to Florida to work

on September 21, please plan to call your

with your students. We are also blessed to collaborate with Wanda Cantrell,

cancellations typically make a number of

Robin Frank, Lois Henry, Teresa Ancaya,

rooms available at that time.

Chad DeLoach, and Elizabeth Lajeunesse

Also, make sure you register yourself,

at the piano.

them to be prepared for their auditions!

your all-state students, and your chaper-

forget to cancel any reserved hotel rooms

tration closes at 11:59 pm on December 6.

leave this all-state experience with trea-

deal of money by simply meeting the

and moments made with each of these

Once the results are out, please don’t

that you will not need for the FMEA conference in January. The deadline to cancel rooms without penalty is November 9 at 5 pm. Once that deadline has passed, the card on file at the hotel will be charged for the first night of your stay. If

you were not able to get the rooms you

I have no doubt that your students will

ones for the conference before preregis-

sured memories of the beautiful music

You can save your choral program a great

amazing artist-teachers and of the time

preregistration deadline and avoiding

spent with new friends from all over

the increased cost of on-site registration.

Florida. I look forward to sharing with

We have a fabulous group of conduc-

you in their joy! See you in Tampa!

tors joining us for All-State this year! Elizabeth Phillips (FVA middle school

INSPIRE | CREATE | PERFORM

CHANGING LIVES THROUGH THE POWER OF THE ARTS 2019-20 ADMISSION AND SCHOLARSHIP AUDITIONS November 1, 2019 • February 1, 2020 • March 14, 2020 • April 4, 2020 BACHELOR DEGREES OFFERED

Performance • B.A. in Music Music Education • Music Therapy

10501 FGCU Boulevard South Fort Myers, FL 33965-6565 (239) 590-7851

fgcu.edu/cas/music

An All Steinway School

GENEROUS SCHOLARSHIPS AND OUT OF STATE TUITION WAIVERS AVAILABLE FOR TALENTED UNDERGRADUATES

November 2019

35


ComponentNews

FLORIDA NAfME COLLEGIATE

Katherine Attong-Mendes, President

10 Ways

to Enhance Your Education by Mavel Morales

The Oxford dictionary defines education in two ways: The process of receiving or giving systematic instruction, especially at a school or university; also, an enlightening experience. The first definition is the most familiar to students because that is why we attend a university, in order to further our education. The second definition, however, is just as important as the first, if not more so. Professors are wonderful assets to our education, but ultimately, one is responsible for creating one’s own education. Educators can facilitate your success, but you need to cultivate your own experiences. Here are some ways I have found to be incredibly helpful to make me a better person and educator.

1/ Experience live music and art.

Seeing live music is educational, and it

fuels the soul. It is a fundamental element to curating your success. There is a lot

to learn from watching people perform, especially if it is a genre or an art form

with which you are not as well acquainted. We need to be supporting the arts in

all facets because if we do not, then we cannot expect others to follow suit.

2/ Listen to and perform music for fun.

Music students are constantly immersed

in music, and sometimes music is the

last thing they want to think about. It’s important to continue to listen to music for fun to help avoid burnout. Jamming

out with your friends is incredibly beneficial, and can remind you that music is

fun. You’ll be surprised how much you can learn about an ensemble by creating music for your personal enjoyment.

3/ Dress to impress.

Look good, feel good. Sometimes the best way to perform better or to gain courage

36    F l o r i d a

is by dressing up. Never underestimate

band. This has deepened my knowledge

on both your and others’ perception of

more marketable as an educator.

the impact a change of wardrobe can have

you. This is especially true for day-to-day interactions with professionals.

4/ Combine your passions.

Music does not need to feel so separated

from other parts of your life. Find a way to combine what you love. An interdisciplin-

ary database in your head creates a better understanding of the world. Everything is

connected in some way, and by combining different areas of life such as math, philosophy, scuba diving, etc., you’re able

to see those connections and maybe even discover something new.

5/ Experience elements outside of

your comfort zone.

This is about becoming marketable as an educator. Even if you identify as a certain

type of musician, step outside of your comfort zone and familiarize yourself

of music and has allowed me to become

6/ Learn to relax.

Our mental health and physical health are the most important parts of ourselves. We need to learn to take care of ourselves

and to decompress. This can come in

forms such as working out, meditation, mindfulness, sleeping, socializing, etc. The important thing is not what you do; it’s how it helps you.

7/ Be effective, not busy.

It’s easy to be busy because of our involvement with student organizations, jobs,

and homework. The truth is we all have

24 hours in a day. We have to make sure to plan and to organize ourselves effectively

so that our default is not being busy. The better we plan, the more effective we can be.

with areas of music you would not typi-

8/ Ask questions.

sical voice but found myself performing in

life. We are fortunate to live in a world

cally lean toward. In my case, I study clasa Latin jazz orchestra and in the marching

Music Director

Everyone has a different experience in

with people of diverse nationalities,


cultures, beliefs, ideas, and experiences.

u Lead your students to a beautiful sound with

It is important for us to acknowledge that

warm-ups focused on playing in all parts of the bow.

and to seek answers to questions. We do

u Creative Warm-Ups is broken down into four

not have to know all the answers, but we

interchangeable units to provide flexibility:

are responsible for asking the questions.

Sound Intonation • Sound Rhythms • Sound Bowing Fluency and Choreography • Sound Creativity

9/ Know your strengths and

u Develop improvisation and creativity skills with

weaknesses.

exercises ranging from a 17th-century Chaconne to a drone-based Taqsim.

It is important to know what you are

good at and what you are developing in.

Knowing yourself allows you to seek out

people and programs on how to grow. We are always learning, but we can only grow if we know in what areas we need an extra boost.

10/ Involve yourself with activ-

ities outside the music department. The amazing thing about being in an

institution of higher learning is that it caters to everyone. There are many leadership development programs that have

u Develop technical skills through clear,

concise, yet thorough exercises.

u Sound Development presents right-

and left-hand exercises and routines essential for success: Sound Tone • Sound Bowings • Sound Shifting • Sound Scales and Arpeggios

u Focus on how to develop a beautiful

tone with a comprehensive presentation of bow lanes, bow weight, bow speed, shifting, and vibrato.

nothing to do with music and will still benefit you. Becoming a volunteer in your community is a wonderful way to give

back and to understand people better. Joining clubs that have people who study

All levels are available in SI Online and SmartMusic

connect with others. This is a great way to

u Expert MasterClass videos,

different subjects helps you network and

accompaniment tracks, and supplemental exercises are available on SI Online.

form connections with other people and to support each other in your respective

areas of study. You advocate for your pro-

u Empower students with immediate

feedback on their progress with SmartMusic.

fession and they advocate for theirs. Mavel Morales is a

senior at the University of Miami majoring in music

education with minors in

Learn more at alfred.com/SI-Strings.

education and philosophy. She is a mezzo soprano

studying classical voice.

She serves as president of her NAfME chapter and parliamentarian of the Florida NAfME Collegiate State Executive Board.

November 2019

37


ComponentNews S

ince 1863, Americans have annually observed a Thursday at the end of

FLORIDA NAfME COLLEGIATE

Mark A. Belfast, Jr., PhD, Advisor

mend to them that while offering

full enjoyment of peace, harmony,

for such singular deliverances and

of the Thirty-Eighth Congress of the

up the ascriptions justly due to Him

November as a day of thanksgiving. On

October 3 of that year, President Abraham

blessings, they do also, with humble

Lincoln signed a proclamation that stated,

penitence for our national perverse-

in part:

ness and disobedience, commend to His tender care all those who have

I do therefore invite my fellow cit-

become widows, orphans, mourners

izens in every part of the United

or sufferers in the lamentable civil

States, and also those who are at sea

strife in which we are unavoidably

and those who are sojourning in for-

engaged, and fervently implore the

eign lands, to set apart and observe

interposition of the Almighty Hand

the last Thursday of November next,

to heal the wounds of the nation and

as a day of Thanksgiving and Praise

to restore it as soon as may be consis-

to our beneficent Father who dwel-

tent with the Divine purposes to the

leth in the Heavens. And I recom-

tranquillity and Union (Public Acts United States, p. 735).

Let us first acknowledge how beauti-

ful our language can be. Wow! What is fascinating about that excerpt is that in 1863, President Lincoln found himself and his country in the middle of a civil

war. Nevertheless, in the midst of the “national perverseness” and “lamentable

civil strife,” Lincoln chose to be thankful.

Throughout the rest of the proclamation, Lincoln describes for his fellow citizens precisely why they ought to give thanks.

He believed the U.S. population to be

increasing (in spite of the ongoing mili-

tary conflict), industry and the economy FLORIDA ORCHESTRA ASSOCIATION

Matthew Davis, President

to be growing, and perhaps most importantly, no foreign powers had decided to

take advantage of America’s military vulnerability during the Civil War. Whew!

H

appy fall, everyone! I hope you have begun to feel a little relief from the heat as we move toward preparation for the holidays and that all is well in

your classrooms thus far.

As we follow close on the heels of an outstanding Fall Conference, the plan-

ning committee welcomes your ideas for future sessions. Please begin thinking of topics for the 2020 Fall Conference, and share them with us so we may best

serve you. We also need people to serve as all-state coordinators for the 7-8

Middle School Orchestra, 9-10 Concert Orchestra, and 9-12 High School Honors Orchestra. If you are interested in serving in any of these capacities, please contact our executive director, Donald Langland, at exdirfoa@yahoo.com.

Congratulations to all those students who prepared and auditioned for our

all-state ensembles, and thank you to the teachers who inspire these students

daily. We are looking forward to outstanding performances from our all-state

ensembles at the 2020 FMEA Professional Development Conference in January. By now, audition results should have been published. Please remember to cancel any hotel rooms you don’t need by November 9 at 5 pm. On November 12, you will be charged for the first night of each room held. Conference preregistration

closes at 11:59 pm on December 6. The all-state orchestra coordinators will mail music in December before the winter break. Please anticipate its arrival at your school for each of your all-state students.

Wishing you all the best as we continue to inspire our future.

38    F l o r i d a

Music Director

Later, Congress solidified Thanks-

giving Day as the fourth Thursday in November (rather than the last), and we often refer to the time during that fourth

week as Thanksgiving Break, but how much thanks do you typically give? This year, I

challenge you to consider who, what, and where you are. It is likely you did not

reach this point in your story without a little help. This November, between

watching big football rivalries and finishing your orchestration projects, choose

to be thankful. Send a note of thanks to some of the folks who guided your steps

and enabled you to be who, what, and where you are today. Kiss your spouse!

Hug your mom. Send a message of gratitude to your sixth-grade music teacher (thanks, Dr. Barber!) or your high school

band director (you continue to inspire me, Dr. Logan). Choosing to give thanks

will bring joy to you and to them. Try it. You’ll thank me later.


FLORIDA ELEMENTARY MUSIC EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION

Ernesta Chicklowski, President

G

reetings! It’s the most wonderful

time of the year, and also the bus-

iest! Between all of the hustle and bustle of rehearsals, programs, and concerts at your school, take a moment to breathe, reflect, and remind yourself of the amaz-

ing joy you bring to the lives of all of your students. Our

annual

FMEA

Professional

Development Conference is just around

the corner. Now is the perfect time to remind your school administrators of

your and your students’ participation in this dynamic and meaningful education conference. The FMEA conference provides wonderful opportunities

to enhance and further music skills, to

Rene Boyer-Alexander (sponsored by

there are too many good sessions hap-

exhibit hall, and to be enveloped with the

of Cincinnati’s College Conservatory

clinicians will be scheduled in repeat

reconnect with old friends, to shop the

sounds of incredible music swelling from

each workshop room or concert hall. This conference leaves our members feeling revitalized and recharged from spending

memorable time with colleagues who share their love and passion for teaching music in our Florida schools.

We are delighted to have world-class

clinicians at the 2020 conference. The innovative and energetic music educator

Matthew Stensrud (sponsored by West Music) will be joining us from Sidwell

Friends Lower School in Washington, D.C., with these powerful and engaging sessions: “Improvise Now! Using Playful Improvisation to Prepare Students for

Meaningful Notation,” “Dust them Off! Breathing Life Into Forgotten Resources,” and “Teaching Without Words: Exploring Innovative

Teaching

in

Elementary

Music.” Esteemed music educator Dr.

pening at the same time. Many of our

Peripole) will join us from the University

sessions throughout the conference.

of Music as one of FEMEA’s conference

Sandy Lantz and Gretchen Wahlberg will

headliners. Known nationally and inter-

lead an evening session, “Black Light

nationally for her work in multicultural

Thursday,” following the FEMEA Annual

and urban music education, her 2020

Business Meeting on Thursday. Come

conference sessions will be “Sigamé

sing, play, and dance with your friends in

Mis Amigos/Follow Me My Friends,”

the amazing black light! Participants will

“Hook, Line, and Sinker: The Power of

learn pieces involving drumming, danc-

Rhythm and Rhyme in the Classroom,”

ing with props, and performing body

and “Jazz Beginnings in the General

percussion. (Wear dark clothing to max-

Music Classroom.” Cutting-edge multi-

imize the black light effect.)

cultural, Orff, and choral sessions will be

In addition to our outstanding clini-

presented by headliners Karen Howard

and Roger Sams (sponsored by Music Is

cians from far and wide, remember that

educators will present sessions titled

rehearsals for the All-State Elementary

your registration badge gets you into the

Elementary). These distinguished music

Chorus and the All-State Orff Ensemble,

“World Music Pedagogy in Elementary

the exhibit hall, and the Curriculum Fair.

School,” “Collecting and Arranging Folk

This year’s conference will be outstand-

Songs for Children,” and “Is It Orff or

ing. Your FEMEA Board of Directors and

Choir?”

I look forward to seeing you soon in

A common post-conference comment/

Tampa!

complaint we receive every year is that

MUSIC EDUCATION JOB BANK! flmusiced.org/FLmusicApps/JobBank

November 2019

39


CommitteeReports I

AWARDS COMMITTEE

Debbie Fahmie, Chairwoman

want to take this opportunity to thank

quality music education happening in a

ing each and every list of achievements

a nomination packet for the 2020 FMEA

inators, thanks for your participation in

nomination packet, ultimately making

everyone who took the time to submit

Awards Program. I am always so inspired by learning more about the fab-

variety of demographic settings. So, nomthe process this year, and if your nominee wasn’t selected, please consider resubmitting for next year.

ulous things happening throughout our state. the nominators put

ty to thank the ded-

having sample appli-

icated

cations posted on the

guide. We received appli-

rural districts. The selection committee was impressed by seeing evidence of

of

folks who are doing remarkable jobs of recruiting and retaining students in their high-quality music programs, as well as

those who have contributed their entire careers to music education.

In my next article, you will have the

opportunity to read about all of the 2020

one nominee from each category. Trust

be just as inspired as I am by them. Until

me when I say it was no small job. The committee did due diligence in review-

Music Director

Education Service Award applications.

Committee, who had the

daunting job of selecting just

cations representing all areas

of the state, from large districts to small

members

the Awards Selection

website was helpful as a

40    F l o r i d a

I always enjoy getting to meet so many

seize the opportuni-

process. I hope that

Next up we will be reviewing the

would love to celeI also want to

into the application

awardee in each category.

Music Enrollment Award and Music

brate.

much time and effort

the tough decision of selecting just one

We certainly have many

worthy individuals we

It was obvious that

and letter of support presented in each

awardees, so stay tuned. I know you will then, enjoy this fall season, and I look forward to seeing you in Tampa!


STUDENT DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE

MULTICULTURAL NETWORK Bernard Hendricks, Chairman

I

t’s November! Time sure does fly by when you are having fun. Now

Michael Antmann, EdD, Chairman

T

he Florida Music Education Association offers two programs to make our con-

ference accessible to students who may not have an opportunity to attend as an

all-state student: the Student Conference Experience and the new Tri-M Conference

that your year is in full swing and

Experience.

concerts, let me take a quick moment

annual conference to students from throughout the state. Participating students will

Network news. Dr. Chandler Wilson

performing groups. These students will have memorable experiences they can take

he has since accepted a new position

on Thursday and Friday of the 2020 FMEA Professional Development Conference.

as chairman until our January busi-

engage in networking and social activities with

the MCN will elect a new chairman

The purpose of the FMEA Tri-M Conference

you are probably preparing for winter

The purpose of the FMEA Student Conference Experience is to expand access to the

to catch everyone up on Multicultural

interact with amazing clinicians and educators, college representatives, and incredible

was elected to serve as chairman, but

back and share with their high school music programs. The program will take place

out of state. So I was asked to remain

Students will participate in workshops, observe rehearsals, attend College Night, and

ness meeting in Tampa, during which

their peers.

who will take office in May. Speaking

Experience is to provide students with experienc-

encourage everyone to attend. We all

skills, as well as to expose them to the experiences

ting there, but the benefits of attending

of the Student Conference Experience. This year, Tri-M students must preregister for

of the Tampa conference, I want to

es that will build their leadership and advocacy

have some type of challenges with get-

available at the annual conference. Tri-M participants will be involved with portions

far outweigh the obstacles.

the conference and should follow the Tri-M student schedule. Both programs require

As you plan for your winter perfor-

mances, don’t forget to explore music

chaperones to be present at all times.

One teacher per school may nominate students for these programs, and schools can

of various cultures, especially those

only submit students for one of these programs. Details, including requirements and

allows for student ownership in our

questions.

represented in your classrooms. This

deadlines, can be found on the FMEA website. Please feel free to contact me with any

programs as well as diversity in music

literature and cultural experiences. It is also a great opportunity to invite community leaders, partners, as well as elected officials to your winter pro-

ductions. Elected officials typically love the opportunity to be seen in

their districts interacting with their constituents; however, they can’t do

that if they don’t know what’s going

on. Send them an invitation and see what happens. Another great tool is

having your parents contact elected

officials to let them know the impor-

tance and value that music education plays in their community. More advo-

cacy information is available on the FMEA website.

Have a great fall, and I hope to see

everyone in Tampa come January.

Elementary, Middle, and High School Band, Choir, and Orchestra 2020: April 3 April 17 April 24

2021: April 9 April 16 April 23

2022: April 8 April 22 May 6

www.SMMFestival.com or call:1-855-766-3008

November 2019

41


CommitteeReports

DIVERSE LEARNERS COMMITTEE Alice-Ann Darrow, PhD, Chairwoman

Addressing Social Justice in Music Education:

RESOURCES FOR MUSIC EDUCATORS

F

or this month’s column, I would

and instructional personnel to

have found timely and useful to

undoubtedly daunting. Where

all students. The challenge is

like to share four resources I

to start? Recognition of and con-

my teaching and ponderings about

cern for the needs of students

education today. These resources

who lack an appropriate music

are four recently published books

education is a starting point.

about social justice in music educa-

Being informed and advocating

tion. They are both authored texts

for all students takes us another

and edited books with chapter con-

tributions from some of our finest

step forward to meeting this

thought leaders in music education. As an

financial and human resources equitably.

challenge. Unfortunately, most of us live

term social justice and what it means in

who attend schools in neighborhoods

of those who are most like ourselves.

introduction, I will attempt to define the society and education, and then give the reference information for the texts as well as a brief overview of each one. What is social justice?

Social justice is a term used often in contemporary discourse. As a societal construct, social justice is the concept of fair

and just relations between individuals

and society. Because the term is vague and broad, evaluating the extent to which a society is just is difficult; though it is gen-

erally measured by the equitable distribu-

tion of opportunities and privileges. The

Unfortunately, we know that students

with low tax bases do not have the tech-

nology, books, or other artistic and academic resources that create a well-round-

ed education, while students in high tax areas have the latest academic resources,

technologies, and counselors and other

personnel to help them succeed in school

and life. Bringing about change is not easy and is a constant challenge for those who care about the education of all our future

citizens. Addressing the challenge means

first understanding the challenge, partic-

ularly as it applies to our own disciplines.

application of social justice in education

Social justice in music education

Social justice in education is a multifacet-

education implies more than just recog-

takes on a somewhat different meaning. ed endeavor involving the negotiation of conflicting values and interests, political action, and concern for all students, especially those who have been marginalized

or oppressed (Benedict, Schmidt, Spruce, & Woodford, 2016).

Social justice is also about distributing

42    F l o r i d a

The pursuit of social justice in music nition of differences and allowing for

greater diversity and inclusivity in the classroom (Benedict, Schmidt, Spruce, & Woodford, 2016). Like all education, the music education profession must

grapple with the challenge of providing equitable music offerings, resources,

Music Director

in silos. We are familiar with the lives Unless we make a conscious effort, we are generally unfamiliar with how others live their lives. At least initially, becoming familiar with and understanding the

lived experiences and circumstances of students whose personal and educational conditions are far different from ours and our students will help us the most

in meeting the challenge of social justice in music education. I believe these four texts will help any music educator better

understand the issues involved in educa-

tional social justice. The viewpoints and

perspectives of the various authors will likely challenge any reader to consider his or her own thoughts and opinions about

social justice in music education today. I welcome discussion of the texts from

FMD readers or music educators as well as recommendations of other useful texts on social justice in music education.

The following summaries of these texts

were written by the authors and are taken from the publishers’ webpages.


Benedict, C., Schmidt, P., Spruce, G. & Woodford, P. (Eds.) (2016).

The Oxford handbook on social justice in music education. New York: Oxford University Press. The Oxford Handbook of Social Justice in Music Education provides a comprehensive overview

and scholarly analyses of the major themes and issues relating to social justice in musical and educational practice worldwide. The first section of the handbook conceptualizes social justice

while framing its pursuit within broader contexts and concerns. Authors in the succeeding sections of the handbook fill out what social justice entails for music teaching and learning in the home, school, university, and wider community as they grapple with cycles of injustice that might be perpetuated by music pedagogy. The concluding section of the handbook offers

specific practical examples of social justice in action through a variety of educational and social projects and pedagogical practices that will inspire and guide those wishing to confront

and attempt to ameliorate musical or other inequity and injustice. Consisting of 42 chapters by

authors from across the globe, the handbook will be of interest to anyone who wishes to better understand what social justice is and why its pursuit in and through music education matters. Talbot, B. C. (Ed.). (2018).

Marginalized voices in music education. New York: Routledge Publishers. Marginalized Voices in Music Education explores the American culture of music teachers by looking at marginalization and privilege in music education as a means to critique prevail-

ing assumptions and paradigms. In 15 contributed essays, authors set out to expand notions

of who we believe we are as music educators—and who we want to become. This book is a collection of perspectives by some of the leading and emerging thinkers in the profession and identifies cases of individuals or groups who had experienced marginalization. It shares the diverse stories in a struggle for inclusion, with the goal to begin or expand conversation in undergraduate and graduate courses in music teacher education. Through the telling of these

stories, authors hope to recast music education as fertile ground for transformation, experimentation, and renewal.

Lind, V. R., & McKoy, C. (2016).

Culturally responsive teaching in music education: From understanding to application. New York: Routledge Publishers. Culturally Responsive Teaching in Music Education presents teaching methods that are responsive to how different culturally specific knowledge bases impact learning. It is a pedagogy that

recognizes the importance of including students’ cultural references in all aspects of learning.

Designed to be a supplementary resource for teachers of undergraduate and graduate music education courses, the book provides examples in the context of music education, with theories presented in Section I and a review of teaching applications in Section II. Culturally Responsive

Teaching in Music Education is an effort to answer the question: How can I teach music to my

«« Offering theoretical/philosophical frameworks of social justice; «« Providing practical examples of transferring theory into practice in music education; «« Illustrating culturally responsive pedagogy within the classroom; and «« Demonstrating the connection of culturally responsive teaching to the school and larger

students in a way that is culturally responsive? This book serves several purposes, by:

community.

Continued on page 44

November 2019

43


CommitteeReports DIVERSE LEARNERS COMMITTEE

Continued from page 43 Hess, J. (2019).

Music education for social change: Constructing an activist music education. New York: Routledge Publishers. Music Education for Social Change: Constructing an Activist Music Education develops an activist music education rooted in principles of social justice and anti-oppression. Based on the interviews of 20 activist-musicians across the United States and Canada, the book explores the

common themes, perceptions, and philosophies among them, positioning these activist-musicians as catalysts for change in music education while raising the question: amidst racism

and violence targeted at people who embody difference, how can music education contribute to changing the social climate?

Music has long played a role in activism and resistance. By drawing upon this rich tradition,

educators can position activist music education as part of a long-term response to events, as a crucial initiative to respond to ongoing oppression, and as an opportunity for youth to develop collective, expressive, and critical thinking skills. This emergent activist music education—

like activism pushing toward social change—focuses on bringing people together, expressing

experiences, and identifying (and challenging) oppressions. Grounded in practice with examples integrated throughout the text, Music Education for Social Change is an imperative and urgent consideration of what may be possible through music and music education.

2020   F M E A   P rofess i o na l   Deve l o p me nt   Co nfe re nce

BEexhAibitonr! 44    F l o r i d a

Music Director

R E S E RSVPEO T Y O U RD AY ! TO LEA R N MOR E AT:

DEADLINE

Nov. 15, 2019

FMEA.org/Exhibits

For information specific to the Trade Show Exhibition, please email Exhibit Managers Byron and Bobbie Smith at exhibits@fmeaexhibits.com.


ExecutiveDirector’sNotes

Musical Excellence: Past, Present, & Future

FMEA Executive Director

T

he 2020 FMEA Professional Development Conference, to be held January 8-11 in Tampa, is aptly titled

Kathleen D. Sanz, PhD

Musical Excellence: Past, Present, & Future. Sessions will have a focus on the past, the present, and the future. The mission

The Future

As we approach 2020, we need to look toward the future with foresight. The 20’s decade is being labeled by

of The Florida Music

some as the Tumultuous Twenties, and we as music educators will certainly need foresight for teaching and learning in order to meet the many diverse needs of our students and programs.

Education

Association is to promote quality,

The Past

On September 23-26, 1999, the past president of MENC (now the National Association for Music Education) led Vision 2020, a symposium where music educators gathered in Tallahassee and presented a vision to guide

the future of music education through 20 years. I was fortunate to attend this incredible gathering of the field. The symposium resulted in the Housewright Declaration (named for Wiley Housewright), which included

comprehensive

music education for all Florida students as a

agreements by the field in these 12 areas:

part of their complete

education.

We agree on the following:

1. All persons, regardless of age, cultural heritage, ability, venue, or financial circumstance deserve to participate fully in the best music experiences possible.

2. The integrity of music study must be preserved. Music educators must lead the devel-

IMPORTANT DATES

experience.

FMEA Professional Development Conference & All-State Concerts Musical Excellence: Past, Present, & Future January 8-11, 2020 Tampa, Florida Registration for the conference is open. Be sure to watch the FMEA website to take advantage of this excellent conference in Tampa.

opment of meaningful music instruction and

3. Time must be allotted for formal music study at all levels of instruction such that a comprehensive, sequential, and standards-based program of music instruction is made available.

4. All music has a place in the curriculum. Not

only does the Western art tradition need to be preserved and disseminated, music educators

also need to be aware of other music that people experience and be able to integrate it into classroom music instruction.

5. Music educators need to be proficient and knowledgeable

concerning

technological

changes and advancements and be prepared to use all appropriate tools in advancing music study while recognizing the importance of

people coming together to make and share music.

6. Music educators should involve the music

industry, other agencies, individuals, and

music institutions in improving the quality

NAfME National Conference Amplify 2019: Opening Doors for All Students November 6-10, 2019 Gaylord Palms, Kissimmee, Florida Don’t miss this opportunity to attend this national conference right in our own backyard! NAfME All-National Honor Ensembles November 7-10, 2019 Gaylord Palms, Kissimmee, Florida FMEA is pleased to announce that Florida has 42 students in the All-National Honor Ensembles. Come listen to our Florida students as they perform with students from around the nation. Government Relations and Advocacy Mark your calendars for the 2020 Florida Legislative Session, which begins on January 14 and ends on March 13. Please be prepared to take action and advocate for your music students. Be sure to read Government Relations Chairwoman Jeanne Reynolds’ article in each edition of FMD.

Continued on page 46

November 2019

45


Advertiser Index The Florida Music Director is made possible by the participation of the following businesses whose advertisements appear in this issue. They make it possible to provide you with a high-quality publication, and we gratefully acknowledge their support of our mission. We hope you will take special notice of these advertisements and consider the products and services offered. It is another important way you can support your professional association and the enhancement of Florida music education. The publisher does not endorse any particular company, product, or service. The Florida Music Education Association (FMEA) is not responsible for the content of any advertisement and reserves the right to accept or refuse any advertisement submitted for publication. Information for advertisers (rate card, insertion orders, graphics requirements, etc.) can be found at FMEAMediaKit.org. ADVERTISERS Alfred Music Publishing Co., Inc.................................................................. 37 Florida Atlantic University....................................................................... IFC Florida Gulf Coast University..................................................................... 35 Florida State University.................................................................................. 7 Illiac Software.................................................................................................. 40 Smoky Mountain Music Festival.................................................................. 41 Stanton’s Sheet Music....................................................................................... 9 University of Florida..................................................................................... 34 Yamaha Corporation of America............................................................... BC

Advertisers shown in bold provide additional support to FMEA members through their membership in the Corporate and Academic Partners program. These advertisers deserve your special recognition and attention.

EDnotes Continued from page 45

and quantity of music instruction. This should start within each local community by defining the appropriate role of these resources in teaching and learning.

7. The currently defined role of the music educator will expand as settings for music instruction proliferate. Professional music educators must provide a leadership role in coordinating music

activities beyond the school setting to ensure formal and informal curricular integration.

8. Recruiting prospective music teachers is a responsibility of

many, including music educators. Potential teachers need to be drawn from diverse backgrounds, identified early, led to devel-

op both teaching and musical abilities, and sustained through ongoing professional development. Also, alternative licensing

should be explored in order to expand the number and variety of teachers available to those seeking music instruction.

9. Continuing research addressing all aspects of music activity

needs to be supported including intellectual, emotional, and

physical responses to music. Ancillary social results of music study also need exploration as well as specific studies to increase meaningful music listening.

10. Music making is an essential way in which learners come to know and understand music and music traditions. Music making should be broadly interpreted to be performing, composing, SUBSCRIPTIONS: Direct correspondence regarding subscriptions to: Hinckley Center for Fine Arts Education, 402 Office Plaza, Tallahassee, FL, 32301-2757. Subscription cost included in FMEA membership dues ($9); libraries, educational institutions, and all others within the United States: $27 plus 7.5% sales tax. CIRCULATION: 4,500 educators. Published eight times annually by The Florida Music Education Association, Hinckley Center for Fine Arts Education: 402 Office Plaza Tallahassee, FL 32301-2757. FMEA reserves the right to approve any application for appearance and to edit all materials proposed for distribution. Permission is granted to all FMEA members to reprint articles from the Florida Music Director for non-commercial, educational purposes. Non-members may request permission from the FMEA office. SUBMISSIONS: Article and art submissions are always considered and should be submitted on or before the 1st of the month, one month prior to the publication issue to: D. Gregory Springer, PhD, dgspringer@fsu.edu.

All articles must be provided in digital format (e.g., Microsoft Word). All applicable fonts and images must be provided. Images must be at least 300 dpi resolution at 100% of the size. All submissions must be accompanied by a proof (color, if applicable). Ads may be submitted via email to val@fmea.org. Florida Music Director reserves the right to refuse any ad not prepared to the correct specifications OR to rework the ad as needed with fees applied. 2019-20 FMEA Membership: You are eligible for membership in the Florida Music Education Association if you are an individual engaged in the teaching, supervision, or administration of music in elementary and secondary schools, colleges, or universities within the state. Visit FMEA.org/membership to learn more about the benefits of active membership.

46    F l o r i d a

Music Director

improvising, listening, and interpreting music notation.

11. Music educators must join with others in providing opportuni-

ties for meaningful music instruction for all people beginning at the earliest possible age and continuing throughout life.

12. Music educators must identify the barriers that impede the full actualization of any of the above and work to overcome them.

The Present

Turning to the present, we realize we are quickly approaching 2020. FMEA will review the documents developed at the 1999

symposium to help lead us into the future with knowledge based

on the past and with foresight into the future. The 2020 FMEA Professional Development Conference will have sessions devoted to moving Florida programs forward. We look forward to having

you as part of these important discussions, so please plan to attend. Let’s continue to work toward the FMEA mission of promoting

quality, comprehensive music education in all Florida schools. Musically yours,

Kathleen D. Sanz, PhD


F LO R I DA M U S I C E D U C AT I O N A SSO C I AT I O N

Officers and Directors

EXECUTIVE BOARD President

Steven N. Kelly, PhD

Florida State University; College of Music, KMU 330 Tallahassee, FL 32306 (850) 644-4069; skelly@admin.fsu.edu Past President

Kenneth Williams, PhD

Douglas Anderson School of the Arts 2445 San Diego Road; Jacksonville, FL 32207 (904) 346-5620; kenwms@flmusiced.org President-Elect

Shelby Chipman, PhD

Florida A&M University, Department of Music Foster-Tanner Music Bldg., Room 318 Tallahassee, FL 32307; (850) 599-8165 shelby.chipman@famu.edu FBA President

Cathi Leibinger

Ransom Everglades School 2045 Bayshore Dr.; Miami, FL 33133 (305) 250-6868; president@fba.flmusiced.org FCMEA President

Stacie Rossow, DMA

Florida Atlantic University Schmidt College of Arts and Letters 777 Glades Rd.; Boca Raton, FL 33431 (561) 297-4230; srossow@fau.edu

Historian/Parliamentarian & Executive Director....................................................Kathleen D. Sanz, PhD Hinckley Center for Fine Arts Education 402 Office Plaza Dr.; Tallahassee, FL 32301-2757 (850) 878-6844; Fax: (850) 942-1793; kdsanz@fmea.org

Florida NAfME Collegiate Advisor

Mark A. Belfast, Jr., PhD

Southeastern University 1000 Longfellow Blvd.; Lakeland, FL 33801 (863) 667-5104; mabelfast@seu.edu FMSA President

Harry “Skip” Pardee

Collier County Public Schools 5775 Osceola Trail; Naples, FL 34109 (239) 377-0087; pardeh@collierschools.com FOA President

Matthew Davis

Harrison School for the Arts 750 Hollingsworth Rd.; Lakeland, FL 33801 (863) 499-2855; matthew.lawson.davis@gmail.com FVA President

Jason Locker

Orange County Public Schools 445 W. Amelia St.; Orlando, FL 32801 (407) 317-3200; jason@fva.net Member-at-Large

Edgar Rubio

Silver Trail Middle School 18300 Sheridan St.; Pembroke Pines, FL 33331 (754) 323-4321; merenguesax@aol.com

FLORIDA NAfME COLLEGIATE President............................................................ Katherine Attong-Mendes University of Miami; kxa395@miami.edu Past President...............................................................Jennifer Luechauer jennifer.luechauer@browardschools.com

FMEA COMMITTEE CHAIRPERSONS

FLORIDA ELEMENTARY MUSIC EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION

Awards.................................................................................... Debbie Fahmie fahmied@yahoo.com

President..................................................................... Ernesta Chicklowski Roosevelt Elementary School; 3205 S. Ferdinand Ave.; Tampa, FL 33629 (813) 272-3090; ernesta.chicklowski@sdhc.k12.fl.us

Budget/Finance, Development.................................. Steven N. Kelly, PhD Florida State University, College of Music, KMU 330 Tallahassee, FL 32306; (850) 644-4069; skelly@admin.fsu.edu Committee Council...................................................................................TBA

Past President...............................................................Rosemary Pilonero rosemary@femea.flmusiced.org

Conference Chairman................................................John K. Southall, PhD Indian River State College; 3209 Virginia Ave.; Fort Pierce, FL 34981 (772) 462-7810; johnsouthall@me.com

Executive Director............................................................. Jennifer Sullivan 1750 Common Way Rd., Orlando, FL 32814 (321) 624-5433; slljenn@aol.com

Contemporary Media................................................... David Williams, PhD University of South Florida; 4202 E. Fowler Ave., MUS 101 Tampa, FL 33620; (813) 974-9166; davidw@usf.edu

FLORIDA MUSIC SUPERVISION ASSOCIATION President.....................................................................Harry “Skip” Pardee Collier County Public Schools; 5775 Osceola Trail; Naples, FL 34109 (239) 377-0087; pardeh@collierschools.com

Diverse Learners.....................................................Alice-Ann Darrow, PhD Florida State University, Music Education and Music Therapy 123 N. Copeland St.; Tallahassee, FL 32306 (850) 645-1438; aadarrow@fsu.edu

Past President............................................................................Scott Evans scott.evans@ocps.net

Emerging Leaders............................................................ Mary Palmer, EdD 11410 Swift Water Cir.; Orlando, FL 32817 (407) 382-1661; mpalmerassoc@aol.com

Government Relations..................................................Jeanne W. Reynolds Pinellas County Schools, Administration Bldg. 301 4th St., SW, P.O. Box 2942; Largo, FL 33779-2942 (727) 588-6055; reynoldsj@pcsb.org

University of Miami; kxa395@miami.edu

President...................................................................... Stacie Rossow, DMA Florida Atlantic University; Schmidt College of Arts and Letters 777 Glades Rd.; Boca Raton, FL 33431 (561) 297-4230; srossow@fau.edu

FSMA President................................................................Craig Collins, EdD College of Arts & Media, Southeastern University 1000 Longfellow Blvd.; Lakeland, FL 33801 (863) 667-5657; cscollins@seu.edu

Roosevelt Elementary School 3205 S. Ferdinand Ave.; Tampa, FL 33629 (813) 272-3090 ernesta.chicklowski@sdhc.k12.fl.us

Katherine Attong-Mendes

FLORIDA COLLEGE MUSIC EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION

Editor-in-Chief.....................................................D. Gregory Springer, PhD FSU College of Music; 122 N. Copeland St.; Tallahassee, FL 32306 (850) 644-2925; dgspringer@fsu.edu

FMEA Corporate & Academic Partners....................................Fred Schiff All County Music; 8136 N. University Dr.; Tamarac, FL 33321-1708 (954) 722-3424; fredallcounty@aol.com

Florida NAfME Collegiate President

Business Manager..................................................................Jo Hagan, CPA 8975 San Rae Rd.; Jacksonville, FL 32257 (904) 379-2245; Fax: (904) 379-2260; jo@barefootaccounting.com

EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS

FEMEA President

Ernesta Chicklowski

Treasurer......................................................................................... Ted Hope Hillsborough County Public Schools, School Administration Center 901 E. Kennedy Blvd.; Tampa, FL 33602 (813) 272-4861; ted.hope@sdhc.k12.fl.us

FLORIDA ORCHESTRA ASSOCIATION President................................................................................Matthew Davis Harrison School for the Arts; 750 Hollingsworth Rd.; Lakeland, FL 33801 (863) 499-2855; matthew.lawson.davis@gmail.com Past President...........................................................................Jason Jerald jason.jerald@sdhc.k12.fl.us

Multicultural Network...................................................Bernard Hendricks Ocoee High School, 1925 Ocoee Crown Point Pkwy.; Orlando, FL 34761 (407) 905-3009; bernard.hendricks@ocps.net

Executive Director............................................................. Donald Langland 220 Parsons Woods Dr.; Seffner, FL 33594 (813) 502-5233; Fax: (813) 502-6832; exdirfoa@yahoo.com

Professional Development........................................................Scott Evans Orange County Public Schools; 445 S. Amelia St.; Orlando, FL 32801 (407) 317-3200; scott.evans@ocps.net

FLORIDA VOCAL ASSOCIATION

Research...................................................................... Don D. Coffman, PhD University of Miami; d.coffman1@miami.edu

President.................................................................................. Jason Locker Orange County Public Schools; 445 W. Amelia St.; Orlando, FL 32801 (407) 317-3200; jason@fva.net

Secondary General Music.............................................................Ed Prasse Leon High School; 550 E. Tennessee St.; Tallahassee, FL 32308 (850) 617-5700; prassee@leonschools.net

Past President.....................................................................Tommy Jomisko tommy@fva.net

Student Development.............................................. Michael Antmann, EdD Freedom High School; 2500 W. Taft-Vineland Rd.; Orlando, FL 32837 (407) 816-5600; michael.antmann@ocps.net

Executive Director....................................................................J. Mark Scott 7122 Tarpon Ct.; Fleming Island, FL 32003 (904) 284-1551; exec@fva.net

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE

Business Manager..................................................................Jo Hagan, CPA 8975 San Rae Rd.; Jacksonville, FL 32257 (904) 379-2245; Fax: (904) 379-2260; business@fva.net

Exhibits Managers................................................ Byron and Bobbie Smith 4110 Tralee Rd.; Tallahassee, FL 32309 (850) 893-3606; fmeaexhibits@fmea.org

CENTER FOR FINE ARTS EDUCATION

402 Office Plaza Dr.; Tallahassee, FL 32301-2757 (850) 878-6844; Fax: (850) 942-1793

Local Co-Chairpersons Ted Hope—(813) 272-4861; ted.hope@sdhc.k12.fl.us Melanie Faulkner—(813) 272-4461; melanie.faulkner@sdhc.k12.fl.us Hillsborough County Public Schools, School Administration Center 901 E. Kennedy Blvd.; Tampa, FL 33602

Executive Director....................... Kathleen D. Sanz, PhD (kdsanz@fmea.org) Director of Operations........................Valeria Anderson, IOM (val@fmea.org) Director of Finance & Client Relations...............................Richard Brown, CAE (richard@fmea.org)

FLORIDA BANDMASTERS ASSOCIATION President.............................................................................. Cathi Leibinger Ransom Everglades School; 2045 Bayshore Dr.; Miami, FL 33133 (305) 250-6868; president@fba.flmusiced.org

Technology Director......................................Josh Bula, PhD (josh@fmea.org)

Past President........................................................................Jason Duckett Bartram Trail High School; 7399 Longleaf Pine Pkwy.; St. Johns, FL 32259 (904) 343-1999; pastpresident@fba.flmusiced.org

Marketing & Membership Coordinator................................. Jasmine Van Weelden (jasmine@fmea.org)

Public Affairs & Communications Coordinator..............................................Jenny Abdelnour (jenny@fmea.org)

Executive Director......................................................................Neil Jenkins Florida Bandmasters Association P.O. Box 840135; Pembroke Pines, FL 33084 (954) 432-4111; Fax: (954) 432-4909; exec@fba.flmusiced.org

November 2019

47


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48    F l o r i d a

Music Director

Profile for Center for Fine Arts Education, Inc

Florida Music Director November 2019  

The official publication of the Florida Music Education Association. Featured in this issue: Success Through Solfège, FBA Hall of Fame and R...

Florida Music Director November 2019  

The official publication of the Florida Music Education Association. Featured in this issue: Success Through Solfège, FBA Hall of Fame and R...

Profile for cfaefl